• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 An A.B.C. of every-day people
 Back Cover






Group Title: An A. B. C. of every-day people, good, bad & indifferent
Title: An A. B. C. of every-day people, good, bad & indifferent
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087057/00001
 Material Information
Title: An A. B. C. of every-day people, good, bad & indifferent
Alternate Title: ABC of every-day people
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Farrow, G. E ( George Edward ), b. 1866
Hassall, John, 1868- ( Illustrator )
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean & Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1900?]
 Subjects
Subject: Alphabet books -- 1905   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1905
Genre: Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Summary: An alphabet book of character traits: amiable, bumptious, contented, doleful, etc.
Statement of Responsibility: by G. E.Farrow ... ; illustrated by John Hassall.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087057
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002229714
oclc - 39871671
notis - ALH0047

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 4
    An A.B.C. of every-day people
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Back Cover
        Page 59
        Page 60
Full Text








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Jl~d in -W Ah.
o u A h -O Z'. '







A$


OF
BVERY-DAY


PrOPLI


GOOD


BAD


& INDIFFERENT.


BY
G. E. FARROW


AUTtiOR OF THE-


"THE


ULTTLE.


WALLY PUG


PANUAN RUM' 5


OF WHY "


DODO "


ETC. ETC.
I .I ..U .5 'T TP. AT E-. I


BY JOHN


LON D N DEAN


HA55ALL .


ON IbOA FLFT 5T E,.C.


$ ,,,&Y


& S











ft


/~

/


A THE AMIABLE







the Amiable!


what


party


is


holds


an
A,


out


a genial


amiable


his


hand


way


He is


hearty and hale,


And he loves a good sail.


What a


capital friend on


fine


summer s


day!


He


in


(4IT


cC P


Ah!








































1h9if a


'THE 5UPXPTIOU5


dP- -- ---L rL--LPL- LPlp~S1~4C~C~







Bumptious.


Boastful,
Bohemian


He


plays


ind


bumptious


B,


on


the


fiddle


most


beautifully;


But


is


really


so


vain,


That some people complain


That his fiddling


but


is


nothing


fiddle-de-dee.


the


II





























C TH CONTENTED







the contented.


Cheerful,
smiling


contented,


is


and


C,


good-natured,


old


lady


is


pleasant


she


And

Tho'


even


he


her

isn't


cat,


too


Appears-
most


to


be


grinning


amiably.


A


fat,


I II I -


,"I-


























ir%4K


















DT~r. DOLEFUL






the


Doleful.


Dear!


Dear!


dreadfully


The


picture


What


dolorous
of


misery


surely


is


he;


When he asks for a penny,


And


does n't


get


any,


His language is


not what


his language should be.


1(1~ I-


ZK


D,

















('f'
Q


ETi- EN)EJGETIC







the Energetic.


Behold,


eager-e)


energetic
red E,


and


Who has no time to stand


upon

He's all

And sc


ceremony;

hurry and hustle,


iurry


and


bustle,


About something or other
continually.


7i


-C


-IMMMNMMMMM






































F Tr~ E FELEBI


~ ~d~CIP6~L~S~~k- -~ --I 7Srsea --I~-------- ------~--~l~""ssaseB~






the Feeble.



Fidgety, fretful, and frac-


tious


For feeble and fragile, and


frail


Not
And


a tooth in his head,


now,


it


is


said,


The old fellow
remarkably


becoming


deaf.


is


F.


is


old


F;













































G TH GEN-ERoS


CL6-~CI e I ~k- --- L~L-~q ~ ~ r







the Generous.


This is


good-natured


and


generous .


A kind little fellow, you'll


doubtless


agree;


See


him


willingly


share


That extremely large pear,
How very surprised Pretty


Polly


must


be.


rr -- -













5s~c


n THE HAUGHTY


..






the Haughty.


Hoity-toity! Here's high-
minded haughty Miss H.


To


be


so


self-satisfied's


naughty,


Miss


With your nose in the air,


And
I can't


rour


insolent


think


what


stare,
you'll


look like at forty, Miss H.


H,


A





































I TME IND5UTRIOU5


~llbl ~T~-~ c --- ~' I~areaP~a~ll


- oIw







I the Industrious.


You can't help but admire
this industrious 1,
Who is studying hard, tho'
there's nobody by.


He's


so lost in his book,


He has no time to look
At the ink he has spilt; and
it's getting quite dry.


........


-- ~r I












































Xi T tE 0dLLY


IIL I' ~LI I-- ii -'' IL






the Jolly.


This


is


the jovial, jocular J,


Who's enjoying at Margate
a fine holiday.


makes everyone


laugh,


With his fun and his chaff.


You've


met somebody like


him before, I dare say.


J


He


//


I -, -- r


j
































K ThE KNAVISH


Vr


~*~







the Knavish.


2Ji
C./


I'd knock o'er the knuckles
this knavish young K:


He's been picking
and now runs


But Policeman


a pocket
away.


X2


Has this person in


view,


And will certainly catch the
young rascal some day.


M



















Epp,


L Tte LIVELY


4~dP~q~






the Lively.


Lissome and lively
footed L,


is


light-


Who


dances


hornpipe


the


very


sailor's


well.


From morning to night,
He is merry and bright,


this jolly


Jack


Tar,


one


may easily tell.


Is


- ---





















4


V sA


THe M EEK


PI







the Meek.


Down-trodden, brow-beaten,
meek little M,
This torrent of fault-finding
nothing can stem.


If her mistress


were


kinder,


No doubt she would find
her


The best of good
a regular gem.


servants,







the Neighbourly.


2/I


This


is


good-natured


and


reighbourly N,
Who over the wall has been


talking


since


To the lady


ten.


next


door,


(Who's perhaps rather poor)
She's lending her very best
flat-iron again.


'I -;-L---sl




























N ThE NEIGH'BOURLY







the Obliging.


An obliging official


is


good


P'liceman O.
He holds up his hand, and the


coachman


says


"Whoa!"


His


smile is seraphic,


When stopping the traffic,


To let
over,


a small lady


cross


you know.


/6?'>


LLII



























_ /I
3 /


0 THE OBLIGINHG


- -






the Perky.


Perky


and


proud


is


par-


ticular P.
She wouldn't converse with
a policeman, not she!

But I have heard it said,
That a soldier in red


is regarded


more


favourably.


By


her


















J r


P THE PERKY


)I I I~I -J I .,, s _r, I I







0 the Quarrelsome.


This


is


the querulous, quar-


relsome Q.


Nothing


will


please


her,


whatever you do;


And


from


morning


night,


This


or that isn't right,


And whatever you tell her,
she says isn't true.


till


~ I


































(7


/UA RR



Q TH qUARREL50OA.


*"r
s


^as






the Respectable.



Proper and highly respect-
able R.


About


your


appearance


most particular.

The man with the broom
Steps aside to make room,
And wonders, poor fellow,


whoever you


are.


-~















Liz


R THE RESPECTABLE


~eh-~gr Ip I LC _C, ~91 I _I_ 1 I--lp






S the Satisfied.


In his cooking most highly


Successful


is


And his smiling


face


doth


satisfaction


express.


He
And


ays,
so,


"Very


good


doubtless,


stew!"
would


you.


This person's


a Chef,


as you


see by his dress.


S


A


I_ I


























f A 337


STHE SATISFIED


~plB~8~aas~e4~w ~-~ _~- ,, I






the Timid.


Terribly timid is tremulous
T,
Who appears to be sitting
uncomfo rtably.

He looks nervous and ill,
And will certainly spill


All his


tea.


some already, I


He has spilt


see.





































STHE TIMID






the Unhappy.


Unfortunate and most Un-


willing


is


U.


The poor little chap's in


terrible stew,


When


he's had


the tooth


out


He'll be better, no doubt,
And a new tooth will grow
where the other one grew.

























U THE UNHAPPY






the Vacant.


Utterly Vacant and lost


is


poor V,
He's forgotten the date of


the wedding you


see.


He's forgotten the ring,
And in fact everything;


remarkable


kind


bridegroom is he.


A


of


- II


~v'





























V THEr VACANT







the Willing.


Perfectly willing
Miss ,


is


antique


Tho' I


fear very


much that


nobody will trouble


you.


Few are anxious to kiss


Such an elderly


miss;


but


a fact,


poor ancient Miss


you
W.


//1


It


is


sad,


~ II I II I



























W TE WILLI
V TtI .WILLING







the Excitable.


This


is


the highly excitable


X.


The result of


some land


the poll, or


we


annex,


Drives


him


quite off his


head;
And I have heard it said


That such conduct his


doth exceedingly


wife


vex.


X


-III I


































i" A~A


X THE EXCITABLE


~la~BIIIIC~Yrr -ge ~DIII~BBPll~p~l, a__ =,--~-~C~l I CT 1 rl


;//=/


A i






the Youthful.



This is the girlish and youth-
ful Miss Y,
Who'll bestow a sweet smile


as she


passes


you by.


To look younger than ever
Is her constant endeavour;


Though


her


age


you


will


probably guess, if you try.






































Y TfIE YOUTHFUL


p IPr I IL 1131,






the Zealous Zoologist.


This is the Zealous Zoologist
Z
Examining an hippopotamus'
head.


There's no


cause


for alarm,


It can do you no harm,


For the creature, of


is


course,


decidedly dead.


'


I





































A35Ay


ZOOLOGIST


Z


Nil I A~~~~I ~-l~ --g ~ rllpCFksllp


b ~ --~ -- Ip.a,-- --- ~ ug--r~C ~l~--r--a~q~a 9P91111SI ~ llT e~l


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