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 Summary of the University of Florida...
 Biodiversity and environmental...
 Florida Teach: increasing the quality...
 Forensic DNA identification...
 Interdisciplinary program insustainability...
 Nanoscience Institute for Medical...
 Real-time Awareness, Decision-making...
 Solutions for water resources...
 Florida High Tech Corridor Council...
 Transitional imaging technology...
 Florida Public Health Consorti...
 Clinical and Transitional Research...
 Florida veterinary workforce expansion...
 Promoting healthy, sustainable...
 Development of disease resistant...
 Bioenergy systems and feedstoc...
 Diversified specialty crop...
 Florida Partnership for Climate...
 Sustaining Florida's fisheries...






Group Title: Legislative budget requests
Title: Legislative budget requests 2008-2009.
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 Material Information
Title: Legislative budget requests 2008-2009.
Series Title: Legislative budget requests
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Office of the Provost, University of Florida
Publisher: University of Florida Office of the Provost
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008-2009
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087006
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

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Table of Contents
    Summary of the University of Florida issues
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Biodiversity and environmental biology: the bioinformatics renaissance
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Florida Teach: increasing the quality and quantity of mathematics and science teachers
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Forensic DNA identification laboratory
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Interdisciplinary program insustainability and a healthy environment
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology (NIMET)
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Real-time Awareness, Decision-making and Response (RADAR) system: enhanced security for Florida campus and statewide communities
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Solutions for water resources sustainability
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Florida High Tech Corridor Council Program
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Transitional imaging technology and applications
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Florida Public Health Consortium
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Clinical and Transitional Research Institute (CTSI)
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Florida veterinary workforce expansion initiative
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Promoting healthy, sustainable animal systems
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Development of disease resistant citrus cultivars
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Bioenergy systems and feedstocks
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Diversified specialty crop agrisystems
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Florida Partnership for Climate and Society (PCS)
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Sustaining Florida's fisheries and coastal resources
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
Full Text




State University System of Florida
Summary of the University of Florida Issues
2008-09 Legislative Budget Request


2008-2009 Budget Amount from Non-
Issue Title University BOG Goal Priority Brief Description/Justification University Outcomes Request Recurring Funds
Educational & General

To assemble biomformatics electronic databases that holds information Ths initiative will allow the Umversity of Flonda and the Honda Museum of
associated with our collection of specimens As the world's biodiversity comes Natural History to make all of our existing specimen information available via
under ever-increasing threats, it becomes cntical to develop a better the Internet over the next few years, catapulting the UF/FLMNH to first place
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research understanding of the world's biota Thus bionformatics initiative will make UF nationally in the amount of information served to the public, scientists and pub
Biodiversity and Environmental Biology The Blomformatics Renaissan UF-E&G Capacity 1 not only competitive, but also the model in the field for other major unrversiti servants $ 1,086,000 $ 585,000
Honda Teach, a new program at UF is designed and managed by the Colleges o
Liberal Arts and Sciences and Education The central strategy of Flonda Teach
to create a comprehensive program in which students with a potential interest in Production of Math and Science Teachers by Fonda Teach 2008-2013
Science, Technology, Engineenng, and Math (STEM) teaching at the 6-12 level 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13
are recruited, mentored, and rewarded throughout their university career, with a # New Students 50 75 100 125 150
Flonda Teach Increasing the Quality and Quantity of Mathematics and Science strong emphasis on field expenences in area classrooms startmg in the first year # Students m Program 50 125 200 275 350
Teachers UF-E&G Meeting Statewlde Professional and Workforce Need 2 inm the program Graduate (B S /B A) 0 25 50 75 100 $ 1,000,000 $ 159,000

The InterdisciplinaryProgram in Biomedical Sciences recent decisionto create a
This funding will be used to augment and enhance the current capability of the program m Forensic Medical Sciences at the Master's and ultimately Doctoral
human identification process provided by the C A Pound Human Identification level would be greatly strengthened by this new capability at the Pound
Laboratory by incorporating the latest technologies available in genetic forensic Laboratory which will house four students m the first two year and an addition
It is proposed to develop molecular forensic services, specifically using mtDNA two students thereafter Also, this will allow the resolution of cold cases, by
Meeting Commumty Needs and Fulfilhng Umque technologies that wll be made available to law enforcement and families seeking identifymg the identified, assists in the prosecution of homicide and otherwise
Forensic Molecular Laboratory UF-E&G Institutional Responsibilhtie 3 to reconcile cold cases, missing person's and umdentified decedents undetermined deaths in Honda $ 1,431,660 $ 820,500
Teaching 2 new unversity-wide certificate programs will be developed for
A new program designed to utilize expertise developed internationally to undergraduate and graduate students Student will contribute to the
promote sustainability hteracy through graduate and undergraduate teaching an incorporation of sustainability practices m commumty context
to promote sustainable development m Flonda through research and extension Research Success will be determined based on the extent to which
It will formalize the relationship between UF's nationally recogmzed campus interdisciplinary research collaborations result in new knowledge and
sustanablity practices and the academic mission by incorporating the Office of technologies developed, apphed and reported
Sustanablity into this new comprehensive program Utihzmg the campus itself Extension Success will be measured by the extent to which knowledge and
Meeting Commumty Needs and Fulfilhng Umque as a laboratory for sustainablhty research will more efficiently connect our technologies are transferred from the University of Honda campus to county
Interdisciplnary Program in Sustainability and a Healthy Envlromne UF-E&G Institutional Responsibilhtie 4 statewide researchers on campus and extension personnel in the field extension offices and applied in the communities they serve $ 3,483,500 $ 316,000

The purpose of this request is to provide umnque, world-class instrumentation an The NIMET is expected to generate Increased federal funding opportunities
staff for this newly constructed facility so that it can create research, education, over a five year penod of$50M, support that will result in the transfer of
and commercialization opportunities in nanoscale science and technology in the nanotechnology and creation of start-up compares within Honda, trading of
State of Flonda Competing in Nanoscale Science &Technology at the national more than 150 graduate students, and development of new research concepts,
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research level requires leading-edge equipment, facilities, and technical staff, and these crop improvement, and manufacturing iimtatives through collaborative
Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology (NIME1 UF-E&G Capacity 5 can be provided through the Nanosclence Research Faclhty housed at UI interactions $ 6,797,225 $ 5,972,225


The RADAR system will provide integrated (1) real-tune motoring of large-
scale areas and infrastructure (2) augmenting informed decision-making with
timely access to data integrated from trusted sources and (3) coordination of
swift and effective response to a wide vanety of unforeseen situations These
situations range from typically routine occurrences (1 e urban hazard and rescue
or rural fires and flooding) to campus and community momtonng, and response
to large-scale events including disaster preparation/relef, agncultural
infestations, and biological, conventional or unconventional terronst attempts Pnmary benefits to Honda campuses and commutes include effective
The results of integrating these vanous systems into a coherent visualization wil coordmation of information between local, county, and State agencies for both
Real-time Awareness, Decision-making and Response (RADAR) System Meeting Commumnty Needs and Fulfilhng Umque vastly increase the speed and effectiveness decision-makers in times of stress an routine and exceptional circumstances and our leaders and decision-makers will
Enhanced Secunty and Quality of Life at the Local and National Lev IUF-E&G Institutional Responsibilhtie 6 potential crisis be provided with functionally-enhanced decision making capabiltie $ 3,950,000 $ 2,439,526

This proposal will develop a long-term, interdisciphnary research, education an
technology transfer program aimed at developing technologies and sustainable
solutions across natural and man-made threats to Flonda's water resources
Honda's economic and social development over the past several decades has
been fueled by its climate and abundant water resources Increased population,
rapid urban development large agncultural water demands, and the need to The outcome of this effort will be world-class research, education and
protect natural resources, however, have led to water resource problems in man technology transfer programs that will develop, demonstrate, and dehver
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research parts of the State Flonda's population is expected to increase from 16 million solutions to state agencies, cities, agculture, industry and pnvate citizens facing
Solutions for Water Resources Sustainabilit IUF-E&G Capacity 1 7 present to 22 million by the year 2020 water-related problems $ 1,500,000


2008-2009 LBR








State University System of Florida
Summary of the University of Florida Issues
2008-09 Legislative Budget Request


2008-2009 Budget Amount from Non-
Issue Title University BOG Goal Priority Brief Description/Justification University Outcomes Request Recurring Funds

This program is an expansion of the existing Fonda High Technology Coridor
initiative at the Umversity of Honda The Umversity of Honda entered into thi
program m FY2005-2006 and is seeking an crease in funding to support
program growth The program is to provide research opportunities between
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research Honda lhgh technology compares and universties as well as to give graduate Tlus program will allow UF to expand the High Tech Matclung Grants Program
Honda High Tech Comdor Council Progran UF-E&G Capacity 8 students training that can be used by these high technology compame by supporting 15-30 research project S 2,000,000

The proposed new faculty recruits and technical support staff will significantly
add to the existing infrastructure and talent atUF and the state of Honda and
will contribute to new extramural funding opportunities, new major program
project grants, new shared instrumentation grants, and new student education
These funds will be used to combine and expand imaging research and enhance and training opportunities at UF Additionally it is expected that they will
its transition, in both the short and long terms, into the chmc and marketplace contribute both to the overall health of the human population and towards the
while providing the faculty, staff and imaging infrastructure to rapidly expand expansion of the biomedical research and technology base in industry in Florda
and advance research and technology development in inagmg for the With the cntical collaborations with the CTSI, these new opportunities will
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research enhancement ofhuman health Imaging is an essential component of virtually translate into improved human health and economic opportunities to the ctzen
Translational Imaging Technology and Apphcatioi UF-E&G Capacity 9 every area of modern biomedical research and clinical medicine of HFlonda $ 6,362,500 $ 4,000,000

The three colleges of public health in the state of Honda have committed to
identify ways to effectively collaborate in the current and future education oftht
public health workforce m the state Because of the geographical distribution ol
the three universities, it is possible for the Consortium to serve the entire state o Each university will enroll ten additional students winch at matunty will result
Honda and for each of the three universities to offer their expertise and resource thirty new MPH professionals working within local health departments and offer
to the Department of Health and to the education of all health professions m the four short courses per year to local health department employees or others
UF/USF/FIU Florida Public Health Consortiun UF-E&G Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Need 10 respective campuses and throughout the state interested in public health issues $ 1,500,000

The State of Flonda and the Nation in general, face a cntical shortage of skilled
clinical investigators capable oftranslatmg basic science discoveries into new
therapies for the diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cure of human disease
University of Flonda's strategy to position itself and the State of Flonda to be
national leaders in clinical and translational research and training The Clinical
and Translational Science Institute will enable UF to bnng necessary personnel
and resources together under one roof, including space for education and
training, clinical trials coordination, biostatistics, epidemiology, biomedical
mformatics, bioethics, study design, regulatory support, community health and
health policy research The colleges participating in planning for the CTSI With our history ofleveraging extramural funding from federal, foundation, an
include Agnculture and Life Sciences, Dentistry, Engineenng, Fine Arts, Healt industry grants, we estimate conservatively that the annual return on investment
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research and Human Performance, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, will be approximately $3 5M to $4M per year if the university's Clinical and
Clinical and Translational Research Institut UF-E&G Capacity 11 Pharmacy, Public Health and Health Professions and Vetennary Medicine Translational Science Award (CTSA) request is funded $ 2,000,000 $




The Honda PCS will orgamze, acquire, and analyze scientific information m
order to understand the causes, consequences and rates of chmate-mduced
changes m our State A better understanding of the nature and time-scale for Liberal Arts and Sciences will hire faculty including a climate analysis scientist
the manifestation of climate change in Honda is urgently needed for policy a paleoclimatologist to study past perturbations of the climate system, a coastal
makers and government officials to craft sensible responses that mnimize the processes scientist to study Flonda's 2200 miles of dynamic coastline, a coastal
societal and ecological impacts of looming climate changes Research question and land use ecologist to study sea level nse, changes m mangrove and salt
that will be addressed in this program are (1) how can patterns of past chmate marsh ecosystems, saltwater mtrusion into coastal aquifers, and impacts on near
change help us anticipate the magnitude and rate of future chmate change, (2) shore forest ecosystems, an orgamsm and population scientist to evaluate the
what are the most accurate measures of changing climate in Honda and how wl biological consequences of chmate change, and an environmental social scient
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research these changes be mamfested in Honda, and (3) what can Flondians do to prevel who can evaluate potential impacts of climate change on institutions (e g, health
Florida Partnershp for Climate and Society (PCS UFE&G apacty 12 or cope with these changes are, housing education, transportation and on Florida's population $ 1,500,000 $
UF E&G Tota 32.610.885 $ 14,292,251


2008-2009 LBR








State University System of Florida
Summary of the University of Florida Issues
2008-09 Legislative Budget Request


2008-2009 LBR


2008-2009 Budget Amount from Non-
Issue Title University BOG Goal Priority Brief Description/Justification University Outcomes Request Recurring Funds
Health Science Center

The State of Flonda and the Nation in general, face a critical shortage of skilled
clical investigators capable of translatmg basic science discoveries into new
therapies for the diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cure of human disease
Umversity of Flonda's strategy to position itself and the State of Flonda to be
national leaders m clinical and translational research and traimng The Clinical
and Translational Science Institute will enable UF to bnng necessary personnel
and resources together under one roof, including space for education and
training, chmcal trials coordination, biostatistics, epidemiology, biomedical
mformatics, bioethics, study design, regulatory support, commumty health and
health policy research The colleges participating in planning for the CTSI With our history ofleveraging extramural funding from federal, foundation, an
include Agnculture and Life Sciences, Dentistry, Engineenng, Fine Arts, Healt industry grants, we estimate conservatively that the annual return on investment
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research and Human Performance, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, will be approxunately $3 5M to $4M per year if the university's Clical and
Clinical and Translational Research Institut UF-HSC Capacity 1 Pharmacy, Public Health and Health Professions and Veterinary Medicine Translational Science Award (CTSA) request is funded $ 2,000,000 $


There is a critical shortage of vetennanans nationally that is especially acute m
Honda This proposal is to better meet these needs and better serve Fonda by a
significant expansion ofvetennary student enrollment There is an immediate
need for over 500 vetennaans in public health practice, based pnmanly m state An increase in the number of veterinary medicine students over the next 5 years
and federal agencies We would expand enrollment in the UF College of beginning in
Veterinary Medicine by 50% We will admit 44 more students to each entering 2009-10 44, 2010-11 = 42, 2011-12 42, 2012-13= 42
class, thus when all four classes are filled to this number the total enrollment
increase will be 176 students We have sufficient applicants to accept ths An increase in the number of MPH and PhD students beginning in
FlondaVetenaryWorkforce Expanson tiativ UF-HSC Meeting Statewde Professionaland Workforce Need 2 additional number wth no drop in student qualification 2009-106 FTE, 2010-11 18 FTE, 2011-12 22 FTE, 2012-13 =23 $ 5,910,958
UF-HSC Total S 7,910,958 S








State University System of Florida
Summary of the University of Florida Issues
2008-09 Legislative Budget Request


2008-2009 LBR


2008-2009 Budget Amount from Non-
Issue Title University BOG Goal Priority Brief Description/Justification University Outcomes Request Recurring Funds
IFAS

Ts initiative is designed to produce new, science-based information and
transfer the information to Honda's hvestock industries, mammal owners, and
public to be apphed in every county m Flonda Considenng the breadth of Under ths initiative we will conduct Genetic research, on new forage species
impact of mammal agnulture, it is clear that sustainng the mdustry is critical to and crops for hvestock feed and grazing systems, research on beef/forage
the health and welfare of all Hondians, now and in the future Because Honda' integrated production systems, basic research on genetics and physiology of
environment is not replicated in any other area m the US, we must generate data animal feed conversion and nutrition to increase production efficiency, economy
specific to this setting and evaluate the impact of this environment on aimmal studies on hvestock production systems research on livestock and equine
performance and well-being In the broader perspective, the data generated m nutrition and health, research and education programs on hvestock waste
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research Honda has application on an international scale and bnngs that global dimension management, and expand education programs, especially for youth, on livestod
Promoting Healthy, Sustainable Ammal System UF-IFAS Capacity 1 to our activities, an important factor m today's interconnected world and equine care, management and health $ 2,240,000
Invasions of citrus canker, citrus greemng and several msect pests m the past
decade create challenges for pest management that cannot be overcome with
increased pesticide use, and thus, permanent genetic solutions are indicated
Combining traditional plant breeding and plant microbiology with new molecule r
tools will lead to increased understanding of the disease/plant cycles and will
point to opportunities for the development and evaluation of new plant cultivars While genetic solutions on a perennial plant hke citrus encompass longer term
that can better withstand the attack of exotic disease orgasms Directing considerations, the search for genetic resistance mechanisms already is
current scientific capability to this set of issues will not only address the critical underway Within 2-3 years, candidate resistance genes and mechanisms can b
challenges of today's diseases, but the knowledge generated will accelerate identified and preliminarily tested within citrus plant tissues An additional
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research efforts to address new disease and pest challenges as they matenalize m the penod of several years will be required to integrate candidate genes into citrus
Development of Disease Resistant Citrus Cultivar UF-IFAS Capacity 2 future plant material and test effectiveness under laboratory and greenhouse condition $ 1,400,608
This new initiative will provide the platform for bioenergy crop and ethanol
production research to provide the knowledge necessary to build a vibrant
biofuels industry m Florida Research will identify bioenergy crops and
management conditions that are best suited for Florida Emphasis will be place The outcome will be realized in new pnvate investment m commercial plant
on maximizmgthe amount ofbiomass produced per acre, minmizing inputs and facilities and their accompanying economic development m Flonda Investmen
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research reducing costs of production, and maximizing the amount of bioenergy produce in this research and extension initiative will result in economic development
Development of Bio-energy Systems and Bio-energy Feedstock UF-IFAS Capacity 3 per unit ofblomass based on these new energy production technologies $ 1,250,000
Industry efficiencies and global competitiveness, improvements and
This program will allow the identification of specialty crops that will be identification of hgh cash value vegetable, fruit and flonculture crops, preserve
marketable and of hugh value This program will also allow agnculture and and enhance soil, air, and water resources, increase the number of years ofviabl
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research natural resource industes to increase their multi-billion dollar economic Impac production, and target all agncultural chemical inputs appropately and
Diversified Specialty Crop Agnsystem UF-IFAS Capacity 4 on Honda in these regions through research and extension activities recommend the use of new harvest systems 1,342,000 417,000

The Honda PCS will organize, acquire, and analyze scientific information m
order to understand the causes, consequences and rates of chmate-minduced
changes in our State A better understanding of the nature and time-scale for IFAS will hlre faculty including a coordinator with experts in the application
the manifestation of climate change in Honda is urgently needed for policy climate formation to agncultural and water resources management, an agro
makers and government officials to craft sensible responses that minimize the meteorologist with background in crop modehng, drought, and interdisciplnary
societal and ecological impacts of looming climate changes Research question research, an aero-biologist to study and model the effects of climate on
that will be addressed in this program are (1) how can patterns of past chmate movement of orgasms in the atmosphere and corresponding disease outbreak
change help us anticipate the magnitude and rate of future chmate change, (2) and spread of invasive species, a natural resource economist to analyze tradeoff
what are the most accurate measures of changing climate in Honda and how w knd opportunities for financial gain, an agncultural education and extension
Building World-Class Academic Programs and Research these changes be manifested in Honda, and (3) what can Flondians do to preve specialistto lead extensionoutreach activities, an agronomist or horticulturalst
Honda Partnership for Climate and Society (PCS IUF-IFAS Capacity 1 5 or cope with these changes? for impact studies on crops, and a hurricane housing development specials $ 600,000








State University System of Florida
Summary of the University of Florida Issues
2008-09 Legislative Budget Request


2008-2009 LBR


2008-2009 Budget Amount from Non-
Issue Title University BOG Goal Priority Brief Description/Justification University Outcomes Request Recurring Funds




This initiative will provide 1 Sustanable Fishenes Scientific solutions
and educational efforts will (a) contribute to making fisheries sustainable
through ecosystem-based management, b) provide fishenes managers
with science-based alternatives for management, and (c) inform citizens
about the need to conserve and protect habitat, water quality and the fish
communities they support
2 Aquaculture This sector of Florida's economy will benefit from (a)
enhanced shellfish production and product safety, and (b) industry
development through a reduction in both technical and non-technical
bamers
3 Mannas/Boating/Waterways The water-dependent manne industries,
the public and the resource managers will be provided science-based
alternatives to (a) maintain the economic and environmental sustamabilit
of this resource use, (b) create decision support tools to guide public
policy to support coastal management, c) assist in developing a non-
This initiative will provide science-based alternatives to industry and regulatory framework that maintains the environment while enhancing
resource managers and develop community-based educational programs waterfront communities and business growth and (d) recommending way
that will address issues including habitat loss, fishing pressure, and water- to mitigate and prepare for coastal storms in order to inumize economic
dependent coastal issues including impacts of rapid development and and environmental losses
environmental quality issues This initiative will establish an mtegrative 4 Academic Enhancement and Manne Education The next generation of
program to address critical issues affecting the health and long-term professionals for the both the pnvate sector and resource managers will
survival of Flonda's manne and freshwater fishenes industries, the be trained and citizens will be educated through extension and outreach
Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilhng Unique growing aquaculture industry and the water-dependent manne industries programs
Sustaming HFlonda's Fishenes and Coastal Resources UF-IFAS Institutional Responslblhties 6 that are critical to Florida's future $ 644,000

Nationally there is a clear shortage of vetennanans in all areas of professional
endeavor Recent studies (NAS, KSU, AAVMC) document these cntical needs
There is an immediate need for over 500 vetennanans in public health practice,
based pnmanly in state and federal agencies These positions, best filled by
vetennanans, are focused on protecting public health by preventing diseases of
animals that are capable of infecting humans such as rabies, avian influenza, ma
cow disease, and many others Some of these vetennanans focus on keeping on
animal-based food supply free of infectious agents such as E coll or chemical
contaminants Vetermananns are also needed in the FDA, USDA, Homeland
Secuty, U S Army, CDC, NIH, as well as numerous Fonda State agencies
where regulation and control of animal disease, emergency preparedness and
Flonda Vetennary Workforce Expansion Initiativ UF-IFAS __ environmental protection are paramount See outcomes from HSC Intiative # 4,000,000 $
_UF-IFAS Total $ _____ 11,476,608 $ 417,000









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I
University: University of Florida
Descriptive Issue Title: Biodiversity and Environmental Biology:
The Bioinformatics Renaissance
University Priority Number: 1
Date Approved by Board of Trustees: 6-15-2007

Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i\ing. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
0 Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)



I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i iih the provision offunds for this
issue?):
With over 26 million specimens and artifacts in its collections, and an emphasis on
Florida, the southeastern U.S., and the circum-Caribbean, the Florida Museum of
Natural History (FLMNH) houses one of the largest scientific collections in the
nation. The data associated with these specimens represent an irreplaceable
information resource about the biodiversity and distribution of plants and animals in
space and time. Yet, despite 100 years of collecting and documenting, much of the
data exists only in hard copy where it can't be computer-accessed or shared
electronically, limiting its usefulness. Linked information such as specimen images,
DNA sequences, library citations, frozen tissues, and geographical localities, can
dramatically enhance the value of the original specimen data. When the specimen
data and the linked information are available in electronic format, and connected via a
functioning Cyberinfrastructure, they can be accessed and examined rapidly by
students and researchers in Florida as well as the world-over. Such information is
essential to: ecologists investigating habitat preservation or the influence of invasive


2008-2009 LBR









species on natural populations; environmental engineers assessing the biotic effects of
pollution or climate change; conservation biologists seeking to preserve biodiversity;
regional and city planners concerned with the impact of development; medical
researchers tracking natural vectors of disease; biologists predicting the spread of
agricultural pests; and many more. The Bioinformatics Renaissance will
revolutionize our ability to ask and answer questions about our natural world and
realize a huge return on the investment of decades of data collected by hundreds of
faculty, staff and students.

The FLMNH, UF Research and Graduate Programs, and the UF Provost collectively
committed $500,000 to jump-start the first phase of this initiative. The FLMNH just
hired Drs. Reed Beaman and Nico Cellinese away from Yale University this spring.
They rank among the world's leading scientists in the field of biodiversity
informatics. Even before arriving on campus, this team was selected as one of four
semi-finalists to submit a NSF Plant Science Cyberinfrastructure Collaborative
proposal for $50 million, which was submitted through UF in April. Drs. Beaman
and Cellinese were notified on May 23, 2007 that their grant proposal was selected as
one of two finalists. The NSF site visit team will arrive on campus Tuesday, June 12,
2007 for their review of the research team, facilities and infrastructure, and UF's
institutional commitment. The FLMNH requests $1,086,000 ($585,000 one-time
funds; $501,000 recurring) to grow this Bioinformatics Initiative at UF.

II. Justification

A. Description of the service or program to be: The information stored in
collections, such as those at the FLMNH, is vitally important for documenting and
conserving biodiversity; however, its applications extend far beyond basic science
and conservation. As the world's biodiversity comes under ever-increasing
threats, whether from uncontrolled development, anthropogenic climate changes,
pollution, or other factors, it becomes critical to develop a better understanding of
the world's biota. Scientists have been gathering this information for over 200
years, and the majority of these data are stored in natural history museums.
Unfortunately, most of this information has been unavailable to rapid, large-scale
examination because the data are textual and cannot be rendered digitally. This
bioinformatics initiative will make UF not only competitive, but the model in a
field where it has lagged behind other major universities.

Gainesville is home to the second largest collection of natural history specimens
in the country, second only to the Smithsonian Institution. The information
associated with these specimens, including species descriptions, geographic
localities, images, library citations, frozen tissues, DNA sequences, etc.,
represents an enormous library of life on Earth. The University of Florida and
Florida Museum of Natural History have partnered to assemble a bioinformatics
initiative whose goal is to develop the tools to connect the electronic databases
that hold this information with each other, as well as link to national and
international biodiversity enterprises such as the Global Biodiversity Information
Facility in Denmark.


2008-2009 LBR










This is a new program that clearly complements the Building World-Class
Institutions goal of the 2008-09 Board of Governors Strategic Plan.

B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this program: UF/FLMNH is uniquely poised to be
the national leader in biodiversity informatics and environmental biology. The
size and importance of the museum research collections, the university setting that
encourages student training, the overall strength of UF with excellent associated
CLAS departments such as Anthropology, Botany, Geosciences, and Zoology,
along with associated IFAS departments such as Entomology & Nematology,
Fisheries, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, are unique in the U.S. The only
missing component is strength in collection-related bioinformatics. The
tremendous success of the University of California, Berkeley and the University
of Kansas as leaders in biodiversity studies, despite their less important collection
resources, is the direct result of the investment they made in bioinformatics.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: This initiative will allow UF/FLMNH to
make all of our existing specimen information available via the Internet over the
next few years, catapulting the UF/FLMNH to first place nationally in the amount
of information served to the public, scientists and public servants. Once linked
via the Internet with global databases, they will be mined by UF researchers and
students for information vital to biodiversity and environmental issues facing
Florida and the nation. Other institutions will look to UF and FLMNH for
leadership in this rapidly expanding area of science, ultimately leading to new
opportunities in genetics, medicine, and agriculture, in addition to basic biology.
Specimen information can be used to trace the spread of invasive species and
disease vectors and will become increasingly important as scientists and
lawmakers seek to understand the impact of global warming on the distribution of
species and habitats throughout Florida.

As mentioned in Section I, the two new UF faculty members hired to jump-start
this bioinformatics initiative have already submitted a $50 million grant proposal
to the National Science Foundation's new Plant Science Cyberinfrastructure
Collaborative. A final decision will be made in November 2007 with funding of
the successful proposal to begin early in 2008. The team of Beaman and
Cellinese will bring $2 million in current bioinformatics NSF funding to UF from
Yale University when they start in August 2007. Additional proposals to NSF
and to private foundations will be forthcoming within the 2008-2009 academic
year. They will involve the migration of diversified museum collection databases
to a common platform, addition of bioinformatics components to renewals of two
current "Assembling the Tree of Life" grants at the FLMNH, a proposal to
integrate the Biocorder and TOLKIN initiatives, and renewal for their web service
design grant for rapid digital specimen image and data capture.


2008-2009 LBR









III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form II):

2007-08 Budget 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
for Issue (A) State Funds Anticipated and Incremental
Requested Reallocation Years (D)
(B) (C)
a. Recurring $200,671 $501,000 $0 $501,000
Funds:
b. Non- $300,000 ,2 $585.000 $0 $585,000
recurring
Funds:
c. Total: $500,671 $1,086.000 $0 $1,086,000


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the funds) that
will be used to initiate this program (column A).

1Research and Graduate Programs $200,000
2Florida Museum Grant Overhead $100,000

B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).

C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if applicable
(include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated personnel) (column C).

D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from the state
for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years (column D only
includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:

A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?

This program does not require an expansion or construction of a facility.

B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so, identify the
project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.
2.


2008-2009 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University of Florida
Biodiversity and Environmental Biology:
The Bioinformatics Renaissance


RECURRING


NON-
RECURRING


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


1.00
5.00

6.00


$70,000
$224,000

$294,000


$405,978
$60,000
$35,022
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$501,000


0.00
0.00

0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$0
$385,000
$0
$200,000
$0
$0
$0
$0

$585,000


2008-2009 LBR


University:
Issue Title:


TOTAL









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:



University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida
Florida Teach: Increasing the Quality and
Quantity of Mathematics and Science
Teachers

2
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,,\i iti, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i'ilg. etc.)
N Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
F Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i iih the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct):

The Florida Board of Governors (BOG) Strategic Plan, adopted June 9, 2005, identifies
teacher shortages in middle and high school mathematics and science as a critical need to
be addressed state-wide. The BOG goal is to produce 2,729 degrees in critical needs
subject areas system-wide by 2012/2013. In addition, the BOG Strategic Plan targets
several thousand graduates in emerging technology fields. The production of such college
graduates will require a cohort of well-trained STEM (science, technology, engineering,
and mathematics) graduates from Florida high schools. Unfortunately, many high schools
do not have a sufficient quantity of qualified mathematic and science teachers.

Recent estimates suggest that 18% 30% of new Florida secondary mathematics and
science teachers do not have certification appropriate to the subject they are hired to
teach. The University of Florida currently does not have pathways for undergraduates to


2008-2009 LBR









pursue teaching credentials as an undergraduate. The Florida Teach initiative will meet a
critical state workforce need and contribute to meeting secondary school STEM needs by
significantly increasing the number ofB.A. & B.S. graduates in STEM fields who
graduate with eligibility for teaching certification through a new FL-DOE-approved
minor in education.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include ii heIher this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished ii ith the current service/program?)

Florida Teach will be a new program at UF, collaboratively designed and managed by the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Education. The program will
increase the number of quality mathematics and science teachers prepared to teach at the
undergraduate level and provide graduate-level support during the critical induction years
when as much as 30% of the teaching force leaves the profession after three years.
Florida Teach will take advantage of a new state of Florida rule that permits universities
to offer an education minor as a means of certification for teacher candidates majoring in
liberal arts and sciences disciplines. Completers of the competency-based education
minor meet all the state's professional education requirements and are recommended for
a temporary teaching certificate. Upon completion of one year of successful teaching, a
professional certificate can be issued. Florida Teach will target approximately 100
graduates/per year by the year 2013 in math and sciences with professional 6-12 teacher
certification.

The central strategy of Florida Teach is to create a comprehensive program in which
students with a potential interest in STEM teaching at the 6-12 level are recruited,
mentored, and rewarded throughout their university career, with a strong emphasis on
field experiences in area classrooms starting in the first year in the program. Florida
Teach also embraces a job-embedded professional development framework that equips
teachers with critical subject-specific knowledge and teaching skills while teaching. A
robust induction approach will be developed and made available to Florida Teach
graduates, as well as new mathematics and science teachers who enter teaching in all
Florida schools through alternative certification routes (currently 49% of new teachers!).
Finally, we will customize a professional development program for those teachers who
host Florida Teach interns in their classrooms so they can become effective mentors of
new teachers.

Critical features of the Florida Teach program are:

*Employs professional faculty and program staff, with dedicated, central office space
and classrooms. The bulk of the recurring budget for Florida Teach is for these
faculty and staff. The program faculty will be recruited nationally and will have
outstanding academic credentials. Experience in the public schools will be strongly
preferred for the faculty positions.


2008-2009 LBR









* Creates new major sequences in science and math through CLAS departments;
programs will be 120 hours and can be completed in four years. Expands existing
Pathways to Teaching program between CLAS and CoEd.
* Insures graduates earn a Florida Professional Teaching Certificate in Mathematics,
Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Earth-Space Science upon degree completion and
one year of successful teaching in a Florida school.
* Creates multiple entry points for 2nd, 3rd, 4th year and post-baccalaureate students.
* Offers specialized courses in the CLAS and COE departments, focusing on scientific
inquiry, pedagogy, and applications of technology


The production of large numbers of STEM teachers will require much more than a
curriculum for a degree, as mentoring and a sense of a community with other future
teachers must be built. The program will be administered by a central academic program
office, which will be closely modeled after UF's undergraduate Honors programs. As
with honors programs, Florida Teach students will be part of something special. For
example:


* Recruitment of new Florida Teach students begins with Preview, in the summer prior
to their arrival on campus.
* Students will be offered paid internships and scholarships funded by private and
corporate donations.
* Advising by professional mentors, who will also assist with postgraduate placement
in Florida schools.
* Field experiences in local public schools will begin in the first year of program. These
experiences are meant to solidify their commitment to teaching in the early years their
college careers.
* The field experiences are mentored by specially chosen science or mathematics
teachers in the surrounding school districts, selected and compensated by the program
* Graduate assistants will supplement the program faculty and assist in field
experiences, professional training, and enhancement of subject area skills for Florida
Teach students.
* Teaching institutes and in-service programs will be offered to Florida mathematics
and science teachers, and these workshops will increase knowledge and skills in
subject areas and contemporary teaching methods.

Building on successful national models such as the UTeach program at the University of
Texas at Austin and the California Teach program in the University of California system,
we propose an intensive, comprehensive, and attractive program in science education and
mathematics education at the University of Florida.


2008-2009 LBR











B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:


The University of Florida has many existing academic programs that will serve as the
underlying infrastructure for Florida Teach:
* Existing B.S./B.A. program structures, and an approved Pathways to Teaching minor.
Approximately 1900 mathematics and science majors and approximately 230 full-
time mathematics and science faculty currently in CLAS.
* Specialized classrooms and laboratories available in CLAS and CoEd.
* New faculty lines in Science Education and in Mathematics Education recently filled
in CoEd.
* Existing Academic Advising Center in CLAS and Student Services Center in CoEd
would assure program completion with teacher certification requirements.
* Existing campus-wide science outreach efforts include CPET (Center for
Precollegiate Education and Training), SPICE (an NSF-funded GK-12 program).
* Bolstered by a $1.5 million grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)
and a match of nearly $3 million in university and private funds, nearly 50 UF
academic departments in 10 colleges are partnering in the Science for Life initiative.
Science for Life is creating a new interdisciplinary science teaching laboratory,
undergraduate opportunities for authentic research experiences, and a series of
innovative new science courses to recruit and retain bright and talented students into
the sciences.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and
the expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following,
if applicable.)

i. Number of Headcount Students receiving services or participating in
the program by year, for the next five years:
ii. Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year for the next five years. If these are new FTE Students
are they included in the 5-year enrollment plan?
iii. Additional degrees, if any, produced as a result of this initiative
(Indicate the additional number ofBachelor, Master, Doctoral &
Professional degrees produced by school year.)
iv. Other outcomes:


2008-2009 LBR









Teachers Produced at UF, 2000-2005
2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 Total
Math 6-12 6 5 3 5 0 19
Biology 6-12 7 8 7 11 10 43
Chemistry 6-12 0 0 0 2 1 3
Physics 6-12 0 0 3 0 0 3


Expected Production of Math and Science Teachers by Florida Teach 2008-2013
Year 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

Number of New 50 75 100 125 150
Students
Total Students in 50 125 200 275 350
Program
Graduates (B.S./B.A.) 25 50 75 100


The targets represent an approximately 7-fold increase in STEM 6-12 teachers once the
level of 100 graduates per year is attained. By way of concrete example, as of Spring
2005 the UTeach program at the University of Texas (http://uteach.utexas.edu/) recruits
approximately 100 new students each fall, has 403 students enrolled in the program, and
in 2004 graduated 76 students in math and science with professional certification. Based
on experiences in UTeach, we expect that 50% of the new teachers will come from
biological sciences fields; the remaining 50% will come equally from mathematics,
chemistry, and physics.

Other outcomes:

* UF-trained teachers will be ambassadors for the State University System in the
Florida school systems, increasing the ability of our universities to attract the best and
most diverse entering students, especially in math and science. This deeper talent pool
should help all Florida colleges and universities to develop more robust
undergraduate programs in STEM fields. Therefore, Florida Teach will help the State
meet its critical needs in emerging technologies for economic development and the
health professions.

* The program can serve as a coordinator for interactions with the public schools for
many different UF programs, including those funded by federal and state grants. The
program will increase the UF success rate for research grant proposals that
incorporate science and mathematics education components.

* The program will actively seek federal, foundation, and private funding to enhance
teacher training activities on campus.


2008-2009 LBR









* The program will coordinate with the recently funded Howard Hughes Medical
Institute UF Science for Life grant and will assist that program in meeting its
educational goals, especially in the biological sciences teacher training component.
This program includes several other institutions, including Scripps Florida, among its
collaborators.

* The commitment by UF to the program should enhance the STEM quality of local
schools and improve chances of attracting top faculty, who are concerned about the
local school quality.

* Based on the University of Texas UTeach experience, we can project that the
program will be more diverse than the UF student population as a whole. This will
improve the diversity in math and science majors and enhance proposal success for
those disciplines.

* Ultimately, improving the math and science literacy of the Florida population will
increase the public support for education, technology and research investments.

* Florida Teach at UF can become a model for similar programs at other SUS schools.

III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form
II):

2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
Budget for State Anticipated and Incremental Years
Issue (A) Funds Reallocation (D)
Requested (C)
(B)


a. Recurring $0 $ 841,000 $ 14,000
Funds:
b. Non- $0 $ 159,000 $0
recurring
Funds:


c. Total: $0 1 $1,000,000 1 $14,000 1 $2,363,000

A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).

Tom Dana (College of Education) and Alan Dorsey (College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences) will serve as Co-Directors of Florida Teach and will
donate time to its start-up and overall management.


2008-2009 LBR


$1,700,000

$663,000









D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
Recurring $841,000 $155,000 $304,000 $200,000 $200,000
Non-
Recurring $159,000 $204,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000
Total $1,000,000 $359,000 $404,000 $300,000 $300,000

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?

No. However, a centralized office/teaching lab suite on the UF campus will
need to be identified. Some renovations may be necessary.


B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,
identify the project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.
2.


2008-2009 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University: University of Florida
Florida Teach: Increasing the
Quality and Quantity of
Issue Title: Mathematics and Sciences Teachers




NON-
RECURRING RECURRING TOTAL

Positions
Faculty 6.00 0.00
Other (A&P/USPS) 5.00 0.00

Total 11.00 0.00


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty $325,000 $0
Other (A&P/USPS) $150,000 $0

Total $475,000 $0


Salaries and Benefits $617,500 $0
Other Personal Services $75,000 $0
Expenses $53,500 $0
Operating Capital Outlay $10,000 $0
Electronic Data Processing $0 $0
Special Category (Specific) $0 $0
Inservice teacher workshop $50,000 $0
Internship/travel $35,000 $0
Space renovation $0 $159,000

Total All Categories $841,000 $159,000


2008-2009 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:
University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida
Forensic DNA Identification Laboratory
3
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, at 'ising. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
F Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
0 Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)



I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed ii iih the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct):

This document represents the C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory's
(CAPHIL) need to create a forensic molecular DNA component in order to
positively identify Florida's victims of violent crime and provide relief for
families. There are over 100,000 missing persons at any one time in the
United States and over 50,000 unidentified decedents that are known to exist.
The State of Florida, serving as a microcosm for the US with its overall large
population size, mix of urban and rural settings, fluctuating migrant
population and multi-interstate system, accounts for a great many of these
missing persons and unidentified human remains. UF is in a position to set
the Gold-Standard for forensic DNA identification. This request is critical in
order to upgrade capabilities to compete for federal funds.

Missing persons and unidentified human remains investigations, particularly,
if a case goes cold, present a tremendous challenge for financially strapped


2008-2009 LBR









state and local law enforcement agencies. As of December 31, 2006, there
were 110,484 active missing person records in the NCIC (National Crime
Information Center). Children under the age of 18 denote 53.18% of the
records and 11.46% represent young adults between the ages of 18 and 20
(FBI-NCIC Missing Person and Unidentified Person Statistics for 2006). Many
who go missing are never reported. By enhancing and expanding the
capabilities of the CAPHIL, to include mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequencing,
UF proposes to develop the capacity to perform molecular analyses that does
not currently exist anywhere in the State of Florida: to identify the
unidentified dead and assist Florida's families, law enforcement agencies, and
medical examiners in resolving cold cases and unsolved cases of missing
persons.

This request directly addresses the needs of Florida's citizens and the
CAPHIL's mission to be the statewide center for identification of Florida's
missing and unidentified; to conduct all functions required to care for our
past, present, and future victims; to bring closure to families; and to ensure
there is never again an unknown decedent.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include 1i h/eher this
is a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished i/ih the current service/program?)

The purpose of this funding request is to augment and enhance the current
capability of the human identification process provided by the CAPHIL by
incorporating the latest technologies available in genetic forensics. It is
proposed to develop molecular forensic services, specifically using mtDNA
technologies that will be available to law enforcement and families seeking to
reconcile cold cases, missing person's and unidentified decedents.

Florida currently has over 5,000 missing adults and children. Many of these
are presumed dead. There are over 500 known unidentified bodies in the state
of Florida per a recent survey of the Medical Examiner Commission and the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). The 500 refers only to
cases after 1975. There are likely numerous others in Potter's Fields
throughout the state.

These new forensic services, and others, will be delivered to any local or state
agency who arranges to submit tissue samples from unidentified decedents
and exemplar samples from possible family members. DNA services will
expand the current program of clinical services delivered by the CAPHIL to
Florida's citizens, law enforcement and medical examiner's by increasing the
number of decedents identified, and further expand our mission regionally and
nationwide. Forensic scientists at the Pound Laboratory have been
cooperating with law enforcement and medical examiners since the late
1980's and in that time have provided clinical services and courtroom
15 2008-2009 LBR









testimony in judicial circuits worldwide and have examined over 2400
decedents. The FDLE, representing the needs of the people of this state,
currently do not and will not develop these very specialized DNA laboratory
capabilities. All molecular analyses, data collection and sampling of both
primary and family reference samples tissues will strictly adhere to the
published FBI protocols and forensic standards. Further we will establish a
systematic re-evaluation of any and all human tissue (bone, hair, and teeth)
considered to be related to any cold case regardless of the passage of time for
its evidentiary potential, including the exhumation of any and all Jane or John
Does interred in 'Potter's Fields' throughout the state of Florida, regardless of
postmortem interval. This model has been used successfully by the Joint
Pacific Accounting Command Central Identification Laboratory to identify
the nation's military service members from all foreign conflicts.

The new facility will also perform technical research on enhancing the
analytical value of compromised or contaminated tissue samples and
exploring the potential DNA yield of abiotic sources, such as reduced size
STR and mtDNA amplicon performance. Research has demonstrated that a
reduction in amplicon size will increase the potential success from severely
degraded tissue samples such as bone exposed to the environment and passage
of time. There is little information on the persistence of mtDNA from
degraded human tissue in contact with soil. We will test issues related to the
extraction and purification of human DNA from soil thus increasing our
ability to positively identify cold cases. Several commercially available DNA
extraction protocols will be evaluated for their ability to extract and purify
template DNA and new technologies developed and patented based on these
results.

Research on contaminated tissue including pathogens naturally occurring or
via an unfriendly agent, especially after exposure to the elements and more
specifically thermal damage will directly address issues facing the
government after 911 and continuing today.

B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that
will strengthen the provision of this service/program:
a. Consultation and coordination with the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement Forensic Laboratories is on going.
b. The University of Florida's College of Medicine, Department of
Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, recently acquired the
Office of the District Eight Medical Examiner and provides clinical pathologic
services. Cooperation with that unit has been long standing and this new
program will compliment their daily mission.
c. The University of Florida's Cancer/Genetic Research Institute's program
in Genetics will be an invaluable resource for young new researchers.


2008-2009 LBR









d. The University of Florida's Cancer/Genetic Research Institute, a 60
million dollar investment, will provide additional space to the current
CAPHIL to house the new capability, taking advantage of state of the art
equipment and personnel attuned to these specific requirements.
e. The Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Science's recent decision to
create a program in Forensic Medical Sciences at the Master's and ultimately
Doctoral level will compliment this new initiative by providing students with
hands-on experience.

III. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and
the expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following,
if applicable.)

The University of Florida has clearly demonstrated its commitment to
molecular genetics as evidenced by the newly dedicated 350,000 square foot
Cancer/Genetic Research Complex. Nearly 400 faculty, research scientists
and staff are devoted to developing new methodologies and techniques, and
are generating delivery systems for medical science. The CAPHIL moved
into a custom-designed 4000 square foot laboratory, with a full autopsy suite,
cold room, radiography, etc., in this state-of-the-art facility in July of 2006.
This new initiative takes advantage of any and all potential collaborations
with in-house expertise.

The establishment of this facility will allow the University of Florida to take
advantage of the President's allocation of nearly 5 billion dollars
(www.DNA.gov) made available for resolving cold cases. The University of
Florida will become the only non-profit institution east of the Mississippi to
have these capabilities and can become the sole-source for this ever growing
need for the citizens of the state. Finally, we envision making these services
available to any submitting law enforcement agency or medical examiner in
the US and the University of Florida becoming a leader in research on the
circumstances these unique tissues present.

A. Number of Headcount Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year, for the next five years:

Four (4) students from the proposed IDP in forensic medical sciences will
be required and form the core for the first two (2) years, followed by an
additional two students per year.

B. Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year for the next five years. If these are new FTE Students are
they included in the 5-year enrollment plan?

Not applicable.


2008-2009 LBR










C. Additional degrees, if any, produced as a result of this initiative (Indicate
the additional number of Bachelor, Master, Doctoral & Professional
degrees produced by school year.)

The Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences recent decision
to create a program in Forensic Medical Sciences at the Master's and
ultimately Doctoral level would be greatly strengthened by this new
capability at the Pound Laboratory.

D. Other outcomes:
The resolution of cold cases, by identifying the unidentified, assists in
the prosecution of homicide and otherwise undetermined deaths in
Florida.

III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form
II):

2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
Budget State Anticipated and Incremental Years
for Issue Funds Reallocation (D)
(A) Requested (C)
(B)
a. Recurring $0 $611,160 $0 $611,160
Funds:
b. Non-recurring $0 $820,500 $0 $820,500
Funds:
c. Total: $0 $1,431,660 $0 $1,431,660


E. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
F. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
G. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).
H. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
No. Existing space in the UF Genetics and Cancer Institute will be
upgraded to meet the accreditation requirements of the American Society
of Crime Lab Directors.


2008-2009 LBR













2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II




University: University of Florida
Issue Title: Forensic DNA Identification Laboratory




NON-
RECURRING RECURRING TOTAL

Positions
Faculty 9.00 0.00
Other (A&P/USPS) 0.00 0.00

Total 9.00 0.00


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty $110,000 $0
Other (A&P/USPS) $254,000 $0

Total $364,000 $0


Salaries and Benefits $80,160 $0
Other Personnel Services $32,000 $0
Expenses $0 $0
Operating Capital Outlay (Equipment) $0 $420,500
Electronic Data Processing $135,000 $0
Special Category $0 $0
(Required Upgrades for Certification) including HVA $0 $400,000
at Forensic standards, Cross-Contamination $0 $0
Mitigation, and specialized Security measures $0 $0

Total All Categories $611,160 $820,500


2008-2009 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:

University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida
Interdisciplinary Program in
Sustainability and a Healthy Environment
4
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i\ilg. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry workforce programs, retention of students.).
F Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
0 Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)

I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i itl the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct):

Sustainability is a quickly evolving cross-cutting perspective that links teaching, research,
extension and service across disciplines involving ecology, economy and social equity,
set in a global context. It is integral to nine of the twelve "Strategies for Maximum
Impact" identified in the University of Florida Strategic Work Plan.1 It also coheres with
the growing recognition around the world, including at the 2002 United Nations World
Summit on sustainable Development, which declared that developing sustainable
lifeways and livelihoods must become civilization's axial social organizing principle.
This belief was accurately grounded on the recognition that the health and prosperity of
human beings and nature are intimately related.


1 The strategies most closely tied to sustainability are: 2) Internationalization, 3) Life Sciences, 4) Ecology
and the Environment, 5) Energy, 6) Agriculture and its Impact, 9) Professional Preparation, 10) Health
Professionals and Health Care, 11) Children and Families, and 12) Aging. Each of these strategies, and the
synergies they generate, will increasingly benefit from adoption of the knowledge bases, research methods
and ethical positions described by sustainability.
20 2008-2009 LBR









The University of Florida's Mission Statement, included in the Board of Governors'
Strategic Plan, specifically recognizes that "changing times will require that we
continually expand and evaluate our academic aspiration," and that the "University of
Florida aspires to advance the state, nation and the international community by
strengthening the human condition and improving the quality of life." The proposed
interdisciplinary Program in Sustainability and a Healthy Environment directly addresses
this culminating element in the University's Mission Statement.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include ii hether this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished i ith the current service/program?)

The Program for Sustainability and a Healthy Environment will be a new program
designed to utilize expertise developed internationally to promote sustainability literacy
through graduate and undergraduate teaching and to promote sustainable development in
Florida through research and extension. It will connect not duplicate, ongoing research
programs. It will formalize the relationship between UF's nationally recognized campus
sustainability practices and the academic mission by incorporating the Office of
Sustainability into this new comprehensive program. Utilizing the campus itself as a
laboratory for sustainability research will more efficiently connect our statewide
researchers on campus and extension personnel in the field. The Program proposes the
following linked components:

The Sustainable Development Laboratory (incorporating the existing Office of
Sustainability)
Undergraduate Certificate in Sustainability Studies (fostering sustainability
literacy)
Graduate Certificate in Sustainability and a Healthy Environment (training
interdisciplinary professionals for the work force; creating new forms of service
learning)
Program in Applied Sustainability Research (developing new technologies and
addressing human behavioral change)
Extension Program in Sustainability (ensuring that technologies and knowledge
are transferred where they are needed in Florida and beyond)

The Certificate programs will be campus-wide and incorporate experiential service
learning into their pedagogy. The research and extension programs will bring new
resources to the following campus units: The Warrington College of Business
Administration, The College of Design Construction and Planning, The College of
Engineering, The Levin College of Law, The School of Natural Resources and the
Environment, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and IFAS, including the IFAS
Cooperative Extension Service.


2008-2009 LBR









B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:

The new program will build on current and proposed sustainability initiatives at UF.

First, the Office of Sustainability, viewed as a national leader, and created as a five-year
project by the President, will be institutionalized and explicitly linked to the academic
program by creation of the Campus Sustainable Development Laboratory. This virtual
facility will utilize the entire campus as the basis for experimentation in sustainable
technologies and behavioral change.

Second, current research Centers, Institutes and Programs at UF have some focus on
sustainability as it relates to water, energy, land use, natural resources and the built
environment, among others, but consider sustainability from discrete disciplinary
perspectives. This program will use sustainability's triple bottom line to integrate
research between and among these campus units through project-based collaborations.

Third, the IFAS Cooperative Extension Service has formed a fledgling sustainability
working group and has recently retained several new county agents explicitly tasked with
a sustainability mission. Still on-campus extension programming does not currently
deliver knowledge generated by all of UF's Colleges; some such as Business
Administration and Design Construction and Planning are critical to addressing
sustainability, yet employ no statewide extension specialists.

Finally, UF has a rich curriculum in courses that explicitly address, or are related to,
sustainability but these courses or collections of courses are not coordinated across the
range of disciplines implicated in the triple bottom line. In the Fall of 2007 the Office of
the Provost funded a project of the UF Sustainability Committee to support mini-grants to
incorporate sustainability into the curriculum. More than a dozen proposals from a wide
range of disciplines were funded. Clearly, there is significant faculty interest in bringing
sustainability theory and methods into the classroom.

The Program for Sustainability and a Healthy Environment will connect and scale up this
rich array of current and developing resources by creating conceptually sound certificate
programs, organizing project-based interdisciplinary research and scholarship; promoting
applied sustainability extension and outreach; modeling campus sustainability initiatives,
and fostering state and national and international exchange through conferences and
marketing.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and
the expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following,
if applicable.)

i. Number of Headcount Students receiving services or participating in
the program by year, for the next five years:


2008-2009 LBR









ii. Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year for the next five years. If these are new FTE Students
are they included in the 5-year enrollment plan?
iii. Additional degrees, if any, produced as a result of this initiative
(Indicate the additional number ofBachelor, Master, Doctoral &
Professional degrees produced by school year.)
iv. Other outcomes:

The Program's outcomes will reflect and integrate the university's three part mission of
teaching, research and service/extension.

Teaching: Research supported by the Office of the Provost concluded that our current
offerings in sustainability-related courses are comparable to some peer universities.
However, these are not connected and marketed across disciplinary divides. To overcome
this deficiency, 2 new university-wide certificate programs will be developed for
undergraduate and graduate students. Success will be determined by enrollment levels,
the extent to which these Programs attract highly qualified students, post-graduate
employment in sustainability-related professions, by the development of new and
retooled existing courses (especially capstone courses, those that integrate service
learning and those that offer critical approaches to sustainability theory), recruitment and
retention of new faculty, and by Program recognition by state and national accreditation
entities, professional associations and peer institutions.

Research. The program will create connectivity between colleges, subunits (institutes,
centers, programs) and individual faculty members and to the Office of Sustainability.
New lines will be distributed according to a collaborative decision making process; some
lines may be used as rotating visiting lines, dedicated to time-limited projects. Specific
projects, collaboratively determined and developed, will focus interdisciplinary action on
programmatic priorities, also collaboratively determined. Success will be determined
based on the extent to which interdisciplinary research collaborations result in new
knowledge and technologies developed, applied and reported (through publications), and
the extent to which applications, practices and policies are disseminated and
implemented. Success will further be determined by the extent to which on-campus
demonstration projects are established and long-term monitoring systems put into place.
The number and value of interdisciplinary grants the Program facilitates will also serve as
a key evaluative metric.

Extension: Service in a statewide context is described as extension and is the critical
component of the University of Florida's land grant mission. The role of extension must
change to reflect the State's changing priorities and under the current IFAS leadership
this has already begun. This Program will add new statewide extension faculty from the
participating units in order to further sustainability extension, and contribute to new
county extension faculty where demand is expressed. Success will be measured by the
extent to which knowledge and technologies are transferred from the University of
Florida campus to county extension offices and applied in the communities they serve.
Growth and development of sustainability extension services can also be measured


2008-2009 LBR









against already developed programs in peer institutions such as Michigan State,
Wisconsin and North Carolina.

Service and Service Learning: Service learning allows students to incorporate community
service into their course work, while reflecting on their community-based experiences.
Typically described as the "scholarship of engagement" this form of pedagogy is
underutilized and undervalued. This Program will fortify existing service learning
programs in sustainability-related fields, foster new ones, and encourage
interdisciplinarity in service learning. Success will be determined based on the extent to
which students contribute to the incorporation of sustainability practices in community
contexts. Because service learning remains a developing pedagogy, an additional metric
will be a demonstration of national leadership through traditional academic venues such
as conferences and publications.

III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form
II):

2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
Budget for State Funds Anticipated and Incremental
Issue (A) Requested Reallocation Years (D)
(B) (C)
a. Recurring $0 $3,167,500 $0 $3,167,500
Funds:
b. Non-recurring $0 $316,000 $0 $316,000
Funds:
c. Total: $0 $3,483,500 $0 $3,483,500


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).
D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?

This project will identify existing space on campus to be renovated.

B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,
identify the project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


2008-2009 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University: University of Florida
Issue Title: Interdisciplinary Program in
Sustainability and a Healthy Environment




RECURRING NON-RECURRING TOTAL

Positions
Faculty 24.00 0.00
Other (A&P/USPS) 8.00 0.00

Total 32.00 0.00


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty $1,434,000 $0
Other (A&P/USPS) $399,000 $0

Total $1,833,000 $0


Salaries and Benefits $2,425,500 $0
Other Personal Services $37,000 $0
Expenses $705,000 $316,000
Operating Capital Outlay $0 $0
Electronic Data Processing $0 $0
Special Category (Specific) $0 $0
$0 $0
$0 $0
$0 $0

Total All Categories $3,167,500 $316,000


2008-2009 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:

University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida
Nanoscience Institute for Medical and
Engineering Technology (NIMET)
5
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i\ilg. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
Z Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i iit the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct):

Imagine a next-generation computer small enough to fit in your shirt pocket, orders of magnitude
faster and more powerful, able to respond to your verbal commands, and operating on quantum
mechanical logic that provides new functionality and much lower power consumption. Imagine a
medical device small enough to be implanted in the body, powerful enough to diagnose disease
and send real-time wireless vitals to a physician anywhere in the world. Imagine house paint that
converts sunlight into electricity for the home; public buildings where single molecules of toxins
are detected and eliminated. Imagine measuring the functions of a single brain cell with the
resolution of individual molecules. These achievements may sound like science fiction, but are
conceptually possible with the advent of nanoscale science and technology (NS&T).

Understanding and manipulating objects at the nanoscale is widely viewed as the most significant
technological frontier currently being explored in science. The decision to master this length
scale is not arbitrary; it represents a boundary where structures engineered by man are becoming
limited by current technologies; it is the scale where biological molecules and living cells
function and interact; and the interface where these like dimensions merge is the new frontier that


2008-2009 LBR










science, engineering and medicine must conquer to advance. When matter is controlled at the
nanoscale, fundamental properties of things like temperature, electricity, magnetism, and
chemical reactions can change completely. The laws of classical physics describe our cosmic
universe; the motions of the planets, the trajectory of a baseball, and the behavior of things we
experience everyday. But the laws of quantum mechanics apply in the nano-world. The operation
of computer chips in present-day computers can be explained by the laws of classical electron
flow; but when electrons are confined to nanoscale-dimension they behave according to the laws
of quantum mechanics. The semiconductor industry currently utilizes electron and optical
lithography techniques to fabricate integrated circuits with billions of features on 8-inch silicon
wafers. But this fabrication technology has progressed about as far as it can. Now, utilizing
nanotechnologies, scientists have learned to manipulate individual molecules or nanowires and
connect them for information processing. Consequently, future chips made with nanoscale
dimensions will process information based on quantum mechanical principles and lead to
computers with new logic and functionality. These new nanoscale technologies offer significant
promise for innovation in virtually every sector of society including health, electronics,
transportation, materials, energy, the environment, and national security, and have been heralded
as "the next industrial revolution."

The Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technologies (NIMET) was recently
established at the University of Florida (UF). The center piece of the NIMET is the newly
constructed Nanoscale Research Center Facility in which nanosystems will be fabricated. The
purpose of this request is to provide unique, world-class instrumentation and staff for this
facility so that it can create research, education, and commercialization opportunities in
nanoscale science and technology in the State of Florida.

Already the State of Florida has provided:

$35 million through the Public Education Capital Outlay (PECO) fund in 2004-2005
to construct the new Nanoscale Research Facility (NRF) that provides some of the
most advanced NS&T capabilities such as state-of-the-art Class 100 clean rooms and
advanced imaging labs for nanofabrication and biotechnology.
$4 million in 2006-2007for a Center of Excellence in Nano-Bio Sensors (CNBS) that
will utilize NRF capabilities to develop and commercialize sensors for medical and
homeland security applications.

To fully accomplish this vision for the future the following will be needed:

Instrumentation of the new Nanoscale Research Facility (NRF) building with key
equipment essential for multidisciplinary research at the interfaces of engineering,
physics, chemistry, biology, agriculture, and medicine; and consolidation of select
existing facilities and staff at UF into NRF space
Recruitment of highly-trtained technical staff to operate the state-of-the-art
nanotechnology equipment, train our students in its use as part of their education in
nanotechnology, and assist our industrial collaborators in research leading to
commercialization.
Attract exceptional faculty into the Colleges of Medicine, Liberal Arts and Sciences,
and Engineering to catalyze research and development, educational activities, and
entrepreneurship at the UF in the fields of NS&T through interdisciplinary
collaborations.


2008-2009 LBR










NIMET's Nanoscale Research Facility is a major State of Florida resource and to realize the full
benefit the facility needs to be adequately staffed and instrumented. Thus additional non-
recurring funding is requested to acquire specialized equipment to fabricate, visualize and
manipulate nanoscale structures into useful devices and sensors for commercialization. Recurring
funding is requested to hire highly-trained technical staff to operate this equipment and train our
students in NS&T skills for jobs in this new industry. These new nanoscale technologies offer
significant promise for innovation in virtually every sector of society including health,
electronics, transportation, materials, energy, agriculture, the environment, and national security.
These additional resources, along with existing capabilities of NIMET and UF in nanoscience,
would instantly position the State of Florida as an international leader in nanotechnology research
and education with capabilities that would rival those of any major research university in the U.S.



II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include i/ whether this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished lI ith the current service/program?)
NIMET
The Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technologies serves as an umbrella
support organization for UF's multimillion dollar NS&T research efforts across the campus. The
University of Florida already has significant NS&T activities. Nano-related research contracts
currently in place account for $40M-$50M in UF research funding, involves the research of over
eighty faculty and staff, group consortia, multidisciplinary centers, and research facilities that
span several colleges at the University. But competing in NS&T at the national level requires
leading-edge equipment, facilities, and technical staff; and these can be provided through NRF.


The NRF Will Provide the Facilities for NIMET Research
The centerpiece of NIMET will be the $35 million, NRF building currently under construction on
the UF campus just off Center Drive across from the New Engineering Building. The UF made a
compelling case to the State of the need for NS&T research, and the State of Florida provided $35
million through the Public Education Capital Outlay (PECO) fund to construct the new Nanoscale
Research Facility (NRF). The NRF will be a two-story building with seven functional areas
essential for NS&T research:
1. Class 100-1000 cleanroom facilities for nanofabrication and bio processing.
2. Advanced electron, optical, and surface imaging laboratories.
3. Core research laboratories for synthesis, processing, characterization, assembly, testing,
and integration of organic and inorganic nanoscale materials, devices and sensors.
4. General laboratory space for interdisciplinary research collaborations.
5. Offices for faculty, staff and users
6. Interactive spaces for conferences, informal gatherings, user administration, and
surroundings conducive to multidisciplinary interactions.
7. Building support and utility handling areas.


2008-2009 LBR










The Class 100-1000 cleanroom facilities provide seven research bays that have highly controlled
environments to filter virtually all particles from the air since even a dust particle could foul a
device with nanometer features. A Bio/Nano research bay is specifically designed for bio
processing with a separate air handling system that environmentally isolates it to avoid cross
interaction with the other nanofabrication bays. The Advanced Electron Beam Imaging suites are
constructed to achieve as low vibrations as possible, and to be free from electromagnetic
interference (EMI). Such extreme conditions are essential requirements if one hopes to use
highly sensitive instruments successfully for resolving objects with atomic resolution.

NIMET Science and Technology

It is truly mind-boggling to contemplate the potential impact of NS&T on future society. The
emerging developments in nanoscience and nanoengineering are making it possible to
manipulate matter at the most fundamental levels that control the way most everything functions.
While there is still much to be learned, it is becoming possible for man to engineer systems at the
nanoscale that rival or even improve on natural systems. Specific science and technology areas
of research here at the University of Florida where advances in nanoscience and technology will
have seminal impact are: 1)Nanomedicine, 2)Nanoelectronic Phenomenon, 3)Functional
Microsystems, 4)Nano-biotechnology, and 5) Nano Plant and Food Science.

Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine is utilizing nanotechnology phenomena to achieve highly selective medical
intervention at the molecular level where biological molecules and living cells function. This is
helping medical researchers selectively target and treat cancer and heart disease with minimal
side effects. New prosthetic and medical implants are being engineered with molecular covers
tailored to interact with the body in beneficial ways. Drugs are being processed with nanometer
dimensions that greatly accelerate the reactivity and effectiveness of the drug in the body because
of the increased surface area, or make it possible to be absorbed through the skin directly into the
blood. Nanoparticles with tailored properties can be injected into the blood to selectively absorb
and treat drug poisoning or overdoses.

Nanoelectronic Phenonmenon

Making electronic components smaller and smaller has already revolutionized consumer
electronics, communications and computing. In 1970 semiconductor processing technology had
made it possible to assemble about 4,000 transistors on a silicon chip; today it is possible to get
100,000,000 features on that same chip due to the industry's increasing ability to fabricate smaller
and smaller feature sizes on silicon.

But engineers are reaching the limits of these manufacturing technologies, and if we are going to
maintain this communication revolution it will be new nanoscale technologies that sustain the
continued miniaturization. Today researchers are showing that single molecules properly
configured can function as a transistor, and that nanotubes and nanowires fabricated from strings
of molecules and atoms can be manipulated into configurations where they can be used to store
and/or process information.


2008-2009 LBR









* Functional Microsystems


Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) have proven that making things smaller, faster and
cheaper is good business. Typically fabricated with micron dimensions (10-6 m), current day
MEMS devices include air bag sensors, accelerometers, stress sensors, flow indicators, and
microfluidic devices that can separate and analyze minute quantities of chemicals. Now with
nanofabrication capabilities nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) are being fabricated as
mass detectors with the ability to weigh single molecules; as high-frequency resonators with
sensitivities up to the GHz range; as ultra-fast, low-power switches; and as integrated
microfluidic devices capable of separating, manipulating, and analyzing individual human cells.
At the nanoscale, conventional interactions like surface tension, temperature and electrical
properties change, and new forces like quantum friction and quantum elasticity bring new
opportunities to the engineer's tool kit.

Nano-Biotechnology

Semiconductor engineers are also learning from their life science colleagues that biological
molecules can be functionalized to serve as a template for arranging nanoscale circuit
components in a regular fashion. DNA is a well known organic molecule that is versatile and
stable, and has already been used to help fashion logic devices, chemical and biological sensors,
and molecular transistors of nanoscale proportions. Even viruses have gotten into the act and in
one application, researchers have utilized viruses and their proteins, doped with selected metals
and wrapped around a single strand of DNA, to template wires and thin film structures used in
battery electrodes.

Nano Plant and Food Science

The University of Florida is one of the leading research universities in the world in plant and food
science, and many of the same concepts in NS&T that are proving so useful in medicine and
biotechnology can and need to be applied in the areas of plant and food science. These range all
the way from developing cheap, reliable, disposable nanosensors for ensuring the safety of our
processed food supply; to developing nanoscale indicators that can track plant biology and
disease origins.



B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:


With the NRF facility fully instrumented with world-class state-of-the-art equipment,
NIMET will facilitate collaborative activities through multi-disciplinary proposals with
other faculty and research facilities here at UF. The Institute will lead efforts to establish
the State of Florida Center of Excellence in Nano-Bio Sensors (CNBS). The Institute
will closely coordinate resource development and programmatic direction with related
research entities on campus, including CNBS, MAIC, PERC, the Genetics Institute, the
Brain Institute, and IFAS. The University of Florida Nanofabrication Facilities (UFNF)
will be moved from temporary space into the new NRF space. Key faculty support and
appointments will be used to stimulate and focus research in NS&T targeted at new
funding and entrepreneurship. The Institute will also seek to establish multiple federally-


2008-2009 LBR










funded multi-investigator Centers of Excellence to support the fundamental nanoscience
research (through NSF MRSEC & NSEC), integrated functional microsystems (through
DARPA, ARL, NSF-ERC, NSF-STC) and Nanomedicine (through NIH). Topics under
active discussion for federally-funded Center proposals include Nanomedicine,
Nanotechnology for Energy, and the Nanoscience of Single Quantum Events.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and
the expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following,
if applicable.)

Summary: We expect that the facilitation of NIMET will result in:

Generation over 5 years of $50-million in external grant/contract funding at the
University of Florida
Acquisition of at least one national nanoscale science and technology research and
education center
Support of the Center for Nano-Bio Sensors that will result in the transfer of
nanotechnology and the creation of start-up companies within the state of Florida
Recruitment of exceptional faculty attracted by NIMET's capabilities.
Training of more than 150 graduate students in the interdisciplinary areas of
nanotechnology
Development of new research concepts, crop improvement, and manufacturing
initiatives through collaborative interactions.

Specific opportunity areas include the following:

1. Increased Federal Funding Opportunities. Nanoscale science and technology is a major
focus of Federal funding agencies that has been increasingly supported in the U.S. The National
Nanotechnology Initiative was launched in Fiscal Year 2001 and since then annual Federal
funding has grown to more than one billion dollars; total research and development spending is
about $3 billion annually; the technology has spawned numerous patents, publications, and start-
up companies; and eleven Federal agencies now support various areas of nanotechnology and
national coordination of research is managed through the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and
Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC).
The equipment and techniques developed in NS&T centers like NIMET NRF today will be used
to educate the next generation workforce and develop the manufacturing tools that produce the
consumer products of the future.

2. Increased Opportunities for Industrial Interactions and Intellectual Property. The
economic impact of NS&T will attract industrial users interested in these next-generation
technologies, and result in spin off industries, patents, and licensing of new technologies
developed in NRF. As testament to the economic market impact of nanotechnology in general
and NIMET potential in particular, it is estimated that over the next 10-15 years, nanotechnology-
based industries will require a 2 million strong workforce. Nanotechnology will directly
contribute over $200 B annually in goods and services to the world economy by 2007 and greater
than $1 trillion annually within the next ten years.


2008-2009 LBR









By merging the scientific skill sets of critical interdisciplinary faculty with cutting edge
nano-instrumentation contained within the dedicated NRF building, NIMET will act as
the foundation to create an internationally renowned research program in translational
nanotechnology that will spin off revolutionary applications in medicine, engineering, life
sciences and physical sciences. Specific possibilities include: 1) medical applications
including nano-therapeutics and nano-diagnostics, 2) energy, food and potable water
production, 3) nano-scale electronics, photonics, magnetics, instrumentation and
metrology, 4) remediation of environmental pollution, 5), homeland security applications,
7) modeling and simulation, and 8) knowledge of nanotoxicity.
3. Acquisition of Large Research Grants ($2-4 million per year)
The NRF capabilities, properly staffed and instrumented, will provide strong support and
exceptional justification for major research grants from Federal funding agencies like NSF, DOD,
NASA, NIH, DOE, etc. for a number of reasons:
Large grants require exceptional facilities like those provided by NRF.
The major funding agencies prefer to award large grants to centralized user facilities
because:
o They reach many users with only one large equipment purchase
o The facilities are maintained and operated by a highly trained technical staff so
equipment use is more efficient and stays in service much longer
o There is continuity to the support of students and education in the use of forefront
techniques
Virtually all large research grants to other universities are supported in some manner by major
research facilities.
4. Improved Success on Individual Investigator Research Grants ($100,000 to 300,000 each)
Because NRF facilities will be centralized and open to all faculty, Individual Investigators can
experience increased success rates for even small awards by proposing access to NRF facilities
without including expensive equipment requests in their proposals.
5. Forge Multiple Strategic Research Partnerships
The capabilities of a fully instrumented NRF and the intellectual leadership of NIMET at UF will
form the basis for strategic alliances with:
Major federal funding agencies (e.g. NSF, DOD, NIH, etc.)
National Laboratories (e.g. Sandia National Lab)
Top tier academic institutions (e.g. Scripps Institute)
Fortune 1000 companies interested in access to NIMET NRF research, students, and
faculty (e.g. Intel Corp.)
6. NRF User Fee Income ($100,000 to 1,000,000 per year)
Since NRF is a general user facility fees can be charged for use of equipment. Fees charged to
UF and external academic users would need to be moderate and commensurate with those
charged at other universities; they would come from research grants. Fees charged to industrial
users would be more substantial, priced to be equal to similar services available commercially.
Depending on the fee structure, how fully NRF is instrumented, and the numbers of users income
could range from a few hundred thousand to a million dollars.


2008-2009 LBR









7. Improved Faculty and Student Recruitment
Because of the national prominence and activity in NS&T research, some of the best researchers
in the world are doing research in this area. In order to attract these faculty or their students to
UF it is essential to have nanoscience facilities and a body of active colleagues in this field.
Similarly, the best students will be attracted by the same opportunities.
8. Educational Benefits
The research at NIMET NRF and UF in NS&T can be used to create novel multidisciplinary
undergraduate and graduate curricula to address the employment demands of the burgeoning
multifaceted nanotechnology industry.
9. Nucleation of Multidisciplinary Interactions
Just as NS&T has become a focus area in Federal funding priorities, so has the emphasis on
multidisciplinary research. The NIMET NRF building was conceived and built as a
multidisciplinary project involving three colleges at UF (COE, CLAS, HSC). Furthermore,
because it is a user facility open to all and because of its design that provides offices and
interactive spaces for users, it will be a natural meeting place for faculty and students from many
disciplines because that is where their research will be. This will do more to nucleate
collaborative interactions than almost any other mechanism.
10. Increase Private Philanthropy to UF ($10,000,000 30,000,000)
The new NRF building, the high visibility of nanotechnology, and the longevity this field will
have presents realistic expectations that a donor will want to contribute funds for support of NRF.
i. Number of Headcount Students receiving services or participating in
the program by year, for the next five years:
ii. Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year for the next five years. If these are new FTE Students
are they included in the 5-year enrollment plan?
iii. Additional degrees, if any, produced as a result of this initiative
(Indicate the additional number ofBachelor, Master, Doctoral &
Professional degrees produced by school year.)
iv. Other outcomes:

III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form
II):

2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
Budget for State Anticipated and Incremental Years
Issue (A) Funds Reallocation (D)
Requested (C)
(B)


a. Recurring $0 $825,000 $431,549
Funds:
b. Non- $0 $5,972,225 $0
recurring
Funds:


c. Total: $0 $6,797,225 $431,549 $15,747,225


2008-2009 LBR


$1,775,000

$13,972,225










A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).

B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).

C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).

Existing equipment facilities from the University of Florida Nanofabrication
Facility (UFNF) will be moved from temporary space into the NRF Cleanroom
(estimated replacement value $2 million), and three technical personnel and
their support funds will be transferred to NRF operations ($431,549).

D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

Fiscal Year 2009-10
Request Recurring Non-recurring
Funds Funds
Salaries and fringe for three faculty in the Colleges of $600,000
Medicine, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Engineering.
Key equipment for the NRF Cleanroom and Bio/Nano Bay, $3,000,000
Advanced Imaging and Characterization Labs, Core
Research Labs, and General Interdisciplinary Labs.
Start-up packages for three new faculty lines. $3,000,000
Salaries and fringe for technical staff to operate NRF $225,000
facilities.
TOTALS $825,000 $6,000,000

Fiscal Year 2010-11
Request Recurring Non-recurring
Funds Funds
Salaries andfringeforfaculty in the Colleges ofMedicine, $0
Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Engineering.
Key equipment for the NRF Cleanroom and Bio/Nano Bay, $2,000,000
Advanced Imaging and Characterization Labs, Core
Research Labs, and General Interdisciplinary Labs.
Salaries and fringe for technical staff to operate NRF $125,000
facilities.
TOTALS $125,000 $2,000,000

This multi-year request includes a total of six faculty hired over three years; and one-time start-up
funds for each faculty hired of $ million.


2008-2009 LBR










IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
Yes.
B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,
identify the project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested

1. NIMETNanoscale Research FY 04-FY 07 5,922,300
Facility -UF 202 construction
project

2.

Beginning in FY 2004-05 the State ofFlorida approved Public Education Capital Outlay (PECO)
funds to construct the new Nanoscale Research Facility (NRF).

Public Education Capital Outlay 2004 2005 $6,496,000
Public Education Capital Outlay 2005 2006 $ 22,733,300
Public Education Capital Outlay 2006 2007 $ 5,922,300
Total $ 35,151,600


2008-2009 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University of Florida
Nanoscience Institute for Medical and
Engineering Technologies (NIMET)


RECURRING


NON-
RECURRING


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


3.00
2.00

5.00


$450,000
$150,000

$600,000


$825,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$825,000


0.00
0.00

0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$750,000
$250,000
$4,972,225
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$5,972,225


2008-2009 LBR


University:

Issue Title:


TOTAL








State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I
University: University of Florida
Descriptive Issue Title: Real-time Awareness, Decision-making and Response
(RADAR) system: Enhanced Security for Florida Campus
and Statewide Communities
University Priority Number: 6
Date Approved by Board of Trustees: 6-15-2007

Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective this issue will address:
D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included under this goal
would be new enrollment gn i ith, outreach, recruitment, financial aid, academic tracking, al iing.
etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated citizenry /workforce programs,
retention of students.).
F Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of issues that may
be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research initiatives, enhancements of certain
academic programs or program implementation / expansion of non-targeted programs.)
N Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities (Examples could
include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's mission.)

I. Needs Statement: (What need will be addressed i iili the provision offunds for this issue?)
The State of Florida is particularly vulnerable to large-scale threats from a number of
external sources including natural disasters, agricultural damage and international terrorism and
even recent examples of campus domestic terrorism. At present the typical PC-based systems
used to monitor and respond to these events are at best a patchwork of incompatible and non-
integrated proprietary systems. The University of Florida (UF) has already filed a provisional
patent for the Integrated Situational Awareness System (ISAS) technologies that provides the
core platform of the Real-time Awareness, Decision-making And Response (RADAR) system
proposed in this document.
UF has a unique depth of expertise in multiple areas required to create and transfer this
technologically robust Awareness, Decision and Response system. The RADAR system will
provide integrated (1) real-time monitoring of large-scale areas and infrastructure (2)
augmenting informed decision-making with timely access to data integrated from trusted
sources and (3) coordination of swift and effective response to a wide variety of unforeseen
situations. These situations range from typically routine occurrences (i.e. urban hazard and
rescue or rural fires and flooding) to campus and community monitoring, and response to large-
scale events including disaster preparation/relief, agricultural infestations, and biological,
conventional or unconventional terrorist attempts.
This RADAR system would be designed (and potentially manufactured exclusively) in
Florida. The skilled operators required for this system would be trained exclusively in Florida.
It is not unreasonable to project that each of the 67 counties in the State would implement at least
one of these systems for both routine and special situations. These local area systems would
form a statewide network that could be readily connected to one or more central administrations
37 2008-2009 LBR








in times of crisis. A secondary but significant benefit would be the demand for these integrated
Florida-built systems by numerous Federal agencies and every State in the Union.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include ii heIher this is a new
or expanded initiative. If expanded, what has been accomplished I ith the current
service/program?)
This proposal builds upon a current multi-faceted research and development
initiative undertaken across multiple colleges and departments at UF. UF has already
filed a provisional patent for the Integrated Situational Awareness System (ISAS)
technologies that will form the core platform to enable swift response and deployment of
both human and machine-based resources in the Real-time Awareness, Decision-
making And Response (RADAR) system proposed in this document.
A fully developed RADAR system will enable high-level decision makers
(ranging from campus and local law enforcement officials to the Office of the Governor)
to make functionally-enhanced decisions in times of stress and potential crisis. The ISAS
research team has already succeeded in bringing together Interactive Media Systems
Designers with Agricultural and Biological engineers, Mechanical and Aerospace
engineers, Urban Planners and other faculty from the College of Design, Construction
and Planning. The original ISAS concept was being developed to augment critical
decision-making by our nation's military and security forces. But as a result of working
with various UF researchers in the initial development phase, Digital Worlds realized that
an integrated interactive media system could also be applied effectively to a much
broader scope of activities including campus and community security.
This proposal seeks to specifically expand the capabilities of the ISAS
technologies to create a RADAR system to the benefit of Florida communities statewide.
RADAR applications range from enhanced campus security and response to local fires
and car accidents all the way up to coordinating multiple agency efforts and response
during widespread natural disasters or large-scale terrorist attempts. This RADAR
system is interoperable with current equipment already in place (i.e. surveillance
cameras, environmental sensors, existing databases) and next generation resources (i.e.
autonomous and unmanned ground, air and water vehicles, advanced agricultural,
biological and environmental sensors, satellite imagery and telemetry, etc.). The results
of integrating these various systems into a coherent visualization will vastly increase the
speed and effectiveness decision-makers in times of stress and potential crisis.
B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:

A. Description of outcome anticipated (Be specific).

By undertaking a concerted multi-year initiative to develop a functionally
effective RADAR system at the University of Florida, the security, prosperity and
safety of our students and citizens will be enhanced significantly. A variety of
existing and emerging technologies are currently being integrated into a flexible
system that will provide a number of significant benefits to the citizens of the State of
Florida. These interactive media systems can be deployed in communities across the
38 2008-2009 LBR








state. They can be readily connected to regional and State government offices in
times of need. With adequate support, it is anticipated that this system could be
available for technology transfer, manufacturing and deployment as early as 2010.

Primary benefits to Florida campuses and communities include:
1) Effective coordination of information between local, county and State
agencies for both routine and exceptional circumstances. This benefit
ranges from situations including:
A) Coordinating the monitoring and mitigation of forest and rural fires
throughout the State with an effectively integrated system to critical
planning, coordination and effective decision-making during
unforeseen events involving large numbers of citizens:
a) Advance simulation and planning for potential hurricane
scenarios
b) Coordinated and informed response during natural disasters
c) Advanced simulation and planning for terrorist threats
(whether agricultural, biological, nuclear, conventional or
unconventional weapons)
d) Concerted response to any unforeseen event, ranging from a
fire in a crowded stadium to an unexplained explosion or
sickness at one or more Florida tourist attractions.
B) Monitoring campus communities to ensure the highest level of
security and response to potential danger situations
C) Effectively coordinating traffic lights on the most expeditious route for
fire and rescue vehicles to arrive on the scene during rush hour in a
medium-to-large urban community
D) Lives and property saved by eliminating the need for high-speed car
chases by using the integrated airborne, mobile and fixed sensor arrays
to track and apprehend wrongdoers

2) Our leaders and decision-makers will be provided with functionally-
enhanced decision making capabilities. Humans tend to become
overwhelmed during times of stress and crisis. Coupled with inaccurate or
missing information, these factors can lead to wrong decisions and tragic
consequences. RADAR systems deployed throughout the State will create an
effective network that will not only monitor important rural and urban areas,
but actually correlate and display vast quantities of relevant data to decision-
makers in an intuitive visualization. The capability to rapidly link multiple
RADAR nodes together to create a real-time information network will
enhance the decision-making capabilities of our leaders exponentially,
especially when it is needed the most.

Beyond the safety and security features, additional benefits include:

A) The potential for the exclusive manufacture of RADAR systems in
Florida for both internal and external users, creating significant
economic opportunities. Placing just one system in every county in
Florida would require 67 systems. According to the National


2008-2009 LBR








Association of Counties and the 2000 US Census, the continental US
averages 64 counties per state. If 20 states deployed only one of these
systems in each of their counties, the demand would be for 1,280
systems. By extension, there are dozens of Federal Agencies that
would have a great interest in acquiring integrated situational
awareness systems.

B) The training of young people as RADAR system operators for
each county in Florida. Staffing an individual system 24/7 would
require a minimum base of 4-5 trained Operators per county. The
operational model for these systems may be thought of as a "virtuoso
video game" where the Operators "plays the data" to quickly correlate
and display it for the decision-makers. Thousands of young people
currently display extraordinary motor skills and cognitive dexterity in
the use of video games for entertainment. Their increasing interest
and skill with interactive media systems represents a vast potential to
be channeled into a productive pursuit that can ultimately result in
career placement and advancement.

C) The economic impact of ongoing training for RADAR system
operators from other States. If only 20 States deployed these
systems in each of their counties (an average of 64 counties per state
with 5 trained operators in each county = 320 operators x 20) 6,400
operators would be required. Federal and other State agencies would
also require ongoing training for system operators, expanding the
training needs. By offering beginning, advanced and continuing
education through the institution that designed the RADAR system,
UF and the State University System would realize a significant
number of student credit hours, either on-campus or through distance
education programs.

C. Additional information to justify request:

Florida has established itself as a national leader in high-tech initiatives. A 21st
Century system as described in this proposal is needed at not only the State level, but
at the Federal level as well.

The University of Florida has the unique combination of faculty and researchers
to effectively create, refine and transfer this integrated technology system to industry
for manufacturing and export. Most current monitoring and response systems still
use PC-based standard keyboard/mouse interfaces to gather and display information.
The current status of UF's ISAS system is already based in next-generation
visualization and user-interfaces, representing a substantial improvement in intuitive
usage and response.


2008-2009 LBR










The images below will help convey the sense of how a skilled ISAS operator interacts with multiple
streams of data to provide decision-makers with the information they need to correctly access complex
and dynamic situations.


Command center with ISAS and integrate data
displayed for informed decision-making


Operator selects sources of information to be
disnlaved and correlated as required


Multiple mobile resources can be rapidly deployed
to respond to any number of routine or emergency
situations


Operator correlates data into visual imagery to be
ri ionl a1 01 -f'nr T h\i + h ni ci~r \ nn_ tn Lr c


Polyphonic touch-display created at UF allows
Operator to quickly select target areas


Polyphonic interaction surface eliminates the need
for PC keyboard-based commands and instead
uses shapes and gestures


2008-2009 LBR


A short movie demonstrating a campus security application of the ISAS system can be found at
http://www.digitalworlds.ufl.edu/projects/isas

















Real-time Awareness, Decision-making And Response
(RADAR) system
S builds upon the University of Florida's core
Integrated Situational Awareness System
(ISAS)


IRADAR Systems would be initially manufactured
and Implemented In the State of Florida
S All RADAR Operators would be trained
and certified in the State of Florida


A diagram of the RADAR System Configuration and potential application scenarios shows how this
system will build upon the core ISAS technologies already being developed at the University of Florida
by adding the integration into existing and new infrastructure at the local, county and statewide levels.


2008-2009 LBR








III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form II):


2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Incremental Year
Budget State Anticipated 2009-10
for Issue Funds Reallocation
(A) Requested (C)
(B)


$3,510,474

$3,789,526


a. Recurring $150,000 $1,510,474 $160,000
Funds:
b. Non- $125,000 $2,439,526 $140,000
recurring
Funds:


c. Total: $275,000 $3,950,000 $300,000 1 $6,800,000

A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the funds) that will
be used to initiate this program (column A)
Digital Worlds Institute resources and startup funds received from the Opportunity
Seed Initiative and Office of Technology Licensing laid the groundwork of the ISAS
developments in 2006-2007. Currently venture capital and other federal sources are
being actively pursued. With Legislative support for 2008-09, campus-wide R&D for
the RADAR system would commence in a major concerted effort. Additional funds
will be sought for completion of the research phase in 2009-10, with anticipated
technology transfer as early as 2010.

B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B)

C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if applicable
(include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated personnel) (column C).
UF Digital Worlds Institute's affiliated faculty, researchers and graduate students
would form the core of dedicated and reallocated FTEs. Digital Worlds (DW)
affiliates already working in the underlying ISAS technologies come from across the
campus including IFAS areas (Agricultural Engineering, Sensors and Database
Development), Engineering areas (Mechanical and Aerospace, Biomedical, Computer
Science and Engineering), Medicine & Health Science areas (McKnight Brain
Institute, Neurology and Imaging) Design, Construction and Planning (GIS and
Regional & Urban Planning) and Fine Arts areas (Digital Media, Interaction Design).
Additional TEAMS and OPS personnel would be retained for the concerted R&D
during the 2008-09 year with a reduced force for final development in 2009-10.

D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from the state for
each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years. (column D only includes
column B plus each future year's need).
Request is for two years' support: $3,950,000 in 2008-09; $2,850,000 for 2009-10.

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
No


2008-2009 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II






University of Florida
Real-time Awareness, Decision-
making And Response (RADAR)
system: Enhanced Security for
Florida Campus and Statewide


RECURRING


NON-
RECURRING


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


5.10
2.20

7.30


$552,500
$115,000

$667,500


$926,806
$348,668
$45,000
$190,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$1,510,474


0.00
11.00

11.00




$0
$1,250,000

$1,250,000


$1,588,526
$127,500
$13,500
$660,000
$50,000
$0
$0
$0
$0

$2,439,526


2008-2009 LBR


University:


Issue Title:


TOTAL









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:
University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida
Solutions for Water Resources Sustainability
7
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

- Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,,i thi, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, ath ising. etc.)
- Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
N Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F- Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i ith the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct):

Florida's economic and social development over the past several decades has been
fueled by its climate and abundant water resources. Increased population, rapid urban
development, large agricultural water demands, and the need to protect natural
resources, however, have led to water resource problems in many parts of the State.
Florida's population is expected to increase from 16 million at present to 22 million
by the year 2020. Furthermore, per capital water use remains high (174 gallons per
day in 2000) despite increasing emphasis on conservation. Florida agriculture and
public water supply constitute the vast majority Florida's current freshwater usage
(48% and 32% respectively), and both increased approximately 20% between 1995
and 2000. Thus freshwater withdrawals in Florida are expected to grow from
approximately 8.2 billion gallons per day (bgd) in 2000 to more than 9.3 bgd in 2020,
with the obvious potential to produce further conflict between urban, agricultural,
industrial, and natural system water users.


2008-2009 LBR









Mining, industrial, urban, and agricultural land uses not only consume large quantities
of water, but can also compromise water quality and lead to human health and
ecological concerns. In addition to supplying Florida's citizens with drinking water
and Florida's agriculture with irrigation water, adequate clean water is needed to
protect Florida's world-class natural resources such as the Everglades and its
abundant springs. Degrading water quality in lakes (e.g. Lake Okeechobee), rivers
(e.g., Lower St. Johns), springs (e.g., Wakulla), and coastal areas (e.g., red tide
outbreaks) provide dramatic evidence of degradation of water supplies. Natural
disasters, such as the recent hurricane activity, highlight the vulnerability of Florida's
water supplies in coastal areas, as well as inland areas protected by aging levee
systems.

These complex problems require long-term, multidisciplinary scientific research and
education programs aimed at developing technologies and sustainable solutions
across natural and man-made threats to Florida's water resources if our state is going
to continue to prosper.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include 1w heiher this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished i/th the current service/program?)

This proposal will develop a long-term, interdisciplinary research, education and
technology transfer program aimed at developing technologies and sustainable
solutions across natural and man-made threats to Florida's water resources. The
initiative builds on the recently established UF Water Institute (which integrates the
expertise of existing faculty in the UF Colleges of Agricultural and Life Sciences,
Business, Design Construction and Planning, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Sciences,
and Law) by adding 8 new faculty and support staff in key unrepresented areas.

In addition to building faculty and staff expertise, funding is requested to continue to
build the UF Water Systems Collaboratory (advanced distributed interdisciplinary
laboratories, field facilities, pilot scale test facilities etc.). In 2007-08 the Florida
Legislature allocated $500,000 in non-recurring funds to begin to building the UF
Water Systems Collaboratory. The Water Systems Collaboratory will provide Florida
with a comparative advantage for a wide variety of competitive major research funds,
educational opportunities for Florida's future leaders, and commercialization
opportunities that will enhance Florida's economy. These synergistic facilities will
maximize the benefits of integrated efforts of diverse researchers addressing
important interdisciplinary water issues.


B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:

In 2006 The University of Florida established a campus-wide Water Institute to
coordinate and manage interdisciplinary research and education to support solutions
46 2008-2009 LBR









to water resource issues and thus serve the needs of all stakeholders in the State of
Florida. The Water Institute will coordinate and manage the development and
operation of the Solutions for Water Resources Sustainability Program.

The University of Florida has dedicated existing recurring funds for the Water
Institute Director's salary and existing non-recurring funds for program start-up
expenses. Approximately $4Million in private endowment funds have been pledged
for continuing Water Institute program expenses. Funds from this Legislative Budget
Request will guarantee the long term stability and success of the Water Institute, and
provide much needed funds for new faculty and staff expertise to solve critical water
resource problems.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and the
expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following, if
applicable.

The outcome of this effort will be world-class research, education and technology
transfer programs that will develop, demonstrate, and deliver solutions to state
agencies, cities, agriculture, industry and private citizens facing water-related
problems. Innovative interdisciplinary experiential educational programs will
increase the pool of well-trained water-related scientists, engineers, planners, and
policy-makers in Florida by at least 60 students per year.
Examples of water issues that UF Water Institute faculty will use the Water Systems
Collaboratory to develop and test solutions for include:

o Development of Alternative Water Supplies and Treatment
Technologies
o Improved Methodologies and Incentives for Water Conservation
o Effective Land-use Planning to Protect Water Recharge Areas, Spring-
sheds, Wetlands and Watersheds while Allowing Continued Economic
Development
o Methods to Develop and Allocate total maximum daily load (TMDL)
for Springs, Rivers, Lakes, Estuaries and Groundwaters
o Provide Objective Science for Resource Management Agencies to
Support Establishment of Minimum Flows and Levels (MFLs) for
Rivers, Lakes and Groundwaters
o Development, Implementation and Evaluation of Urban and
Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs)
o Remediation and Restoration of Water Supplies, Wetlands and
Ecosystems
o Improved Management of Stormwater and other Sources of Pollution
for Coastal Zone Protection
o Improved Water Legislation, Policy, Management and Pricing
Strategies


2008-2009 LBR









New knowledge, and new engineering, policy and legal solutions developed in
Florida will provide a model for others to follow both nationally and internationally.
Thus we envision a program committed to addressing Florida issues, but recognized
nationally and internationally as providing global solutions to water resource
problems.

Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form


2007-08
Budget for
Issue (A)


2008-09
State
Funds
Requested
(B)


2008-09
Anticipated
Reallocation
(C)


a. Recurring $0 $1,500,000 $0
Funds:
b. Non- $500,0001 $0
recurring
Funds:


Total:


$500,000 $1,500,000


Budget for 2008-09
and Incremental Years
(D)


$1,500,000

$0


$1,500,000


State Appropriated non-recurring LBR funds for UF Water Systems Collaboratory

A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).
D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?

No. Adequate buildings and associated laboratories already exist at UF for
the research and education activities described in this proposal.


B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,
identify the project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.


2008-2009 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II


University:
Issue Title:


University of Florida
Solutions for Water Resources Sustainability




NON-
RECURRING RECURRING TOTAL


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


8.00
5.00

13.00


$800,000
$280,000

$1,080,000


$1,300,000

$200,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$1,500,000


0.00
0.00

0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$0


2008-2009 LBR














University:
Issue Title:


State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I
University of Florida
Florida High Tech Corridor Council
Program


University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


8
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,, i ith, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i'ilg. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
0 Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed ii iih the provision offunds for
this issue? : Florida needs to retain, provide growth opportunities, and attach
more high technology companies to the Florida High Tech Corridor (23 counties
in central and north central Florida). In conjunction with this is the need to
provide more research and educational opportunities for the faculty and students
in the partner universities and community colleges. In addition, funds for this
initiative will train a high technology workforce which will be needed by the high
technology companies to allow their expansion and retention.
II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided (include 1w heiler this is a
new or expanded initiative; if expanded what has been accomplished ii ith the
current service/program): This program is an expansion of the existing Florida
High Technology Corridor initiative at the University of Florida. The University
of Florida entered into this program in FY2005-2006 and is seeking an increase in
funding to support program growth. The program is to provide research
opportunities between Florida high technology companies and universities as well


2008-2009 LBR









as to give graduate students training that can be used by these high technology
companies.
B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:

Beginning in 2005, the University of Florida has been providing companies in the
23 county Corridor with unique access to UF's over $500M in research in
virtually all areas of health science, agriculture, engineering, physical sciences,
and many other disciplines. In FY2006-2007, UF approved approximately $700K
in collaborative research matching grants for this program and the need is
expected to rise substantially in the next few years as the program grows at UF.

FHTCC matching funds from the University of Florida of up to $150k, per project
are awarded on a monthly basis to excellent collaborative research proposals that
provide industry partners with proven benefits including:

Supplementing company internal R&D with over $500M of cutting edge research
at the University of Florida

Leveraging company external research investments with FHTCC matching funds
free of overhead

Building world-class R&D teams to respond to joint federally funded
opportunities or other future collaborative work

Filling a company recruiting pipeline with top-notch students with industrial
research experience

C. Description of outcome anticipated (Be specific).

FHTCC's primary focus is to foster applied research between the partner
universities and their high tech industry partners in these counties. During its first
ten years, FHTCC and its industry partners have provided more than $150M to
research and development projects that benefited 250 companies in support of
more than 700 research projects engaging 1,400 graduate and doctoral students
and research assistants and 400 faculty members in side-by-side research with
company scientists and engineers. In FY2006-2007, UF approved research grants
of over $700k in FHTCC funds to match over $1M in industry cash funds and
over $1M in industry in-kind support for seven collaborative research projects.
Collectively, these funds were dedicated to support 26 faculty and graduate
students at UF. Between FY2005-2006 and FY2006-2007, the program has
supported 24 faculty and 57 graduate students with almost $1.5M of UF FHTC
matching funds, over $2M of industry funds, and over $2M of industry in-kind
support.

The budget request of $2M for FY2008-2009 will allow UF to expand the
Matching Grants Program by supporting 15-30 research projects in the fiscal year
51 2008-2009 LBR









with $2M of the request. All of these activities support the core mission of the
Corridor to attract, retain, and grow high tech industry and to help develop the
workforce to support those industries.

D. Additional information to justify request:

The Florida High Tech Corridor Council (FHTCC) was established by the Florida
Legislature in 1996 to attract, retain and grow high tech industry and to help
develop the workforce to support those industries in the service areas of the
University of Central Florida and the University of South Florida. In 2005, the
FHTCC was expanded to include the University of Florida (UF) as the third
partner of this unique economic development initiative, merging the strengths of
three world-class universities and bringing the number of Corridor counties to 23
including Alachua, Putnam, Levy, Marion, Flagler, Citrus, Sumter, Lake, Volusia,
Seminole, Brevard, Orange, Osceola, Polk, Hernando, Pasco, Hillsborough,
Pinellas, Manatee, Sarasota, De Soto, Hardee, and Highlands.


III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form
II):

2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
Budget for State Anticipated and Incremental Years
Issue (A) Funds Reallocation (D)
Requested (C)
(B)


a. Recurring $0 $2,000,000 $0
Funds:
b. Non- $1,000,000 $0 $0
recurring
Funds:


c. Total: $1,000,000 1 $2,000,000 1 o$01 1 $2,000,000


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the funds)
that will be used to initiate this program (column A).

B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09.

C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if applicable
(include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated personnel).

D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from the
state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years.


2008-2009 LBR


$2,000,000

$0









IV. Facilities:


A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
No

B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,
identify the project, fiscal amount, and year requested.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.
2.


2008-2009 LBR










2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University of Florida
Florida High Tech Corridor Council
Program


RECURRING


NON-
RECURRING


Positions
Faculty
Other (TEAMS/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate
Faculty
Other (TEAMS/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


10.00
3.00

13.00


$950,000
$144,000

$1,094,000


$1,367,500
$286,000
$152,500
$194,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$2,000,000


0.00
0.00

0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$0


2008-2009 LBR


University:

Issue Title:


TOTAL









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I
University: University of Florida
Descriptive Issue Title: Translational Imaging Technology and
Applications


Priority:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


9
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i\ilg. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
0 Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i iil the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct):
The needs addressed with this provision of funds are immediate and critical to
enhancing the health of the citizens of the state of Florida. We will utilize the funds to
combine and expand imaging research and enhance its transition, in both the short
and long terms, into the clinic and marketplace while providing the faculty, staff and
imaging infrastructure to rapidly expand and advance research and technology
development in imaging for the enhancement of human health. It will also contribute
towards the future of engineering and medicine through state of the art real world
focused academic initiatives. To maximize the effectiveness of the resources we will
also be leveraging research and development with close cooperation with existing
initiatives in imaging (such as the McKnight Brain Institute, the Cancer/Genetics
Centers, Emerging Pathogens Institute and the Advanced Magnetic Resonance
Imaging and Spectroscopy facilities).


2008-09 LBR









II. Justification


A. Description of service or program to be provided:

Imaging is an essential component of virtually every area of modern biomedical research
and clinical medicine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is in every major hospital and
is often the primary method to non-invasively examine tissues for human diseases such as
cancer, stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, muscular degeneration and injury,
and many problems associated with aging. More recently, functional MRI (fMRI) has
now been approved as a clinical technique to non-invasively monitor human brain
activity as part of many neurological procedures. Several other imaging modalities such
as magnetoencephalography (MEG), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET),
optical, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and others all have provided major impacts in
clinical health care and biomedical research.

Modem medical imaging was created by decades of basic science technology
development in physics, engineering, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and
biology. The highly interdisciplinary nature of imaging has required scientists from all of
these areas to work together to solve major problems in human health. The University of
Florida is uniquely positioned to make major new contributions to biomedical imaging:
The Health Science Center (HSC) at UF is home to dozens of basic science and
clinical departments, the new Clinical and Translational Research Institute
(CTSI), the McKnight Brain Institute, the Cancer Center, and Shands Healthcare,
the largest healthcare provider in the Southeast United States.
The College of Engineering has initiated a major new research and technology
thrust through the creation of the new Biomedical Engineering Department
(BME) as well as significant bioengineering (BE) initiatives across the entire
college of Engineering. A significant enhancement of the infrastructure (The
NanoTechnology, Emerging Pathogens and Biosciences buildings) and faculty in
biomedical engineering is fostering new efforts in technology development in
areas that include imaging, nanoscience, nanoengineering, computer modeling,
and biomaterials development. In particular, Bioimaging is a primary thrust area
of BME in collaboration with the HSC. UF, already a known leader in
Bioimaging is poised to become an internationally recognized hub of innovation
in imaging.
The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) has been widely
recognized by several national reviews and a National Academy of Sciences Blue
Ribbon panel report as the leading magnet laboratory in the world. To quote from
the NSF site review report from Jan, 2007: "It [the NHMFL] is truly a jewel in the
crown of US science."
The University of Florida's Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and
Spectroscopy (AMRIS) facility in the McKnight Brain Institute is the biological
arm of the NHMFL. With seven major instruments, an electronics laboratory, and
about a dozen support staff, AMRIS provides resources to scientists throughout
the world for studies in chemical identification, tissue microimaging, animal
imaging, and human imaging. AMRIS currently provides imaging and


2008-09 LBR









spectroscopy support for over $14 million dollars per year of federal grants,
including several program project grants, to UF investigators.

These groups will work together to create the next generation of imaging technologies
and expand and improve existing applications. The research groups in COE and the
technological efforts of the NHMFL will combine with basic biomedical scientists and
clinical investigators at UF to develop new imaging methods and more effective ways to
exploit existing imaging modalities. These will have an immediate positive impact on
major existing programs at UF and will facilitate new extramural funding opportunities.
Through the CTSI, these new imaging technologies will be transitioned into the clinic
through in house collaborations with Shands as well as through startup industries that are
already emerging from the intellectual incubator that exists through the close cooperation
and collaboration between groups in the COE, COM and CTSI that has arisen over the
last several years. It is a given that the expansion and encouragement of this
collaboration will enhance the health of Floridians as well as create new economic
opportunities and growth.
B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:
SJ. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering Department
Founded in the College of Engineering in 2002, the rapid expansion of the
biomedical engineering department complements and enhances the ongoing
efforts to initiate and facilitate the formation of multidisciplinary teams to rapidly
take laboratory discovery into the clinic and marketplace. Having grown to 10 full
time faculty, 50-affiliate faculty (from medicine, engineering and the life and
physical sciences) and over 80 graduate students, the department is rapidly taking
its place as a research and technology and educational development hub. Set to
move into state of the art research facilities in the $94 M Biosciences building
under construction (opening January, 2009) in the health sciences complex, it
represents one of only a handful of engineering departments so integrated into a
College of Medicine and Health Sciences Center. Anticipated continued rapid
growth is focused upon enhancing and accelerating research, technology and 21st
century solutions to improving human health through rapid and innovative
progress in imaging techniques and technology. It is anticipated that the
department will continue to grow to twice its current size over the next several
years. Aided by a $20M private endowment (the first named department at UF)
and extensive funding from the National Institutes of Health, National Science
Foundation and the Department of Defense, the Biomedical Engineering
Department has the mission to develop and transition all aspects of biomedical
discovery into better human health solutions and higher quality of life.
http://www.bme.ufl.edu
Cancer-Genetics Complex
The Cancer & Genetics Research Complex is designed to maximize
collaborations among different groups of researchers and to convert scientific
ideas into innovative cancer therapies and other beneficial technologies. A five-
story research wing of the UF Shands Cancer Center and a six-story Genetics
Institute wing are contained in the facility, which opened in 2006. Also included
57 2008-09 LBR









are the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research, which provides
support services to scientists, and the C.A. Pound Human Identification
Laboratory, a premiere forensic anthropology laboratory. www.ufscc.ufl.edu
* McKnight Brain Institute
The McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida is one of the nation's
most comprehensive and technologically advanced centers devoted to
neuroscience. Today the MBI-UF's collaborative spirit is alive and growing and is
represented by over 300 faculty from 51 academic departments and ten colleges
and entails research and educational programs in nearly all aspects of basic,
clinical and translational neuroscience. Additional collaborators around the world
expand this into an international effort. To the best of our knowledge, there is no
other academic program anywhere with this breadth and magnitude of
multidisciplinary talent focused on the nervous system.
With a design theme of beyond the-state-of-the-art, the conceptual mission of the
extramurally funded, $60 million, 210,000 gsf MBI-UF building that serves as a
catalyst and focal point for widely diverse, but synergistically interacting
multidisciplinary research programs. Thus, in addition to an obvious emphasis on
high technology, the strategic design of the new building includes a strong
emphasis on multi-user core facilities and a full digital integration of these and all
other systems through high speed networks and state-of-the-art computer systems.
www.mbi.ufl.edu
* Emerging Pathogens
Emerging Pathogens Institute (EPI) by fusing signature disciplines at the
University of Florida and creating opportunities for novel scientific interaction.
Develop the research capability to be prepared to prevent and contain outbreaks of
new diseases that threaten Florida. Develop the teaching capability to train the
next generation of scientists who will keep these pathogens at bay in the future.
Develop the outreach capability to educate the people of Florida on steps they can
take to avoid human diseases as well as help our private sector avoid diseases that
affect plants and animals. http://epi.ufl.edu/
* Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technologies
The Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology (NIMET) is
an umbrella organization that focuses and coordinates research and educational
activities at the University of Florida in the fields of nanoscale science and
nanotechnology (NS&T). Research in nanoscience and related fields at UF has
developed in several colleges and now involves the research of over eighty faculty
and staff in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering, and materials
science. http://www.nimet.ufl.edu/
* Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility
AMRIS is a state-of-the-art NMR facility for high-resolution solution NMR,
solid-state NMR, microimaging, animal imaging, and human imaging. AMRIS
currently has six spectrometer systems, including a 750 MHz wide bore, the most
sensitive instrument for molecular analysis in the world, an 11 T/40 cm bore
horizontal animal imaging magnet, and a 3T human system. All of our systems
are available to University of Florida and external academic and industrial


2008-09 LBR









scientists. AMRIS is a facility in the McKnight Brain Institute of the University of
Florida and was developed, in part, through a grant from the Department of
Defense. AMRIS is the facility for the biological investigations in the National
High Magnetic Field Laboratory as supported by the National Science
Foundation. http://www.mbi.ufl.edu/facilities/amris/
These and other UF and statewide biosciences initiatives are the foundation upon
which the state of Florida is emerging as preeminent location for innovation in the
biosciences and medicine (as recently reported the most prestigious scientific
magazine Nature in the article "Bioscience in the Sun" vol. 446, pp 112-3, April
2007).

C. Description of outcome anticipated:

Several existing needs in imaging at UF will be addressed with new faculty and
staff hires as part of this proposed initiative:

* Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is an indispensable tool for
mapping human brain function for both basic science and clinical procedures. The
Univeristy of Florida has several groups who use fMRI in their research, and we
recently invested in a state-of-the art human scanner in the Advanced Magnetic
Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility (AMRIS,
http://www.mbi.ufl.edu/facilities/amris/) that can support fMRI. However, UF
lacks key faculty groups in fMRI technology development, fMRI data processing,
and associated engineering technology development. Three faculty recruits and
addition of technical support staff in these areas will stimulate extensive new
research opportunities through the CTSI and other UF initiatives.
* Through the NHMFL and AMRIS, UF has established world leadership in animal
models using advanced techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to trace
nerve and muscle fibers in living tissues and in vivo spectroscopy to probe
metabolism. To translate these technologies into humans and ultimately into
clinical practice will require two faculty hires to bridge the animal and human
imaging developments at UF.
* The most significant advances in the next generation of imaging will be made
through the combination of different imaging technologies, each with its own
unique strengths. For example, MRI can provide exquisite anatomical detail but
limited information on physiology and biochemistry of living animals and
humans. PET provides very low-resolution anatomical detail but very specific
biochemical information. Other imaging modalities currently being pursued
include optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electrical impedance
tomography (EIT) for breast cancer imaging as well as optical imaging for
imaging of the brain and the heart. By recruiting additional faculty to work on the
combination of multiple imaging techniques, more complete information can be
obtained and used for improved patient care. The close collaboration between
COE and COM through CTSI will be one of the primary engines driving
biomedical translational and clinical research in the state of Florida


2008-09 LBR









Molecular imaging has the potential to significantly improve the diagnosis, and
perhaps the treatment, of human disease by probing the chemistry and physiology
of living animals and humans. Significantly, molecular imaging is being
developed at UF to monitor the results of gene and stem cell therapy. This
requires advanced imaging techniques, specialized nanoparticle design and
synthesis, and sophisticated computer software development. UF and the
NHMFL have built the foundation for this work in cells, tissue, and animals.
Additional faculty recruits will be required to translate these important advances
into human clinical research.
Finally, discoveries at the molecular level often form the foundation of important
new treatments for human disease. In the past six months at least two patents
have been filed by UF investigators for discoveries of new molecules from natural
sources that kill cancer cells in culture. These discoveries are important both for
the potential as new human drugs but also for the positive economic impact they
can provide to the state of Florida. The CTSI will provide an excellent way for
these compounds to be tested and developed, and we seek an additional faculty
recruit to add to this growing team of investigators.

The extensive collaborative efforts to realize the potential described here require not only
world-class facilities and infrastructure but world-class faculty as well. The critical
limitation to enhancing and accelerating the pace of translational biomedical imaging
research is the shortage of faculty and researchers. Only the most outstanding
investigators who have a demonstrated ability to work in an interdisciplinary
collaborative team will be hired into this effort. Junior faculty will be hired based on
their potential to be leading researchers and teachers. Senior faculty recruited will be
hired on the basis of the following expectations:

World class researcher (a given)
Strong interest or track record in innovation as evidenced by patents and
translational research metrics such as transition into pre clinical and clinical
environments either directly or through industry
An interest (or track record) of getting inventions out of the lab as evidenced
by metrics including licensing of inventions, startup companies and
involvement with clinical or industrial entities.
Talent in training the next generation of Florida researchers, clinicians and
technical personnel.

In particular we will be seeking faculty that can lead and enable multidisciplinary
research collaborations in biomedical imaging across the research community centered at
UF, as needed in following the NIH Roadmap to advancing clinical and translational
science research We will recruit talented faculty who can foster and participate in
pertinent collaborations across the state, nation and the world and advance the theory and
practice of biomedical imaging by continuing a vibrant personal research agenda based
on extramural funding.

The proposed new faculty recruits and technical support staff will significantly add to the
existing infrastructure and talent at UF and the state of Florida and will contribute to new
60 2008-09 LBR









extramural funding opportunities, new major program project grants, new shared
instrumentation grants, and new student education and training opportunities at UF.
Additionally it is expected that they will contribute both to the overall health of the
human population and towards the expansion of the biomedical research and technology
base in industry in Florida. With the critical collaborations with the CTSI, these new
opportunities will translate into improved human health and economic opportunities to
the citizens of Florida.

III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form II):


2008-09
State
Funds
Requested
(B)


2008-09
Anticipated
Reallocation
(C)


a. Recurring $ $2,362,500 $
Funds:
b. Non- $ $4,000,000 $
recurring
Funds:


$6,362,500


Budget for 2008-09
and Incremental Years
(D)


$2,362,500

$4,000,000


$6,362,500


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).
D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?

This program does not require funds for expansion or construction of facilities.

B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,identify the
project, fiscal amount, and year requested.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.
2.


2008-09 LBR


2007-08
Budget for
Issue (A)


Total:














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II


University:
Issue Title:


University of Florida
Translational Imaging Technology and Applications




NON-
RECURRING RECURRING TOTAL


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


10.00
6.00

16.00


$1,730,000
$300,000

$2,030,000


$2,162,500
$0
$200,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$2,362,500


0.00
0.00

0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$0
$0
$4,000,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$4,000,000


2008-2009 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:

Descriptive Issue Title:
University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida, University of South
Florida, Florida International University
Florida Public Health Consortium
10
June 15, 2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i\ilg. etc.)
N Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
F Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i iit the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct.):
The importance of public health has never been more tangible to the American public.
National catastrophes such as hurricanes, terrorism events such as the attacks on the
World Trade Towers in 2001, and growing concerns with obesity, Avian flu, and
health risks, demonstrate the importance of a strong public health system in our daily
lives. As a large peninsula with thousands of miles of coastline Florida faces
extraordinary risks for natural disasters and terrorism events. As a mecca for millions
of tourists, Florida's economy depends on a healthy workforce. As such, Florida's
need for an educated and effective public health workforce has never been greater.
Unfortunately, in Florida, like in other states, only a small minority of the total public
workforce has received formal public health training. The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention has estimated that 80% of public health workers in the United
States lack basic training in public health.


2008-09 LBR









Training in public health falls to the nation's schools of public health. In the state of
Florida, the University of South Florida has been an accredited school of public
health for more than twenty years and has prepared many of the states public health
professionals. In recent years, Florida International University, and the University of
Florida, have each sought similar accreditation by the Council for Education on
Public Health. Together, these universities provide an important resource for the
education of Florida's public health workforce. Geographically disparate and
committed to public health education, these universities offer the state critical
resources that can assure appropriate knowledge of both basic and advanced public
health concepts. Florida's local departments of health have unique educational needs,
particularly in areas of environmental health and business management. Moreover,
the graying of the workforce in Florida has created a need for substantial numbers of
formally educated individuals to assume leadership positions in public health over the
next decade.

The three colleges of public health in the state of Florida have committed to identify
ways to effectively collaborate in the current and future education of the public health
workforce in the state. The three universities have come together to form the Florida
Public Health Consortium. The Consortium will enhance the education and technical
assistance provided to state and local departments of health. Because of the
geographical distribution of the three universities, it is possible for the Consortium to
serve the entire state of Florida and for each of the three universities to offer their
expertise and resources to the Department of Health and to the education of all health
professions in the respective campuses and throughout the state.

Each university will establish a technical assistance center to coordinate educational
programs and provide technical assistance. Educational needs will be identified by
local public health departments and faculty on each campus. Topics which have
already been identified by a number of health departments and faculty are
environmental health, risk reduction, and business management. By staffing these
technical assistance offices with faculty and public health experts, we will create a
resource that will enhance the public health capacity in Florida. In addition, the
Centers will reach out to all the health professions on each campus, including
medicine, nursing health professions, dentistry, and veterinary medicine. These
programs will educate the entire next generation of health care providers for the state
of Florida and provide renewal for the public health workforce.

The Centers will increase the size and competence of the public health workforce.
Faculty will provide resources to tackle difficult and, possibly, unforeseen problems
in the public health arena. The Consortium will work with the Florida Department of
Health, local health departments and the broad university community to respond to
identified needs and to help identify other areas of opportunity for work. By
providing resources to the colleges of public health, the Legislature will assure
professional education of the public health workforce, timely responsiveness to
emerging public health problems, and routine continuing education in areas of local
health department need and health professions.


2008-09 LBR










The discipline of public health is broad and interdisciplinary by nature. It
includes complex, interacting components that address individual behaviors,
psychosocial factors, community issues, cultural issues, social, economic,
environmental, and policy factors. By tapping into the broad array of competence
available in public health colleges, the state will assure a myriad of expertise is
available.

Each university will establish a technical assistance center with core staff and
faculty in the five core areas of public health: epidemiology, biostatistics, social
and behavioral sciences, environmental health, and health services administration.
In addition, each technical assistance center will have scholarships for MPH
students and ten interdisciplinary Ph.D. students that can be awarded to students
who are willing to commit to working in health departments for specified periods.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include 1w heiher this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished ii ith the current service/program?)
Each of the three universities in the Florida Public Health Consortium will
establish a technical assistance center. The three centers will be distinct programs
and will manage the overall effort through a tri-college leadership team. Each
center will have a director and be integrated into the university through the
utilization of college faculty and resources. The Center director will be charged
with meeting with local Department of Health leaders and college faculty to
establish needs and develop programs to address perceived needs. In addition, no
less than yearly, the Consortium will arrange to meet with the leadership of the
Florida Department of Health to discuss their needs. Consortium members will
share programs to increase the wealth of information and educational offerings.

Each of the centers will serve three areas:
* Short courses on topics that the State Department of Health and local health
departments have identified as needs
* Work with the State Department of Health and local health departments, and
within the universities, to identify individuals interested in obtaining a master's in
public health. Individuals receiving scholarships through the Consortium will be
expected to make three year commitments to work within local health
departments once they have achieved an MPH.
* Technical assistance to the State Department of Health and local departments of
health on problems that require specific expertise. Each Center will identify
faculty with the expertise to respond to stated needs where possible. Needs that
cross multiple agencies will be addressed collectively.
* Technical assistance and education to all health disciplines at the respective
universities.


2008-09 LBR











B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:

The resources needed to create a college of public health are significant. To be
accredited, a college must have five faculty in each of the five core areas of public
health and offer at least three doctoral programs. The expertise required to
develop these programs is costly and difficult to find. Through the consortium
and the technical assistance center this broad array of resources will be available
to local departments of health and the State Department of Health. Each of the
three universities has made huge commitments to public health education. The
umbrella programs existing in each university will provide considerable resources
and additional expertise beyond the affiliated faculty.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and
the expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following,
if applicable.)

Each of the three universities (UF, FIU, and USF) will enroll ten additional MPH
students through each Center. Once the program reaches maturity, thirty new
master's of public health prepared individuals will be available to work in local
health departments each year. Each Center will enroll ten Ph.D. students to
facilitate material development and teaching of courses.

In addition, each technical assistance center will offer no less than four short
courses per year to local health department employees and to health professionals
interested in gaining more knowledge of public health issues and will respond to a
minimum of four technical assistance requests each year.

i.Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the program by
year for the next five years:

We anticipate enrolling ten additional students through each Center. Once the
program reaches maturity, this will result in thirty new master's of public
health prepared individuals working within local health departments each
year.

In addition, each technical assistance center will offer no less than four short
courses per year to local health department employees and to others interested
in gaining more knowledge of public health issues and will respond to a
minimum of four technical assistance requests each year.


2008-09 LBR









ii.Number of Headcount Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year, for the next five years:

Ten per year.

iii.Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the program by
year for the next five years.

Year 1 7.5 FTE, Years 2 forward 15 FTE

If these are new FTE Students are they included in the 5-year enrollment
plan? No.

iv. Additional degrees, if any, produced as a result of this initiative (Indicate the
additional number ofBachelor, Master, Doctoral & Professional degrees
produced by school year.)

v.Other outcomes:


Type of student 2008- 2009- 2010- 2011- 2012-
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
MPH (FTE) 44.8 44.8 44.8 44.8 44.8
Certificate (PH) 200 200 200 200 heads 200 heads
heads heads heads
Certificate (Health Professions) 200 200 200 200 200


III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form II):


2007-08
Budget for
Issue (A)


2008-09
State
Funds
Requested
(B)


2008-09
Anticipated
Reallocation
(C)


a. Recurring $0 $1,500,000 $0
Funds:
b. Non- $0 $0 $0
recurring
Funds:


1,500,000


$ 1,500,000


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the funds) that will be
used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if applicable (include
for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated personnel) (column C).
67 2008-09 LBR


Budget for 2008-09
and Incremental Years
(D)


$ 1,500,000

$0


Total:










D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from the state for
each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years (column D only includes column
B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
No.


2008-09 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University of Florida
Florida Public Health Consortium


University:
Issue Title:


RECURRING


NON-
RECURRING


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


8.00
1.00

9.00


$724,000
$45,200

$769,200


$1,001,820
$327,720
$107,460
$63,000
$0

$0
$0
$0

$1,500,000


0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$0


2008-2009 LBR


TOTAL


Total All Categories
















Priority #11

Clinical and Translational Research Institute

Combined LBR with UF-Health Science Center

OBI Narrative

See Page 74-80


2008-2009 LBR


















Priority #11

Clinical and Translational Research Institute

Combined LBR with UF-Health Science Center

OBII Fiscal Information

See Page 81


2008-2009 LBR


















Priority #12

Florida Partnership for Climate and Society (PCS)

Combined LBR with UF-IFAS

OBI Narrative

See Page 110-114


2008-2009 LBR


















Priority #12

Florida Partnership for Climate and Society (PCS)

Combined LBR with UF-IFAS

OBII Fiscal Information

See Page 115


2008-2009 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:

Descriptive Issue Title:


University Priority Number:

Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida (E&G and Health
Science Center Collaborated Effort)
Clinical and Translational Research
Institute (CTSI)

E&G #11;
HSC #1
6/15/2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi ,i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, at'ising., etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
N Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed i itl the provision offunds
for this issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct.):

The State of Florida and the Nation in general, face a critical shortage of
skilled clinical investigators capable of translating basic science discoveries
into new therapies for the diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cure of human
disease. Recognizing this crisis in research and health care delivery, the
National Institutes of Health (NIH) has created a major new funding initiative,
called the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The CTSA
provides a mechanism by which the federal government partners with
research-oriented universities and their academic health center to cost-share
the development of the infrastructure necessary to accomplish three principal
goals: 1) to speed the process of translating biomedical research discoveries
into improvements in medical therapies and health care delivery, 2) to


2008-09 LBR









increase the success of technology transfer from UF discoveries to Florida's
developing technology industry and 3) to effectively train the next generation
of multidisciplinary clinical and translational scientists. This document
summarizes the University of Florida's strategy to position itself and the State
of Florida to be national leaders in clinical and translational research and
training.

II. Justification
A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include ii hether this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished iI ith the current service/program?)

To accomplish its goals, UF will create a Clinical and Translational Science
Institute (CTSI) that will serve as the "academic home" for activities
encompassing those supported, in part, by the CTSA and the State of Florida.
The Institute will enable UF to bring necessary personnel and resources
together under one roof, including space for education and training, clinical
trials coordination, biostatistics, epidemiology, biomedical informatics,
bioethics, study design, regulatory support, community health and health
policy research. This coalescence of clinical and translational investigators,
ancillary personnel and infrastructure in one facility will enable the CTSI to
serve as a magnet for industry, foundation and federal grants and as an
important state-wide resource for public health policy-makers, advocates and
community organizations.

The CTSI will accelerate the approval of new drugs and devices and their
entry into the marketplace, with better proof of value of the products. In
addition, the Institute will train multidisciplinary teams of young scientists
and practitioners in the skills required to continue these advances, in academic
health centers, in industry and in the community. In turn, the success of these
activities will result in more industry partnerships and startup companies
based on faculty inventions and will increase the value of UF's technology
portfolio and economic impact throughout the State.

Clinical research, health education and healthcare delivery will be facilitated
by the CTSI through partnership with Shands Healthcare (the largest
healthcare system in the Southeast), the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans
Administration healthcare system (the second largest VA healthcare system in
the country) and the Extension program of UF's Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), which has health education and health care
delivery facilities in every county in Florida. Few, if any, other CTSA
applicant institutions nationwide will be able to match UF's depth and
diversity of interdisciplinary science and its capacity for positively impacting
the health of such a broad, state-wide, constituency. Thus, an overarching
commitment of the CTSI will be to minimize bureaucracy and optimize


2008-09 LBR









fluidity in the translation of UF basic science discoveries to applications for
improving the health of the citizens of this state.

To accomplish the broad mission of the CTSI requires strong clinical and
translational research informatics to 1) link data from various sources (e.g.,
genomic, metabolomics, clinical, and environmental data; and 2) facilitate
interdisciplinary research team collaboration across multiple sites and
disciplines (e.g., physicians, geneticists and health outcomes researchers).
Novel data linkages and interdisciplinary collaborations are essential to 1)
develop new prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies targeted toward
specific patient needs; 2) evaluate patient outcomes associated with the new
interventions; and 3) address critical public health issues, such as racial and
ethnic disparities in health and health care. To make these advances available
to the citizens of Florida, clinical and translational informatics capabilities at
UF must be strengthened and expanded. However, currently UF lacks
sufficient expert personnel and a computing infrastructure to address the
informatics needs of its investigators and trainees and the patients they serve.

Therefore, the CTSI will create a Clinical and Translational Research
Informatics Program (CTRIP). CTRIP will not duplicate the computing and
computational facilities that exist in other health-related programs, such as the
General Clinical Research Center (GCRC), the Genetics Institute or the
Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research. Rather, CTRIP will link
and store data from these different entities, only as required, based on
investigators' scientific protocols, as one of its key functions. In addition,
CTRIP will offer advanced clinical and translational informatics support that
includes study participant identification and tracking; multi-site, web-based
data capture; research portals to allow research teams to collaborate in real
time or separately, regardless of geographic location, in a secure and
compliant manner and documentation and standardization of data, where
possible, to facilitate novel collaborations across projects and study sites.
CTRIP will provide a truly unique resource for the CTSI and will be essential
to its mission to foster clinical and translational research.

Other new programs to be developed under the auspices of the CTSI include:

a. Metabolomics, meaning the identification and quantification ofbiomarkers of
disease, drug efficacy and drug toxicity, would become a major new core
resource for CTSI investigators and would position UF at the forefront of this
existing new field. The Metabolomics core would build upon internationally
recognized strengths at UF in mass spectrometry from the Department of
Chemistry and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging resources housed in the
McKnight Brain Institute.
b. UF scientists have a sterling record of discovering naturally occurring or
synthetic molecules with medicinal potential, yet these discoveries often
languish because of a lack of resources to "scale-up" the synthesis of these
compounds in amounts sufficient for animal testing prior to human trials. The


2008-09 LBR









CTSI will launch a Preclinical Drug Development Program that will provide a
facile pathway from drug discovery to scale-up synthesis and testing, that will
meet the highest standards of determining safety and efficacy of new
compounds before their administration to humans.
c. A major new thrust of the CTSI is to strengthen UF's commitment to
Community Education and Participatory Community Research throughout the
State of Florida. We will utilize resources available through the Shands and
VA hospitals and clinical and the Extension Program directed by IFAS both to
partner with citizens in conducting patient research and to 'give back' to the
communities new knowledge gained about improved health education and
healthcare delivery.
d. New interdisciplinary opportunities for Training and Career Development will
be a central mission of the CTSI, as it removes barriers to communication
among diverse colleges on campus and fosters a multidisciplinary "team"
approach toward problem solving. A new PhD degree program in Clinical
and Translational Science will become available to graduate students
throughout UF and will emphasize mentoring by established scientists in
complimentary disciplines.

Thus, we envision the CTSI to be transforming for UF, in that it is designed to
integrate and synthesize from diverse programs a unified effort directed
towards the study and treatment of human disease. The Institute will serve as
a crucible from which new knowledge will be gained and the next generation
of clinical and translational scientists will evolve. Undergraduates, graduate
students, postdoctoral trainees and junior faculty will be able to be crossed-
trained in both laboratory-oriented and patient-oriented techniques of
hypothesis testing, and become knowledgeable about the design and
implementation of ethically and scientifically rigorous translational science,
including clinical trials and participatory community research.


B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:

The CTSI would provide the new intellectual home for clinical and
translational research and training at UF, integrating and synergizing the
scientific and educational activities of 11 colleges, 5 institutes, 19 centers, 11
hospitals, numerous outpatient clinics and the 67 counties in the State of
Florida. The colleges participating in planning for the CTSI include
Agriculture and Life Sciences, Dentistry, Engineering, Fine Arts, Health and
Human Performance, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Medicine, Nursing,
Pharmacy, Public Health and Health Professions and Veterinary Medicine.
Collectively, these colleges comprise 82 percent of the total faculty and 72
percent of the total undergraduate and graduate student body of the
University. They enjoy substantial institution-wide support and benefit from
the University's financial investments and space allocations toward building
multidisciplinary research teams and mentoring programs in the health


2008-09 LBR









sciences. The University's goals are therefore entirely congruent with those
expressed by the NIH CTSA initiative.

The principal existing UF resource from which the CTSI will evolve is the
General Clinical Research Center (GCRC), located in Shands Hospital. The
GCRC has been continuously funded by the NIH since 1962 and has
repeatedly received "Outstanding" reviews from the NIH for its scientific and
training programs. UF has the only GCRC in the State of Florida. During the
last five years, the Center leveraged over $117 million dollars in extramural
awards to over 100 UF faculty representing six colleges on campus to conduct
cutting-edge clinical and translational research and training. Consequently,
UF will be the only institution in this state capable of both submitting a
competitive CTSA application and realizing the full benefits such an award
can provide its faculty and trainees.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue
focuses on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and
the expected increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following,
if applicable.)

The overriding goal is to knit related, but poorly interacting, programs
throughout the University into a central focus and provide a core program and
environment for these activities through the CTSI. By so doing research
teams will be eligible for new, complex federal and industry grants and
partnerships not currently existing on campus or capable of being pursued by
UF faculty, owing to a lack of existing core infrastructure. Our confidence in
being able to leverage additional extramural dollars through the CTSI is
supported by the long success of the GCRC in accomplishing this goal. Since
2000, the GCRC has leveraged over $117M in federal, foundation and
industry grant support to UF. The additional resources provided by the CTIP
will also enhance the acquisition of grants to UF in two primary ways. First,
faculty members hired as part of the CTRIP are expected to obtain extramural
funding. There are several federal Program Announcements and Requests for
Applications for national data coordinating centers for a variety of
diseases/populations. CTRIP faculty would be competitive in applying for
these awards. Second, investigators using the CTRIP services are expected to
include the costs of those services in their grant applications. We estimate
conservatively that the annual return on investment from both of these
revenue streams will be approximately $3.5M to $4M per year if the CTSA
request is funded.

We also expect to generate considerable new revenue from the CTSI's other
new programs, particularly through the Metabolomics core and the program in
Preclinical Drug Development. Both resources will play major roles in
establishing a new funding stream through scientific and licensing
partnerships with other academic health centers and pharmaceutical
companies.
78 2008-09 LBR










New knowledge gained from the scientific endeavors at UF will be translated
into improved healthcare research and delivery throughout the state,
principally through the Shands and North Florida/South Georgia healthcare
systems and through the IFAS Extension program. Thus, virtually every area
of the State of Florida will be impacted continuously by scientific activities
facilitated through the CTSI.

Additional information to justify request:
a. The program fosters interdisciplinary research, a goal of both the NIH and
the University of Florida.
b. The integration of many diverse and separate programs will foster
multifaceted training opportunities in undergraduate, graduate and
postgraduate education in clinical and translational science.
c. To be successful UF will need to develop methodology to circumvent
traditional cross-college barriers. This accomplishment will benefit virtually
all programs at the University.
d. The CTSI designed and discussed here as a prototypic example of an NIH
CTSA initiative.
e. Improved healthcare research and healthcare delivery through the CTSI has
both positive health and economic impact, the dollars amount of which is hard
to estimate.



III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB II):

2007-08 2008-09 2008-09 Budget for 2008-09
Budget for State Anticipated and Incremental Years
Issue (A) Funds Reallocation (D)
Requested (C)
(B)


a. Recurring $ $4,000,000 $
Funds:
b. Non- $ $
recurring
Funds:


c. Total: $ 1 $4,000,000 1 $ 1 $4,000,000


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).

These funds are requested in both the E&G and Health Science Center
budgets. We are requesting $2,000,000 in E&G and $2,000,000 in HSC.


2008-09 LBR


$4,000,000









C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).
D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
No

B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so,
identify the project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.
2.


2008-09 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





University: University of Florida
Issue Title: Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTSI)




NON-
RECURRING RECURRING TOTAL


Positions
Faculty 6 0
Other (A&P/USPS) 8 0

Total 14 0


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty $1,064,706 $0
Other (A&P/USPS) $578,952 $0

Total $1,643,658 $0


Salaries and Benefits $1,997,042 $0
Other Personal Services $0 $0
Expenses $0 $0
Operating Capital Outlay $1,000,000 $0
Electronic Data Processing $0 $0
Special Category (Specific) $0 $0
Pilot Projects Junior Faculty $750,000 $0
Undergraduate/Graduate Stipends in $0 $0
Clinical and Translational Research $252,958 $0

Total All Categories $4,000,000 $0


2008-09 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:

University Priority Number:

Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida
Florida Veterinary Workforce Expansion
Initiative
HSC #2
IFAS #7
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective this issue
will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included under this
goal would be new enrollment gi ,i iith, outreach, recruitment, financial aid, academic tracking,
adh'iing., etc.)
W Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that may be
included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated citizenry /
workforce programs, retention of students.).
F Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of issues
that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research initiatives,
enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation / expansion of non-
targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed ith the provision offunds for this
issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct.):

Currently the only College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) in the state of Florida is
located at the University of Florida. The CVM, which graduated its first class in
1980, is designed for a maximum capacity of 88 students in each class of the four
year professional degree (DVM) program. In comparison with veterinary colleges in
other states, this class size is quite small in proportion to the Florida's large
population. As a result, approximately 900 qualified students apply for the 88 seats
available in Florida each year, and many well-qualified Florida residents are therefore
unable to gain admission. Further, there is a critical shortage of veterinarians
nationally that is especially acute in Florida. This proposal is to better meet these
needs and better serve Florida by a significant expansion of veterinary student
enrollment.


2008-09 LBR









II. Justification


A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include ii he/her this is a new
or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been accomplished i i/th the
current service/program?)
DVM students graduate from the University of Florida College of Veterinary
Medicine with a reputation for having a high quality education. The CVM is a highly
ranked program, which contributes to the demand both for admission and for
employment of its graduates. Our graduates pass the national board veterinary
examination at a rate well above the national average. Each graduate has multiple job
offers, with Florida having among the best employment opportunities in the nation.
Nationally there is a clear shortage of veterinarians in all areas of professional
endeavor. Recent studies (NAS, KSU, AAVMC) document these critical needs. There
is an immediate need for over 500 veterinarians in public health practice, based
primarily in state and federal agencies. These positions, best filled by veterinarians,
are focused on protecting public health by preventing diseases of animals that are
capable of infecting humans such as rabies, avian influenza, mad cow disease, and
many others. Some of these veterinarians focus on keeping our animal-based food
supply free of infectious agents such as E. coli or chemical contaminants.
Veterinarians are also needed in the FDA, USDA, Homeland Security, U.S. Army,
CDC, NIH, as well as numerous Florida State agencies where regulation and control
of animal disease, emergency preparedness and environmental protection are
paramount.


Veterinarians are also needed to fulfill the need for basic biomedical research in
academia, industry, agencies and institutes. Veterinarians educated in research bring
perspectives regarding animal diseases within the concept of "one medicine" that is
extremely valuable. There are also shortages of veterinarians to serve the
pharmaceutical and other industries in research and technical support, in veterinary
pathology, laboratory animal medicine and other specialties.


The CVM Office of Student Affairs regularly receives requests from practicing
veterinarians in Florida desperate to employ a graduate and facing fierce competition
for the few that are still available. Rural practice, with primary focus on food
producing animals (now termed Food System Veterinary Medicine by some), is
experiencing the most extreme manpower shortages. This need has been extensively
studied by the profession and was highlighted in a recent edition of the New York
Times. Florida is experiencing this shortage to a greater degree than many other
states.


Florida's modest veterinary class size (88) in proportion to the state's large
population (18 million) places it near the bottom of population-enrollment ratios
compared to other states with veterinary schools. Therefore, each year the CVM has
the unpleasant task of notifying all but 88 of the 900 qualified applicants that they


2008-09 LBR









were denied admission to the UF College of Veterinary Medicine. These students and
their families come to the realization that they must choose a different career, or
pursue a veterinary education at an institution located outside of Florida. There are
only 28 veterinary schools in the United States, so the opportunities available to these
students are limited. Many Florida students will attend foreign veterinary schools
because they cannot gain admission to the CVM, which adds cost to their education,
and these students face additional U.S. licensure hurdles once graduated.


The UF College of Veterinary Medicine proposes to provide more educational
opportunity to the students and families of Florida as well as meet Florida's need for
more veterinarians.
Specifically this initiative will:
1) Expand enrollment in the UF College of Veterinary Medicine by 50%.
We will admit 44 more students to each entering class, thus when all
four classes are filled to this number the total enrollment increase will
be 176 students. We have sufficient applicants to accept this additional
number with no drop in student qualifications.
2) To better meet the needs of Florida and the nation:
a) We will recruit approximately 15% of these added students from
applicants committed to pursue careers in Food System Veterinary
Medicine. We will collaborate with the UF Department of Animal
Sciences to identify and admit these students.
b) We will recruit approximately 30% of these added students from
applicants committed to pursue careers in Veterinary Public
Health. We will fully implement the joint DVM/MPH program we
have developed in conjunction with the UF College of Public
Health and Health Professions. These students will receive both
degrees simultaneously at the completion of their veterinary
program by adding the public health courses during the four year
DVM degree program.
3) The UF College of Veterinary Medicine also wishes to establish
regional campus programs in communities outside Gainesville to better
meet the educational experiences of veterinary students. These
locations would allow the College and its various programs to better
serve the diverse geographic areas of Florida. This goal will greatly
enhance implementation of this proposal, but the proposal can be fully
implemented without these regional campus locations.
B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:
The UF College of Veterinary Medicine was physically designed approximately 30
years ago to accommodate a maximum of 80 veterinary students, although enrollment
was subsequently increased to the present 88 during the 1990s. This design limitation


2008-09 LBR









included the lecture rooms, teaching laboratories, seminar rooms, and teaching
hospital. The costs of further increasing student capacity are significant. However, the
CVM has recently made major progress in increasing its capacity with the approval of
the Veterinary Medical Education and Research Facility (2007 PECO). This was the
most costly portion of infrastructure needed to accommodate an increased enrollment.
As a result, the CVM is now in position to complete the expansion of facilities to
accommodate increased enrollment through renovation and reconfiguration of
existing lecture halls and teaching laboratories a substantially less expensive
proposition than adding a new building. The one remaining significant cost is that of
the faculty and staff, which are also sized to classes of 88. If educational quality is to
be maintained, the faculty and staff will have to be substantially increased.

C. Description of outcome anticipated: (Be specific. For example, if this issue focuses
on improving retention rates, indicate the current retention rate and the expected
increase in the retention rate. In addition, identify the following, if applicable.)

This initiative will increase the number of new veterinarians graduating from the UF
CVM by 50% an increase from 84 to 126 new graduates per year. An additional
headcount of 12 MPH graduate per year will result from those students expected to
enroll in the dual degree option. Finally, graduate enrollment will be increased by 15
PhD students as a result of the new graduate teaching assistant positions created to
assist with the expanded laboratory course enrollment.

i. Number of Headcount Students receiving services or participating in the
program by year, for the next five years:
Academic Year Headcount (DVM) Headcount (MPH) Headcount (PhD)
2008-2009: 342* 0 0
2009-2010: 386 12 8
2010-2011: 428** 24 15
2011-2012: 470 36 15
2012-2013: 512*** 48 15
*One year will be needed following approval of this LBR by the Florida
Legislature for the CVM to hire additional faculty and staff as well as adjust
the instructional infrastructure to accommodate the additional students, hence
the head count remains at current levels for Academic Year 2008-2009.
**Assumes same proportion of first year attrition rate among the added
students as with present class size of 88 students (42 of the added students
continue for their second year and subsequently complete the program).
*** Total enrollment stabilizes at this number in subsequent years.
ii. Number of FTE Students receiving services or participating in the program by
year for the next five years. If these are new FTE Students are they included in
the 5-year enrollment plan?


2008-09 LBR









Academic Year FTE (Professional) FTE (MPH) FTE (PhD)*
2008-2009: 342** 0 0
2009-2010: 386 3.4 6
2010-2011: 428*** 6.8 11.25
2011-2012: 470 10.9 11.25
2012-2013: 512**** 12.0***** 11.25

*Each graduate teaching assistant generates 0.75 FTE enrollment.
**One year will be needed following approval of this LBR by the Florida
Legislature for the CVM to hire additional faculty and staff as well as install
the infrastructure required to accommodate the additional students, hence the
Total FTE remains at current levels for Academic Year 2008-2009.
***Assumes same proportion of first year attrition rate among the added
students as with present class size of 88 students (42 of the added students
continue for their second year and subsequently complete the program).
**** Total FTE stabilizes at this number in subsequent years.
*****Combined degree students take 9 MPH credits during their first year, 9
their second year, 11 their third year and 7 their fourth year.

iii. Additional degrees, if any, produced as a result of this initiative (Indicate the
additional number of Bachelor, Master, Doctoral & Professional degrees
produced by school year.)


Year DVM MPH PhD
2008-2009: 0 0 0
2009-2010: 0 0 0
2010-2011: 0 0 0
2011-2012: 0 0 0
2012-2013: 42 12* 15*


First class having increased enrollment graduates in spring of 2013. The 42
additional DVM degrees per year assumes same attrition rate among the
added students as with present class size of 88 students. The 12 additional
MPH degrees per year (awarded by the College of Public Health and Health
Professions) are from the combined DVM/MPH program. The 15 PhD
degrees are indirectly generated as a result of the new graduate teaching
assistantship positions needed to support increased laboratory class sizes.
Annual degree production stabilizes at this increased level in subsequent
years.

iv. Other outcomes:

The College will make major progress in meeting critical veterinary needs of
Florida and the nation in the currently underserved areas of rural practice


2008-09 LBR









(primarily food animal), public health, companion animal and pathology. We
will make progress in meeting these needs by:

A. Providing professional educational opportunities for a larger portion of
applicants seeking the DVM degree from Florida. Currently, a great many
of veterinary college applicants from the state of Florida must leave the
state to receive a veterinary education.
B. More adequately serving the veterinary educational needs of geographic
areas of Florida beyond Gainesville.
C. Building teaching and research infrastructure including teaching labs,
animal simulation laboratories, instructional resources and information.
D. Enhancing scholarship and research in the CVM by adding new faculty
and graduate teaching assistants to implement the new teaching and
outreach obligations of this initiative. Much of the new faculty FTE will
focus on teaching, clinical practice, research and scholarship activities
associated with the expanded class size.

III. Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form II):

2007-08 Budget 2008-09 State Funds 2008-09 Budget for 2008-
for Issue (A) Requested (B) Anticipated 09 and Incremental
Reallocation (C) Years (D)
a. Recurring Funds: $0 $9,910,958 $0 $9,910,958
b. Non-recurring $0 $0 $0 $0
Funds:

c. Total: $0 $9,910,958 $0 $9,910,958


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A)

None.

B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).

The funds requested are recurring funds needed to expand the faculty and
staff. The enrollment will expand by 50% and to meet the educational
requirements of these students as well as to staff the new teaching
hospital, the faculty, staff and graduate teaching assistants will be
expanded by a corresponding 50%. New faculty will be placed in both
basic and clinical sciences departments, primarily for those classes and
laboratories where instructor-intensive small group learning, typical of all
medical education, is needed. These faculty, staff and teaching assistants
will be particularly needed to teach laboratories in anatomy, physiology,
pharmacology, toxicology, histology, pathology, parasitology, and


2008-09 LBR









microbiology/virology. They will also be needed to teach the clinical
laboratories in clinical pathology, medical techniques, surgery
laboratories, necropsy, foods animal practice, zoological medicine, and
shelter medicine. In addition, the new hospital will expand the veterinary
specialties with a concurrent development of new teaching assignments.
There is corresponding staff required in the form of technical teaching
support, hospital clinical staff support, and administrative staff to support
the added personnel requirements.

The numbers of faculty requested in this proposal have been compared to
those of benchmark veterinary schools at other comparable institutions.
This proposal adding 48 faculty and associated staff would place our total
state funded faculty at 131, which is roughly the mean faculty size of our
peer institutions with similar ranking and class size.

The CVM currently receives recurring State funding of $24M. The
requested increase of $10M provides for the 50% enrollment increase. The
resulting $34M annual recurring budget is still $10M per year less than
that of the CVM's peer group of US veterinary colleges at $44M.
Therefore this request keeps costs well below that of veterinary medical
education at similar high quality, accredited veterinary schools in other
states.

C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).

This proposal assumes the three-year PECO commitment (2007-2009)
approved in 2007 by the Florida Legislature to fully fund the Veterinary
Medical Education and Research Facility over the next three years will not
be withdrawn or reduced in amount. No existing funds are available for
reallocation.

D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

This proposal requests the entire budget to be allocated in the first year.
Funds must be available immediately because renovations must be
completed and faculty employed prior to acceptance of the first expanded
class. We propose accepting that class in the shortest timeframe possible.


2008-09 LBR









IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?

This proposal only requires renovation and minor expansion of existing facilities.

B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so, identify the
project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.

It currently is not a part of a capital improvements list.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1. --
2. --


2008-09 LBR














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II


University:
Issue Title:


University of Florida
Florida Veterinary Workforce Expansion Initiative




NON-
RECURRING RECURRING TOTAL


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


Total All Categories


48.00
48.00

96.00


$4,800,000
$1,808,016

$6,608,016


$8,260,000
$428,000
$668,000
$500,000
$54,958
$0
$0
$0
$0

$9,910,958


0.00
0.00

0.00



$0
$0

$0


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$0


2008-2009 LBR









State University System of Florida
Educational and General
2008-2009 Legislative Operating Budget Issue
Form I


University:
Descriptive Issue Title:

University Priority Number:
Date Approved by Board of Trustees:


University of Florida- IFAS
Promoting Healthy, Sustainable Animal
Systems
1
6-15-2007


Check only one of the following to indicate which SUS Strategic Plan Goal/Objective
this issue will address:

D Access to and Production of Degrees (Examples of issues that may be included
under this goal would be new enrollment gi i til, outreach, recruitment, financial aid,
academic tracking, th 'i\ilg. etc.)
F Meeting Statewide Professional and Workforce Needs (Examples of issues that
may be included under this goal would be new or expanded targeted and/or educated
citizenry /workforce programs, retention of students.).
0 Building World-class Academic Programs and Research Capacity (Examples of
issues that may be included under this goal would be new and/or expanded research
initiatives, enhancements of certain academic programs or program implementation/
expansion of non-targeted programs.)
F Meeting Community Needs and Fulfilling Unique Institutional Responsibilities
(Examples could include issues important to a regional area or specific to an institution's
mission.)


I. Needs Statement (What need will be addressed ii i the provision offunds for this
issue. The needs statement should be brief and succinct.):

Animals and animal agriculture continue to hold places of great economic,
environmental, and societal significance in Florida. In our ever-changing world from
predominately rural, farm-based, and community-centered to primarily urban and global
in scope, the interaction between animals and people and the interface between their
environments evolve in concert. The legislative budget initiative, "Promoting healthy,
sustainable animal systems" is designed to produce new, science-based information and
transfer the information to Florida's livestock industries, animal owners, and public to be
applied in every county in Florida.


2008-09 LBR










II. Justification


A. Description of service or program to be provided: (Include ii helher this is
a new or expanded service/program. If expanded, what has been
accomplished i i/h the current service/program?)


Considering the breadth of impact of animal agriculture, it is clear that
sustaining the industry is critical to the health and welfare of all Floridians, now
and in the future. But there are challenges to sustaining the Florida livestock
industry. Because profitability is the foundation of a sustainable industry,
solutions to problems must be economically viable. Yet business decision support
tools for the livestock industry are limited currently and require constant revision
to remain relevant. New potential revenue streams, such as incentives for
maintaining open space, must be evaluated and included in economic models to
ensure that societal benefits beyond food production are appropriately
compensated. Sustainability also depends on a well-trained work force, including
professional managers, veterinarians, and allied industry personnel to support
livestock enterprises. The University of Florida plays a critical role in educating
the next generation of that professional work force, and recruitment to the
UF/IFAS often begins long before a student reaches Gainesville through exposure
to youth outreach programs, e.g. 4-H and FFA. These vital linkages must be
maintained and strengthened for animal agriculture to thrive.
The tropical/subtropical environment of Florida creates unique advantages and
challenges for commercial livestock operations. For example, the climate offers
an opportunity for year round forage production, and thus favors forage
consuming species such as cattle and horses. However, research is needed to
determine optimal forage species for varying climates and specific animal
production cycles. Beyond the animal's ability to utilize forages, the capacity for
different plant species to recycle nitrogen, phosphorus and other byproducts of
animal production is essential knowledge to develop sustainable production
systems. Because Florida's environment is not replicated in any other area in the
US, we must generate data specific to this setting and evaluate the impact of this
environment on animal performance and well-being. In the broader perspective,
the data generated in Florida has application on an international scale and brings
that global dimension to our activities, an important factor in today's
interconnected world.

A final facet of sustainability is applying modern technologies to selection of
animals that can best perform under the challenging conditions found in Florida.
What type of animal can we breed that is best adapted to the environment here in
FL? Can we select animals that are better suited to resist pathogens? Are there
behavioral traits that improve an animal's performance in the tropical/subtropical
environment? Not only is this type of knowledge critical to Florida producers, but
there are collateral benefits for consumers. For example, improved pathogen
resistance should allow for reduced used of antibiotics to treat disease.


2008-09 LBR









Consumers increasingly embrace animal products that are free from exogenous
inputs, and increased knowledge of genetic mechanisms will lead to new
opportunities to manage animals in more sustainable, systematic ways.

B. Description of current university initiatives, and their resources, that will
strengthen the provision of this service/program:
This new initiative, developed in collaboration with the Florida beef, dairy
and horse industries, will expand our capacity to conduct basic and translational
research, and adopt new outreach methods to deliver that information to improve
the well-being and performance of Florida's livestock industry, its individual
animals, the people providing care for and interacting with animals, and their
environment. With this initiative, UF/IFAS will continue to build world class
academic and outreach programs and research capacity to address the needs of
livestock producers and their animals. This program will draw upon the resources
and strengths of the faculty and facilities associated with the IFAS Department of
Animal Sciences; IFAS Range Cattle REC at Ona, Florida; the College of
Vetinerary Medicine; and the IFAS Beef Cattle Feed Efficiency Unit at Marianna.
The Florida Cooperative Extension Service animal science program will be a key
to the success of the program because, research generated but not disseminated is
of little value to the citizens of Florida. But, the ever-increasing population of our
suburban-rural interface creates pressure on our traditional outreach programs.
Increasing the capacity to serve these emerging stakeholder groups is an
important component of this initiative, especially in the equine industry. Further,
as the non-farm population grows, there is a greater need to provide scientifically
sound, unbiased information to consumers regarding animal production practices
and the sustainability of those practices. Investment has been made in
infrastructure to deliver programming over the internet, and a large proportion of
Floridians are ready to use this approach. We must expand our use of web-based
delivery to remain relevant and sustain our presence as the source of unbiased,
scientifically sound information.

C. Description of outcome anticipated:

Under this initiative we will increase our knowledge about livestock and equine
production and economics with focus on forage production and quality, animal
production efficiency, animal health, and economics. For example we will: a)
conduct genetic research on new forage species and crops for livestock feed and
grazing systems, b) conduct research on beef/forage integrated production
systems, c) conduct basic research on genetics and physiology of animal feed
conversion and nutrition to increase production efficiency, d) conduct economic
studies on livestock production systems, e) conduct research on livestock and
equine nutrition and health, f) conduct research and education programs on
livestock waste management, and g) expand education programs, especially for
youth, on livestock and equine care, management, and health.


2008-09 LBR









Budget Request for 2008-09 (detail information provided on the OB Form


2007-08
Budget for
Issue (A)


2008-09
State
Funds
Requested
(B)


2008-09
Anticipated
Reallocation
(C)


a. Recurring $0 $2,240,000 $0
Funds:
b. Non- $0 $0 $0
recurring
Funds:


Total:


$0 1 $2,240,000


$2,240,000


A. Identify 2007-08 funds (if not E&G funds, provide the source of the
funds) that will be used to initiate this program (column A).
B. Identify the amount of funds requested for 2008-09 (column B).
C. Identify existing programs from which funds will be reallocated, if
applicable (include for example, salaries from reallocated or dedicated
personnel) (column C).
D. If this is a multi-year request, identify the incremental funds needed from
the state for each future year, by year, for a maximum of five years
(column D only includes column B plus each future year's need).

IV. Facilities:
A. Does this issue require an expansion or construction of a facility?
No.
B. If yes, is the project identified on the Capital Improvement List? If so, identify
the project, fiscal amount, year requested and priority number.


Facility Project Title Fiscal Year Amount Requested
1.
2.


2008-09 LBR


Budget for 2008-09
and Incremental Years
(D)


$2,240,000

$0














2008-2009 Legislative Budget Request
EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
POSITION AND FISCAL SUMMARY
Operating Budget Form II





IFAS, University of Florida
Promoting Healthy, Sustainable Animal Systems


University:
Issue Title:


RECURRING


NON-RECURRING


Positions
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salary Rate (for all positions noted above)
Faculty
Other (A&P/USPS)

Total


Salaries and Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Electronic Data Processing
Special Category (Specific)


2008-2009 LBR


TOTAL


15.00
14.00

29.00


0.00
0.00

0.00


$1,095,000
$611,100

$1,706,100


$2,217,930
$0
$22,070
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$2,240,000


$0


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$0


Total All Categories




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