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Transportation Network Assessing the ImpactsA publication of a USDOT/RITA grant-funded Tier 1 University Transportation CenterSPRING 2011of Development in the

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Iam very pleased to share with you this newsletter, which highlights issues of growth management, sustainability and active living. Sustainability and active living was the theme of this years External Advisory Board (EAB) meeting, which took place in March. Discussions focused on identifying the existing strengths at the University of Florida related to sustainability, active living and the environment. The EAB also discussed opportunities for future growth and expansion of the CMS research, education and technology transfer activities related to the broad area of sustainability. One of our newest EAB members, David Berrigan, Ph.D., from the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), presented his perspective on transportation and active living as well as needs for future work in this area. I am very pleased that Berrigan also agreed to be our featured participant in this newsletters Q&A (Page 14), where he provides his perspective on the relationship between transportation and health, as well as transportation and livability. Along the same theme, the Departments of Civil & Coastal Engineering (CCE) and Environmental Engineering Sciences (EES) at UF have agreed to form the School of Sustainable Infrastructure and the Environment. The objective of the school is to enhance and coordinate research eorts related to the broad umbrella of infrastructure and sustainability. Therefore, I expect the CMS activities in this area will expand as we increase our collaborative activities within the school and particularly in the area of transportation and air quality. I am very pleased to announce that Ananth Prasad, P.E., a CMS EAB member, and a graduate of the UF civil engineering program (construction), was named Secretary of FDOT in April 2011. Prasad will be responsible for managing the $7 billion agency, which oversees a variety of infrastructure projects in Florida, including highway expansions, maintenance and port dredging. Congratulations Ananth! Another one of our EAB members, Teresa Scott, Director of Public Works for the City of Gainesville, was recently named one of the 10 public works leaders of the year by the American Public Works Association (APWA). The group of winners, which includes Scotts counterpart in Orange County, was selected by a committee of peers for their career-long professionalism, expertise, service and personal dedication to improving the quality of life in the communities they serve, according to a news release. Congratulations, Teresa! In March 2011, shortly after the EAB meeting, we were very pleased to welcome to our center Congressman John Mica (R-Fla.), the chair of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. Rep. Mica met with representatives of the CMS, the College of Engineering and the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering to discuss center activities (Page 4). In May, I had the opportunity to visit my alma mater in Thessaloniki, Greece, to deliver a seminar to the graduate students in transportation engineering. I very much enjoyed catching up with the faculty and students there and hearing about the current transportation program. It has signicantly expanded since my time as an undergraduate student at the university! My visit also resulted in opportunities for collaborative activities: I will assist two of the graduate students with their thesis projects, which are related to highway capacity analyses and trac simulation and are led by Professor George Mintsis (see picture). I hope you will nd this newsletter informative and useful, and I look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions regarding our activities. Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D. Professor of Civil Engineering & CMS Director 02 | Message from the Director03 | CMS at TRB / Register for CORSIM Workshop 04 | Rep. John Mica (R-FL)Visits the CMS / CMS Showcases STEWARD at U.S. DOT University Research Technology Transfer Day05 | CMS Welcomes Four External Advisory Board Members 06| New FDOT Secretary is Named / Distinguished Professional Lecutrer (Jana Lynott, AARP)07 | Spotlight on Research: Assessing the Impacts of Development in the Transportation Network08 | Project Status 09 | Faculty Spotlight (Toi Lawphongpanich, Ph.D.)11 | Student Spotlight (Jessica Mackey, graduate student, civil engineering/urban & regional planning)13 | Annual Student Conference14 | Q&A with David Berrigan, Ph.D., MPH, National Institutes of Health15 | Student Awards / External Advisory Board Member Wins Award/ WTS UF Student ChapterIn This Issue messagethe from directorMaria Eleftheriadou, Prof. Lily Elefteriadou, Prof. George Mintsis newsletter spring

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CMS faculty, students and sta gather for a picture at the Mezzanine of the Marriott Wardman Park hotel in Washington, D.C. Each January, as it is customary, transportation professionals and practitioners from all over the world convene in Washington, D.C., for the Transportation Research Boards (TRB) annual meeting. It is easy to spot a TRBer. They busily walk in and out of the conference hotels with their name badges hanging around their necks, intense looks on their faces some wired from an interesting session, others tired from their long ights to D.C. Here, the largest exchange of information related to the transportation profession occurs, the biggest names are present, and students, the future of the transportation industry, come to learn and disseminate the latest in transportation research and practice. Once again, the CMS made their way up north to attend TRB, and to host the yearly UF reception at the Marriott Wardman Park hotel. CMS faculty, aliates and students participated in various sessions and committee meetings, gave technical paper presentations, won awards, attended the CUTC banquet and awards ceremony at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, and hosted the UF reception. This year, the CMS Student of the Year Award was given to Grady Carrick, a doctoral student. Carrick is a commander with the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP). He was featured in the Fall 2009 issue of the CMS newsletter (see Pages 12-13). The UF reception at TRB was very well-attended. Students, alumni and friends of transportation at UF joined the Gators at the Mezzanine of the Marriott Wardman Park hotel on Jan. 25. During the reception, students showcased their research by displaying posters of their most recent work. CMS atTRB August 11, 2011 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Royal Plaza Hotel (Walt Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Florida)The Transportation Research Center (TRC), the Center for Multimodal Solutions for Congestion Mitigation (CMS), and McTrans at the University of Florida have developed a workshop for CORSIM users. Participants will learn about the modeling structure and approach used by CORSIM, the recently added features to CORSIM, modeling methods that can be used to expand CORSIMs analysis capabilities, advanced output processing, and comparing CORSIM results to HCM results. The workshop will also address the long-range plan for CORSIM. Six professional development hours (PDHs) will be oered to P.E. license holders for attending the workshop:Upcoming UF/TRCWorkshop on CORSIM Workshop presenters include:Ken Courage, University of Florida Lily Elefteriadou, University of Florida David Hale, University of Florida Bill Sampson, University of Florida Scott Washburn, University of Florida TBA, Florida Department of Transportation Fees & registration:Early-birds $245 (Register by July 15, 2011) Regular registration $295 Workshop sponsors $175 Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, including hotel registration, visit Conference & Workshops at http://trc.ce.u.edu/news_and_events/corsim_workshop_2011. ph p or contact Ines Aviles-Spadoni at 352-392-9537, Ext. 1409 or iaviles@ce.u.edu Register NOW! CMS SPRING 2011 | 03

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Congressman John Mica (front row, center, at right) with CMS faculty and students in the lobby of the UF College of Engineering.Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.) met with CMS students, sta and faculty on March 7 at the University of Floridas College of Engineering. The purpose of the meeting was to connect with the Transportation Research Center (TRC) and to learn about the CMS activities as they relate to research, education and technology transfer. CMS Director Lily Elefteriadou was very pleased the congressman met with students and faculty researchers. It was good to hear the congressmans perspective on research and education, and it was an excellent opportunity for our students and faculty to give an overview of their work to him in this forum, Elefteriadou said. I was delighted that Congressman Mica took time out of his busy schedule to visit with our center. Congressman Mica is the Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in Washington, D.C. In Florida, he represents the 7th Congressional District.Rep. John Mica(R-Fla.)Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure CommitteeVisits the CMS From left: Clark Letter, Brett Fuller and Jorge Uy The trac data warehouse, STEWARD, partially funded by CMS, was one of 25 projects chosen among 60 University Transportation Centers in the United States to take part in the U.S. Department of Transportations (U.S. DOT) University Research Technology Transfer Day on March 6 at their headquarters in Washington, D.C. Vipul Modi, a senior transportation engineer working with the CMS, and Ines Aviles-Spadoni, the CMS coordinator, attended the event and networked with individuals from the government and academic sectors. Modi, one of STEWARDs creators, was pleased by the attention the database received during the product showcase. The rationale behind STEWARDs implementation, and its ability to contribute to the future of transportation research were very well-accepted by people visiting our booth, Modi said. The people I spoke to encouraged me to continue with eorts CMS Showcases STEWARD at U.S. DOTs University Research Technology Transfer Day to make STEWARD a national product. Modi said the event was a unique platform for universities to showcase research products to an audience that was not limited to researchers and academics, but to the public sector, including federal ocials. STEWARD is a database that collects raw trac data coming in from ITS detectors on Floridas roadways through trac management centers. STEWARD processes the raw data and makes them available in various report formats to practitioners. The CMS display booth was equipped with a poster of STEWARD, which gave an overview of the database warehouse, including a computer and at screen providing a real-time view of STEWARDs website. The STEWARD database can be accessed at http://cce-trccdwserv.ce.u.edu/steward/index.htm l Vipul Modi (right) discusses STEWARD with a U.S. DOT ocial. 04 | CMS SPRING 2011

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Rep. John Mica(R-Fla.)Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure CommitteeCMS Welcomes Four External Advisory Board MembersDavid Berrigan Applied Research Program Division of Cancer Control & Population Sciences National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health David Berrigan, Ph.D., MPH, has been a biologist in the Oce of the Associate Director of the Applied Research Program since 2003. He previously served as a Cancer Prevention Fellow with funding from the Division of Cancer Prevention from 1999-2003. Before coming to NCI, he was a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at the University of Washington and at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, with funding from the National Science Foundation and the USDA. He currently serves as a member of the TRB Committee on Traveler Behavior. Thomas F. Rossi Principal Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Thomas Rossi is a Principal of Cambridge Systematics with 25 years of experience in transportation planning and travel demand forecasting. He has developed and applied trip-based and activity-based models throughout the United States. For the past 15 years, Rossi has been a consultant to U.S. DOT for model improvement research and development/teaching of training courses. He is the Chairman of TRB Committee on Transportation Demand Forecasting. Rossi holds bachelors degrees in civil engineering and mathematics and a masters degree in transportation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Grant Zammit Team Leader Operations Technical Service Team FHWA Resource Center Grant Zammit currently works as a trac management and systems operations specialist at the FHWA Resource Center in Atlanta, Ga. Zammit is the Operations Technical Service Team lead in the areas of access management, performance measures and data quality, travel demand management, and highway capacity analysis. His current initiatives focus on program development and advancement, technology transfer and outreach, training delivery, and projectlevel technical assistance. Before joining the Resource Center in 2000, Zammit served in the FHWA Divisions in California, Florida, Kansas, and Kentucky. He is a graduate of Oregon State University and holds a masters degree in transportation engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He serves on several technical committees and task forces throughout the United States, including state chapters of ITS America, the Institute of Transportation Engineers, and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Ocials. Edward L. Johnson Interim Chief Executive Ocer Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority, LYNX As Chief Administrative Ocer, Edward L. Johnson oversees LYNX planning and development, information technology, human resources and federal compliance. He has been with LYNX for 12 years, previously serving Wed like to thank Linda Watson, formerly the CEO of LYNX, Orlando and Tamara Christion, of the FHWA, for their time, dedication and service during their tenure as members of the CMS External Advisory Board. as interim chief executive ocer, chief of sta and the manager of operations support/development. Prior to joining LYNX, Johnson worked in his native Alabama with the Birmingham-Jeerson County Transit Authority where he served as the grants and planning manager. He earned his bachelors and masters degrees from Jacksonville State University in Alabama. Johnson serves on various local boards including the American Red Cross Mid-Florida Region, METROPLAN ORLANDO Economic Development Commission Investor Relations Committee, Central Florida Urban League and the Hankins-Johnson Education Foundation. A recipient of the Orlando Business Journals 40 Under 40 Award, he is a graduate of the Eno Transportation Executive Leadership Program, Leadership Orlando and served in the U.S. Army Reserves as an infantry platoon leader. CMS SPRING 2011 | 05

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istinguishedProfessional LecturerJana Lynott, AARPD As a person ages the desire to relocate decreases, and the need for communities to accommodate for the aging population becomes a real necessity. In the next 20 years, the United States will see an 80 percent increase in the population age 65 and older a demographic change so profound that every profession in America will be aected, said Jana Lynott, a senior strategic policy adviser with the Transportation and Livable Communities of the Public Policy Institute at the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP). Lynott was the CMS Distinguished Professional Lecturer on April 7. She was invited by Sherrilene Classen, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy at UF and a member of the CMS Internal Steering Committee. Lynotts presentation concentrated on the considerations that policymakers, planners, engineers and regular citizens need to take for an aging America. During her talk, she focused on road design and how planners and engineers must work together to create streets for a variety of users. She also described a concept known as Complete Streets, which she says many communities in the U.S. are now embracing. Complete Streets addresses the needs of older road users and how those needs are balance with other users such as cyclists and pedestrians. Classen, a rehabilitation scientist working with the aging population, supports the Complete Streets concept, and she is pleased the initiative is taking hold in communities. Through the Complete Streets Initiative, Jana Lynott is challenging engineers, planners and rehabilitation scientist to work in an integrated fashion, Classen said. And this optimizes transportation safety and eciency for all citizens. For more information, including the video recording of Lynotts presentation via Elluminate, visit: http://cms.ce.u.edu/news_ events/distinguished_lecturer_seminar_series.ph p Ananth Prasad, P.E.Secretary, Florida Department of Transportation Ananth Prasad, P.E., was named Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) by Gov. Rick Scott. Prasad, a member of the CMS external advisory board since 2007, will be responsible for managing the $7 billion agency, which oversees infrastructure projects that are vital to Gov. Scotts 7-7-7 Jobs Plan including port dredging, highway expansion and maintenance projects. Prior to his appointment as Secretary of FDOT, Prasad served as the assistant secretary for engineering and operations for the agency. Prasad rejoined FDOT in July 2010 after a brief twoyear stint as a vice president of a construction-services rm. Prasad has a total of 20 years of experience in the transportation industry, including 18 years with FDOT where he previously held the positions of the chief engineer and director of construction. He was responsible for implementing various innovative contracting techniques, including public-private partnerships. Prasad earned a masters degree in civil engineering from the University of Florida. (Source: Governors Oce Press Release) 06 | CMS SPRING 2011

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Assessing the Impacts of Development in the Transportation Network The impact of a development (for example, a shopping center) on the transportation system is traditionally captured in terms of the number of additional trips added to the network. While the trip rate is appropriate to capture the eect of a development locally (say at a nearby intersection), it is not an adequate measure of regional impacts. For instance, two developments could result in the same number of additional trips, but one of them could be attracting these trips from much farther away. In this case, it could be argued that the transportation impacts of both these developments are not identical (as would be indicated by a purely trip-volume-based assessment); rather, the one that leads to longer trip lengths eectively has a greater (negative) impact on the transportation system. With increasing emphasis on growth management and the containment of urban sprawl, there is a need for the assessment of such macro impacts of development using methods that relate the built-environment patterns to trip lengths. Further, there is a desire to moderate the energy consumed by the transportation sector to achieve energy-sustainability and to reduce the extent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from vehicles. To achieve this goal without adversely aecting the quality-of-life of the people (broadly dened as the ability of people to satisfy their activity-participation needs), planners and policymakers are exploring urban-design solutions such as mixed-use neighborhoods (i.e. residential, commercials, schools and retail). In order to assess the extent to which such land-use patterns can reduce the length of travel Spotlight on Research undertaken, it is necessary to quantify the relationships between land use and trip lengths. CMS researchers have recently built a spreadsheet-based tool for estimating the lengths of vehicle trips generated by various types of land use patterns. Travel data from the 1999 Southeast Florida Regional Travel Characteristics Study (about 5,000 households) were combined with detailed land-use and roadway network data from the Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties to build statistical models for trip lengths for dierent trip purposes. These models have been implemented in the spreadsheet-based tool. As an illustration, the tool is used to predict the lengths of home-based work (HBW) and other (HBO) trips produced in identical residential parcels that are located in three very dierent neighborhoods of the region: one in Pahokee (in rural Palm Beach County), the second just outside the city of Palm Beach (suburban) and the third in downtown Miami. The residential parcel in the rural neighborhood produces the longest HBW (19.61 miles) and HBO trips (8.68 miles). The parcel in the urban location produces the shortest HBW (4.21 miles) and HBO (2.23 miles) trips. The suburban location in West Palm Beach produced HBW trips of 6.72 miles and HBO trips of 3.85 miles. Overall, this example illustrates the ability of the models to predict the trip lengths reective of the context in which the travel is taking place. Further details regarding this project are provided at: http://cms.ce.u.edu/research/Steiner_CMS_2008-007_nal.pd f | by Siva Srinivasan, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Civil & Coastal Engineering Figure1: Location and Characteristics of Three Neighborhoods for Model Application Figure2: Spreadsheet Implementation of the Triplength Models CMS SPRING 2011 | 07

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New CMS ProjectsLEGO Robot Vehicle Lesson Plans for Secondary Education A Recruitment Tool PI: Janet Degner, Director, Florida Transportation Technology Transfer Center (T2) Project # 2011-001 Route-Choice Modeling using GPS-based Travel Surveys PI: Siva Srinivasan, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 2011-008 Privacy Preserving Methods to Retrieve Origin-Destination Information from Converted Vehicles PI: Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 2011-009 Florida Long Distance Travel Characteristics and Their Impacts on Transportation Systems PI: Ruth Steiner, Ph.D., Urban & Regional Planning Project # 2011-013 Strengthening the Resiliency of the Coastal Transportation System through Integrated Simulation of Storm Surge, Inundation, and Non-Recurrent Congestion in Northeast Florida PI: Peter Sheng, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 2011-017 Modeling the Interaction among Urban Form, Accessibility, Congestion, and Travel Behavior using System Dynamics PI: Andres Blanco, Ph.D., Urban & Regional Planning Project # 2011-019 The Impacts of Freight Mode Splitting on Congestion, Risk, and Delivery Reliability PI: Joseph Geunes, Ph.D., Industrial & Systems Engineering Project # 2011-023New FDOT Match ProjectsDevelopment of Activity-Based Travel-Demand Models for Florida: An Assessment of Feasibility and Transferability PI: Siva Srinivasan, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 90425 Central Data Warehouse Enhancements, Part 2 PI: Scott Washburn, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 92671 Validity and Usability of a Safe Driving Behaviors Measure for Older Adults PI: Sherrilene Classen, Ph.D., Department of Occupational Therapy Project # TBA Expanded Transportation Performance Measures to Supplement Level of Service (LOS) for Growth Management and Transportation Impact Analysis PI: Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 93661 Heavy Vehicle Eects on Florida Freeways and Highways PI: Scott Washburn, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 93817 Non-Linear Road Pricing PI: Toi Lawphongpanich, Ph.D., Industrial & Systems Engineering Co-PI: Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 93713 & 93714 Development of Recommendations for Arterial Lane Closure to Optimize Trac Operations PI: Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering Project # 93498CMS Project Status Now on the Web!Ongoing projects are posted at: http://cms.ce.u.edu/research / Final reports for all completed projects are posted at: http://cms.ce.u.edu/research/completed_projects.php 08 | CMS SPRING 2011

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Toi Lawphongpanich at the College of Engineering, UF. Siriphong Toi Lawphongpanich was born in the bustling city of Bangkok, Thailand, where he spent the rst 15 years of his life. He began his academic journey half a world away, one which has landed him a tenured position as associate professor in the UF Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering. The journey began in the quaint, sleepy town of Gorton, Mass. Here, Lawphongpanich attended the Lawrence Academy, a high school with about 200 students. There was a bed and breakfast, four or ve shops, and a small supermarket, Lawphongpanich said. Today, Google map shows a slightly bigger town, but the Lawrence Academy still looks very similar to what I remember. According to its website, the school now has a student population of approximately 400 students. He was sent to Lawrence Academy because his parents thought his lack of focus and poor performance in school would make it dicult for him to compete well in Thailands university entrance examination. Lawphongpanich graduated from the Lawrence Academy and was accepted to Cornell University for his undergraduate studies. While at Cornell, Lawphongpanich grew interested in operations research and industrial engineering. He said the interest in these subject areas came out of necessity because he did not like coursesin biology, physics, and chemistry. He preferred those with more of a mathematical and analytical focus to him they require less memorization. I remember hating these three subjects because they required lots of memorization such as the scientic names for plants, body organs, and the periodic table of elements, including the dierent measurement systems, British versus metrics, Lawphongpanich said. He completed his bachelors degree at Cornell in the School of aculty SpotlightToi Lawphongpanich, Ph.D.Associate Professor, Industrial & Systems EngineeringOperations Research and Industrial Engineering, or SORIE. He went on to nish a masters degree in mathematical sciences from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Florida. After earning his Ph.D., Lawphongpanich remained at UF as a visiting assistant professor for one year. During that time, his dissertation received the TSL Dissertation Prize from the Transportation Science and Logistics Society, a society within the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences or INFORMS. Before returning to UF in 2002 as a faculty member, he was the Chief of Strategic Planning Section at Bangkok Bank Limited for two years and taught at the Operations Research Department of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterrey, Calif., for 10 years. His interest in transportation developed while working on his doctoral dissertation at UF. He was tasked with developing ecient algorithms for nding an equilibrium trac ow distribution in large road networks. His adviser at the time, professor Donald Hearn, now an emeritus faculty, had received some funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to do the research. Hearn was also aliated with the transportation program at UF. When I started working on this, I knew nothing about the trac equilibrium problem, Lawphongpanich said. Don Hearn gave me a stack of about 20 papers and told me to read them. That is how I learned about the problem and what had been done previously. From then on, his interests blossomed in transportation science and large-scale optimization. Lawphongpanich said these two areas often complement each other because problems in transportation science are often very large. As a professor at UF, Lawphongpanich dedicates his time to collaborating on congestion-pricing research projects with his colleague and friend, Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineerings transportation program. As a professor at UF, Lawphongpanich dedicates his time to collaborating on congestion pricing research projects with his colleague and friend, Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering. Yin enjoys the partnership in research and the friendship it has sparked. I feel very fortunate to have him as a collaborator, Yin said. We share the same research interests and our skill sets complement each other. Ive learned a lot from the collaboration. Toi has been a good mentor and a close friend to me. Lawphongpanich was introduced to congestion pricing while collaborating on a grant with his former doctoral dissertation adviser. Along with Yin, Lawphongpanich is considered an expert in the congestion pricing eld. However, he is modest. When compared to my colleague professor Yafeng Yin, I am really just a newcomer to the eld of congestion mitigation, he said. Currently, Lawphongpanich, in collaboration with Yin, is working F CMS SPRING 2011 | 9

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on two projects funded by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). One of the projects involve dynamic message signs or DMS, the signs that one often sees along highways that display information such as travel times to various destinations, work zone warnings, hazardous conditions and special events. They are also used for Amber and law enforcement alerts. Our research is concerned with developing a systematic approach for planning, deploying and operating these DMS in the most ecient manner, Lawphongpanich said. The second project is related to congestion or road pricing. Lawphongpanich explained that the original objective of road pricing is to promote a more ecient utilization of congested roads. Road pricing over the years has been used to accomplish other objectives such as reducing emissions, and he said that many have argued that simple pricing structures are not exible enough to accomplish multiple objectives simultaneously. The goal of the Lawphongpanich-Yin congestion pricing project is to consider a more exible road pricing structure and to study how well it can accomplish two or more objectives, simultaneously. In his role as an educator, Lawphongpanich teaches two courses: introduction to industrial and systems engineering and linear programming and network optimization. He also has taught nonlinear programming, network optimization, large-scale optimization, probability, statistics, stochastic models, industrial quality control, operations research and location theory. Collaboration with other departments is important in industrial and systems engineering, Lawphongpanich said, because the eld often deals with nding ways to do things better, e.g., in less time, with less cost, with high benets, with more prots, etc. Many in our eld devote themselves to nding better and faster techniques and algorithms to solve problems, he said. To be useful and relevant, the problems we solve should be practical and one way of nding practical problems to solve is to collaborate with people from other elds. CMS Director Lily Elefteriadou has been very pleased with the contributions Lawphongpanich has made in the four years since the CMS was founded. She is delighted he is a member of the centers Internal Steering Committee and has contributed to the eld of transportation. Toi is an excellent researcher and a wonderful individual, Elefteriadou said. He is very innovative, as well as thoughtful, and he brings a signicant amount of enthusiasm and creativity to the CMS. His collaborative work with CCEs Yafeng Yin and their contributions to congestion pricing the past few years have been tremendous. Lawphongpanich has been at UF since January 2002. He is a member of the CMS Internal Steering Committee and TRBs Congestion Pricing Committee. From left: Yafeng Yin, Scott Washburn, Toi Lawphongpanich, and an animal handler with a captive cheetah at The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre, South Africa. Toi Lawphongpanich and Scott Washburn, a transportation faculty at UF, after arriving at the The Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre located at the foothills of the Waterberg Mountains in South Africa. 10 | CMS SPRING 2011

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Jessica Mackey is a true North American: She was born in Florida and has roots in Canada and Mexico. She is a world traveler who is bilingual in English and Spanish. Mackey is pursuing a concurrent masters degree in the transportation and urban planning program at the University of Florida. Im addicted to dancing salsa and traveling all over the world, Mackey said. I love riding my bike on the Hawthorne Trail, and the underlying reason why I study everything I do is to try to make this world more sustainable. I love nature and any nature-related activities. The Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail runs 16 miles from Gainesvilles Boulware Springs Park through the Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park, and it includes a wildlife management area. The trail has been designed as a recreational area for walking, cycling and horseback riding. Mackeys interest in nature and outdoor activities developed as a result of limitations she encountered while attending high school in South Florida. Every day, she took long bus rides back to and from school, which left little time for enriching activities such as after school programs and clubs. I didnt have a car in high school, so I had to take a twohour bus ride home from school every day, Mackey said. So, having no car also limited me in what activities I could participate in after school. She described the transportation system in South Florida as inecient and lacking options for younger adults and people of lower incomes. The elderly know this better than anyone, Mackey said. All of this is intricately linked to how we plan, or dont plan, our cities. Mackey earned a bachelors degree in civil engineering from UF in 2008. Shortly thereafter, she began the transportation and urban planning dual graduate program at UF. Mackey currently works with Ruth Steiner, associate professor in urban and regional planning and Siva Srinivasan, assistant professor in civil and coastal engineering. She chose the dual specialization because of her interest in improving cities and transportation options, a concern that goes back to the two-hour commutes during her earlier years. Ive always had an interest in improving the urban form in most of Floridas cites, Mackey said. We can be healthier, more sustainable, and improve peoples quality of life. Transportation planning is the link to everything much like Student Spotlight Jessica Mackey (Transportation/Urban Planning)CMS SPRING 2011 | 11

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transportation is the link to every activity we do in life. Mackeys masters work focuses on parking issues. She has evaluated parking and demand policy in downtown Gainesville, and is currently working on a similar project in South Florida, funded by the FDOT (Impact of Parking Supply and Demand Management on Central Business District CBD Trac Congestion Transit Performance and Sustainable Land Use). Right now Im working on a project led by Dr. Ruth Steiner that looks into the impacts of parking supply and demand management in Miami and Fort Lauderdale, Mackey said. Ive also assisted her and Dr. Siva on a vehicle per miles traveled project. Jessicas knowledge in transportation engineering, combined with the courses she has taken in urban planning, will denitely give her a competitive edge in the job market, Steiner said. She takes personal interest in her chosen eld of study, which comes from the transportation choices available to her earlier on in her life and her interest in sustainable living conditions. Its been a pleasure working with her. The combination of transportation engineering and urban planning is ideal for Mackey because of her love of the outdoors. She really enjoys collecting eld data. I get to go outside, and its really the best way to get a sense of the issues, Mackey said. But sometimes, collecting data on a busy street or at a parking lot can become somewhat strange. Mackey recalls collecting data for a particular parking/ circulation study for TRIRAIL, South Floridas commuter rail service. The drivers entering the parking lots were upset she was recording their license plate numbers. Some drivers would back o, but once I explained to them my aliation, and that I was collecting data for a research project, they were OK with it, Mackey said. People are usually nice. Mackey is satised with her decision to pursue the dual degree program, and because of her personal and academic experiences with transportation and urban planning, she has developed her own philosophy and is quite rm about it. Mackey said transportation engineers should have a good sense of urban planning, making sure designs are sustainable, and considering how they will impact regions and the quality of life. Likewise, she added, urban planners should have a good grasp of how a transportation engineer thinks and how they solve problems. Mackey is an avid supporter of sustainability and said there is more work to be done in this area. We are nally moving away from the automobile oriented mentality, but we still have some strides to make, Mackey said. Mackey is scheduled to graduate in fall 2011.Jessica Mackey at the famous Cristo Redentor statue located in the Corcovado mountain in Rio de Janiero, Brazil. Jessica Mackey (right) with her husband, Philippe St. Arnaud in Montreal, Canada. 12 | CMS SPRING 2011

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Each year in March, the CMS showcases the latest in transportation-related research conducted by graduate students at the University of Florida. Students from the departments of civil engineering, industrial and systems engineering, urban and regional planning, occupational therapy, environmental engineering and other related discipline areas attend and/or present papers and posters. The conference is free and open to transportation professionals in academia, and in the private and government sectors. Awards are given to students for outstanding presentations and posters. This year, students from the departments of epidemiology, civil and coastal engineering, and urban and regional planning won awards for their presentations. Students from environmental engineering and civil and coastal engineering won awards for posters. The judges presiding over the awards selection were members of the CMS External Advisory Board. The CMS Annual Student Conference is held in conjunction with the centers External Advisory Board meeting. For more information, visit: http://cms.ce.u.edu/news_events/2011_student_conference. ph p .Annual Student ConferenceMarch 4, 2011 Emerson Alumni Hall (UF) Clockwise: Brett Fuller; Yanning Wang and her faculty adviser, Sherrilene Classen; group photo of poster session participants; Vince Wang at the podium presenting his work on urban form and trac congestion in Florida; CMS Director Lily Elefteriadou (right) with ISE faculty Panos Pardalos and Joseph Geunes; Ori Baber Presentations: 1st Place Yanning Wang, Ph.D. student, epidemiology Title: Validity and Usability of a Safe-Driving Behavior Measure for Older Adults: Strategy for Congestion Mitigation 2nd Place Ruoniu (Vince) Wang, Ph.D. student, urban and regional planning Title: Measuring Urban Form and Examining Its Relationship to Trac Congestion in Florida 3rd Place Dimitra Michalaka, Ph.D. student, civil and coastal engineering Title: Enhancing CORSIM for Simulating High Occupancy/ Toll Lanes Operations Posters: 1st Place Ori Baber, Ph.D. student, environmental engineering Title: Investigation into the Inhalation Toxicity of Constituents of Automobile Exhaust using an Innovated in-vitro Exposure Technique 2nd Place Brett Fuller, M.S. student, civil and coastal engineering Title: Integration of Toll Plaza Analysis into CORSIM 3rd Place Kwangkyun Lim, Ph.D. student, civil and coastal engineering Title: A Comparative Analysis of Alternate Econometric Structures for Trip-Generation Models CMS SPRING 2011 | 13

PAGE 14

David Berrigan in Mexico on the Yucatan Peninsula. What was the career path that led you to your 1. current position at the NIH?My current position involves research and grant/contract administration related to how environments inuence diet, weight, and physical activity and how in turn these three factors inuence health. I have a Ph.D. in biology; after seven years of research and teaching related to the biological eects of global warming, I received a cancer prevention fellowship. The fellowship supported a one-year masters in public health (MPH) and three years of research at NCI.What is the most challenging aspect of your 2. job?A big challenge in my job is making sense of the federal statistical system. There are more than 70 federal agencies that produce statistical information, and a major part of my work has been to try to make a small part of this data better, to nd creative ways to use the data, and to foster eorts to connect dierent elements of the data literally or conceptually.What has been the most rewarding experience 3. of your career?It is hard to think of the No. 1 moment, but a few years ago at the TRB annual meeting a fellow approached me and said more or less, I wanted to tell you that after hearing your speech two years ago, I went home, changed my research emphasis, wrote a grant and received a million dollars. That was a terric feeling to think that I had really inspired and motivated someone.What do you consider the biggest challenges of 4. the future for sustainability?At the moment I think a big challenge is linking sustainability to other shared goals. We have a hard time individually and collectively pursuing goals where the benets are in the future and/or largely accrue to other people. If we can mix up sustainability-related goals with shorter-term health, economic and aesthetic goals in coherent packages, we might do better at fostering the long-term goal of sustainability.What are the major transportation challenges 5. in U.S. as they pertain to sustainability? How can we overcome those? I think I will leave this question to transportation experts. From a health standpoint, active transportation via walking and bicycling has large health and sustainability benets, and I think our nations low population density in many areas is a major challenge to this goal.Advice for the CMS eorts on sustainability? 6. Keep reaching out across multiple disciplines.What scientic knowledge is necessary in order 7. to study or research sustainability? Obviously a lot of knowledge, but maybe a greater eort to incorporate behavioral science, and behavioral economics would be timely. Engineering and ecology will get us to good policy and behavioral options, but we need to get people and institutions to adopt these policies.What can the U.S. do to increase the use of mass 8. transit?I dont have any deep insights into this important question, but I personally hope that a combination of rising energy costs and changing social norms will help increase investment in mass transit and foster changes in planning that lead to greater availability and use of transit. I especially like the idea of putting bicycles into the mix, and the recent success of the Capital Bikeshare program is heartening.What can transportation professionals do to 9. improve active living? I recently read an older text by Thomas F. Saarinen (Environmental Planning, Perception and Behavior). Saarinen emphasizes the idea of Design as Experiment with Design for human well-being an iterative process constantly modied and moving toward more appropriate conditions. I am condent that if overall environmental, community and individual health goals continue to be integrated into more traditional transportation, that we can improve some of the less-desirable features of the U.S. landscapes that have emerged as an unintended consequence of past policies.What advice do you have for students who are 10. interested in a career related to sustainability? My advice is a little generic but beyond good technical skills: 1) Work as hard as you can to become a good writer nothing else you do will help your career as much; 2) Be helpful to your peers, your colleagues and your community; this will pay long term dividends in your capacity to make things happen.Q&A with David Berrigan, Ph.D., MPH National Institutes of Health 14 | CMS SPRING 2011

PAGE 15

Congratulations to our CMS-aliated students for receiving various awards this semester! Grady Carrick, Student of the Year Award, CUTC Awards Banquet, Washington, D.C. January 2011 Dimitra Michalaka, 2010-2011 WTS Central Florida Chapter, Frankee Hellinger Graduate Scholarship, Orlando, Fla., February 2011 Ly Nguyen, 2011 WTS Central Florida Chapter Frankee Hellinger Leadership Undergraduate Scholarship, Orlando, Fla., February 2011 Yanning Wang, Research Excellence Award, College of Public Health and Health Professions (PHHP) Research Day, March 2011Student Awards WTS OcersPresident: Dimitra Michalaka Vice President/Secretary: Amy Cavaretta Treasurer: Zhuofei Li Newsletter/Website Chair: Asha John Fundraising Chair: Anna Zhang Programs Chair: Ly Nguyen Recruitment Chair: Jing Li Recruitment Co-Chair: Cuie Lu The newly formed WTS student chapter at University of Florida has gained momentum this semester. Members have attended conferences, planned activities, set agendas for future projects and recruited members. Seven students joined the chapter as of January 2011, and new ocers were elected. Key activities this semester included a trip to the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Washington, D.C., by graduate students Dimitra Michalaka, Zhuofei Li and Cuie Lu. Both Michalaka and Lu presented papers at the conference. Michalaka, along with Li, attended the WTS International reception, which was held at the Marriott Wardman Park hotel, and where they had the opportunity to interact and network with transportation professionals. In April, the chapter mobilized to host a Resume Development and Interview Workshop, which included Mary Medina, assistant director for employer development at UFs Career Resource Center, and Billy Cottrell, an editor from the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering. The event was very well attended, and included a three-hour fundraiser event at Red Mango, a local frozen yogurt company, which agreed to donate 10 percent of sales to the student chapter. High on the student chapters agenda is the WTS/U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S.DOT) Tansportation You program, an outreach action plan for girls ages 13 to 18. This eort is being led by Leslie Washburn, P.E., CMS workforce development coordinator. The WTS UF student chapter will team up with Washburn and also assist her with other activities related to K-12 students. To nd more about WTS UF Student Chapter, go to Facebook and search for WTS UF Student Chapter (URL http://www.facebook.com/ pages/WTS-UF-Student-Chapter/19736574030315 9 ) or visit the chapter website at https://sites.google.com/site/wtsufstudentchapter /WTS Student ChapterClockwise: Winners of the 2010-2011 WTS Central Chapter (Orlando) student awards, Ly Nguyen and Dimitra Michalaka; the WTS UF Student Chapter along with Mary Medina from the UF Career Center (at right, front row); Mary Medina of the UF Career Center (left) listens to Ashish Kulshrestha discuss his resume. EAB Member Wins AwardTeresa Scott, P.E., director of public works in Gainesville, Fla., and a member of the CMS External Advisory Board, was selected as one of the American Public Works Association (APWA) Top Ten Public Works Leaders of the Year for 2011. She will be recognized for this prestigious award at a local, Gainesville community-oriented event, as well as during an awards ceremony at the APWAs International Public Works Congress & Exposition in Denver, Colorado during September 1821, 2011. Congratulations, Teresa! CMS SPRING 2011 | 15

PAGE 16

Center for Multimodal Solution for Congestion Mitigation 512 Weil Hall P.O. Box 116580 Gainesville, FL 32611-6580 Phone: 352.392.9537, Ext. 1450 Fax: 352.846.1699 Non-Prot Org. US Postage Paid Gainesville, FL Permit No. 94http://cms.ce.u.ed u Publisher Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D. CMS Director Kisinger Campo Professor of Civil Engineering elefter@ce.u.edu Managing Editor Ines Aviles-Spadoni, M.S. CMS Coordinator iaviles@ce.u.edu Copy Editor Kim Fulscher, B.S. Graphic Artist Chad Greene, B.F.A. Register with Us!http://cms.ce.u.edu/contact_u s /


CMS newsletter
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Publisher: Center for Multimodal Solutions for Congestion Mitigation
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011
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am very pleased to share with you this
newsletter, which highlights issues of
growth management, sustainability
and active living. Sustainability and active living
was the theme of this year's External Advisory
Board (EAB) meeting, which took place in March.
Discussions focused on identifying the existing
strengths at the University of Florida related to
sustainability, active living and the environment.
The EAB also discussed opportunities for future
growth and expansion of the CMS research,
education and technology transfer activities
related to the broad area of sustainability. One
of our newest EAB members, David Berrigan,
Ph.D., from the Division of Cancer Control and
Population Sciences at the National Cancer
Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),
presented his perspective on transportation and
active living as well as needs for future work in this
area. I am very pleased that Berrigan also agreed
to be our featured participant in this newsletter's
Q&A (Page 14), where he provides his perspective
on the relationship between transportation and
health, as well as transportation and livability.
Along the same theme, the Departments of Civil
& Coastal Engineering (CCE) and Environmental
Engineering Sciences (EES) at UF have agreed
to form the School of Sustainable Infrastructure
and the Environment. The objective of the school
is to enhance and coordinate research efforts
related to the broad umbrella of infrastructure
and sustainability. Therefore, I expect the CMS
activities in this area will expand as we increase
our collaborative activities within the school and
particularly in the area of transportation and air


quality.

I am very pleased to announcethatAnanth Prasad,
P.E., a CMS EAB member, and a graduate of the
UF civil engineering program (construction), was
named Secretary of FDOT in April 2011. Prasad
will be responsible for managing the $7 billion
agency, which oversees a variety of infrastructure
projects in Florida, including highway expansions,
maintenance and port dredging. Congratulations
Ananth!

Another one of our EAB members, Teresa Scott,
Director of Public Works for the City of Gainesville,
was recently named one of the 10 public works
leaders of the year by the American Public Works
Association (APWA). The group of winners, which
includes Scott's counterpart in Orange County,
was selected by a "committee of peers for their
career-long professionalism, expertise, service
and personal dedication to improving the quality
of life in the communities they serve," according
to a news release. Congratulations, Teresa! In
March 2011, shortly after the EAB meeting, we
were very pleased to welcome to our center
Congressman John Mica (R-Fla.), the chair of the
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in
the U.S. House of Representatives. Rep. Mica met
with representatives of the CMS, the College of
Engineering and the Departmentof Civil &Coastal
Engineering to discuss center activities (Page 4).

In May, I had theopportunityto visit myalma mater
in Thessaloniki, Greece, to deliver a seminar to the
graduate students in transportation engineering.
I very much enjoyed catching up with the faculty
and students there and hearing about the current
transportation program. It has significantly
expanded since my time as an undergraduate
student at the university! My visit also resulted
in opportunities for collaborative activities: I will
assist two of the graduate students with their
thesis projects, which are related to highway
capacity analyses and traffic simulation and are
led by Professor George Mintsis (see picture).

I hope you will find this newsletter informative
and useful, and I look forward to hearing your
comments and suggestions regarding our
activities.


;/-^^-

Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D.
Professor of Civil Engineering & CMS Director












TRB

ach January, as it is customary, transportation
professionals and practitioners from all over theworld
convene in Washington, D.C., for the Transportation
Research Board's (TRB) annual meeting. It is easy to spot a
"TRBer."They busily walking and out of the conference hotels with
their name badges hanging around their necks, intense looks
on their faces some wired from an interesting session, others
tired from their long flights to D.C. Here, the largest exchange
of information related to the transportation profession occurs,
the biggest names are present, and students, the future of the
transportation industry, come to learn and disseminate the
latest in transportation research and practice. Once again, the
CMS made their way up north to attend TRB, and to host the
yearly UF reception at the Marriott Wardman Park hotel.

CMS faculty, affiliates and students participated in various
sessions and committee meetings, gave technical paper


presentations, won awards, attended the CUTC banquet and
awards ceremony at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, and hosted the
UF reception. This year, the CMS' Student of the Year Award was
given toGradyCarrick,a doctoral student. Carrickisa commander
with the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP). He was featured in the Fall
2009 issue of the CMS' newsletter (see Pages 12-13).

The UF reception at TRB was very well-attended. Students,
alumni and friends of transportation at UF joined the Gators
at the Mezzanine of the Marriott Wardman Park hotel on Jan.
25. During the reception, students showcased their research by
displaying posters of their most recent work.


uvi- TacuIly, sluaents ana statigainerTora picture a ne iviezzanine oiTne
Marriott Wardman Park hotel in Washington, D.C.


W US gii URCRgse


August 11,2011
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Royal Plaza Hotel
(Walt Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Florida)

The Transportation Research Center (TRC), the Center for
Multimodal Solutions for Congestion Mitigation (CMS), and
McTrans at the University of Florida have developed a workshop
for CORSIM users. Participants will learn about the modeling
structure and approach used by CORSIM, the recently added
features to CORSIM, modeling methods that can be used
to expand CORSIM's analysis capabilities, advanced output
processing, and comparing CORSIM results to HCM results. The
workshop will also address the long-range plan for CORSIM.

Six professional development hours (PDHs) will be offered to P.E.
license holders for attending the workshop:


Workshop presenters include:
SKen Courage, University of Florida
Lily Elefteriadou, University of Florida
David Hale, University of Florida
Bill Sampson, University of Florida
Scott Washburn, University of Florida
STBA, Florida Department of Transportation

Fees & registration:
SEarly-birds $245 (Register by July 15, 2011)
SRegular registration $295
SWorkshop sponsors $175

Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information,
including hotel registration, visit Conference & Workshops at
http://trc.ce.ufl.edu/news and events/corsim workshop 2011.
php or contact Ines Aviles-Spadoni at 352-392-9537, Ext. 1409
or iaviles@ce.ufl.edu.


CMS SPRING 2011 03









Rep. John Mica(R-Fla.)

Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee


John Mica (R-Fla.) met with CMS students, staff
and faculty on March 7 at the University of Florida's
College of Engineering. The purpose of the meeting
was to connect with the Transportation Research Center
(TRC) and to learn about the CMS' activities as they relate to
research, education and technology transfer. CMS Director
Lily Elefteriadou was very pleased the congressman met with
students and faculty researchers.

"It was good to hear the congressman's perspective on
research and education, and it was an excellent opportunity
for our students and faculty to give an overview of their work
to him in this forum," Elefteriadou said. "I was delighted that
Congressman Mica took time out of his busy schedule to visit
with our center."


Congressman Mica is the Chairman of the House Transportation
and Infrastructure Committee in Washington, D.C. In Florida, he
represents the 7th Congressional District.


Congressman John Mica (front row, center, at right) with CMS faculty
and students in the lobby of the UF College of Engineering.


Traffic data warehouse, STEWARD, partially
funded by CMS, was one of 25 projects chosen
among 60 University Transportation Centers
in the United States to take part in the U.S. Department of
Transportation's (U.S. DOT) University Research Technology
Transfer Day on March 6 at their headquarters in Washington,
D.C. Vipul Modi, a senior transportation engineer working with
the CMS, and Ines Aviles-Spadoni, the CMS'coordinator, attended
the event and networked with individuals from the government
and academic sectors. Modi, one of STEWARD's creators, was
pleased by the attention the database received during the
product showcase.
"The rationale behind STEWARD's implementation, and its
ability to contribute to the future of transportation research were
very well-accepted by people visiting our booth," Modi said.
"The people I spoke to encouraged me to continue with efforts


to make STEWARD a national product."
Modi said the event was a unique platform for universities to
showcase research products to an audience that was not limited
to researchers and academics, but to the public sector, including
federal officials.
STEWARD is a database that collects raw traffic data coming
in from ITS detectors on Florida's roadways through traffic
management centers. STEWARD processes the raw data and
makes them available in various report formats to practitioners.
The CMS' display booth was equipped with a poster of
STEWARD, which gave an overview of the database warehouse,
including a computer and flat screen providing a real-time view
of STEWARD's website.
The STEWARD database can be accessed at http://cce-trc-
cdwserv.ce.ufl.edu/steward/index.html.


04 CMS SPRING 2011












External Advisory Board Members


E David Berrigan
Applied Research Program
Division of Cancer Control
S& Population Sciences
National Cancer Institute
National Institutes of Health

David Berrigan, Ph.D., MPH, has been a biologist in the
Office of the Associate Director of the Applied Research
Program since 2003. He previously served as a Cancer
Prevention Fellow with funding from the Division of
Cancer Prevention from 1999-2003. Before coming to
NCI, he was a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at the
University of Washington and at La Trobe University in
Melbourne, Australia, with funding from the National
Science Foundation and the USDA. He currently serves as a
member of the TRB Committee on Traveler Behavior.

Thomas F. Rossi
Principal
Cambridge Systematics, Inc.

I Thomas Rossi is a Principal of
i Cambridge Systematics with 25 years of
experience in transportation planning
and travel demand forecasting. He has developed and
applied trip-based and activity-based models throughout
the United States. For the past 15 years, Rossi has been a
consultant to U.S. DOT for model improvement research
and development/teaching of training courses. He is
the Chairman of TRB Committee on Transportation
Demand Forecasting. Rossi holds bachelor's degrees in
civil engineering and mathematics and a master's degree
in transportation from the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.

Edward L. Johnson
Interim Chief Executive Officer
Central Florida Regional
Transportation Authority, LYNX

As Chief Administrative Officer, Edward
L. Johnson oversees LYNX' planning
and development, information
technology, human resources and federal compliance.
He has been with LYNX for 12 years, previously serving


as interim chief executive officer, chief of staff and the
manager of operations support/development.

Prior to joining LYNX, Johnson worked in his native
Alabama with the Birmingham-Jefferson County Transit
Authority where he served as the grants and planning
manager. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees
from Jacksonville State University in Alabama.

Johnson serves on various local boards including the
American Red Cross Mid-Florida Region, METROPLAN
ORLANDO Economic Development Commission Investor
Relations Committee, Central Florida Urban League and
the Hankins-Johnson Education Foundation. A recipient of
the Orlando Business Journal's 40 Under 40 Award, he is a
graduate of the Eno Transportation Executive Leadership
Program, Leadership Orlando and served in the U.S. Army
Reserves as an infantry platoon leader.

Grant Zammit
Team Leader
Operations Technical Service Team
FHWA Resource Center

Grant Zammit currently works as a traffic management and
systems operations specialist at the FHWA Resource Center
in Atlanta, Ga. Zammit is the Operations Technical Service
Team lead in the areas of access management, performance
measures and data quality, travel demand management,
and highway capacity analysis. His current initiatives focus
on program development and advancement, technology
transfer and outreach, training delivery, and project-
level technical assistance. Before joining the Resource
Center in 2000, Zammit served in the FHWA Divisions in
California, Florida, Kansas, and Kentucky. He is a graduate
of Oregon State University and holds a master's degree in
transportation engineering from the Georgia Institute of
Technology. He serves on several technical committees and
task forces throughout the United States, including state
chapters of ITS America, the Institute of Transportation
Engineers, and the American Association of State Highway
and Transportation Officials.


We'd like to thank Linda Watson, formerly the CEO ofLYNX, Orlando and
Tamara Christion, of the FHWA, for their time, dedication and service
during their tenure as members of the CMS'External Advisory Board.
CMS SPRING 2011 05












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anth Prasad, P.E., was named Secretary of the
Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT)
by Gov. Rick Scott. Prasad, a member of the
CMS' external advisory board since 2007, will be responsible for
managing the $7 billion agency, which oversees infrastructure
projects that are vital to Gov. Scott's 7-7-7 Jobs Plan including
port dredging, highway expansion and maintenance projects.
Prior to his appointment as Secretary of FDOT, Prasad served as
the assistant secretary for engineering and operations for the


s a person ages the desire to relocate
decreases, and the need for communities
to accommodate for the aging population
becomes a real necessity. "In the next 20 years, the United
States will see an 80 percent increase in the population age 65
and older a demographic change so profound that every
profession in America will be affected," said Jana Lynott, a
senior strategic policy adviser with the Transportation and
Livable Communities of the Public Policy Institute at the
American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).
Lynott was the CMS' Distinguished Professional Lecturer
on April 7. She was invited by Sherrilene Classen, Ph.D., an
associate professor in the Department of Occupational
Therapy at UF and a member of the CMS' Internal Steering
Committee. Lynott's presentation concentrated on the
considerations that policymakers, planners, engineers and
regular citizens need to take for "an aging America." During
her talk, she focused on road design and how planners and
engineers must work together to create streets for a variety


agency. Prasad rejoined FDOT in July 2010 after a brief two-
year stint as a vice president of a construction-services firm.
Prasad has a total of 20 years of experience in the transportation
industry, including 18 years with FDOT where he previously held
the positions of the chief engineer and director of construction.
He was responsible for implementing various innovative
contracting techniques, including public-private partnerships.
Prasad earned a master's degree in civil engineering from the
University of Florida. (Source: Governor's Office Press Release)


of users. She also described a concept known as Complete Streets,
which she says many communities in the U.S. are now embracing.
Complete Streets addresses the needs of older road users and
how those needs are balance with other users such as cyclists and
pedestrians.
Classen, a rehabilitation scientist working with the aging
population, supports the Complete Streets concept, and she is
pleased the initiative is taking hold in communities. "Through the
Complete Streets Initiative, Jana Lynott is challenging engineers,
planners and rehabilitation scientist to work in an integrated
fashion," Classen said. "And this optimizes transportation safety
and efficiency for all citizens."
For more information, including the video recording of Lynott's
presentation via Elluminate, visit: http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/news
events/distinquished lecturer seminar series.php.


06 CMS SPRING 2011








Spotlight

on

I by Siva Srinivasan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Civil & Coastal Engineering


Assessing the Impacts of Development
in the Transportation Network

The impact of a development (for example, a shopping center) on the
transportation system is traditionally captured in terms of the number of
additional trips added to the network. While the trip rate is appropriate to
capture the effect of a development locally (say at a nearby intersection),
it is not an adequate measure of regional impacts. For instance, two
developments could result in the same number of additional trips, but
one of them could be attracting these trips from much farther away.
In this case, it could be argued that the transportation impacts of both
these developments are not identical (as would be indicated by a purely
trip-volume-based assessment); rather, the one that leads to longer trip
lengths effectively has a greater (negative) impact on the transportation
system. With increasing emphasis on growth management and the
containment of urban sprawl, there is a need for the assessment of
such macro impacts of development using methods that relate the
built-environment patterns to trip lengths. Further, there is a desire to
moderate the energy consumed by the transportation sector to achieve
energy-sustainability and to reduce the extent of greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions from vehicles. To achieve this goal without adversely affecting
the quality-of-life of the people (broadly defined as the ability of people
to satisfy their activity-participation needs), planners and policymakers
are exploring urban-design solutions such as mixed-use neighborhoods
(i.e. residential, commercials, schools and retail). In order to assess the
extent to which such land-use patterns can reduce the length of travel


undertaken, it is necessary to quantify the relationships between land
use and trip lengths.

CMS researchers have recently built a spreadsheet-based tool for
estimating the lengths of vehicle trips generated by various types of
land use patterns. Travel data from the 1999 Southeast Florida Regional
Travel Characteristics Study (about 5,000 households) were combined
with detailed land-use and roadway network data from the Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties to build statistical models for trip
lengths for different trip purposes. These models have been implemented
in the spreadsheet-based tool.

As an illustration, the tool is used to predict the lengths of home-based
work (HBW) and other (HBO) trips produced in identical residential parcels
that are located in three very different neighborhoods of the region: one
in Pahokee (in rural Palm Beach County), the second just outside the
city of Palm Beach (suburban) and the third in downtown Miami. The
residential parcel in the rural neighborhood produces the longest HBW
(19.61 miles) and HBO trips (8.68 miles). The parcel in the urban location
produces the shortest HBW (4.21 miles) and HBO (2.23 miles) trips. The
suburban location in West Palm Beach produced HBW trips of 6.72 miles
and HBO trips of 3.85 miles. Overall, this example illustrates the ability of
the models to predict the trip lengths reflective of the context in which
the travel is taking place.

Further details regarding this project are provided at:
http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/research/Steiner CMS 2008-007 final.pdf


I l ..I .. ....i.i .

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Al a


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Figurel: Location and Characteristics of Three Neighborhoods forModel Application


7.._



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Figure2: Spreadsheet Implementation of the Trip-
length Models


CMS SPRING 2011 07














Now on the Web!

Ongoing projects are posted at:
http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/research/

Final reports for all completed projects are posted at:
http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/research/completed projects.php


New FDOT Match Projects


LEGO Robot Vehicle Lesson Plans for Secondary Education
A Recruitment Tool
PI: Janet Degner, Director, Florida Transportation Technology
Transfer Center (T2)
Project # 2011-001

Route-Choice Modeling using GPS-based Travel Surveys
PI: Siva Srinivasan, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 2011-008

Privacy Preserving Methods to Retrieve Origin-Destination
Information from Converted Vehicles
PI: Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 2011-009

Florida Long Distance Travel Characteristics and Their
Impacts on Transportation Systems
PI: Ruth Steiner, Ph.D., Urban & Regional Planning
Project # 2011-013

Strengthening the Resiliency of the Coastal Transportation
System through Integrated Simulation of Storm Surge,
Inundation, and Non-Recurrent Congestion in Northeast
Florida
PI: Peter Sheng, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 2011-017

Modeling the Interaction among Urban Form, Accessibility,
Congestion, and Travel Behavior using System Dynamics
PI: Andres Blanco, Ph.D., Urban & Regional Planning
Project # 2011-019

The Impacts of Freight Mode Splitting on Congestion, Risk,
and Delivery Reliability
PI: Joseph Geunes, Ph.D., Industrial & Systems Engineering
Project # 2011-023


Development of Activity-Based Travel-Demand Models for
Florida: An Assessment of Feasibility and Transferability
PI: Siva Srinivasan, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 90425

Central Data Warehouse Enhancements, Part 2
PI: Scott Washburn, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 92671

Validity and Usability of a Safe Driving Behaviors Measure
for Older Adults
PI: Sherrilene Classen, Ph.D., Department of Occupational
Therapy
Project # TBA

Expanded Transportation Performance Measures to
Supplement Level of Service (LOS) for Growth Management
and Transportation Impact Analysis
PI: Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 93661

Heavy Vehicle Effects on Florida Freeways and Highways
PI: Scott Washburn, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 93817

Non-Linear Road Pricing
PI: Toi Lawphongpanich, Ph.D., Industrial & Systems
Engineering
Co-PI: Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 93713 & 93714

Development of Recommendations for Arterial Lane
Closure to Optimize Traffic Operations
PI: Lily Elefteriadou, Ph.D., Civil & Coastal Engineering
Project # 93498


08 CMS SPRING 2011


New CMS Projects









ulty Spotlight


6 fhong "Toi" Lawphongpanich was born in the bustling
ty of Bangkok, Thailand, where he spent the first 15 years
of his life. He began his academic journey halfa world away,
one which has landed him a tenured position as associate professor
in the UF Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering.

The journey began in the quaint, sleepy town of Gorton, Mass.
Here, Lawphongpanich attended the Lawrence Academy, a high
school with about 200 students.

"There was a bed and breakfast, four or five shops, and a small
supermarket," Lawphongpanich said. "Today, Google map shows
a slightly bigger town, but the Lawrence Academy still looks very
similar to what I remember." According to its website, the school
now has a student population of approximately 400 students.

He was sent to Lawrence Academy because his parents
thought his lack of focus and poor performance in school would
make it difficult for him to compete well in Thailand's university
entrance examination. Lawphongpanich graduated from the
Lawrence Academy and was accepted to Cornell University for his
undergraduate studies.

While at Cornell, Lawphongpanich grew interested in operations
research and industrial engineering. He said the interest in these
subject areas came out of necessity because he did not like
coursesin biology, physics, and chemistry. He preferred those with
more of a mathematical and analytical focus to him they require
less memorization.

"I remember hating these three subjects because they required
lots of memorization such as the scientific names for plants, body
organs, and the periodic table of elements, including the different
measurement systems, British versus metrics," Lawphongpanich
said.

He completed his bachelor's degree at Cornell in the School of
A .11e N W-


Toi Lawphongpanich atthe College of Engineering, UF


Operations Research and Industrial Engineering, or SORIE. He went
on to finish a master's degree in mathematical sciences from the
Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and a Ph.D. in industrial and
systems engineering from the University of Florida.

After earning his Ph.D., Lawphongpanich remained at UF
as a visiting assistant professor for one year. During that time,
his dissertation received the TSL Dissertation Prize from the
Transportation Science and Logistics Society, a society within the
Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences or
INFORMS. Before returning to UF in 2002 as a faculty member, he
was the Chief of Strategic Planning Section at Bangkok Bank Limited
for two years and taught at the Operations Research Department of
the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterrey, Calif., for 10 years.

His interest in transportation developed while working on his
doctoral dissertation at UF. He was tasked with developing efficient
algorithmsforfinding an equilibrium traffic flow distribution in large
road networks. His adviser at the time, professor Donald Hearn, now
an emeritus faculty, had received some funding from the National
Science Foundation (NSF) to do the research. Hearn was also
affiliated with the transportation program at UF.

"When I started working on this, I knew nothing about the traffic
equilibrium problem," Lawphongpanich said. "Don Hearn gave me
a stack of about 20 papers and told me to read them. That is how I
learned about the problem and what had been done previously."

From then on, his interests blossomed in transportation science
and large-scale optimization. Lawphongpanich said these two areas
often complement each other because problems in transportation
science are often very large.

As a professor at UF, Lawphongpanich dedicates his time to
collaborating on congestion-pricing research projects with his
colleague and friend, Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., an assistant professor in
the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering's transportation
program.

As a professor at UF, Lawphongpanich dedicates his time to
collaborating on congestion pricing research projects with his
colleague and friend, Yafeng Yin, Ph.D., an assistant professor in
the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering. Yin enjoys the
partnership in research and the friendship it has sparked.

"I feel very fortunate to have him as a collaborator," Yin said. "We
share the same research interests and our skill sets complement
each other. I've learned a lot from the collaboration. Toi has been a
good mentor and a close friend to me."

Lawphongpanich was introduced to congestion pricing while
collaborating on a grant with his former doctoral dissertation
adviser. Along with Yin, Lawphongpanich is considered an expert
in the congestion pricing field. However, he is modest.

"When compared to my colleague professorYafeng Yin, I am really
just a newcomer to the field of congestion mitigation," he said.

Currently, Lawphongpanich, in collaboration with Yin, is working


CMS SPRING 2011 9







on two projects funded by the Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT). One of the projects involve dynamic message signs or
DMS, the signs that one often sees along highways that display
information such as travel times to various destinations, work zone
warnings, hazardous conditions and special events. They are also
used for Amber and law enforcement alerts.

"Our research is concerned with developing a systematic
approach for planning, deploying and operating these DMS in the
most efficient manner," Lawphongpanich said.

The second project is related to congestion or road pricing.
Lawphongpanich explained that the original objective of road
pricing is to "promote a more efficient utilization of congested
roads." Road pricing over the years has been used to accomplish
other objectives such as reducing emissions, and he said that many
have argued that simple pricing structures are not flexible enough
to accomplish multiple objectives simultaneously. The goal of the
Lawphongpanich-Yin congestion pricing project is to consider a
more flexible road pricing structure and to study how well it can
accomplish two or more objectives, simultaneously.

In his role as an educator, Lawphongpanich teaches two courses:
introduction to industrial and systems engineering and linear
programming and network optimization. He also has taught
nonlinear programming, network optimization, large-scale
optimization, probability, statistics, stochastic models, industrial
quality control, operations research and location theory.

Collaboration with other departments is important in industrial
and systems engineering, Lawphongpanich said, because the field
often deals with finding ways to do things better, e.g., in less time,
with less cost, with high benefits, with more profits, etc.

"Many in our field devote themselves to finding better and faster
techniques and algorithms to solve problems," he said. "To be useful
and relevant, the problems we solve should be practical and one


way of finding practical problems to solve is to collaborate with
people from other fields."

CMS Director Lily Elefteriadou has been very pleased with the
contributions Lawphongpanich has made in thefouryears since the
CMS was founded. She is delighted he is a member of the center's
Internal Steering Committee and has contributed to the field of
transportation.

"Toi is an excellent researcher and a wonderful individual,"
Elefteriadou said. "He is very innovative, as well as thoughtful, and he
brings a significant amount of enthusiasm and creativity to the CMS.
His collaborative work with CCE's Yafeng Yin and their contributions
to congestion pricing the past few years have been tremendous."

Lawphongpanich has been at UFsince January2002. He is a member
of the CMS'Internal Steering Committee and TRB's Congestion Pricing
Committee.


10 1CMS SPRING 2011






















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Annual Student

Conference


ach year in March, the CMS showcases the latest
in transportation-related research conducted by
graduate students at the University of Florida.
Students from the departments of civil engineering, industrial
and systems engineering, urban and regional planning,
occupational therapy, environmental engineering and other
related disciplineareas attend and/or present papers and posters.
The conference is free and open to transportation professionals
in academia, and in the private and government sectors. Awards
are given to students for outstanding presentations and posters.
This year, students from the departments of epidemiology, civil
and coastal engineering, and urban and regional planning won
awards for their presentations. Students from environmental
engineering and civil and coastal engineering won awards for
posters. The judges presiding over the awards selection were
members of the CMS' External Advisory Board. The CMS Annual
Student Conference is held in conjunction with the center's
External Advisory Board meeting. For more information, visit:
http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/news events/2011 student conference.


Presentations:


1st Place- Yanning Wang, Ph.D. student, epidemiology
Title: Validity and Usability of a Safe-Driving Behavior
Measure for Older Adults: Strategy for Congestion
Mitigation
2nd Place Ruoniu (Vince) Wang, Ph.D. student, urban and
regional planning
Title: Measuring Urban Form and Examining Its Relationship
to Traffic Congestion in Florida
3rdPlace- Dimitra Michalaka, Ph.D. student, civil and coastal
engineering
Title: Enhancing CORSIM for Simulating High Occupancy/
Toll Lanes Operations
Posters:
1st Place Ori Baber, Ph.D. student, environmental
engineering
Title: Investigation into thelnhalation ToxicityofConstituents
of Automobile Exhaust using an Innovated in-vitro Exposure
Technique
2nd Place Brett Fuller, M.S. student, civil and coastal
engineering
Title: Integration of Toll Plaza Analysis into CORSIM
3rd Place Kwangkyun Lim, Ph.D. student, civil and coastal
engineering
Title: A Comparative Analysis of Alternate Econometric
Structures for Trip-Generation Models


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CMS SPRING 2011 13








1
I?-


1. What was the career path that led you to your
current position at the NIH?
My current position involves research and grant/contract
administration related to how environments influence diet,
weight, and physical activity and how in turn these three factors
influence health. I have a Ph.D. in biology; after seven years of
research and teaching related to the biological effects of global
warming, I received a cancer prevention fellowship. Thefellowship
supported a one-year master's in public health (MPH) and three
years of research at NCI.

2. What is the most challenging aspect of your
job?
A big challenge in my job is making sense of the federal statistical
system. There are more than 70 federal agencies that produce
statistical information, and a major part of my work has been to
try to make a small part of this data better, to find creative ways to
use the data, and to foster efforts to connect different elements of
the data literally or conceptually.

3. What has been the most rewarding experience
of your career?
It is hard to think of the No. 1 moment, but a few years ago at the
TRB annual meeting a fellow approached me and said more or
less, "I wanted to tell you that after hearing your speech two years
ago, I went home, changed my research emphasis, wrote a grant
and received a million dollars." That was a terrific feeling to think
that I had really inspired and motivated someone.

4. What do you consider the biggest challenges of
the future for sustainability?
At the moment I think a big challenge is linking sustainability
to other shared goals. We have a hard time individually and
collectively pursuing goals where the benefits are in the
future and/or largely accrue to other people. If we can mix up
sustainability-related goals with shorter-term health, economic
and aesthetic goals in coherent packages, we might do better at
fostering the long-term goal of sustainability.

5. What are the major transportation challenges
in U.S. as they pertain to sustainability? How
can we overcome those?
I think I will leave this question to transportation experts. From a
health standpoint, active transportation via walking and bicycling
has large health and sustainability benefits, and I thinkour nation's
low population density in many areas is a major challenge to this
goal.

6. Advice for the CMS' efforts on sustainability?
Keep reaching out across multiple disciplines.

7. What scientific knowledge is necessary in order
to study or research sustainability?
Obviously a lot of knowledge, but maybe a greater effort to


incorporate behavioral science, and behavioral economics would
be timely. Engineering and ecology will get us to good policy and
behavioral options, but we need to get people and institutions to
adopt these policies.

8. What can the U.S. do to increase the use of mass
transit?
I don't have any deep insights into this important question, but
I personally hope that a combination of rising energy costs and
changing social normswill help increaseinvestment in mass transit
and foster changes in planning that lead to greater availability
and use of transit. I especially like the idea of putting bicycles into
the mix, and the recent success of the Capital Bikeshare program
is heartening.

9. What can transportation professionals do to
improve active living?
I recently read an older text by Thomas F. Saarinen (Environmental
Planning, Perception and Behavior). Saarinen emphasizes the idea
of 'Design as Experiment' with "Design for human well-being ...
an iterative process constantly modified and moving toward
more appropriate conditions." I am confident that if overall
environmental, community and individual health goals continue
to be integrated into more traditional transportation, that we can
improve some of the less-desirable features of the U.S. landscapes
that have emerged as an unintended consequence of past
policies.

10. What advice do you have for students who are
interested in a career related to sustainability?
My advice is a little generic but beyond good technical skills: 1)
Work as hard as you can to become a good writer nothing else
you do will help your career as much; 2) Be helpful to your peers,
your colleagues and your community; this will pay long term
dividends in your capacity to make things happen.


David Berrigan in Mexico on the Yucatan Peninsula.


141 CMS SPRING 2011








Student Awards
Congratulations to our CMS-affiliatedstudents for receiving various
awards this semester!

Grady Carrick, Student of the Year Award, CUTC Awards Banquet,
Washington, D.C., January 2011

Dimitra Michalaka, 2010-2011 WTS Central Florida Chapter,
Frankee Hellinger Graduate Scholarship, Orlando, Fla., February
2011

Ly Nguyen, 2011 WTS Central Florida Chapter Frankee Hellinger
Leadership Undergraduate Scholarship, Orlando, Fla., February
2011

Yanning Wang, Research Excellence Award, College of Public
Health and Health Professions (PHHP) Research Day, March 2011




The newly formed WTS student chapter at University of Florida has gained momentum this semester. Members have attended
conferences, planned activities, set agendas for future projects and recruited members. Seven students joined the chapter as of
January 2011, and new officers were elected.

Key activities this semester included a trip to the 90th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Washington, D.C.,
by graduate students Dimitra Michalaka, Zhuofei Li and Cuie Lu. Both Michalaka and Lu presented papers at the conference. Michalaka,
along with Li, attended the WTS International reception, which was held at the Marriott Wardman Park hotel, and where they had the
opportunity to interact and network with transportation professionals. In April, the chapter mobilized to host a Resume Development
and Interview Workshop, which included Mary Medina, assistant director for employer development at UF's Career Resource Center,
and Billy Cottrell, an editor from the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering. The event was very well attended, and included a
three-hour fundraiser event at Red Mango, a local frozen yogurt company, which agreed to donate 10 percent of sales to the student
chapter.

High on the student chapter's agenda is the WTS/U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S.DOT) Tansportation You program, an outreach
action plan for girls ages 13 to 18. This effort is being led by Leslie Washburn, PE., CMS workforce development coordinator. The WTS
UF student chapter will team up with Washburn and also assist her with other activities related to K-12 students.

To find more about WTS UF Student Chapter, go to Facebook and search for WTS UF Student Chapter (URL http://www.facebook.com/
pages/WTS-UF-Student-Chapter/197365740303159) or visit the chapter website at https://sites.google.com/site/wtsufstudentchapter/












. . .


Clockwise: Winners of the 2010-2011 WTS Central Chapter (Orlando) student awards, Ly Nguyen and Dimitra Michalaka; the WTS UF Student Chapter along
with Mary Medina from the UF CareerCenter(at right, front row); Mary Medina of the UF Career Center (left) listensto Ashish Kulshrestha discuss his resume.


CMS SPRING 2011 15









Multimodol
Solutions for Congestion Mitigation
University of Florida

Center for Multimodal Solution for Congestion Mitigation
512 Weil Hall
P.O. Box 116580
Gainesville, FL 32611-6580
Phone: 352.392.9537, Ext. 1450
Fax: 352.846.1699
http://cms.ce.ufl.edu


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