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 Title Page
 Cover story
 Authorization
 Table of Contents
 Executive summary
 Introduction
 Teaching
 Research
 Service
 Administration
 Appendix






Group Title: Annual report of the Shimberg Center for Housing Studies
Title: Annual report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087014/00007
 Material Information
Title: Annual report
Series Title: Annual report
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
Publisher: Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2003
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087014
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Cover story
        Page ii
    Authorization
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    Executive summary
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Teaching
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Research
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Service
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Administration
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Appendix
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
Full Text
















ANNUAL REPORT

of the

SHIMBERG CENTER FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING


M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Building Construction
College of Design, Construction, and Planning
University of Florida
P. O. Box 115703
Gainesville, Florida 32611-5703

December 2003










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


Cover Story

The Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing is administratively attached to the M. E. Rinker, Sr. School
of Building Construction in the College of Design, Construction and Planning at the University of Florida.
On October 14th the School of Building Construction held a dedication ceremony for the newly
constructed M. E. Rinker, Sr. Hall. The new Rinker Hall also serves as the new home of the Shimberg
Center.

The $10 million, 47,270-square-foot building is special in its own right. It is one of about 600 buildings
built nationwide that are certified under a national standard known as Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED). Rinker Hall is designed to use half the energy of other buildings its size
and just a fraction of the water. Most of the building's components were recycled, came from responsibly
managed forests, or can someday be reused in another building. The classrooms, labs, and offices were
built with materials selected because they don't emit chemicals tied to so-called sick building syndrome.
Other steps ensure against mold or other biological pathogens. Abundant windows, airy classrooms, and a
sky-lit atrium make the building more pleasant than futuristic.

The Shimberg Center's main office is located in Rinker Hall, room 203. Three of the Center's faculty
members are located in individual offices on the third floor and four graduate students are located in room
320.

Correspondence sent to the Center should employ the following address:


Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
P. O. Box 115703
Gainesville, FL 32611-5703

The shipping address for the Center is:


University of Florida Campus
Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
Rinker Hall, Room 203
Gainesville, FL 32611










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


AUTHORIZATION

The Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing in the College of Design, Construction, and
Planning, Rinker School of Building Construction, at the University of Florida was created by
the Florida legislature in 1988. The text of Section 1004.46, Florida Statutes, establishing the
Center and as amended by the William E. Sadowski Affordable Housing Act of 1992 reads:

The Board ofRegents shall establish the Multidisciplinary Center for
Affordable H.I ,it I ,, ili,, the School of Building Construction of the College
ofArchitecture of the University of Florida with the collaboration of other
related disciplines such as agriculture, business administration, engineering,
law, and medicine. The center shall work in conjunction with other colleges in
the State University System. The Multidisciplinary Center for I. I' .4,/...
Housing shall:

(a) Conduct research il,,, to the problems and solutions associated
with the availability of affordable housing in the state forfamilies who
are below the median income level and widely disseminate the results
ofsuch research to appropriate public and private audiences in the
state. Such research shall emphasize methods to improve the
planning, design, and production of lorrdahble housing, including, but
not limited to, the financial, maintenance, management, and
regulatory aspects ofresidential development.
(b) Provide public services to local, regional, and state agencies, units of
government, and authorities by helping them create regulatory
climates that are amendable to the introduction ofattirchlble housing
within their jurisdictions.
(c) Conduct special research i,. air,,, to fire safety.
(d) Provide afocus for the teaching of new technology and skills i,. ii,,I
to affordable housing in the state.
(e) Develop a base of informational and financial support from the
private sector for the activities of the center.
(f) Develop prototypes for both multifamily and single-family units.
(g) Establish a research agenda and general work plan in cooperation
with the Department of Community Affairs, which is the state agency
responsible for research and planning for alttrcihlle housing and for
training and technical assistance for providers of affordable housing.
(h) Submit a report to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the
Speaker of the House ofRepresentatives by January 1 of each year.
The annual report shall include information ,. l, ,1 to the activities
of the center, including collaborative efforts with public and private
entities, allittrdible housing models, and any other findings and
recommendations related to the production ofsafe, decent, and
oIttirdhble housing.

This Annual Report has been prepared and submitted in response to and in accordance with
Section 1004.46(h), F.S.










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing




CONTENTS




Section Page

C over Page .................................................................................................................................................... i
C over Story .................................................................................................................................................. ii
AUTHORIZATION................................................................................................................................... iii
CONTENTS ....................................................................................................................................... iv
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................... v

INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................... 1

TEACHING................................................................................................................................................2
Undergraduate Courses........................................................................................2
Graduate Courses ............... ...................................... ....... ..3
Graduate Students ............... .................... ................... ......... 3

RESEARCH.......................................................................................................... 4
Tampa Community Outreach Office........................................................................ 4
Special Needs Housing Research.............................................................................5
Public Housing Authorities Research....................................... ................................ 5
Housing Summit................................................................................................. 5
DCA Impact Fee Proportionality Project......................................................................6
Workforce Housing in Islamorada............................................................................6
Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse...........................................................................6
State of Florida's Housing ..................................................................................... 7
Privatization of Plan Reviews & Inspections............................................................... 8
Windstorm Damage Mitigation Training & Demonstration Centers......................................8
Energy Characteristics of New Homes in Florida.........................................................8
Various Projects................................................................................................. 8

SERVICE............................................................................................................. 9
Community Statistical Systems............................................................................... 9
Dissemination...................................................................................................10

ADMINISTRATION.............................................................................................11
Financial...........................................................................................................11
Personnel..........................................................................................................12

APPENDIX A.....................................................................................................13
Affordable Housing ISSUES Newsletter.................................................................13
Technical Note Series.........................................................................................14
Research Reports..............................................................................................15









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Shimberg Center completed establishment of a graduate level certificate program in
affordable housing that will be available to students from across the university. The Center
continues to work on a masters degree program in housing and community development that will
be a distance-learning program, delivered over the Internet, to professionals whose work is
related to housing. Opportunities to work with several partners are being explored and a draft
curriculum plan has been developed.


During 2003 the Shimberg Center established a Community Outreach Office in Tampa. The
Outreach Office is located in a facility owned by the Tampa Housing Authority and represents a
collaborative effort of the Institute of Urban Policy and Commerce, Florida A&M University;
Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing, University of Florida; and the School of Social Work,
University of South Florida. The goal of the Outreach Office is to house community
development efforts of the three universities in a single location in order to provide a coordinated
outreach function building on the strengths of each university. The Center also began collection
of information about housing opportunities for persons with disabilities with an initial
concentration of the role of public housing authorities. A housing summit is planned for early
2004 to bring together professionals who serve persons with disabilities and executive directors
of Florida's public housing authorities. Other studies examined implementation of the
privatization of plans review and construction inspection that is described in s. 553.791, Florida
Statutes, and assessment of the impact of Florida requiring a proportional, rather the flat rate,
impact fee as a means of stimulating affordable housing production.


In 2003, the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing worked with the support of The Ford
Foundation to coordinate the establishment of a national CSS Network and knowledge
clearinghouse. The mission of the CSS Network will be to promote the development, adoption,
and effective use of community statistical systems within the United States. This effort will
continue through 2004. Included in the Center's service activities was the production of six
more newsletters and seven technical reports. All material continues to be available through the
Internet at www.shimberg.ufl.edu.










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


Staffing stands at ten professionals plus four graduate research assistants and one doctoral student.
Support for the staff came from the University ($260,044) plus a combination from foundations, the
Center's endowments, and contracted research totaling $310,880. It is interesting to note that the backlog
of contract research as of December in FY2004 stood at over $537,700.














INTRODUCTION


The 1988 legislative initiative that established the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing envisioned a
multi-disciplinary organization capable of addressing a broad range of housing and community
development topics. In order to respond to this charge, the Shimberg Center has focused its effort in four
housing-related areas:


Housing Technology Since its establishment, the Center has examined housing affordability, housing
condition, inclusionary housing, impact fees, land development and land development regulations,
manufactured housing, and community development corporations. It has worked with the Florida
Building Code Commission and other organizations impacted by the establishment of the Florida
Building Code as well as the Existing-Building Code.


Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse The Florida comprehensive planning process requires
jurisdictions to evaluate progress and update their comprehensive plans periodically. Working in
cooperation with the Florida Department of Community Affairs and the Florida Housing Finance
Corporation, the Shimberg Center developed and implemented the Affordable Housing Needs
Assessment model. Exercise of the model and production of the resulting reports about affordable
housing supply and demand offers local jurisdictions an accepted means of evaluating their progress
toward the housing goals described in the Housing Element of their Comprehensive Plans. The
Clearinghouse maintains a database of statewide housing supply and demand data. The database
represents a combination of Census data, Florida property appraiser data, data from Florida's affordable
housing needs assessment, and local program data. All reports that are produced and the data contained
in the Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse database are publicly available on the Internet at
www.shimberg.ufl.edu and by selecting "Fla. Housing Data" link.


Other Research Projects The Clearinghouse has developed an inventory of assisted housing in Florida.
State and local officials, nonprofit housing agencies, and the private market use these data for program
planning and program evaluation. Special data subsets address the housing needs of special population
groups like the elderly, farm workers, and persons with disabilities. Other applications of these data










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


include disaster evacuation planning and predicting potential property losses under different manmade or
natural disaster scenarios.


Teaching Although the Center has taught housing-related courses for several years, a formal
"residential track" within the construction management curriculum of the M. E. Rinker, Sr. School of
Building Construction was approved in 1998 and implemented in 1999. This addition to the curriculum
was the result of requests from the home building industry. Recognizing a need to expand training
opportunities in non-profit management for those working in community development, the Shimberg
Center is also leading an effort to establish a campus-wide undergraduate minor in non-profit
management. This effort is being carried out in association with American Humanics, a national
organization of universities providing educational opportunities for students pursuing careers in the non-
profit sector.


The purpose of this Annual Report is to describe the highlights of the teaching, research, and service activities of the
Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing during the past year. A separate section is presented that describes the
staff members of the Center and the funding for the Center.




TEACHING


Undergraduate Courses
The residential track offered within the Rinker School of Building Construction comprises three required
courses:
* Project Planning and Feasibility exposes the student to the process of producing a proposal for

development of a residential project on a specific site. The proposal includes sections on market
analysis, site analysis, project programming, schematic design, project cost estimate, and financial
feasibility. The final product of this project is a design-build proposal that effectively communicates
project viability in a professional manner.
* Creating Affordable Housing introduces the student to the key factors that have produced changes
in US cities that, in turn, have contributed to the current housing situation. The student gains an
appreciation for ways to reduce the cost of housing delivery, factors in the delivery process (including
regulations, finance, building materials, construction methods) that contribute to affordability
problems, and potential methods to facilitate the delivery of housing that is affordable to the buyer.









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


Upon completion of the course the student will be able to identify potential markets and alternative
financing vehicles for affordable housing. They will be prepared to intervene effectively in
discussions regarding local land use and building regulations.

* Housing Transactions for Homebuilders is modeled on the real estate licensing course and
provides an introduction to ownership rights in real property and limitations on those rights, the
transfer of rights, the process of selling a property including contracts and closing, mortgages,
markets, and valuation of property. The emphasis is on providing the homebuilder with a working
knowledge of the sale and leasing of property. Upon completing the course the students will have an
understanding of mortgage types, market opportunities, and the valuation process. They will also be
able to complete the process of selling property including the documents involved.
Graduate Courses
The Shimberg Center offers a graduate-level course titled Housing Economics and Policy that
familiarizes students with basic theories, concepts, terminology, and issues in housing as well as
examining the factors contributing to housing problems and evaluating housing policies. Upon
completion of the course the student is able to estimate the demand for housing, examine the feasibility of
a housing project, and understand the role of government, lenders, and other institutions in the housing
market.
Graduate Students
The Shimberg Center's faculty either chair or serve on committees supervising students conducting
research and developing dissertations, theses, and terminal projects that are required in partial fulfillment
of the requirements of graduate degrees. In 2002-2003 the Center faculty served on doctoral committees
in Sociology, Building Construction, Civil Engineering, and Food and Resource Economics.


In addition to the graduate-level course in Housing Policy and Finance, the faculty teamed with faculty
from the Rinker School of Building Construction to develop and offer a required graduate course titled
Research Methods in Building Construction. The purpose of this course is to introduce beginning
graduate students to the task of preparing a dissertation, thesis, or master's paper. It also provides a
review of basic statistical methods that many of the graduate students will need in conducting their
research.


At the graduate level, a certificate program in affordable housing has been approved which is available to
students from such disciplines as real estate, public administration, planning, and law. The center
continues to work on a masters degree program in housing and community development. This degree









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


program will be a distance-learning program, delivered over the Internet, to professionals whose work is
related to housing. Opportunities to work with several partners are being explored and a draft curriculum
plan has been developed.


The Shimberg Center is also working on a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Neighborhood
Reinvestment Corporation to jointly develop a degree program in housing and community building. The
MOU forms the basis for a relationship between the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation's training
institutes and the university's program.


RESEARCH


Since the passage of the William E. Sadowski Affordable Housing Act of 1992, the research activities of
the Shimberg Center have been coordinated with the activities of the Florida Department of Community
Affairs. Presented below are summaries of new and continuing research projects that were active during
2002-2003 at the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing.
Tampa Community Outreach Office
The Tampa Community Outreach Office, located in West Tampa in a facility owned by the Tampa
Housing Authority, is a collaborative effort of the Institute of Urban Policy and Commerce, Florida A&M
University; Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing, University of Florida; and the School of Social
Work, University of South Florida. The goal of the Outreach Office is to house community development
efforts of the three universities in a single location to provide a coordinated outreach function building on
the strengths of each university. Specifically, the center would provide:
Technical assistance to local governments and nonprofit organizations
Applied research, including community data base development and GIS mapping
Project displays and resources
Broaden the resource base on community development initiatives
Provide a forum for training and a data base for regional partners
Internship placements for students

Workshops and symposia
Support to the Tampa Housing Authority and the Homeownership Center
Support city and county government housing and community development strategies
Compilation of best practices models









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


Provide space for other partners and funders
The benefits of cooperative work across the universities have become apparent through past collaborative
efforts, and the goal of this agreement is to formalize the cooperation between the university centers.
Through this cooperative arrangement, the resources of the three universities will be brought to
community development issues in the Tampa Bay region and the uniqueness of the partnership will create
opportunities for increased foundation and federal funding and support.
Special-Needs Housing Research
The Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing begun implementation of a special-needs housing research
agenda in 2003. This agenda was developed in collaboration with supportive housing experts and service
providers. Research thus far has focused on how public housing authorities use their resources to serve
persons with disabilities, as well as on specialized demographics related to persons with disabilities and
elderly citizens that will be made available on the Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse in the coming
months. Ongoing research efforts include participation in a statewide initiative that will create a web-
based inventory of currently available rental housing accessible to person with disabilities.
Public Housing Authorities Research
The Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing is currently under contract with the Florida Association of
Housing and Redevelopment Officials (FAHRO) to study a number of issues related to the
implementation of federal housing policy and programs at the local level. These issues include an analysis
of public housing authority performance in the administration of both public housing units and housing
choice (Section 8) vouchers. Other issues included in the research focus include an analysis of selected
financial issues and overcoming barriers to effective management.


In addition, the Shimberg Center is working in partnership with Florida A&M University and the
University of South Florida under contract with the Tampa Housing Authority for the evaluation of its
HOPE VI development, Belmont Heights. The partnership will continue its efforts to perform this type of
community outreach and research in the coming months.
Housing Summit
Plans are underway at the Shimberg Center for a February 2004 housing summit that is intended to open a
dialogue between professionals who serve persons with disabilities and executive directors of Florida's
public housing authorities. This meeting is Florida's first effort to bring together statewide leadership
from both groups for facilitated discussion of key issues regarding how persons with disabilities are
served with federal programs administered through local public housing authorities.









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


DCA Impact Fee Proportionality Project
The Shimberg Center has been funded by the Department of Community Affairs to develop and provide
demographic information for local governments that will enhance their ability to respond to
recommendations contained in the Governor's Affordable Housing Study Commission's 2002 Report.
This report included recommendations that local governments use proportional impact fees based on a
number of factors, including dwelling size. Following these recommendations may facilitate production
of housing products affordable to more of Florida's citizens.
Workforce Housing in Islamorada
Working as a subcontractor on a study of workforce housing issues in Islamorada, FL, the Shimberg
Center is using its data set for the community, supplemented by labor force, employment, and other data,
to examine housing needs and jobs/housing issues. Islamorada presents unique issues due to the
construction limitations and housing costs in the Keys.
The Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse
The origin of the Clearinghouse was with the Governor's Affordable Housing Study Commission. At the
Commission's urging a working group of stakeholders that included representatives from local
governments, regional entities, housing advocates, groups such as the Florida Home Builders Association
and the Florida Association of Realtors, and state agencies was organized in 2000. The Housing Data
Clearinghouse was created to provide public access to data on housing need and supply from a variety of
sources. These data sources include the U.S. Census and other population and housing surveys carried
out by the federal government; the Affordable Housing Needs Assessment; and federal, state, and local
program data.


In addition to providing housing data, the Clearinghouse is building the capacity, or infrastructure, to
collect, produce, and store this information for easy public access. Over time anyone will be able to
obtain data, run reports, and perform data analysis by going to the Clearinghouse website. Indeed, the
Affordable Housing Needs Assessment, which is the data and analysis package prepared for each local
government to aid them with their comprehensive planning responsibilities, will be accessed by all on this
website.


The Clearinghouse will take about five years to get fully operational, and the Shimberg Center at the
University of Florida is the lead organization in its development. To ensure that the Clearinghouse
provides access to the most needed data products and services, the Shimberg Center regularly confers









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


with an advisory committee made up of end users. The FY2003-2004 state contract is $252,900, using
monies from the State and the Local Housing Trust Fund plus another $150,000 contributed as by the
Shimberg Center from its own resources.


The responsibilities of the Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse include:
* Creating a data "warehouse" to store data for use by the public;
* Designing a website which allows for user-friendly access to housing data;
* Promoting standard formats to collect and share local housing data;
* Preparing the Affordable Housing Needs Assessment;
* Creating neighborhood-level affordable housing data;
* Preparing an annual report on the "State of Florida's Housing" to provide perspective on trends and
conditions in housing at the state, regional and local level;
* Preparing a statewide rental market study for the Florida Housing Finance Corporation; and
* Creating an integrated database of federal, state, and local assisted housing data.

State of Florida's Housing
The Shimberg Center produced the fourth annual report titled The State ofFlorida's Housing, 2003. The
report is a compendium of facts on Florida's housing. Faculty from Florida Atlantic University and
Florida State University made major contributions to the production of the report. The data highlight the
tremendous diversity in housing characteristics across the state, particularly between the 35 urban
counties and the 32 rural counties, as well as between coastal and non-coastal counties. The
characteristics of Florida's housing reflect the characteristics of the state's population. The population of
the state is growing, creating a demand for additional housing, yet that growth is not distributed uniformly
across the state. Growth is most often a coastal phenomenon. Further, the nature of the growth differs
across the state as characterized by age, income, race, ethnicity, and county of origin. In addition to a
wealth of information on the characteristics of Florida's housing stock by county, the report also includes
a chapter on Florida's dynamic population and household changes in the decade between the 1990 and
2000 Census and the effect of those changes on housing as well as chapters on housing prices and
affordability and house price trends.
Privatization of Plan Reviews & Inspections
The Florida Building Code Commission issued a contract to the Shimberg Center to evaluate the
implementation of the provisions of s.553.791, Florida Statutes, which was implemented in October 2002.
This statute allowed building owners to hire their own plan reviewers and building construction









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


inspectors rather than rely upon the reviewers and inspectors of the local jurisdiction. A telephone survey
of building officials found thirteen jurisdictions that had experienced the exercise of this provision.
Interviews with the thirteen local jurisdictions plus with commercial and residential builder associations,
the building official association, and with engineering firms offering the plan review and inspection
services found no consensus about the benefits of 553.791. Some jurisdictions indicated that privatizing
the review and inspection tasks were working quite well while others regarded it as a disaster. The lack
of experience with the privatization process and the quick-turnaround nature of the evaluation study led to
the recommendation that the Commission initiate a project to develop consensus recommendations for
revisions and enhancements that will improve the effectiveness of this code support system.
Windstorm Damage Mitigation Training & Demonstration Centers
During 2003 negotiations took place with Broward County for the fourth Windstorm Damage Mitigation
Training & Demonstration Center. The primary purpose of these centers is to create a statewide network
of training and demonstration sites for improving the wind resistance of existing and newly constructed
homes. The Shimberg Center serves as the administrator of the program working with an architect, civil
engineering firm, and construction manager. All land development and construction tasks are performed
by local contractors selected from the regions in which the facilities are built. Once completed, the
Department of Financial Services turns the building over to the county. Once operational, the county
must agree to operate and maintain the building. The only stipulation is that the county utilize the facility
primarily for activities that will improve the wind resistance of both existing and newly constructed
homes.
Energy Characteristics of New Homes in Florida
Since February 2001, the Shimberg Center has received and processed the Energy Code Compliance
Forms from every permit-issuing jurisdiction in Florida. A five percent random sample of the forms
describing newly constructed single-family and multi-family residential buildings is drawn. As a result,
the Center is able to publish periodic reports summarizing the energy conserving characteristics of new
homes in Florida. These periodic reports illustrate changes over time as well as by major climatic region
of the state. The most recent report is dated November 2003 and is titled Energy-related C hiiL,,, I s/ s
ofMulti-family Housing Construction in Florida 2003. This and other publications of the Center are
available on the Internet at www.shimberg.ufl.edu.
Various Projects
The Shimberg Center is a participant on a multi-disciplinary, multi-year research study of the impact of
Florida's growth management legislation on rural areas in the state. The study is examining the use,









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


property value, and financial implications of growth management. It is funded by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.


The Sarasota Office of Housing & Community development commissioned the Center to study issues
affecting mortgage defaults among low-income households receiving down payment assistance through
both the SHIP and HOME programs.


Non-funded research includes studies of the implications of concurrency for housing in the state, the
sustainability of low-income household homeownership, cost savings resulting from energy efficiency in
homeownership, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, and measuring housing need, estimating housing
rehabilitation needs, and implications of the Save Our Homes amendment.


SERVICE


The Shimberg Center is called upon by many organizations and communities to participate in working
groups, to speak on issues related to the delivery of affordable housing, or to serve as an information
resource and referral center. These requests for assistance span a range of topics such as building
technology, building regulations, land development, financing, consumer education, and more.
Responding appropriately to these requests is an important function of the Center in its efforts to
encourage and facilitate the production of affordable housing throughout Florida.
Community Statistical Systems
In 2002 the Ford Foundation and the Fannie Mae Foundation provided funding for the Shimberg Center
to organize and conduct a national conference titled "Next Generation of Community Statistical
Systems." In this context community statistical systems (CSS) are multi-topic, multi-source, publicly
available databases that enable community residents and local decision-makers to be better informed
about current and historical neighborhood and local conditions.


In 2004, the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing worked with the support of The Ford Foundation
to coordinate the establishment of a national CSS Network and knowledge clearinghouse. The mission of
the CSS Network will be to promote the development, adoption, and effective use of community
statistical systems within the United States. The short-term goals of this effort are:









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


* Facilitating relationships-The CSS Network will encourage relationship building between and
among researchers, advocates, and data providers as well as between and among government
agencies, nonprofits, and for-profits. It will do so through a variety of interactive mechanisms,
including a major conference in 2003 and smaller workshops on specific topics through the year.
Establishing a listserv will provide an electronic forum for information exchange.

* Providing technical information-The CSS Network will gather, organize, and disseminate
technical information of value to practitioners, advocates, and researchers including professional
standards and practices, information on activities in the field, and updates regarding various data
sources. Dissemination will take advantage of existing journals and electronic web sites.

* Promoting CSS as a valuable tool-The Network will have a marketing function, seeking to
convince leading national opinion leaders and resource providers regarding the value and legitimacy
of community statistical systems and encouraging local nonprofits and governments to establish such
systems.

* Facilitating access to funding-The CSS Network will aid researchers and local developers of
community statistical systems in identifying potential sources of funding support by assembling a
compendium of foundations and other organizations that have a history of providing such support.
Dissemination
Volume XIII of the Center's bi-monthly newsletter titled, Affordable Housing ISSUES, included the
following topics:
December 2002 Measuring Sprawl & Its Impact
February 2003 Top Ten State & Local Strategies to Increase Affordable Housing Supply
April 2003 Predatory Lending
June 2003 Impact of Construction & Real Estate on Florida's Economy
August 2003 Florida's Single-family Housing Supply
October 2003 New Office Location

In addition, the following reports were produced by the Center:
Energy Related Characteristics ofNew Home Construction in Florida (Revised)
Impact of Real Estate on the Florida Economy Update for 2002
Impact of Real Estate on the Florida Economy Update for 2003
Public Housing Authorities: An Analysis ofPractices and Resources for Serving Disabled
Persons
Energy Related Characteristics ofNew Home Construction in Florida 2003
The Impact of Real Estate on the Alachua County Economy
Energy Related Characteristics ofMulti-family Housing Construction in Florida 2003










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


All newsletters and reports are available publicly on the Internet at the Center's web site at www.shimberg.ufl.edu
buy clicking on either "Fla Housing Data" or "Publications" on the home page.



ADMINISTRATION

Financial
The funds that support the Shimberg Center's activities come from three sources: 1) state funds, 2)

endowment earnings, and 3) contracts and grants. During the fiscal year 30 June 2004, the Shimberg

Center for Affordable Housing received $260,044 for salaries & benefits, for other expenses, and other

personnel services funds from the University of Florida. The distribution of these funds by expense
category for fiscal 1998 through 2004 is shown below.


FiIcalmjs --I 1 l''-i'i 2im- 2,001 C.092 2,,^ 2nri4
Total $238,146 $245,007 $262,020 $248,715 $253,175 $255,684 $260.044
Expense category
Salaries & benefits 83% 85% 81% 81% 87% 91% 92%%
Other personnel 10% 11% 11% 10% 10% 2% 2%

Other expenses 7% 4% 7% 6% 3% 6% 6%
Operating capital 2% 1% 1% -
outlay
Unexpended 2% -


The annual estimated earnings from the endowments that are administered by the University of Florida

Foundation for the Shimberg Center provide another $89,400 for the support of faculty and graduate
research assistants plus approximately $8,000 per year for discretionary uses. The Center's two
endowments are:

Ida Rogero Childre Fellowship/Assistantship in Affordable Housing

James H. Shimberg Professorships/Fellowships Endowment & Discretionary Endowment

The other source of funding for the Center is contract or grant supported activities. In FY2002-2003 the

total contract and grant awards received from federal agencies, from state agencies, and from foundations
came to $310,880. (Note: Although FY 2004 is only half over, the backlog of funded activities has
reached $537,711.) Combining FY 2003 funded research with the FY 2004 University and UF
Foundation funding, the Center leverages the state funds by over a 2:1 ration.









2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


Personnel
Dr. Robert C. Stroh, Sr. continues to serve as director of the Center and Dr. Marc T. Smith continues as
associate director. Office administration and secretarial support are provided by Ms. Linda Stanley.


Mr. William O'Dell continues as manager of the Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse project and Mr.
James Martinez continues as coordinator of computer applications and implementation of Internet access
to the Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse. Ms. Diep Nguyen is the principal programmer for
Clearinghouse database development. Mr. Jason Boxman is the Center's newest programmer working on
computer application development. Mr. Douglas White, economist, is focusing on the development of
models that can assess housing condition from existing data, housing database development and other
housing research projects, and is the principal author of The State of Florida's Housing. Ms. Anne
Lockwood Williamson is coordinator of research programs and services and she serves as principal
investigator for special-needs housing research and co-principal investigator for a study of impact fee
proportionality.


The Shimberg Center also supports one doctoral student -Virginia Batista as well as three master's
degree students-Paul Archacki and Rob Burnett. The third master's degree student, Michael Madariaga,
will join the Shimberg Team in January 2004.










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


APPENDIX A

List of Publications


Affordable Housing ISSUES Newsletter


2003
Oct New Office Location
Aug Florida's Single-family Housing Supply
Jun Impact of Construction & Real Estate on
Florida's Economy
Apr Predatory Lending
Feb Top Ten State & Local Strategies to
Increase Affordable Housing Supply

2002
Dec Measuring Sprawl & Its Impact
Oct Mold
Aug The State of Florida's Housing, 2002
Jun Local Economic Contribution of Home
Building
Apr Exemption from Ad Valorem Taxation for
Affordable Housing
Feb Assessing Outcomes

2001
Dec Community Land Trust

2000
Oct 13th Annual Statewide Housing Conf.
Aug Three HUD Housing Programs
Jun The State of Florida's Housing, 2000
Apr Social Benefit & Cost of Homeownership
Feb Rehabilitation Subcode

1999
Dec Design Matters in Affordable Housing
Oct Rental Property Management
Aug Rental Housing Affordability Gap
Jun HUD Community Builder Program
Apr 21st Century Housing Symposium
Feb Regional Training & Demonstration Centers

1998
Dec Affordable Housing Alternatives
Oct Affordable Housing Through Historic
Preservation
Aug Florida Housing Data Center
Jun The Positive Effect of Homeownership
Apr Hidden Cost of Inadequate Housing
Feb Community Builders Fellowship


1997
Dec Local Economic Contribution of Home
Building
Oct A Program for Youth at Risk
Aug Housing Assistance in Florida
Jun Affordable Housing Research Needs in
Florida
Apr Fannie Mae Trillion Dollar Commitment
Feb Comprehensive Homeownership Assistance
Program

1996


Dec
Oct
Aug
Jun
Apr
Feb


Estimating Affordable Housing Need
Resident Economic Development Initiative
Rural Development Strategic Plan
Shimberg Center Home Page
1996 Summer Housing Institute
There Goes the Neighborhood?


1995
Dec Florida Housing Coalition: At Work for
Affordable Housing
Oct Affordable Housing Auction
Aug Technical Assistance Providers
Jun One-stop Permitting Process
Apr Defensible Space
Feb Summer Housing Institute 1995

1994
Dec A Visit to Age-Sensitive Housing
Oct Sustaining Housing Affordability
Aug Alternative Residential Building Systems
Jun Public/Private Partnership for Affordable
Housing
Apr Affordability After Occupancy
Feb Housing Trends

1993
Dec Impact Fee Exemption for Affordable
Housing in Florida
Oct Low- and Moderate Income Lending
Experiences
Aug Density Bonuses for Affordable
Housing in Florida
Jun Affordable Housing Advisory
Committee
Apr Homeownership Training
Feb Employer Assisted Housing










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


1992
Dec State Housing Initiatives Partnership
Oct Affordable Housing Indexes An
Overview
Aug Sadowski Affordable Housing Act
Jun Inclusionary Affordable Housing
Apr Jobs/Housing Balance
Feb Single-Room Occupancy (SRO)

1991
Dec Understanding and Neutralizing
NIMBYism
Oct Impact Fees and Affordable Housing
(Spec) Shimberg Commits $1 Million to Housing
Center
Aug Housing Price Impact of Affordable
Housing


Jun The Low Income Housing Tax Credit
Apr Subsidized Housing Inventory
Feb Cost Reducing land Development
Guidelines
1990
Dec Mutual Housing Associations
Oct Financing Schemes
Aug Technical Resources
Jun Keys to Success for Community-based
Development
Apr Affordable Housing Organizations in
Florida
Feb SUS Housing Related Research
1989
Dec Introduction to the Center


Technical Note Series
#03-5 Energy Related Characteristics of Multi-family Housing Construction in Florida 2003
#03-4 Impact of Real Estate on the Alachua County Economy
#03-3 Energy Related Characteristics of New Home Construction 2003
#03-2 Public Housing Authorities: An Analysis of Practices & Resources for Serving Disabled Persons
#03-1 Impact of Real Estate on the Florida Economy Update for 2003
#02-2 Impact of Real Estate on the Florida Economy Update for 2002
#02-1 Energy-Related Characteristics of New Home Construction in Florida (Revised)
#01-4 County Locations of Frail, Low-income Older Persons in Need of Affordable Assisted Living in Florida
#01-2 The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit & Multi-family Bond Financing: A Comparison of State-level
Allocation Policies
#01-1 Inclusionary Housing A Discussion of Policy Issues
#00-2 Alternative Residential Building Systems Second Edition
#00-1 Affordable Housing in Florida, 1999
#99-1 Migrant Farmworker Housing Needs Assessment Methodology
#98-1 Affordable Housing in Florida 1998
#97-1 Affordable Housing in Florida 1997
#95-3 Technical Assistance Resources: Organizations and Publications
#95-2 A Cost Comparison Study Between Steel and Wood Residential Framing Systems
#95-1 .I I../ ,.t/- Housing ISSUES: 1989 1995
#94-4 Bridge Builders: Community Development Intermediary Systems in the United States
#94-3 Demographics, Technology, and the Future of Housing: Preparing for the 21st Century
#94-2 Manufactured Housing in Florida
#94-1 Alternative Residential Construction Systems










2003 Annual Report of the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


#93-1 Impact Fee Usage in Florida
#92-1 Effects of Growth Controls on Housing Prices: A Review of Literature

Research Reports
#93-3 Inclusionary Housing & Density Bonuses for Affordable Housing in Florida: A Survey of Performance
#93-2 Growth Management and Housing
#93-1 Design of Flexible Homes the Contain Future Expansion Capabilities
#92-1 A Layman's Guide to Low-income Housing Tax Credits in Florida




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