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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Background
 Characteristics of the sample
 Cooling systems
 Heating systems
 Ducts and air-handlers
 Water heating
 Exterior walls
 Ceiling insulation
 Window glazing
 Special energy-related feature...






Group Title: Technical note series - University of Florida Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing ; 02-01 (revised)
Title: Energy-related characteristics of new home construction in Florida (Revised)
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 Material Information
Title: Energy-related characteristics of new home construction in Florida (Revised)
Series Title: Technical note series - University of Florida Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing ; 02-01 (revised)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
Publisher: University of Florida Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2002
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Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087012
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Background
        Page 4
    Characteristics of the sample
        Page 4
    Cooling systems
        Page 5
    Heating systems
        Page 6
    Ducts and air-handlers
        Page 7
    Water heating
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Exterior walls
        Page 10
    Ceiling insulation
        Page 11
    Window glazing
        Page 11
    Special energy-related features
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text


















TECHNICAL NOTE SERIES
02-01 (Revised)


September 2002







Prepared by
Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing
Rinker School of Building Construction
College of Design, Construction & Planning
University of Florida
P. O. Box 115703
Gainesville, Florida 32611-5703


Energy-Related Characteristics
of
New Home Construction in Florida
(REVISED)










CONTENTS
Page
Background 3
Characteristics of the Sample 3
Cooling Systems 4
Heating Systems 5
Ducts and Air Handlers 6
Water Heating 6
Exterior Walls 9
Ceiling Insulation 10
Window Glazing 10
Special Energy-Related Features 11


LIST OF TABLES

Table Page
1 Characteristics of the Sample 3
2 Conditioned Floor Area in Square Feet 4
3 Central Air Conditioning System Characteristics 5
4 Heating System Characteristics 5
5 HVAC Duct Location 6
6 Duct Length and Insulation 6
7 Air Handler Location 7
8 Domestic Water Heating Systems 8
9 Domestic Water Heating Systems Capacity & Efficiency 8
10 Heat Recovery Units Installed in DWH 8
11 Exterior Wall Configuration Percent of Units 9
12 Exterior Wall Configuration Insulation R-value 9
13 Exterior Wall Configuration Wall Area in Square Feet 10
14 Ceiling Insulation R-value and Area by Year 10
15 Ratio of Glass Area to Floor Area 11
16 Clear Versus Tinted Glazing in Percent of Homes 11
17 Ceiling Fan Frequency 12
18 Cross Venting Frequency 12
19 Whole-House Fan Frequency 12
20 Radiant Barrier Under Roof Frequency 13
21 Programmable Thermostat Frequency 13
22 Heat Pump Programmable Thermostat (Cooling) Freq. 13
23 Heat Pump Programmable Thermostat (Heating) Freq. 14
24 Multizone Cooling Frequency 14
25 Multizone Heating Frequency 14
26 White Roof Surface Frequency 15
27 Air-Tight Ducts Frequency 15
28 Factory-Sealed Air Handling Unit Frequency 15


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LIST OF FIGURES

Figure P,
1 Conditioned Floor Area by Climatic Zone 4
2 Heating System Choices by Year 5
3 Air Handler Placement Choices by Climatic Zone 7


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BACKGROUND

In January 2001, the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing entered into an agreement
with the Florida Department of Community Affairs to serve as the receiving point for
Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction (FEECBC) Compliance forms
submitted by local building officials across the state. Through March 2002, a total of
95,106 forms had been received.

Upon receipt of the FEECBC Forms, the Shimberg Center draws a random sample of 1
out of 20 (5%) of the forms for entry into a database. If a jurisdiction submits less than
20 forms, one form is selected at random and entered in to the database. This procedure
insures representation in the database of housing markets with low levels of construction
activity. However, it also results in an over sampling of the low-activity areas and has
resulted in a sample of 7.2 percent, rather the planned 5 percent. As of March 2002 a
total of 6,924 forms had been drawn as the sample and are being entered into the
database.

The following analyses are focused on the data captured on the compliance forms
submitted for 1,612 single-family homes built between late 1999 and 2001. The
summary tables present comparisons of the housing characteristics built in Florida's three
Climatic Zones and, where possible, comparisons between homes built in 2000 and 2001.
The sample size of homes built in 1999 was too small to provide meaningful results. The
objective of this report is to provide the Department of Community Affairs and other
interested organizations with a snapshot of the buildings constructed in Florida in the
2000-2001 time frame.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SAMPLE

Of the 1,612 forms randomly chosen as the sample, 21.7 percent were from the South
zone of Florida, 57.8 percent were from the Central zone, and 20.5 percent were in the
North zone as shown in Table 1. All forms in the sample were for newly constructed
single-family residential structures.

Table 1: Characteristics of the sample


Climatic zone 1999 2000 2001 Total
South 5 95 250 350
Central 34 241 657 932
North 4 43 283 330


Shown in Table 2 is a summary of the conditioned space in the single-family housing
units included in the sample. As may be seen, the median values for each Climatic Zone
in both 2000 and 2001 are less than the corresponding average values. This relationship
indicates that in all cases there were some exceptionally large homes being built


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BACKGROUND

In January 2001, the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing entered into an agreement
with the Florida Department of Community Affairs to serve as the receiving point for
Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction (FEECBC) Compliance forms
submitted by local building officials across the state. Through March 2002, a total of
95,106 forms had been received.

Upon receipt of the FEECBC Forms, the Shimberg Center draws a random sample of 1
out of 20 (5%) of the forms for entry into a database. If a jurisdiction submits less than
20 forms, one form is selected at random and entered in to the database. This procedure
insures representation in the database of housing markets with low levels of construction
activity. However, it also results in an over sampling of the low-activity areas and has
resulted in a sample of 7.2 percent, rather the planned 5 percent. As of March 2002 a
total of 6,924 forms had been drawn as the sample and are being entered into the
database.

The following analyses are focused on the data captured on the compliance forms
submitted for 1,612 single-family homes built between late 1999 and 2001. The
summary tables present comparisons of the housing characteristics built in Florida's three
Climatic Zones and, where possible, comparisons between homes built in 2000 and 2001.
The sample size of homes built in 1999 was too small to provide meaningful results. The
objective of this report is to provide the Department of Community Affairs and other
interested organizations with a snapshot of the buildings constructed in Florida in the
2000-2001 time frame.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SAMPLE

Of the 1,612 forms randomly chosen as the sample, 21.7 percent were from the South
zone of Florida, 57.8 percent were from the Central zone, and 20.5 percent were in the
North zone as shown in Table 1. All forms in the sample were for newly constructed
single-family residential structures.

Table 1: Characteristics of the sample


Climatic zone 1999 2000 2001 Total
South 5 95 250 350
Central 34 241 657 932
North 4 43 283 330


Shown in Table 2 is a summary of the conditioned space in the single-family housing
units included in the sample. As may be seen, the median values for each Climatic Zone
in both 2000 and 2001 are less than the corresponding average values. This relationship
indicates that in all cases there were some exceptionally large homes being built


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producing a greater effect on the arithmetic average than on the median. The frequency
distribution shown in Figure 1 illustrates this condition, particularly in the case of the
South Climatic Zone.

Table 2: Conditioned Floor Area in Square Feet

Total 2000 2001
Climatic zone Average Median Average Median Average Median
South 2484 2299 2559 2235 2465 2324
Central 2116 1985 2207 2006 2087 1978
North 2120 1970 2578 2002 2058 1975


40.0%

30.0%

2 20.0%
10.0%
10.0%


U. U0/


iiilr


<1000 1000to
<1500


1500to 2000to 2500to
<2000 <2500 <3000
Square Feet Category


* South
* Central
O North


3000 or
more


Figure 1: Conditioned Floor Area by Climatic Zone



COOLING SYSTEMS

The characteristics of central air-conditioning systems installed in new single-family
homes are shown in Table 3. The table presents average capacity and average energy
efficiency rating (EER) for the first or primary central A/C system along with the number
of housing units included in the sample. Also shown in Table 3 are the characteristics of
the second (and third) A/C systems that were installed in some homes. As expected, the
central A/C systems in the South had the highest average capacity and the highest EER in
order to handle the higher cooling loads. The averages for the Central and North zones
were similar to each other. Efficiencies were higher in the Central zone and capacities
were higher in the North zone. It is interesting to note that overall 15 percent of the
single-family homes reported having a second A/C system. In the South zone second
A/C systems were reported in a quarter (24.9%) of the homes.


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Table 3: Central Air-conditioning System Characteristics


Climatic Average first system Average second system Average third system
zone Sample EER kBtu Sample EER kBtu Sample EER kBtu
South 349 11.0 45.2 87 11.1 33.8 7 11.7 38.3
Central 921 10.3 39.5 97 10.3 31.9 20 10.3 33.6
North 330 10.6 38.4 57 10.7 30.8 4 10.5 32.0



HEATING SYSTEMS

In the South zone electric strip heat is the predominant heating system whereas in the
Central and North zones the heat pump is the predominant heating system (see Table 4).
As expected, natural gas heating systems are not present in the South.

Table 4: Heating System Characteristics

Climatic Heat pump Natural gas Electric strip
zone Sample HSP kBtu Sample AFUE kBtu Sample COP kBtu
South 5 8.3 33.4 344 1.0 38.4
Central 703 7.1 39.4 170 0.8 53.7 43 1.0 27.5
North 272 7.2 37.6 48 0.8 44.6 8 1.0 38.4

Presented in Figure 2 is a histogram showing the change in heating system choice from
year to year. It is clear that the heat pump system displayed a gain in market share at the
expense of both natural gas and electric strip heating systems.


Heat pump


Natural gas


S2000
* 2001


Elec. Strip


Heating system

Figure 2: Heating System Choice by Year


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DUCTS AND AIR-HANDLERS

The location, length, and R-value of the ducts in the heating and cooling system as well
as the location of the air-handling units play an important role in the overall efficiency of
the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in a home.

Shown in Table 5 is a summary of the location of the supply and return ducts in the three
Climatic Zones. It is clear the supply ducts are most commonly installed in
unconditioned space (e.g., attic areas). However, up to 30 percent of return ducts (see
South Climatic Zone) are being installed in conditioned space.


Table 5: HVAC Duct Location
Climatic Supply ducts Return ducts
zone Unconditioned Conditioned Unconditioned Conditioned
South 324 93.4% 23 6.6% 240 69.6% 105 30.4%
Central 828 97.6% 20 2.4% 743 87.6% 105 12.4%
North 324 98.8% 4 1.2% 249 76.6% 76 23.4%


Presented in Table 6 is a summary of the average R-values for the duct system as well as
the average total duct length.


Table 6: Duct Length and Insulation


Climatic Average duct Average duct
zone length in feet insulation R-value
South 122.1 5.9
Central 134.4 6.0
North 97.9 7.0


The air-handler component of the HVAC system can be installed in a variety of locations.
Presented in Table 7 is a summary of the air-handler location choices in the three
Climatic Zones.


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Table 7: Air-Handler Location


Climatic Interior Garage Outdoors Attic Other Total
zone # % # % # % # % # % #
South 138 40.1 162 47.1 2 0.6 41 11.9 1 0.3 344
Central 131 15.6 653 77.9 5 0.6 41 4.9 8 1.0 838
North 89 27.4 213 65.5 2 0.6 17 5.2 4 1.2 325
Totals 358 23.8 1028 68.2 9 0.6 99 6.6 13 0.9 1507


The histogram shown in Figure 3 is a graphic representation of the relative frequency by
Climatic Zone of placement of the air-handler.



90
80
70
60 -
*50 South
S50 -
Central
o 40 ^H
a. 30 North

20
10 -
0 -
Interior Garage Outdoors Attic Other
Air-handler placement

Figure 3: Air-handler Placement Choice by Climatic Zone





WATER HEATING SYSTEMS

Electric water heaters dominated all Climatic zones as shown in Table 8. Between 1.0
percent and 2.0 percent of the homes in all three Climatic Zones reported the use of LP
Gas for water heating. The average capacity of the water heating systems ranged from
45.9 to 52.1 gallons. Between 1 and 4 percent of the homes reported installation of a
second water heating system. In the Central and North Climatic Zone these second water
heating system were either electric or natural gas. In the South Climatic Zone the second
systems were all electric.


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Table 8: Domestic Water Heating Systems


First DWH System Second DWH System
Climatic Nat LP Nat LP
zone Sample Avg. Elec Gas Gas Sample Avg Elec Gas Gas
size Gallons % % % size Gallons % % %
South 347 52.1 96.8 2.0 1.2 13 51.2 100.0 -
Central 901 45.9 80.6 18.4 1.0 11 46.9 54.5 45.5
North 326 52.0 85.9 12.9 1.2 6 46.7 83.3 16.7


The changes in water heating capacity and water heating efficiency between 2000 and
2001 followed no particular pattern. In the South, average capacity declined while
average efficiency remained relatively unchanged. Both average capacity and average
efficiency remained relatively unchanged in the Central zone. And in the North, both
average capacity and average efficiency increased. (See Table 9)


Table 9: Domestic Water Heating System Capacity and Efficiency


Climatic Capacity in gallons System Efficiency
zone 2000 2001 2000 2001
South 57.8 50.1 0.87 0.88
Central 46.9 45.6 0.82 0.85
North 46.5 52.9 0.74 0.87


Heat recovery units were reported as installed in 51 (14.7%) of the 347 single-family
homes built in the South Climatic Zone in 2000-2001. One percent of the 901 homes
built in the Central Climatic Zone and 1.8 percent of the 326 homes built in the North
also reported the inclusion of heat recovery units in the same time frame. (See Table 10)


Table 10: Heat Recovery Units Installed with Domestic Water Heaters*
2000 2001
Climatic Dedicated Heat recovery Dedicated Heat recovery
zone heat pump (Air conditioner) heat pump (Air conditioner)
South 0 24 7 18
Central 3 0 5 1
North 0 0 1 5
*Footnote: Waste heat recovery units (HRUs) include dedicated heat pump and air conditioners or tankless
add-on heat pumps coupled to water heater.


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EXTERIOR WALLS


Exterior walls are categorized by the structural elements of the wall system, by the R-
value of the insulation installed, and by the area of the wall of that configuration. Shown
in the following three tables is a summary of the exterior wall characteristics by Climatic
Zone of the housing units built in 2000 and 2001. The percentage of homes with a given
wall type may not add up to 100% since one unit may report different wall configurations
in the same home. It is clear from Table 11 that 63.7 percent of the homes in the South
zone were built with concrete wall systems. Wood frame walls were included in 39.7
percent of the homes. Concrete and wood frame construction were also reported by 90
percent or more of the homes in the Central and North zones. In the North zone, brick
veneer on a wood-frame structure was reported by 14.8 percent of the homes.



Table 11: Exterior Wall Configuration Percent of Units

Face brick Concrete Lt Wt Conc Poly
Climatic Wood Conc Int Ext Int Ext bead Wood Steel
zone frame block insul insul insul insul aggregate frame frame Log Other
South
0.5% 0.5% 62.0% 1.7% 3.4% 1.1% 39.7% 0.2%
(350 units)
Central
Centl 42.8% 1.7% 1.6% 0.1% 0.5% 53.2% 0.2%
(932 units)
North
N t u14.8% 0.6% 9.1% 0.3% 0.6% 0.9% 79.4%
(330 units)



Presented in Table 12 is the average R-value installed in the exterior wall of the various
wall configurations. A dash (-) indicates no data reported for the configuration.



Table 12: Exterior Wall Configuration Insulation R-value

Face brick Concrete Lt Wt Conc Poly
Climatic Wood Conc Int Ext Int Ext bead Wood Steel
zone frame block insul insul insul insul aggregate frame frame Log Other
South
11.0 3.0 4.3 3.9 3.8 4.2 -12.5
(350 units)
Central
Central 4.5 5.1 5.6 4.0 11.3 11.4 24.0
(932 units)
North
rth 11.4 22.0 3.7 4.2 4.2 16.3 11.8
(330 units)



Presented in Table 13 is the average square feet per housing unit of each exterior wall
configuration.


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Table 13: Exterior Wall Configuration Wall Area in Square Feet


CEILING INSULATION

Ceiling insulation is installed either on the floor of the attic area or in the space between
the ceiling finish and the roof sheathing in the case of a vaulted or cathedral ceiling. The
latter location is shown in Table 14 in the columns headed Single Assembly
Ceiling/Roof In a home with multiple ceiling configurations, two or more entries
describing the ceiling insulation may be required. These multiple entries of individual
homes produce the increased numbers shown under the column heading Sample Size.

Table 14: Ceiling Insulation R-value and Area by Year

Ceiling Under Attic Sin le Assembly Ceiling/Roof
Insulation Avg. area Insul Avg. area
Climatic Sample R-value (sq. ft.) Sample R-value (sq. ft.)
zone size 2000 2001 2000 2001 size 2000 2001 2000 2001

South 405 22.8 23.9 2063.3 1790.6 2 25.2 3280.0

Central 989 24.6 23.2 1845.5 1773.0 2 21.8 1102.0

North 326 25.2 25.9 1475.4 1162.7 -




WINDOW GLAZING

The ratio of total glass area to conditioned floor area in the three Climatic Zones for
homes built in 2000 and 2001 ranged between 0.14 and 0.17 as shown in Table 15. The
total glass area include single- and double-pane clear glass as well as single- and double-
pane glass that was tinted, had reflective film, or had solar screen. The values shown in
Table 15 indicate a great deal of similarity among the three Climatic Zones with little or
no change from 2000 to 2001.


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Face brick Concrete Lt Wt Conc Poly
Climatic Wood Conc Int Ext Int Ext bead Wood Steel
zone frame block insul insul insul insul aggregate frame frame Log Other
South
126.0 1952.0 744.1 1014.0 695.5 1283.3 530.3
(350 units)
Central
enta 1409.4 3131.2 1224.3 1117.2 664.2 2185.0
(932 units)
North
orth 1710.8 1352.0 1315.1 1014.0 1264.0 3342.0 1457.3
(330 units)


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Table 13: Exterior Wall Configuration Wall Area in Square Feet


CEILING INSULATION

Ceiling insulation is installed either on the floor of the attic area or in the space between
the ceiling finish and the roof sheathing in the case of a vaulted or cathedral ceiling. The
latter location is shown in Table 14 in the columns headed Single Assembly
Ceiling/Roof In a home with multiple ceiling configurations, two or more entries
describing the ceiling insulation may be required. These multiple entries of individual
homes produce the increased numbers shown under the column heading Sample Size.

Table 14: Ceiling Insulation R-value and Area by Year

Ceiling Under Attic Sin le Assembly Ceiling/Roof
Insulation Avg. area Insul Avg. area
Climatic Sample R-value (sq. ft.) Sample R-value (sq. ft.)
zone size 2000 2001 2000 2001 size 2000 2001 2000 2001

South 405 22.8 23.9 2063.3 1790.6 2 25.2 3280.0

Central 989 24.6 23.2 1845.5 1773.0 2 21.8 1102.0

North 326 25.2 25.9 1475.4 1162.7 -




WINDOW GLAZING

The ratio of total glass area to conditioned floor area in the three Climatic Zones for
homes built in 2000 and 2001 ranged between 0.14 and 0.17 as shown in Table 15. The
total glass area include single- and double-pane clear glass as well as single- and double-
pane glass that was tinted, had reflective film, or had solar screen. The values shown in
Table 15 indicate a great deal of similarity among the three Climatic Zones with little or
no change from 2000 to 2001.


Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


Face brick Concrete Lt Wt Conc Poly
Climatic Wood Conc Int Ext Int Ext bead Wood Steel
zone frame block insul insul insul insul aggregate frame frame Log Other
South
126.0 1952.0 744.1 1014.0 695.5 1283.3 530.3
(350 units)
Central
enta 1409.4 3131.2 1224.3 1117.2 664.2 2185.0
(932 units)
North
orth 1710.8 1352.0 1315.1 1014.0 1264.0 3342.0 1457.3
(330 units)


September 2002


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Table 15: Ratio of Glass Area to Floor Area

Climatic Sample Glass/Floor Ratio
zone size 2000 2001
South 350 0.17 0.17

Central 932 0.15 0.15

North 330 0.15 0.14


Based on the data summarized in Table 16, clear glass has been the predominant choice
for new single-family homes in all three Climatic Zones. However, glazing with tinting,
solar film, or solar screen has been installed in 44.2 percent of the homes in the South
zone in 2000 and in 37.6 percent of the homes in 2001. Note that the percentages may
not add up to 100 percent because one home can be reported as having both clear glazing
and tinted glazing.


Table 16: Clear Versus Tinted Glazing in Percent of Homes


SPECIAL ENERGY-RELATED FEATURES

Compliance with the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction includes
a number of special actions that will enhance the building's thermal efficiency. Presented
in the follow tables is a summary of the frequency of use of each of the energy
conserving techniques.


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Tinted, Film,
Climatic Sample Clear glass Solar screen
zone size 2000 2001 2000 2001

South 350 68.4 62.4 44.2 37.6

Central 932 87.4 81.6 11.6 4.4

North 330 76.7 95.0 7.0 0.7


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Table 17: Ceiling Fan Frequency


Table 18: Cross Venting Frequency


Table 19: Whole House Fan Frequency


Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing


2000 2001
Climatic Sample Ceiling Sample Ceiling
zone size fan Percent size fan Percent

South 95 7 7.3 250 29 11.6

Central 241 19 7.8 657 70 10.7

North 43 10 23.2 283 47 16.6


2000 2001
Climatic Sample Cross Sample Cross
zone size ventilation Percent size Ventilation Percent

South 95 250 -

Central 241 1 0.4 657 2 0.3

North 43 283


2000 2001
Whole Whole
Climatic Sample house Sample house
zone size fan Percent size fan Percent
South 95 250

Central 241 1 0.4 657

North 43 283 -


September 2002


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Table 19: Radiant Barrier Under Roof Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Radiant Sample Radiant
zone size barrier Percent size barrier Percent

South 95 250

Central 241 657

North 43 283


Table 20: Programmable Thermostat Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Program Sample Program
zone size thermostat Percent size thermostat Percent
South 95 3 3.2 250 20 8.0

Central 241 1 0.4 657 11 1.7

North 43 283 3 1.1


Table 21: Heat Pump Programmable Thermostat (Cooling) Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Prog Thermo Sample Prog thermo
zone size for HP cooling Percent size for HP cooling Percent
South 95 3 3.2 250 11 4.4

Central 241 8 3.3 657 19 2.9

North 43 1 2.3 283 8 2.8


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Table 22: Heat Pump Programmable Thermostat (Heating) Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Prog thermo Sample Prog Thermo
zone size for HP Heating Percent size for HP heating Percent

South 95 3 3.2 250 9 3.6

Central 241 8 3.3 657 19 2.9

North 43 1 2.3 283 8 2.8


Table 23: Multizone Cooling Frequency


2000 2001
Climatic Sample Multizone Sample Multizone
zone size cooling Percent size cooling Percent

South 95 4 4.2 250 27 10.8

Central 241 11 4.6 657 14 2.1

North 43 3 6.9 283 13 4.6







Table 24: Multizone Heating Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Multizone Sample Multizone
zone size heating Percent size heating Percent

South 95 2 2.1 250 27 10.8

Central 241 11 4.6 657 14 2.1

North 43 3 6.9 283 13 4.6


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Table 25 White Roof Surface Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample White Sample White
zone size roof Percent size roof Percent

South 95 250

Central 241 657

North 43 283




Table 26 Airtight Ducts Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Air tight Sample Air tight
zone size ducts Percent size ducts Percent

South 95 250

Central 241 657

North 43 283




Table 27 Factory Sealed Air Handling Unit Frequency

2000 2001
Climatic Sample Sealed Sample Sealed
zone size AHU Percent size AHU Percent
South 95 250

Central 241 657

North 43 283


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September 2002


Page 16




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