PAGE 1

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Department of Animal Sciences Quarterly Newsletter Vol. 11 No. 2 Spring 201 1 David R. Bray Now is the time to prepare for the long hot summer: 1. Clean out high organic matter dirt (MUD) in pastures and lots and add new dirt, especially in calving areas. 2. Clean your barn cooling fans now and whenever they look dirty D irty fan shields can reduce fan efficiency by 50%. If cows are in the barn or holdin g area, run fans 24 hours a day. T his not only moves air to cool cows it also helps to remove moisture and dr y the place out. 3. Make sure your sprinklers, foggers, e tc, work. It was a cold winter and many pipes froze and/or broke D irty nozz heck timers for the proper time for adding water C onstant water is not as efficient as interm ittent sprinkling and saves water. Set your sprinkler thermostat at 75 degrees F or lower during the hot season S prinklers need to run at night because cows get hotter at night than daytime on those hot nights. You need timers to control sprinklers at night, so they only run when cows are eating and standing at the feed line R unning sprinklers when cows are in the stalls will waste grea t volumes of water and raise the humidity in the barn. 4. Clean and rebuild your pulsators. W ash out and change the f i lters on your vacuum controller (unless you have a variable speed drive); make sure all ATO s work. Believe it or not, dealers do sell new pulsators. 5. Replace all milk hoses, wash hoses, pulsator hoses and jetter cup holders. Replace all rubber hoses that may be in the milk house that may a dd water to the pipeline and /or bulk tank wash T hese hoses harbor Pseudomonas and Coliforms and can raise your bacteria count. If rubber hoses are used to wash udders, change them also. 6. Check every cow in the herd fo r blind quarters B and the T his will lower your SCC and SPC C onsider drying off or killing these quarters. 7. Replace all of your floor mounted cow wash sprinkler nozzles once a year S pring is a good time to do this. T hey not only clean cows they cool cows also. Several short wash cycles are more efficient and use less water 8. Check the pipeline and bulk tank chemical concentrations I f you change brands or suppliers, they may need to be checked. With new LPC concer ns this is important. 9. Clean your condenser fins on your milk coolers D irty fans cut down cooling and efficiency and you get warmer milk at higher electric costs. If they are by a dusty area, concrete the area to keep the dust off the condensers. 10. Mow an d spray careless weeds in all pastures; calves, heifers, dry cows 11. Cull your chronic mastitis cows now I t will lower your cell count and your help is sick of treating them. 12. Clean out the back third to half of your free stalls at least 10 to add new sand K eep your stalls bedded e very 4 to 5 days and groomed daily. 13. Clean out cooling ponds Pump out the water, clean out the sludge and spread it someplace where the cows do not have access to it. 14. Let ponds sit dry for the sun to work on the bacteria. Mycoplasma and other nasty stuff live in ponds Y ou must clean them out at least once a year if you continuously add water to the pond. If you DO NOT continuously add water, you need to sample the p onds for Mycoplasma a nd clean out the ponds once or twice during the summer. 15. Keep a stiff upper lip I f you made it through last year, you can make it through this year. 16. Clean out your mind, go visit other dairies. Some of them are doing amazing things and other s are not. Y ou them. Contact Dave Bray at drbray@ufl.edu or call (352) 392 5594 ext. 226 for more spring cleaning advice. of Bermudagrass Haylage Gbola Adesogan, Oscar Queiroz, Kathy Arriola, Juan Jose Romero, Evandro Muniz, Joseph Hamie, Miguel Zarate, and Jan Kivipelto Few previous studies have examined if inoculant application can improve the quality of bermudagrass hayl age or silage. To our knowledge, no previous study has examined how the fermentation and quality of bermudagrass haylage is companies. Older inoculants targeted either only the front phase of sil age production (by increasing acidification during fermentation in the silo) or the back phase (by improving bunk life during feedout). Combo inoculants have bacteria that target both the front and back phases of silage production. This project aimed to compare effects of four

PAGE 2

inoculants from two companies on the fermentation, aerobic stability, and quality of Tifton 85 bermudagrass haylage that had been ensiled in round bales. A 4 week regrowth of Tifton 85 bermudagrass was harvested and treated with n othing (Control) or Buchneri 500 inoculant (B500, containing Lactobacillus buchneri and Pediococcus pentosaceus) or Biotal Plus II inoculant (BPII, containing Pediococcus pentosaceus and Propionibacteria freudenreichii) or Silage inoculant II (SI, containi ng Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus Pentosaceus) or SiloKing inoculant (SK, containing Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and Pediococcus pentosaceus). The first three inoculants are from Lallemand Animal Nutrition and the last one is f rom Agri King. One of the main purposes of adding inoculants is to rapidly reduce the pH to about 4 to prevent the growth of spoilage organisms. In this trial, the rate of pH decrease during storage was greatest for B500, followed by BPII and SI but SK and the control had similar rates. No difference was found among treatments in fiber (NDF) digestibility or shrinkage (DM losses). All inoculant treatments reduced protein degradation (measured b y ammonia release) except SI. Inoculants B500 and SI had l ower mold counts than other treatments. Inocul a n ts B500, BPII, SI, and SK improved bunk life by 195%, 161%, 162%, and 75%, respectively compared to the Control. We concluded that the inoculants had different effects on the fermentation of bermudagrass h aylage. All inoculants improved the aerobic stability of bermudagrass haylage but some were more effective than others. Contact Adegbola Adesogan at adesogan@ufl.edu for more information. Resistance to Heat Stress is Under Genetic C ontrol Pete r H ansen One of the major factors limiting optimal production and profitability in Florida is heat stress. During the summer, cows experience declines in milk yield of 15 20% and reductions in conception ra te to values as low as 10%. Recent research supported by the Southeast Milk Inc. Dairy ability to regulate its body temperature and prevent the negative effects of heat stress on cow function is determined in part b y its genetics. What that means is it should be possible to select cows genetically that are more resistant to the effects of heat stress. Serdal Dikmen, a visiting scientist from Uludag University in Turkey, conducted the research on three dairies in no rth Central Florida. During the months of June September, Dikmen measured rectal temperatures of lactating Holstein cows housed in free stall barns between the hours of 3:00 and 5:00 PM, when body temperature is highest. Over the course of 2 years, he recorded values from 1695 cows that were sired by 509 different bulls. Working with John Cole of the USDA Animal Improvement Laboratory and myself, he used the data to obtain estimates of the heritability of rectal temperature. Heritability is an estima te of how much animals vary from each other because of differences in genetics. The heritability of rectal temperature was found to be 0.21, which means that 21% of the variation between cows in rectal temperature was due to differences in genes between t he cows. By comparison, the heritability of milk yield was 0.36 and the heritability of productive life was 0.16. The heritability of rectal temperature is high enough that you could expect to improve resistance to heat stress by selecting for rectal tem perature in the summer. It is also likely that the bovine gene chip currently available for genetic testing of cattle could be used to speed up the rate of progress in selection for rectal temperature. Our team also found that there was no genetic corre lation between rectal temperature and milk yield but that cows that were genetically more likely to have low temperatures in the summer were also slightly more likely to have genes that i mproved somatic cell counts productive life, daughter pregnancy rate and net merit. What this means is you can select for rectal temperature without selecting for low milk yield and can expect some slight improvement in genetic merit for health and reproduction traits. Contact Peter Hansen at pjhansen@ufl.edu for more information. UF Dairy Science Club Host ed Southern ADSA Student Affiliate Division Meeting Mary Sowerby What do you get when you congregate over one hundred dairy club members from ten southeastern universities at the University of Florida in Gainesville on a beautiful late February weekend? Answer: Competitive dairy quiz bowl, research paper presentations, and club chapter competitions; informative tours; fun times; and lots of new fr iends. One hundred two dairy club members and their advisors from ten southeastern universities met in Gainesville, FL, February 24 26, 2011, to participate in the Annual Meeting of the Southern Branch of the American Dairy Science Association Student Af filiate Division (Southern ADSA SAD) Members of the University of Florida Dairy Science Club hosted, with Candy Munz chairwoman of the event. Participating universities included: Clemson, Louisiana State, Mississippi State, North Carolina State, South ern Illinois, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia Tech and West Virginia.

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University of Florida students started things off Thursday evening by climbing into the vans of visiting universities to guide a campus tour which concluded with dinner, personalit at the UF Horse Teaching Unit. On Friday, the undergraduate paper and activity symposium presentations were given, followed by the Dairy Quiz Bowl contest. A visit to the Florida Museum of Natural His tory, featuring a History of Florida Cattle exhibit, capped the day, followed by dinner and Minute to Win It competitions. Tours of Southpoint grazing dairy, North Florida Holsteins, and the University of Florida Dairy Unit kept students busy on Saturday The meeting climaxed at the evening Awards Banquet where Virginia Tech was awarded Outstanding Student Chapter and victor of the Dairy Quiz Bowl, Jake Anderson from LSU was named Outstanding Student Affiliate Member, and his advisor, Cathy Williams was named Outstanding Club Advisor. Many thanks to Ron St. John, Charlie Smith, Pete Hetherington and the Southpoint crew for opening the eyes of many students to the concept of intensive rotational grazing; to Don Bennink, David Temple and all at North Florida Holsteins for showcasing ways to keep cows comfortable in confinement through Florida heat and humidity; and to Jay Lemmermen, Eric Diepersloot and all at research and teaching dairy farm Contact Mary Sowerby at meso@ufl.edu Mary Sowerby is the advisor of the UF Dairy Club and an advisor of the national ADSA Student Affiliate Division. Hospital Barn Procedures David R. Bray The hospital herd can b e milked in a separate parlor on some dairies or in the main parlor on other dairies. The choice is yours. Being in the ho spital herd is stressful enough: new roommates, new place to eat and drink and guess what, and usually a new way to be milked. The Parlor. We have devised milking schemes to milk clean dry udders to get the milking units on the cows about one minute from the start of stimulation to get maximum milk out. This allows the cows to get back to their stalls within a 1 hour time limit. The hospital herd production (no matter where the cows are housed) Everything changes when the hospital herd is milking. We must break the line so no antibiotic or bad milk gets into the tank. Wash the walls and the floors a little bit. Since the hosp ital herd often is far away and those lame cows drive to the parlor. They stand all bunched for an hour while finishing the herd cows. We then break the line, get the hospital list to see who is in the parlor and find the supervisor who leads the production. With the cows finally in the parlor, the milking begins. A guy in a clean cap and shirt and pants enters the parlor with a clipboard, followed by some guy with dirtier clothes, followed b y an exhausted guy who already milked a shift. They start with the first cow. Mr. Clean looks at his clipboard. The second guy looks at the cow and squirts a little milk out of each quarter and third guy squirts more milk. They all talk about how the c ow is and what will be done. The same thing is done to the next cow. This procedure may take about an hour before the units are hung on this side. They move to side two where the same thing is done again. We now have hung a machine on a sick cow with n o stimulation, so she is not going to milk out because this does not resemble her milking routine. Now they go back to these cows and do treatments. Proper mastitis treatment procedures good at least be s anitary ) 1. Everyone who touches an udder wears gloves that are sanitized between each cow and dried with a clean towel. If milk samples are taken label the bottle with the necessary information 2. Wash and d ry the udders and teats and pre strip them. 3. Sanitize the teats to be sampled S ani tize the teats away from you first with alcohol pads. Allow alcohol to dry because alcohol kills by drying, so a big globe of alcohol on the teat is not good. 4. Open the bottle then sample the teats closest to you so not to get your arms on clean sanitized teats. 5. Squirt milk in the bottle a nd close the bottle immediately Sample other teats if needed on that cow. 6. Keep samples in a cooler and covered to keep the bottle clean before and after sampling. 7. Contaminates are air borne, even mycoplasma, so turn off T reatment procedures : 1. Sanitize and dry gloved hands 2. Clean teats to be treated as in above 3. Use partial insertion tips if possible 4. Massage drug in the udder 5. Dip teats after done 6. Write down what was done to each cow and record Other concerns : 1. Are you following treatment instructions? 2. Treating at proper intervals: 12 hours or 24 hours? 3. Use c orrect doses 4. If exceeding label directions. A re you sure you have the proper withdrawal time ? 5. Has your veterinarian been consulted about your treatment choices and procedures? They should be advising you on treatment choices and procedures, not the head milker or some guy who writes articles in magazines Results Lame cows get lamer because of standing on concrete for two hours. The mastitis cows are not milked out because they had no let down. These cows have to return to their part time home and lay down because they are and then get digestive problems. DO YOU KNOW WHA T YOUR HOSPITAL HERD ROUTINE IS? Contact Dave Bray at drbray@ufl.edu or call (352) 392 5594 ext 226 for more on hospital barn procedures.

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Florida Students Particip ated in the 10 th North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge Albert De Vries and Mary Sowerby The UF Dairy Challenge team won a silver placing in the Tenth Annual North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge (NAIDC) held March 31 April 2 in Hickory, N.C. The event was co hosted by North Carolina State University and Virginia Tech, with 30 teams from the United States and two teams from Canada competing. The team from UF consisted of Kara Alexander, Lauren Ellison, Stephanie Kirchman and Ama nda Reeg. Mary Sowerby and Albert De Vries coached the team. NAIDC is an innovative two day competition for students representing dairy science programs at North American universities. It enables students to apply theory and learning to a real world dair y, while working as part of a four person team. In its 10 year history, NAIDC has helped train over 3000 students through the national contest and four regional contests conducted annually. Day One of NAIDC began with each team receiving information about a working dairy, including production and farm management data. After an in person inspection of one of four designated dairies, participants interviewed the herd managers. Then, each team developed a farm analysis and presentation materials, including recommendations for nutrition, reproduction, milking procedures, animal health, housing and financial management. Day Two was presentation day. Team members presented recommendations and then fielded questions from a panel of judges. These official judge s included dairy producers and industry experts in dairy finances, reproduction, nutrition and animal health. Presentations were evaluated, based on the analysis and recommendations. The evening concluded with a reception and awards banquet. The UF stude nts said they enjoyed the event and that they learned a great deal about dairy farm evaluation, presenting, and the interactions with students from other schools and sponsors. The North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge was established as a manage ment contest to incorporate all phases of a specific dairy business. It strives to incorporate a higher learning atmosphere with practical application to help prepare students for careers in the dairy industry. Supported financially through generous dona tions by agribusinesses and coordinated by a volunteer board of directors, the first NAIDC was held in April 2002. Dairy Production Systems, High S prings, FL, is a platinum sponsor of the NAIDC. UF Dairy Science students have been participating in the ann ual NAIDC events since 2002. Teams have traveled to events in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Idaho, California and now North Carolina. UF was also a founding sch ool when the Southern Regional D airy Challenge was created in 2006, a spinoff of the NAID C event Southern Regional events are limited to students from schools from the South(east) where aggregate teams focus a bit more on learning than on competition. UF will host the upcoming 6 th Southern Regional Dairy Challenge in Live Oak, FL, on November 17 19, 2011. For more information, e mail Molly Kelley at naidcmjk@aol.com visit www.dairychallenge.org or contact Mary Sowerby, meso@ufl.edu or Albert De Vries, devries@ufl.edu The UF team at the 10 th North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge in Hickory, NC Standing from left: Amanda Reeg, Kara Alexander, Lauren Ellison, and Stephanie Kirchman Si t ting: Albert De Vries and Mary Sowerby, c oach es 2010 DHIA Production Recognition of High Florida Herds* RHA Producer City Milkings Milk WHITE OAK DAIRY MAYO 3X 25,543 BRANDY BRANCH DAIRY BALDWIN 3X 23,287 D.P.S. BELL BELL 3X 22,903 JEFFCO DAIRY QUITMAN 3X 22,873 LARSON DAIRY #5 OKEECHOBEE 3X 22,856 NORTH FL HOLSTEINS BELL 3X 22,759 D.P.S. BRANFORD BRANFORD 3X 22,573 BRIAN MCADAMS MAYO 3X 22,547 SUWANNEE DAIRY INC MC ALPIN 22,474 ELJIM DAIRY GRANDIN 22,351 IFAS DAIRY UNIT GAINESVILLE 21,901 SHIVER DAIRY MAYO 21,754 MILK A WAY WEBSTER 21,187 SHENANDOAH DAIRY LIVE OAK 21,157 ATR DAIRY LLC MAYO 20,351 WALKER & SONS FARM MONTICELLO 20,335 T.K. HATTEN DAIRY INC BROOKSVILLE 3X 20,119 Production as of September 30, 2010. For more Southeast DHI summary statistics, see the appendix of the 2011 Florida Dairy Production Conference proceedings, on line at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu 2011 Ruminant Nutrition Symposium Proceedings Online The 22 nd Ruminant Nutrition Symposium was held February 1 2, 2011 at the Best Western Gateway Grand in Gainesville. The symposium included 12 speakers and attracted more than 150 participants. The proceedings are now online at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu

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2011 Dairy Produ ction Conference Proceedings Online The 47 th Florida Dairy Production Conference was held March 30, 2011 at the Best Western Gateway Grand in Gainesville and attracted 120 participants, among them dairy producers, dairy employees, allied industry representatives, and dairy science students. The Proceedings are now online at the UF Dairy Extension site at http://dai ry.ifas.ufl.edu For more information, contact Albert De Vries, devries@ufl.edu or call (352) 392 5594 ext. 227. Prediction of the Future Florida Mailbox Price: May 2011 April 201 2 Albert De Vries Using the Class III future settle prices of April 8 2011 and a University of Wisconsin formula based on historical prices for the association between the Class III price and the Florida mailbox price we predict the Florida mailbox price for May 2 011 to April 2012 as follows: Month Year Class III settle price* Predicted Florida mailbox price May 2011 17.08 19.85 June 2011 17.34 20.08 July 2011 17.70 21.83 August 2011 17.88 21.99 September 2011 17.95 22.06 October 2011 17.65 21.88 November 2011 17.00 21.30 December 2011 16.88 21.20 January 2012 16.40 20.23 February 2012 16.08 19.95 March 2012 16.01 19.88 April 2012 17.08 18.86 Class III settle price as of April 8 2011 For more information, contact Albert De Vries, devries@ufl.edu or (352) 392 5594 ext 227. Dai ry Extension Agenda The 2011 UFL/UGA Corn Silage and Forage Field Day is planned for Thursday June 16, 2011 at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus, Tifton, GA Contact Jerry Wasdin at jwas@ufl.edu Monthly Risk Management Workshops for dairy producers and others are held in the Lafayette County Extension Office, Mayo, FL. Contact Mary Sowerby at (386) 362 2771 or meso@ufl.edu Who is Who in UF Dairy Extension? S tate specialists and specialized dairy extension agents Mr. David Bray Milking, mastitis, housing, management E mail: drbray@ufl.edu Phone: (352) 392 5594 Ext. 226 Department of Animal Sciences Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive PO Box 110910 Gainesville, FL 32611 Ms. Courtney Davis Dairy / water quality Email: cbdavis@ufl.edu Phone: (863) 763 6469 Okeechobee County Extension 458 Highway 98 North Okeechobee, FL 34972 Dr. Albert De Vries Economics, dairy management E mail: devries@ufl.edu Phone: (352) 392 5594 Ext. 227 Department of Animal Sciences Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive PO Box 110910 Gainesville, FL 32611 Mr. Chris Holcomb Dairy youth programs E mail: christophersholc@ufl.edu Phone: (863) 519 8677 Polk County Extension PO Box 9005 Bartow FL 33831 Dr. Jose Santos Nutrition, reproduction E mail: jepsantos@ufl.edu Phone: (352) 392 1958 Department of Animal Sciences Bldg 499, Shealy Drive PO Box 110910 Gainesville, FL 32611 Dr. Charlie Staples Nutrition E mail: chasstap@ufl.edu Phone: (35 2) 392 1958 Department of Animal Sciences Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive PO Box 110910 Gainesville, FL 32611 Dr. Mary Sowerby North Central Regional dairy E mail: meso@ufl.edu Phone: (386) 362 2771 Suwannee County Extension 1302 11th Street Live Oak, FL 32060 Dairy Update is published quarterly by the Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida, as an educati onal and informational service. Please address any cancellations or comments to Albert De Vri es, Editor, Dairy Update, PO Box 11091 0, Gainesville, FL 32611 0910. Phone: (352) 392 5594 ext 227 E mail: devries@ufl.edu Past issues are posted on the UF/IFAS Florida Dairy Extension website at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu This issue was published on April 11 2011


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Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)
Department of Animal Sciences


airy Update


Quarterly Newsletter Vol. 11 No. 2 Spring 2011


It's Spring Cleaning Time Again! #16

David R. Bray

Now is the time to prepare for the long hot summer:

1. Clean out high organic matter dirt (MUD) in pastures and
lots and add new dirt, especially in calving areas.
2. Clean your barn cooling fans now and whenever they
look dirty. Dirty fan shields can reduce fan efficiency by
50%. If cows are in the barn or holding area, run fans 24
hours a day. This not only moves air to cool cows, it also
helps to remove moisture and dry the place out.
3. Make sure your sprinklers, foggers, etc, work. It was a
cold winter and many pipes froze and/or broke. Dirty
nozzles don't add much water. Check timers for the
proper time for adding water. Constant water is not as
efficient as intermittent sprinkling and saves water. Set
your sprinkler thermostat at 75 degrees F or lower during
the hot season. Sprinklers need to run at night because
cows get hotter at night than daytime on those hot
nights. You need timers to control sprinklers at night, so
they only run when cows are eating and standing at the
feed line. Running sprinklers when cows are in the stalls
will waste great volumes of water and raise the humidity
in the barn.
4. Clean and rebuild your pulsators. Wash out and change
the filters on your vacuum controller (unless you have a
variable speed drive); make sure all ATOs work. Believe
it or not, dealers do sell new pulsators.
5. Replace all milk hoses, wash hoses, pulsator hoses and
jetter cup holders. Replace all rubber hoses that may be
in the milk house that may add water to the pipeline and
/or bulk tank wash. These hoses harbor Pseudomonas
and Coliforms and can raise your bacteria count. If
rubber hoses are used to wash udders, change them also.
6. Check every cow in the herd for blind quarters. Band the
cow's legs so they are not milked. This will lower your
SCC and SPC. Consider drying off or killing these
quarters.
7. Replace all of your floor mounted cow wash sprinkler
nozzles once a year. Spring is a good time to do this.
They not only clean cows, they cool cows also. Several
short wash cycles are more efficient and use less water.
8. Check the pipeline and bulk tank chemical
concentrations. If you change brands or suppliers, they
may need to be checked. With new LPC concerns, this is
important.


9. Clean your condenser fins on your milk coolers. Dirty
fans cut down cooling and efficiency and you get warmer
milk at higher electric costs. If they are by a dusty area,
concrete the area to keep the dust off the condensers.
10. Mow and spray careless weeds in all pastures; calves,
heifers, dry cows.
11. Cull your chronic mastitis cows now. It will lower your
cell count and your help is sick of treating them.
12. Clean out the back third to half of your free stalls at least
10 to 12" deep and add new sand. Keep your stalls
bedded every 4 to 5 days and groomed daily.
13. Clean out cooling ponds. Pump out the water, clean out
the sludge and spread it someplace where the cows do
not have access to it.
14. Let ponds sit dry for the sun to work on the bacteria.
Mycoplasma and other nasty stuff live in ponds. You
must clean them out at least once a year if you
continuously add water to the pond. If you DO NOT
continuously add water, you need to sample the ponds
for Mycoplasma and clean out the ponds once or twice
during the summer.
15. Keep a stiff upper lip. If you made it through last year,
you can make it through this year.
16. Clean out your mind, go visit other dairies. Some of
them are doing amazing things and others are not. You
can get new ideas or be glad you don't own some of
them.
Contact Dave Bray at drbrav@ufl.edu or call (352) 392-
5594 ext. 226for more spring cleaning advice.


Effects of Different 'Combo' Inoculants on the Quality of
Bermudagrass Haylage

Gbola Adesogan, Oscar Queiroz, Kathy Arriola, Juan-Jose
Romero, Evandro Muniz, Joseph Hamie, Miguel Zarate, and
Jan Kivipelto

Few previous studies have examined if inoculant
application can improve the quality of bermudagrass haylage
or silage. To our knowledge, no previous study has examined
how the fermentation and quality of bermudagrass haylage is
affected by the newer 'combo' inoculants sold by different
companies. Older inoculants targeted either only the front
phase of silage production (by increasing acidification during
fermentation in the silo) or the back phase (by improving
bunk life during feedout). Combo inoculants have bacteria
that target both the front and back phases of silage
production. This project aimed to compare effects of four






inoculants from two companies on the fermentation, aerobic
stability, and quality ofTifton 85 bermudagrass haylage that
had been ensiled in round bales.
A 4-week regrowth of Tifton 85 bermudagrass was
harvested and treated with nothing (Control) or Buchneri 500
inoculant (B500, containing Lactobacillus buchneri and
Pediococcus pentosaceus) or Biotal Plus II inoculant (BPII,
containing Pediococcus pentosaceus and Propionibacteria
freudenreichii) or Silage inoculant II (SI, containing
Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus Pentosaceus) or
SiloKing inoculant (SK, containing Lactobacillus plantarum,
Enterococcus faecium, and Pediococcus pentosaceus). The
first three inoculants are from Lallemand Animal Nutrition
and the last one is from Agri-King. One of the main purposes
of adding inoculants is to rapidly reduce the pH to about 4 to
prevent the growth of spoilage organisms.
In this trial, the rate of pH decrease during storage was
greatest for B500, followed by BPII and SI but SK and the
control had similar rates. No difference was found among
treatments in fiber (NDF) digestibility or shrinkage (DM
losses). All inoculant treatments reduced protein
degradation (measured by ammonia release) except SI.
Inoculants B500 and SI had lower mold counts than other
treatments. Inoculants B500, BPII, SI, and SK improved bunk
life by 195%, 161%, 162%, and 75%, respectively compared to
the Control.
We concluded that the inoculants had different effects
on the fermentation of bermudagrass haylage. All inoculants
improved the aerobic stability of bermudagrass haylage but
some were more effective than others.
Contact Adegbola Adesogan at adesoqan@ufl.edu for
more information.


Resistance to Heat Stress is Under Genetic Control

Peter Hansen

One of the major factors limiting optimal production and
profitability in Florida is heat stress. During the summer,
cows experience declines in milk yield of 15-20% and
reductions in conception rate to values as low as 10%.
Recent research supported by the Southeast Milk Inc. Dairy
Checkoff Program indicates that a cow's
ability to regulate its body temperature
and prevent the negative effects of heat
stress on cow function is determined in
part by its genetics. What that means is
it should be possible to select cows
southeast Mul*, In genetically that are more resistant to the
Dairy Check-ff effects of heat stress.
Serdal Dikmen, a visiting scientist from Uludag University
in Turkey, conducted the research on three dairies in north
Central Florida. During the months of June September,
Dikmen measured rectal temperatures of lactating Holstein
cows housed in free stall barns between the hours of 3:00
and 5:00 PM, when body temperature is highest. Over the
course of 2 years, he recorded values from 1695 cows that
were sired by 509 different bulls. Working with John Cole of
the USDA Animal Improvement Laboratory and myself, he


used the data to obtain estimates of the heritability of rectal
temperature.
Heritability is an estimate of how much animals vary
from each other because of differences in genetics. The
heritability of rectal temperature was found to be 0.21, which
means that 21% of the variation between cows in rectal
temperature was due to differences in genes between the
cows. By comparison, the heritability of milk yield was 0.36
and the heritability of productive life was 0.16. The
heritability of rectal temperature is high enough that you
could expect to improve resistance to heat stress by selecting
for rectal temperature in the summer. It is also likely that the
bovine gene chip currently available for genetic testing of
cattle could be used to speed up the rate of progress in
selection for rectal temperature.
Our team also found that there was no genetic
correlation between rectal temperature and milk yield but
that cows that were genetically more likely to have low
temperatures in the summer were also slightly more likely to
have genes that improved somatic cell counts, productive life,
daughter pregnancy rate and net merit. What this means is
you can select for rectal temperature without selecting for
low milk yield and can expect some slight improvement in
genetic merit for health and reproduction traits.
Contact Peter Hansen at pihansen@ufl.edu for more
information.


UF Dairy Science Club Hosted Southern ADSA Student
Affiliate Division Meeting

Mary Sowerby

What do you get when you congregate over one hundred
dairy club members from ten southeastern universities at the
University of Florida in Gainesville on a beautiful late
February weekend? Answer: Competitive dairy quiz bowl,
research paper presentations, and club chapter competitions;
informative tours; fun times; and lots of new friends.
One hundred two dairy club members and their advisors
from ten southeastern universities met in Gainesville, FL,
February 24-26, 2011, to participate in the Annual Meeting of
the Southern Branch of the American Dairy Science
Association Student Affiliate Division (Southern ADSA-SAD).
Members of the University of Florida Dairy Science Club
hosted, with Candy Munz chairwoman of the event.
Participating universities included: Clemson, Louisiana
State, Mississippi State, North Carolina State, Southern
Illinois, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia Tech and West
Virginia.






University of Florida students started things off Thursday
evening by climbing into the vans of visiting universities to
guide a campus tour which concluded with dinner,
personality "true color" tests, and a cow building contest held
at the UF Horse Teaching Unit. On Friday, the undergraduate
paper and activity symposium presentations were given,
followed by the Dairy Quiz Bowl contest. A visit to the Florida
Museum of Natural History, featuring a History of Florida
Cattle exhibit, capped the day, followed by dinner and


Minute-to-Win-It competitions.
Tours of Southpoint grazing dairy,
North Florida Holsteins, and the University
of Florida Dairy Unit kept students busy on
Saturday. The meeting climaxed at the
evening Awards Banquet where Virginia
Tech was awarded Outstanding Student
Chapter and victor of the Dairy Quiz Bowl,
Jake Anderson from LSU was named


STUDENT
AFFILIATE
DIVISION


Outstanding Student Affiliate Member, and his advisor, Cathy
Williams was named Outstanding Club Advisor.
Many thanks to Ron St. John, Charlie Smith, Pete
Hetherington and the Southpoint crew for opening the eyes
of many students to the concept of intensive rotational
grazing; to Don Bennink, David Temple and all at North
Florida Holsteins for showcasing ways to keep cows
comfortable in confinement through Florida heat and
humidity; and to Jay Lemmermen, Eric Diepersloot and all at
the IFAS Dairy Unit for the opportunity to show off UF's
research and teaching dairy farm.
Contact Mary Sowerby at meso@ufl.edu. Mary Sowerby
is the advisor of the UF Dairy Club and an advisor of the
national ADSA Student Affiliate Division.


Hospital Barn Procedures

David R. Bray

The hospital herd can be milked in a separate parlor on
some dairies or in the main parlor on other dairies. The
choice is yours. Being in the hospital herd is stressful enough:
new roommates, new place to eat and drink and guess what,
and usually a new way to be milked.
The Parlor. We have devised milking schemes to milk
clean dry udders to get the milking units on the cows about
one minute from the start of stimulation to get maximum
milk out. This allows the cows to get back to their stalls
within a 1 hour time limit.
The hospital herd production (no matter where the cows
are housed). Everything changes when the hospital herd is
milking. We must break the line so no antibiotic or bad milk
gets into the tank. Wash the walls and the floors a little bit.
Since the hospital herd often is far away and those lame cows
don't move fast, we go out a little early to start the cattle
drive to the parlor. They stand all bunched for an hour while
finishing the herd cows. We then break the line, get the
hospital list to see who is in the parlor and find the supervisor
who leads the production. With the cows finally in the parlor,
the milking begins. A guy in a clean cap and shirt and pants
enters the parlor with a clipboard, followed by some guy with
dirtier clothes, followed by an exhausted guy who already


milked a shift. They start with the first cow. Mr. Clean looks
at his clipboard. The second guy looks at the cow and squirts
a little milk out of each quarter and third guy squirts more
milk. They all talk about how the cow is and what will be
done. The same thing is done to the next cow. This
procedure may take about an hour before the units are hung
on this side. They move to side two where the same thing is
done again. We now have hung a machine on a sick cow with
no stimulation, so she is not going to milk out because this
does not resemble her milking routine. Now they go back to
these cows and do treatments.
Proper mastitis treatment procedures (If you can't be
good at least be sanitary).
1. Everyone who touches an udder wears gloves that are
sanitized between each cow and dried with a clean
towel. If milk samples are taken, label the bottle with
the necessary information.
2. Wash and dry the udders and teats and pre-strip them.
3. Sanitize the teats to be sampled. Sanitize the teats away
from you first with alcohol pads. Allow alcohol to dry
because alcohol kills by drying, so a big globe of alcohol
on the teat is not good.
4. Open the bottle, then sample the teats closest to you so
not to get your arms on clean sanitized teats.
5. Squirt milk in the bottle and close the bottle
immediately. Sample other teats if needed on that cow.
6. Keep samples in a cooler and covered to keep the bottle
clean before and after sampling.
7. Contaminates are airborne, even mycoplasma, so turn
off fans while sampling if it's breezy in the pit.
Treatment procedures:
1. Sanitize and dry gloved hands.
2. Clean teats to be treated as in above.
3. Use partial insertion tips if possible.
4. Massage drug in the udder.
5. Dip teats after done.
6. Write down what was done to each cow and record
when the cow's milk will be safe to go in the tank.
Other concerns:
1. Are you following treatment instructions?
2. Treating at proper intervals: 12 hours or 24 hours?
3. Use correct doses.
4. If exceeding label directions. Are you sure you have the
proper withdrawal time?
5. Has your veterinarian been consulted about your
treatment choices and procedures? They should be
advising you on treatment choices and procedures, not
the head milker or some guy who writes articles in
magazines.
Results. Lame cows get lamer because of standing on
concrete for two hours. The mastitis cows are not milked out
because they had no let-down. These cows have to return to
their part time home and lay down because they are
exhausted, hot and miserable. They don't eat and then get
digestive problems. DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR HOSPITAL
HERD ROUTINE IS?
Contact Dave Bray at drbrav@ufl.edu or call (352) 392-
5594 ext. 226for more on hospital barn procedures.






Florida Students Participated in the 10th North American
Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge

Albert De Vries and Mary Sowerby

The UF Dairy Challenge team won a silver placing in the
Tenth Annual North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge
(NAIDC) held March 31- April 2 in Hickory, N.C. The event
was co-hosted by North Carolina State University and Virginia
Tech, with 30 teams from the United States and two teams
from Canada competing. The team from UF consisted of Kara
Alexander, Lauren Ellison, Stephanie Kirchman and Amanda
Reeg. Mary Sowerby and Albert De Vries coached the team.
NAIDC is an innovative two-day competition for students
representing dairy science programs at North American
universities. It enables students to apply theory and learning
to a real-world dairy, while working as part of a four-person
team. In its 10 year history, NAIDC has helped train over
3000 students through the national contest and four regional
contests conducted annually.
Day One of NAIDC began with each team receiving
information about a working dairy, including production and
farm management data. After an in-person inspection of one
of four designated dairies, participants interviewed the herd
managers. Then, each team developed a farm analysis and
presentation materials, including recommendations for
nutrition, reproduction, milking procedures, animal health,
housing and financial management.
Day Two was presentation day. Team members
presented recommendations and then fielded questions from
a panel of judges. These official judges included dairy
producers and industry experts in dairy finances,
reproduction, nutrition and animal health. Presentations
were evaluated, based on the analysis and recommendations.
The evening concluded with a reception and awards banquet.
The UF students said they enjoyed the event and that
they learned a great deal about dairy farm evaluation,
presenting, and the interactions with students from other
schools and sponsors.
The North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge was
established as a management contest to incorporate all
phases of a specific dairy business. It strives to incorporate a
higher-learning atmosphere with practical application to help
prepare students for careers in the dairy industry. Supported
financially through generous donations by agribusinesses and
coordinated by a volunteer board of directors, the first NAIDC
was held in April 2002. Dairy Production Systems, High
Springs, FL, is a platinum sponsor of the NAIDC.
UF Dairy Science students have been participating in the
annual NAIDC events since 2002. Teams have traveled to
events in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Idaho, California
and now North Carolina. UF was also a founding school when
the Southern Regional Dairy Challenge was created in 2006, a
spinoff of the NAIDC event. Southern Regional events are
limited to students from schools from the South(east) where
aggregate teams focus a bit more on learning than on
competition. UF will host the upcoming 6th Southern
Regional Dairy Challenge in Live Oak, FL, on November 17-19,
2011.
For more information, e-mail Molly Kelley at
naidcmik@aol.com, visit www.dairychallenge.org, or contact


Mary Sowerby, meso@ufl.edu, or Albert De Vries,
devries@ufl.edu


The UF team at the 10"' North American Intercollegiate Dairy
Challenge in Hickory, NC. Standing from left: Amanda Reeg,
Kara Alexander, Lauren Ellison, and Stephanie Kirchman.
Sitting: Albert De Vries and Mary Sowerby, coaches.



2010 DHIA Production Recognition of High Florida Herds*

RHA
Producer City Milkings Milk
WHITE OAK DAIRY MAYO 3X 25,543
BRANDY BRANCH DAIRY BALDWIN 3X 23,287
D.P.S. BELL BELL 3X 22,903
JEFFCO DAIRY QUITMAN 3X 22,873
LARSON DAIRY #5 OKEECHOBEE 3X 22,856
NORTH FL HOLSTEINS BELL 3X 22,759
D.P.S. BRANFORD BRANFORD 3X 22,573
BRIAN MCADAMS MAYO 3X 22,547
SUWANNEE DAIRY INC MC ALPIN 22,474
EUIM DAIRY GRANDIN 22,351
IFAS DAIRY UNIT GAINESVILLE 21,901
SHIVER DAIRY MAYO 21,754
MILK-A-WAY WEBSTER 21,187
SHENANDOAH DAIRY LIVE OAK 21,157
ATR DAIRY LLC MAYO 20,351
WALKER & SONS FARM MONTICELLO 20,335
T.K. HATTEN DAIRY INC BROOKSVILLE 3X 20,119

Production as of September 30, 2010.
For more Southeast DHI summary statistics, see the
appendix of the 2011 Florida Dairy Production Conference
proceedings, on-line at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu.



2011 Ruminant Nutrition Symposium Proceedings Online

The 22nd Ruminant Nutrition Symposium was held
February 1-2, 2011 at the Best Western Gateway Grand in
Gainesville. The symposium included 12 speakers and
attracted more than 150 participants. The proceedings are
now online at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu.






2011 Dairy Production Conference Proceedings Online

The 47th Florida Dairy Production Conference was held
March 30, 2011 at the Best Western Gateway Grand in
Gainesville and attracted 120
participants, among them dairy
producers, dairy employees, allied

FLORIDA
industry representatives, and dairy
DIRY PRODUC science students. The Proceedings are
now online at the UF Dairy Extension
site at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu. For more information,
contact Albert De Vries, devries@ufl.edu, or call (352) 392-
5594 ext. 227.



Prediction of the Future Florida Mailbox Price:
May 2011 April 2012

Albert De Vries

Using the Class III future settle prices of April 8, 2011 and
a University of Wisconsin formula based on historical prices
for the association between the Class III price and the Florida
mailbox price, we predict the Florida mailbox price for May
2011 to April 2012 as follows:

Month Year Class III settle Predicted Florida
price* mailbox price
May 2011 17.08 19.85
June 2011 17.34 20.08
July 2011 17.70 21.83
August 2011 17.88 21.99
September 2011 17.95 22.06
October 2011 17.65 21.88
November 2011 17.00 21.30
December 2011 16.88 21.20
January 2012 16.40 20.23
February 2012 16.08 19.95
March 2012 16.01 19.88
April 2012 17.08 18.86
Class Ill settle price as of April 8, 2011.


For more information, contact Albert De Vries,
devries@ufl.edu or (352) 392-5594 ext 227.


Dairy Extension Agenda

* The 2011 UFL/UGA Corn Silage and Forage Field Day is
planned for Thursday June 16, 2011 at the University of
Georgia Tifton Campus, Tifton, GA. Contact Jerry Wasdin
at iwas@ufl.edu.
* Monthly Risk Management Workshops for dairy
producers and others are held in the Lafayette County
Extension Office, Mayo, FL. Contact Mary Sowerby at
(386) 362-2771 or meso@ufl.edu.


Who is Who in UF Dairy Extension?


State specialists and specialized dairy extension agents

Mr. David Bray
Milking, mastitis, housing, management
E-mail: drbrav@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-5594 Ext. 226
Department of Animal Sciences
Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive
PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611

Ms. Courtney Davis
Dairy/ water quality
Email: cbdavis@ufl.edu
Phone: (863) 763-6469
Okeechobee County Extension
458 Highway 98 North
Okeechobee, FL 34972


Dr. Albert De Vries
Economics, dairy management
E-mail: devries@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-5594 Ext. 227
Department of Animal Sciences
Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive
PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611


Mr. Chris Holcomb
Dairy youth programs
E-mail: christophersholc@ufl.edu
Phone: (863) 519-8677
Polk County Extension
PO Box 9005
Bartow, FL 33831


Dr. Jose Santos
Nutrition, reproduction
E-mail: iepsantos@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-1958
Department of Animal Sciences
Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive
PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611


Dr. Charlie Staples
Nutrition
E-mail: chasstap@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-1958
Department of Animal Sciences
Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive
PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611



Dr. Mary Sowerby
North Central Regional dairy
E-mail: meso@ufl.edu
Phone:(386) 362-2771
Suwannee County Extension
1302 11th Street
Live Oak, FL 32060


Dairy Update is published quarterly by the Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida, as an educational and informational service. Please address any
cancellations or comments to Albert De Vries, Editor, Dairy Update, PO Box 110910, Gainesville, FL 32611-0910. Phone: (352) 392-5594 ext 227. E-mail:
devries@ufl.edu. Past issues are posted on the UF/IFAS Florida Dairy Extension website at http://dairy.ifas.ufl.edu. This issue was published on April 11, 2011.




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