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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 The navy alphabet
 Back Cover






Title: The navy alphabet
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087056/00001
 Material Information
Title: The navy alphabet
Physical Description: 29 l. : col. illus. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Baum, L. Frank ( Lyman Frank ), 1856-1919
Kennedy, Harry Otis ( Illustrator )
Costello, Charles
George M. Hill Company ( Publisher )
Donor: Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher: G. M. Hill
Place of Publication: Chicago
Publication Date: 1900
 Subjects
Subject: Alphabet rhymes -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Navies -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1900   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1900   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1900
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: verse by L. Frank Baum; pictures by Harry Kennedy; lettered by Charles Costello.
General Note: Printed on one side of leaf only.
General Note: Imprint also notes publisher's location in New York.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy 2 donated by Robert Egolf.
Funding: Dr. Robert L. Egolf Collection.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087056
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001523970
oclc - 02608248
notis - AHD7224
lccn - 03003283

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The navy alphabet
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text












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THE NAVY

ALPHABET
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PICTURES L ~ T n LETEID
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EHere is the ADMIRAL, gallant and true,

Lord of the Navy in peace,or in war;

Warrior, sailor and diplomat, too ;

Winning our battles in countries afar.

Grand is the Admiral, great is his fame.

Favors and riches are his to command.

Ev'ry American honors his name

Victor at sea and a hero on land!


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E* Here we see the BVLWARKS stout
That fend the ship all round about
And shelter all within.
For when confronted by the foe
Our men can ducl their heads below
The Bulwarks' rim, and thus, you know,
More calmly wander to and fro
Amid the battle's din.
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E This noble ships a CRVISER,
She's armored for the fray;
The Admircil loves to vxie her
For missions fcr away,
To cruise in ev'ry foreign sec
Our commerce to protect,
And gucrd our Nation's dignity
From any disrespect.

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IlA view of theDECK thisfine picture presents:
On shipboard a deck is of great consequence;
For each sailor's standing throughout the whole fleet
Must surely depend on the deck neathh his feet.
It gives him a footing that nothing else can,
Supporting his claim as a seafaring man.
And,when it is needful our foemen to check,
American sailors are always on deck.









E Now gaze on the ENSIGN so charming
Don't notice his frown so alarming.
He's really as mild as a well behaved child,
And none would be willingly harming.
His uniform gladdens his heart,
For he knows it's becominE and smart;
The ladies all pet him,and straightway forget him
As soon as he's forced to depart.
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This is the FOK ESEL of the ship,
Wherein the sailors lihe
And pass the time with jest or quip
Or dreamy narrative.
The seamen swing their hammocks there
And slumber peacefully,
For sailors seldom have a care
While they are safe at sea.


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Hurrah for the GVNNER! theNavy's pride-
Stalwart and faithful when wars betide.
Before his calm and deadly aim
War- ships crumble or burst aflame
Or, foundering, soon find their graves
Beneath the cold, engulfing waves.
Trains he the cannon,which belch and thunder,
Filling our foemen with fear and wonder.












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SI'ht11AL YAVKU of a warship raise
The signal-flcafs peak,
F r thus the A dmiral displays
The words he cannot speak.
I every ship the message sees
And answers the command
fl ittering signals in the breeze
To show thevy understand.


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I The stmrdyIRONCLAD has plates
Of tempered steel upon her side,
And, armored thus,the foe awaits
In conscious power and fearless pride.
Though shot and shell Mpon her rain
It quickly glances off again;
And nothing can her crew alarn ,
Protected thus from-every harm.


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SThe JACKE Y on a mnca-o'-Lwar
Can scarce be called a $,jolly tar,
When all the decks he has to scrub,
And all the metal trimmings rub,
And do the work abo-ut the ship
Witho-ut an error or ci slip.
Buvt when at last his task is done
The Ja cltey's alwayvs fuCll of fun.


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'e Ti the pride of all our Navy
How the KEAIPSAIRGE fought,one day,
With the warship Alabama -
And was victor in the fray.
Many years she sailed thereafter,
Vntil wrecked by fate's decree.
Now she lies full fifty fathoms
Neath the Caribbean Sect.
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U The lki1 l UTnovA throws its piercing ray
Across the sea for miles away,
WarninE all ships upon the deep
From treacherous shoals and reefs to keep.
It guides them into harbor fair
By reason of its steady glare,
And so the lighthouse proves a friend
Our ships and sailors to defend.


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On deck the MAPRJNis most usually seen,
Patrolling his beat with a dignified men.
His comrarge is vaunted
Insong and in story,
Hes brave and undaunted
And hungers for glory.
And thus the Marine, ever watchful and keen,
Is a warrior-sailor both proud and serene.








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The NAVAL CADET isn't rated.as yet,
As sailor in more than an amateur way
But if he keeps training,and knowledgelkeeps gaining,
He'll be in a way to surprise us someday
If seamen are made-and they are, it is said,
For" borm'ones must study to master the trade-
Thisyouny Cadet's thriving will come with his striving,
He11 fight for his epDulets. all undismayed.







* Across the OCEAN vast and blue
Our warships plow the billows through
To guard our Colonies afar
And carry aid in time of' war
They sail to fair Manila from
The sunny little Isle of Guacm,
A nd then from Porto Rican blooms
To where Hawaii grandly looms.


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The naughtyPIIRTE, fierce and bold,
Oft sailed the seas in tines of old
o seize our ships, and climb aboard
With mnarlin-spike and knife and sword.
A nd then he whacked, and cut and hacked
Vrntil thehelpless ship was sacked.
But now no Pirates over-run
Our seos, we'Ve conquered everyone.






The QVARTPERDECK is sacred to
The officers, but not the crew
And eVen'mid a fight or wreck
The captain walks the Quarter-deck
And yells his orders to the men,
Who cry "aye, aye, sir!" back again.
And so the place of dignity -
Is on the Quarter- deck, you see.






E This is the IVDDEIthat steers the ship
A nd makes it so this way and that.
It guides the keel with never a slip
And points out the omrse guickc as seat.
Woe to the ship if the _udder breaks!
The Vessel is then "all at sea ,
Rolling and hitching, tossing and pitching
In manner both awkward and free.









E TheSTERN of the ship is thelast thingthat goes
Out of the harbor, as everyone lnows.
STis also thelast thing to ever return
(A singular habit acquired by the Stern).
'Tis a lovable thing, as all must agree,
The R xdder's attached toit strongly,you see;
And the name of each ship,in letters guitebold,
Appears on the Stern for us all to behold.
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T ORPED U S are missiles quite sureto affrinht
T he stoutest of foes when they enter a fiSht.
They're loaded with powder andfiercedynamite
And shaped like a tube-long and slim.
The re fired fromTorpedoBoats full at the foe,
A nd when they explode carry havoc andwoe
A nd send the ship, shattered and torn, down below,
Where only the fishes can swim.
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The Navy's flag is theUNION JACK
It flies from the bow of theboat;
While high at the stern, and farther back,
Our Stars and Stripes must float
The Union JachR is of royal blue
With a star for ev'ry State,
And when these clustered stars we view
We know why we are Ereat.


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Our Navy wins aVICT Wherever it unay fight.
No matter who our eneimy,
Our cciuse is always right.
Uncongcered ever on the sec
To us all lands defer,
And none would.ever willingly
Our Nation's ire bestir.


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EDid you ever see a sailor-manWIG-WAGGING?
Youd thinkthathe some railway trcainwas flginq;
For he waves a flag in air
And wig-wags there and there.
Yet making ev'ry movement with the greatest care.
He's waving secret signals to the ships near by,
A nd captains with their telescopes his signals spy;
For well they know what all the movements signify.


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E The XEBEC is a clumsy boot,
Although, of course the thing can float.
It's sails are square, and many say
The Corsairs trimmed theirboats that way
And carried men to slavery
In countries far across the sea.
We seldom see a Xebec now-
The slave-trade's ended, anyhow.
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E TheYARD-ARMSwere designed tohold
The sails on men-of-war of old,
When ships were "suare-riged fore and aft"
As boys in our time rig a raft.
'Tis said, and maybe it s true,
That pirates o'er the Yard-Arm threw
A rope, and hanged their victims there-
A crime that now they'd never dare.


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E When ships sail in the Torrid ZONE
They often find themselves alone;
For ships are sailed most frequently
In pleasant Temperate Zones, you see.
The Frigid Zone of ships is bare,
Unless explorers wander there;
And if they do they often stay
Because they cannot cet acwcy3.


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ANDnow, although our book is nearly done,
And all the verse and all the sober fun
Is written d own for you to plainly read,
We hope this final sentiment yo ll heed;
Anericans may feel c loyal pride
In Army,qStatesnen,'udade,and muchbeside;
But when on high our Union Jacks unfurled
It niarks the Finest NcIy in the World




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