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 Program narrative
 2006-2007 grant funding
 Peer-review publications 2006-...
 Selected presentations at scientific...
 Restructuring of Institute for...
 Non-recurring requests
 Recurring requests






Group Title: Annual report, Institute for Child Health Policy
Title: Annual report, Institute for Child Health Policy 2006 - 2007.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087000/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report, Institute for Child Health Policy 2006 - 2007.
Series Title: Annual report, Institute for Child Health Policy
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida
Publisher: Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007-2008
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Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087000
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

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Table of Contents
    Program narrative
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    2006-2007 grant funding
        Page 15
    Peer-review publications 2006-2007
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Selected presentations at scientific meetings 2006-2007
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Restructuring of Institute for Child and Adolescent Research and Evaluation (ICARE)
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Non-recurring requests
        Page 26
    Recurring requests
        Page 27
Full Text







Annual Report 2006-2007 Academic Year
Institute for Child Health Policy

1. Mission and Purpose

The mission of the Institute for Child Health Policy (ICHP) is to research, evaluate, formulate,
and advance health policies, programs, and systems that promote the health and well-being of
children and youth. Specifically, ICHP conducts multidisciplinary research in the following
thematic areas:
Health promotion and risk reduction,
Quality and outcomes of care for children,
Organization and financing of the health care delivery system for children, and
Effects of national, state and local policies on child and adolescent health.

Our core strengths include:
Cutting-edge research in the epidemiology of disease and injury in children and
adolescents;
Multidisciplinary children's health services research examining health care outcomes;
Innovative design and evaluation research expertise on policies and programs for
children and youth;
An expanding portfolio of training and mentoring opportunities for graduate students and
junior faculty with flexible emphases on pediatric and adolescent epidemiology and
health policy and outcomes research;
Leadership in disseminating research results and in interpreting research to
policymakers, health care practitioners, and the public.

2. Goals and Expected Outcomes

2.1. Teaching

* Goal: Provide funding opportunities for graduate education, through the use of training
grants and research and teaching assistantships. Outcome: We expect to provide graduate
assistantships for a minimum of two graduate students annually from colleges throughout
campus.

* Goal: Offer formal course material in pediatric epidemiology and health policy and outcomes
research for students conducting child health-related research at the master's, doctoral
levels, and post-doctoral levels. Outcome: Faculty will teach or co-teach one to two classes
per year, primarily at the graduate level, focused on children's health and well-being and
methods that are critical for the appropriate design of children's health studies (i.e.,
community-based trials, longitudinal designs, and others).

2.2. Research

* Goal: Maintain a nationally and internationally visible research agenda focused on children's
health and well-being. Outcome: Faculty will have multiple publications annually in high
quality peer-review journals and will present research findings at national and international
meetings.

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* Goal: Maintain a broad portfolio of extramural funding related to areas of strength within the
Institute. Outcome: Faculty will have extramural funding from federal, foundation, and other
competitive peer-review sources focused on children's health and well-being. Faculty will
cover a minimum of 50% of their salaries on grants.

* Goal: Foster multidisciplinary research collaboration with faculty throughout UF focused on
children's health and well-being. Outcome: The Institute for Child Health Policy will develop
and maintain core support functions to foster the development of research design and
analysis, database management, and access to existing datasets to develop pilot and
exploratory studies leading to R21, R03, R01, and Program Project grant funding involving
multidisciplinary teams.

* Goal: Mentor junior faculty in the conduct of multidisciplinary research and foster their
development toward becoming independent investigators. Outcome: Junior faculty within
the Institute for Child Health Policy will be supported in developing their research through
the establishment of a formal mentoring committee and a written mentoring plan that is
reviewed annually. As part of their mentoring plans, all junior faculty will have detailed plans
to establish themselves as independent investigators that include specific support from
senior faculty (i.e., inclusion as co-investigators with senior faculty, submission of K23
applications with senior faculty as mentors, specific commitments from senior faculty
regarding access to data and collaboration on publications).

2.3. Service

* Goal: Provide leadership in disseminating research results and in interpreting research to
policymakers and the public. Outcome: The Institute for Child Health Policy will disseminate
policy analyses and recommendations based on research findings through its Focus on
Children Issue Brief Series.

* Goal: Serve as a local, state, national, and international resource for communities,
universities, governments, and other organizations seeking guidance about issues related to
children's health, children's health services delivery, implementation of evidence-based
health policy for children, and the epidemiology of disease and injury among children.
Outcome: The Institute for Child Health Policy faculty will provide technical assistance to and
serve on advisory boards for the previously described groups and organizations.

2.4. Diversity

* Goal: To maintain an intellectually enriching academic community culture that supports
equity among diverse groups. These groups may vary based on race, ethnicity, or the
presence of disabilities. Outcome: The Institute for Child Health Policy will identify diversity
opportunities in the hiring of faculty and staff and the recruitment of graduate students and
post-doctoral fellows.

2.5. Fund Raising

* Goal: To establish a named or endowed professorship in child health policy. Outcome: The
Institute for Child Health Policy will continue to work with the Development Officers to
identify potential donors and strategies to foster interest in child health policy.


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3. Strategic Fit of the Institute for Child Health Policy Plan


3.1. The University's Strategic Work Plan: The Institute for Child Health Policy is consistent
with the University's Strategic Work Plan in several areas. First, the Strategic Work Plan
includes children as a specific focus and states that "The University of Florida will also be a
leader in the field of health care for children and families" with overall goals of improving the
health and well-being of children and families through research, education and service and
promoting interdisciplinary approaches to the complex health and social problems facing
children and families. The Institute for Child Health Policy mission and goals are directly linked
to the goals in the Strategic Work Plan.

Second, the Institute for Child Health Policy is consistent with the focus in the Strategic Work
Plan related to faculty development. We provide an excellent mentoring program for junior
faculty that consists of a mentoring committee, written mentoring plan, and specific goals and
resources to foster their development as independent investigators. Our accomplishments in
this area are described in Section 4.1. Top Five Achievements in 2006-2007.

Third, the Institute for Child Health Policy provides excellent opportunities for graduate and post-
doctoral students. Currently, we provide support for five graduate students: two from the
Department of Economics in the College of Business, one from the Department of Health
Education and Behavior in the College of Health and Human Performance, one from the
Department of Anthropology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and one from the
Department of Food and Resource Economics and IFAS, in the College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences. These students are collaborating with experienced research teams in all phases of
their research. In the area of diversity, one of our graduate students is a Hispanic female. ICHP
faculty also are members of dissertation committees in other colleges, including the College of
Health and Human Performance and IFAS.

We currently do not offer a PhD Program. However, several of the Institute faculty were involved
in developing the joint PhD in Epidemiology Program between the College of Public Health and
Health Professions (PHHP) and the College of Medicine (COM). Children's health issues are
an important component of epidemiology and we will offer several courses in this area in the
new program.

In addition, during the past year, we supported a post-doctoral fellow who worked with an
experienced research team. Her salary was competitive with other members of the AAU. She
attended national meetings to present her work, had excellent work space, and access to a
state-of-the art data coordinating center.

Finally, the Institute for Child Health Policy provides an excellent overall environment for faculty
and staff. We offer competitive salaries to our faculty and staff, provide ongoing opportunities for
attendance at national meetings to present research, and provide training opportunities for staff.

3.2. The Board of Governors' Strategic Plan: The Institute for Child Health Policy is
consistent with the Board of Governors' (BOG) Strategic Plan related to building world class
research capacity and access to and production of degrees. Currently, ten full-time faculty
members (4 tenured, 3 tenure-track, 3 research track) have primary assignments within the
Institute for Child Health Policy. Collectively, these faculty members have national and
international reputations in the areas of children's health services and outcomes research,
adolescent risk behavior, alcohol risk reduction, and the conduct of community trials. In 2006-
2007, these faculty were responsible for garnering $4,910,474 in extramural funding from
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competitive federal, foundation, and state sources. The BOG report lists research expenditures
per faculty as one of the evaluation metrics. For overall research dollars, we generated
$491,047 per faculty member from all extramural sources in 2006-2007. Restricting these
dollars to federal grants and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) funding, we generated
$197,550 per faculty member. This compares favorably to the BOG Strategic Plan total
academic research expenditures per full-time faculty member of $143,518 in 2005 and federal
research expenditures of $77,757 per full-time faculty member.

Another metric used in the research category of the BOG Strategic Plan is Highly Cited
Scholars. Dr. Alex Wagenaar was named an Institute for Scientific Information Highly Cited
Researcher, beginning in 2004, and has had this designation continually renewed since that
time. This distinction is awarded to less than one-half of one percent of published scientists.

As described in Section 3.1. The University Strategic Work Plan, Institute faculty offer
assistantships to doctoral students focusing on children's health and were involved in the
development of the PhD in Epidemiology Program. When the PhD Program is approved and
operational, we expect to expand the number of graduate students supported through grants at
the Institute.

4. The Institute for Child Health Policy Core Achievements

4.1. Top Five Achievements in 2006-2007

4.1.1. Research: Maintaining a Mixed Portfolio of Extramural Funding and Fostering
Multidisciplinary Collaboration. In 2006-2007, faculty obtained $4,910,474 for the year in
extramural support. This amount is consistent with prior funding levels of $4,868,227 in 2004-
2005 and $5,154,902 in 2005-2006. Given the paylines at NIH and the increasing competition
for other sources of extramural funding, we recognize the strong effort and excellent reputation
that is necessary to maintain the stable extramural funding that the Institute has enjoyed.
However, we always seek opportunities to increase the amount of funding that we attain each
year.

The focus of the 2006-2007 awards include: 1) examining health care delivery system and
provider reimbursement factors that influence children's quality and outcomes of care.
Children's outcomes of care are broadly defined and include traditional measures such as
children's health care service use, control of pain and other symptoms, and disease-specific
measures but also include pediatric health related quality of life (HRQOL), which includes
assessing family functioning, school functioning, and peer interactions; 2) community
intervention trials aimed at reducing adolescent risk behaviors; 3) examining the impact of state
and local policies on alcohol use among adolescents; 4) examining the impact of providing a
medical home in Community Health Centers and other safety net settings for low-income
children, including children of migrant workers; and 5) examining the impact of health plan exits
from the market on continuity of care for children enrolled in Medicaid. Appendix A contains a
summary of the projects, the principal investigators, and the funding sources.

In addition, faculty submitted several proposals during the year. Two proposals to the Robert
Wood Johnson Foundation were funded. In addition, one proposal to HRSA, Maternal Child
Health Bureau Research (MCHB) Division was funded. One proposal to the National Institute of
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) received a priority score of 157 and the investigator
plans to resubmit the proposal for the next deadline. Two additional proposals are under review
- a R21 submitted to NIAAA and a K23 submitted to the National Institute for Child Health and
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Human Development (NICHD). With one exception, all faculty covered a minimum of 50% of
their salaries with extramural funds.

The Institute for Child Health Policy primary faculty are multidisciplinary and include health
services researchers, economists, epidemiologists, a psychologist, and a social demographer.
In addition, we collaborate with colleges across campus including the College of Health and
Human Performance (alcohol-related research), the College of Nursing (palliative care), the
College of Business (Economics social capital and children's well-being), the College of
Medicine (children's health outcomes), the College of Public Health and Health Professions
(Clinical Psychology item response theory and children's health-related quality of life), and the
College of Education (transition to adulthood for children with special health care needs).

Finally, Institute for Child Health Policy faculty are collaborating with multiple colleges on the
NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) application in the following areas: Design
and Analysis Core, Community Research and Engagement Core, and the Novel and
Translational Methodologies Core. Our expertise in the areas of appropriate study designs for
research involving vulnerable populations, the conduct of community trials, the use of
community-based participatory research strategies, and novel methods for measuring patient
reported outcomes are important additions to the CTSA application. In addition, the Institute for
Child Health Policy is being included as a research venue for junior scholars and faculty who
apply for support from or use of the Cores affiliated with the CTSA. The CTSA is an essential
component for continued success in receiving NIH-funded awards. Moreover, the inclusion of
children in research is a NIH priority.

4.1.2. Research: Maintaining a Nationally and Internationally Visible Research Agenda -
Publications and Presentations. As a group, in 2006-2007, Institute for Child Health Policy
faculty have 33 unique peer-review publications that either appeared or are in press in highly
rated journals. Appendix B contains a list of faculty and their publications for the reporting
period. The unique publication count indicates that each publication is counted only once for
the purpose of the narrative but may appear more than once in the list in Appendix B because
faculty publish together.

In addition to their publications, faculty made numerous presentations at national and
international scientific meetings. The list of presentations is included in Appendix C.

4.1.3. Research: Mentor Junior Faculty in the Conduct of Multidisciplinary Research and Foster
Their Development Toward Becoming Independent Investigators. All tenure- and research-
track faculty have a mentoring committee and plan to guide their development. We want to
highlight the accomplishments of our junior faculty and also recognize the efforts of their
mentoring teams.

*Dr. Mildred Maldonado-Molina is the Co-Principal Investigator on the newly RWJF-
funded study, "State Alcohol Tax Policy: Effects on Risky Behaviors and Health
Outcomes,"Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Substance Abuse Policy Research
Program (SAPRP) (Wagenaar, PI and Primary Mentor). In addition, Dr. Maldonado-
Molina was included as Co-Principal Investigator on the following proposal, "Etiology of
Alcohol Use and Consequences among Multi-Ethnic Urban Youth," National Institute on
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) (Komro, PI, Mentoring Committee Member).
This proposal received a score of 157 and is currently being revised for resubmission.
Finally, Dr. Madonado-Molina is preparing a K23 application for the June deadline.

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*Dr. I-Chan Huanq is highly productive in the area of patient reported outcomes,
particularly examining health-related quality of life for children. In recognition of his
achievements, Dr. Huang was named to the Editorial Board of Quality of Life Research,
a prestigious journal in the area of health outcomes research. This is an
accomplishment for any faculty member but is particularly noteworthy given the very
early stage of Dr. Huang's career (received his PhD from Johns Hopkins University in
2003 and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at JHU in 2005). In addition, Dr. Huang
submitted the following K23 application to NICHD "Development of Health-Related
Quality of Life Measurements for Children." This proposal uses novel measurement
techniques to assess HRQOL in a broad range of children (with varying
sociodemographic and health status characteristics) (Shenkman, Primary Mentor for
K23 and for Mentoring Committee). In addition, faculty from the College of Public Health
and Health Professions and the College of Education are participating in this proposal in
order to foster multidisciplinary collaboration.

Dr. Sema Aydede received two external awards this year. The first is from HRSA,
MCHB, Research Division: "Health Plan Turnover. Disenrollment, and Health Care
Quality" (Shenkman, Co-PI and Primary Mentor). Approximately 10 percent of proposals
submitted to HRSA, MCHB Research Division are funded. Dr. Aydede also was
awarded funding for the project entitled: "Development of Care Coordination Strategies
for Children with Special Health Care Needs" by the Florida Department of Health
(Shenkman, Co-PI and Primary Mentor).

Dr. Damon Clark (joint hire between the Department of Economics, College of Business
and ICARE) received one award from the US Department of Education entitled "The
Effect of Exit Exam Performance on High School and Post-Secondary Outcomes." The
project period is 09/021/2006 through 10/30/2008 for a total of $367,081 (Figlio, Primary
Mentor, Shenkman, Co-Mentor). Dr. Clark's award is not counted in the ICHP total
award amount. In addition, Dr. Clark is developing a letter of intent (LOI) to the RWJF.
RWJF uses a four-page LOI mechanism to determine if they want to invite a full
proposal. The LOI and the proposal undergo peer-review.

4.1.4. Education: Offer Assistantships to Graduate Students and Offer Formal Course Material:
As documented in Section 3.1. Strategic Fit of the Institute for Child Health Policy Plan with the
University Strategic Work Plan, we supported five graduate students during the past academic
year from other colleges (College of Business, College of Health and Human Performance,
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and IFAS and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences).
ICHP faculty provide mentorship and are members of dissertation committees of students
throughout campus, including within the College of Health and Human Performance and IFAS.
In addition, we collaborated with faculty in the College of Public Health and Health Professions
and the College of Medicine in the development of the PhD in Epidemiology Program. We have
three child health courses that we will offer (GMS 6816 Pediatric Epidemiology, GMS 6835
Health Policy Issues and Children, and GMS 6833 Health Care Policy and Vulnerable
Populations).

We also developed a series of methods courses which draw upon the expertise of our faculty
and use examples from child and adolescent health research: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal
Research Design, Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Research Designs for Community
Settings, and Translational Research Methods. In collaboration with our colleagues in Public

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Health and in Medicine, we would like to develop a concentration in pediatric epidemiology.
Finally, one of the Institute for Child Health Policy faculty members is teaching an economics
elective (MEL 7954: Health Care Economics) to medical students. This course contains a
substantial component on public health insurance options for children, how these options are
financed, and the potential benefits to children.

4.1.5. Service: Provide Leadership in Disseminating Research Results and in Interpreting
Research to Policymakers and the Public: Through the activities of one of our faculty members, we
host several list-serves and websites for information dissemination about policies and research
findings related to children with special health care needs and their families. In addition, Institute
faculty conduct semi-annual technical support and training sessions to Medical Directors of national
health plans who offer Medicaid product lines about evaluating the quality of care for their
beneficiaries and about pay-for-performance reimbursement strategies to enhance the quality of
care they deliver. Several faculty provide external education programs in community health centers
and other clinic environments related to medical home issues and adolescent transition to adult
health care systems. Faculty also participate on advisory boards. For example, Dr. Shenkman is
on the State Advisory Board for the Title V Children with Special Health Care Needs Program. Dr.
Wagenaar is on several advisory boards including: the External Advisory Board for the Health
Research and Policy Centers at the University of Illinois at Chicago; Advisory Board, Global Alcohol
Policy Alliance; the Scientific Advisory Board, Mothers Against Drunk Driving; and the National
Evaluation Advisory Panel for the Free to Grow Project: Head Start Partnerships to Promote
Substance-Free Communities, sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

4.2. Strategy for Future Achievement

Our strategies for future achievement are targeted toward the following interrelated goals:

Provide funding opportunities for graduate education, through the use of training grants
and research and teaching assistantships.
Maintain a nationally and internationally visible research agenda focused on children's
health and well-being.
Maintain a broad portfolio of extramural funding related to areas of strength within the
Institute.
Foster multidisciplinary research collaboration with faculty throughout UF focused on
children's health and well-being.
Mentor junior faculty in the conduct of multidisciplinary research and foster their
development toward becoming independent investigators.

During the 2006-2007 year, we proposed restructuring the Institute for Child and Adolescent
Research and Evaluation (ICARE) to be more closely aligned with the research themes within
the Institute for Child Health Policy. This alignment would allow the University to better leverage
the limited resources allocated to ICARE and to take advantage of the ICHP infrastructure and
faculty expertise in the area of children's health and well-being. In addition, this alignment will
promote the five goals listed above. We submitted a proposal to the Provost in November 2006
and had a subsequent meeting with the Provost about the proposed restructuring strategies to
foster multidisciplinary research.

The original document that was submitted to the Provost's Office in November 2006 was
revised to reflect new opportunities to work with the College of Health and Human Performance
(HHP). The revised document is contained in Appendix D. The primary purpose of the
restructuring was to enhance core support currently available through ICHP in the area of
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research design and analysis, database management, access to existing datasets, and access
to expertise in child health services research, epidemiology, biostatistics, and policy analysis to
develop pilot and exploratory studies leading to R21, R03, R01, and Program Project/Center
grant funding. There were additional goals for the restructuring, which included enhanced
research and mentoring opportunities for graduate students and junior faculty who were focused
on child-related research.

We developed the following strategies, which will be implemented in the 2007-2008 year:

4.2.1. Form an ICHP Steering Committee, comprised of UF faculty from a diverse set of
colleges, to recommend and provide feedback on strategic goals, seek common grant funding
opportunities, and select proposed pilot projects for further development. The Steering
Committee will meet twice each year, in conjunction with ICHP research development meetings.
A national expert will be invited to these meetings to consult on specific research themes and to
provide expertise on research opportunities. The following UF faculty have been invited to be
members of the ICHP Steering Committee:

Rick Bucciarelli, MD, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
(accepted)
Veronica Feeg, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Chair, Department of Women, Children
and Family, College of Nursing (accepted)
Julie Graber, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences (contacted and awaiting a response)
David Figlio, PhD, Knight-Ridder Professor of Economics, College of Business (on
sabbatical for the Spring Semester)
Robert Cook, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
College of Public Health and Health Professions (accepted)
Nayda Torres, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Family, Youth and Community
Sciences, IFAS (contacted and awaiting a response)
Chudley (Chad) Werch, PhD, Professor, College of Health and Human Performance and
Director, Addictive and Health Behaviors Research Institute (accepted)
Desmond Schatz, MD, Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Pediatrics,
College of Medicine (accepted)
Natalie C.G. Freeman, Ph.D., M.P.H., Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology,
Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (contacted and
awaiting a response)

4.2.2. ICHP will host 2-3 faculty research exploratory lunches per year at various
departments/colleges throughout the University. The first research exploratory lunch will be held
with faculty in the College of Health and Human Performance (HHP) in April, 2007. The
purposes of the lunch meetings are (1) to further connect ICHP faculty with other faculty
members throughout campus who are interested in children's health and well-being and child
health policy issues, and (2) to develop collaborative relationships toward the goal of
multidisciplinary proposal development. Potential areas of research collaboration between ICHP
and HHP include: adolescent risk reduction (including alcohol use and suicide prevention),
health literacy, obesity, and shared decision making between parents and providers. It is
expected that several meetings will be held with HHP faculty to further develop collaborations.

4.2.3. Expand the core services offered through ICHP, which include analytic support, data
management, access to a rich child health and well-being data repository, and multidisciplinary

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expertise, to develop multidisciplinary research pilot studies and proposals related to children's
health and well-being. To do so, we proposed that funds be used for the following:

A biostatistics faculty member assigned 0.50 FTE to strengthen the design and analysis
component of the core.
A research coordinator assigned 0.25 FTE to participate in proposal development and
research dissemination for those projects that involve faculty from other colleges.
Travel and honoraria for two national experts in children's health and well-being to meet
with ICHP, the Steering Committee, and affiliate faculty around focused themes that are
targeted for proposal development. These sessions would be small, invitational
meetings designed to critique pilot work and full proposals prior to submission to federal
funding agencies.
Pilot proposal development that involves collaborators from other colleges with a
particular emphasis on collaboration with the College of Health and Human
Performance. Pilot projects that require development funds and biostatistics support will
be selected in collaboration with the Steering Committee.
Graduate students from different colleges who are focused on child health research.
These students will apply for assistantships at ICHP and applications will be reviewed in
collaboration with a subcommittee of the Steering Committee to make final selections.
Two major criteria must be met for a faculty member to work with a graduate student: 1)
the faculty member must have current extramural funding and 2) the faculty member
must have sufficient funding to support 50% of the student's stipend for at least one
year.

4.2.4. Foster development of co-authored publications involving authors from different colleges
and departments in peer-reviewed scientific journals, social science journals and other
multidisciplinary journals of national stature.

5. The Institute for Child Health Policy Challenges

5.1. Top Five Impediments

5.1.1. Funding limitations at NIH: The NIH payline is a major impediment. Additionally,
competition for funding at other peer-review federal agencies such as HRSA/MCHB and the
Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and foundations such as RWJF has become even more
intense given the NIH limitations.

5.1.2. Fundraising: We also face challenges related to fund-raising. We have met with UF
Development Staff who understand the importance of and are interested in a) translational
research expanding studies from very controlled settings into community trials to examine the
impact of the intervention on large populations; b) examining the impact of federal and state
policies on children's outcomes; and c) developing policy recommendations based on health
outcomes and epidemiological research findings. The challenge is that the Development Staff
are addressing many areas of need, and we recognize the many competing and very important
priorities within pediatrics.

One strategy that we proposed to the Development Staff is modeled on that employed by the
University of South Florida (USF), which successfully established an endowed professorship in
child health policy. The strategy used at USF involved working with the Women's Guild for All
Children's Hospital to conduct fund-raising. We suggested considering this option for the

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Children's Hospital at Alachua General Hospital (Shands at AGH). The Institute for Child Health
Policy would welcome the opportunity to collaborate with the Department of Pediatrics in
establishing such a group and determining their interest in a child health policy fundraising
initiative. We recognize that we do not have the population base or the local wealth that exists
for the Women's Guild at All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg. However, we think this
strategy, among others, should be considered to promote child health policy as a targeted
fundraising initiative.

5.2. Strategies for Dealing with Impediments

5.2.1. Funding Limitations at NIH: We have encouraged faculty to diversify their funding
portfolio and to factor in additional time to revise and resubmit proposals that likely would have
been funded in the past with one or two submissions. In addition, we are highly selective about
initiatives that we choose to pursue and carefully examine all funding opportunities. We also
are conservative about recurring expenditures because of the uncertainty around grant funding.

In addition, the core support strategy to foster greater multidisciplinary collaboration across the
UF colleges as described in Section 4.2 Strategy for Future Achievement will enhance our
ability to compete for federal awards. Through a core support model, we can initiate pilot
projects that build on existing faculty strengths throughout campus and are strategically targeted
toward NIH and Agency for Health Care Research and Quality funding initiatives. Additionally,
the core support model will allow groups of investigators to publish together and to develop
interrelated and complementary projects that will allow us to be more competitive for Center
grants.

5.2.2. Fundraising: We will continue to work with Development Staff to identify potential
donors. In addition, we will work with Development Staff to enhance awareness that scientific
discoveries at the bench or in controlled trials in restricted settings must be expanded to
community settings and translated to policy and program recommendations to have an impact
on populations of children. Fundraising to support these important avenues of research is
needed.

6. The Institute for Child Health Policy Improvement Strategies

6.1. Strategy to Gauge Performance on Goals

6.1.1. Annual Goal Setting with Faculty and Monitoring of Goals: Specific goals are set during
annual evaluations with faculty that include plans for grant applications, expected salary
coverage from extramural sources, and targets for peer-review publications and scientific
presentations. Quarterly, faculty are sent reminders about NIH and other federal agency
application deadlines with a request to provide information about applications that are being
prepared. Grant applications are monitored throughout the year relative to faculty goals. In
addition, faculty salary coverage levels from extramural sources are monitored every month
along with anticipated start and end dates for projects.

Faculty are highly productive and motivated. In almost every case, faculty whose funding will be
reduced due to major projects ending provide a written plan listing the targeted funding
agencies and their strategies to obtain additional funding. Dr. Shenkman meets individually with
faculty who do not provide this information and discusses strategies with them to obtain funding.
At that time, the faculty member's research goals (established during the annual evaluation) are

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also discussed. Dr. Shenkman and Dr. Komro (Associate Director) also meet to discuss
specific faculty and strategies to help them meet their goals.

6.1.2. Annual Review of Institute Goals and Accomplishments: Each year the Institute faculty
review and revise our goals. We also critically assess our achievements relative to those goals.
Finally, we discuss strategies to achieve our goals and incorporate those strategies into our
workplan.

6.1.3. Student Feedback: For formal courses, we use formal course feedback forms and follow
proper procedures for distribution and scoring. In addition, we meet with graduate students
informally during the semester and formally at the end of the semester to obtain their feedback
about their experiences and to make adjustments for the upcoming semester, as needed, to
enhance their education.

6.1.4. Annual Steering Committee Review. The Steering Committee is a new addition for the
Institute for Child Health Policy. The Steering Committee will meet twice per year to provide
input about strategic direction. In addition, we plan to provide a draft of the Institute annual
report that is prepared for the Provost to the Steering Committee for review and input. We will
add the Steering Committee's assessment of our performance to future reports.

6.2. The Current Assessment Data on Goal Achievement

Currently, we maintain records in PeopleSoft about submitted grant applications and current
grant support. We also maintain excel spreadsheets for each faculty member's funded projects
with start and end dates and salary support for the faculty member and each member of his or
her project team. As previously described, these data are monitored monthly related to our
goals for research productivity. Publications and presentations are monitored annually through
faculty activity reports that are submitted prior to their annual evaluations. The information from
the faculty activity reports are summarized for an overall annual Institute evaluation to assess
how we are meeting our goals as a group in addition to the individual assessments. We also
monitor the number of graduate assistantships we provide.

6.3 Improvements Already Implemented

During the 2006-2007 year, we developed the proposal to better leverage ICARE resources and
met with the Provost about the core support and Steering Committee model (see Section 4.2
Strategy for Future Achievement and Appendix D). These strategies will enhance our ability to
foster multidisciplinary collaboration that is essential for larger NIH grant awards. The proposal
also increases our ability to provide assistantships and valuable mentored research experiences
to graduate students. In addition, we participated in developing the PhD in Epidemiology with
our colleagues in Public Health and Medicine to enhance our participation in and support of
graduate education.

7. The Culture of the Institute for Child Health Policy

7.1. Mentoring of Undergraduate and Graduate Students

As previously described, one of our goals is to provide funding opportunities for graduate
education, through the use of training grants and research and teaching assistantships.
Graduate students only work with faculty who have funded research projects and are integrated
into the project team. The student interacts with members of the project team ranging from Co-
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Investigators from a variety of disciplines to project coordinators, programming staff, and
community advisory boards. All graduate students are given an individual workspace, a
dedicated computer, and access to the Data Coordinating Center servers. Graduate students
are included on papers produced by the research teams and we mentor them to develop areas
that they wish to pursue for their dissertations. When possible, we support their travel to at least
one scientific meeting.

We also work with undergraduate students in research assistant positions but this has not been
a primary area of emphasis. Undergraduate students are given very focused activities such as
assisting with background information for papers or grant applications, participating in report
preparation, and learning how to prepare descriptive statistics. It also is possible for some
undergraduates, with the permission of the instructor, to take the 6000 level course in pediatric
epidemiology. We would like to expand our options to work with undergraduate students to
include students in the Honors Program and to participate in initiatives to enhance students'
interest in fields where there is a need for more scientists such as epidemiology and health
outcomes research related to children's health and well-being.

7.2. The Intellectual Life of the Programs and Departments

The Institute for Child Health Policy is an enriching academic environment because of the
nationally recognized, multidisciplinary faculty within the Institute, the array of funded projects,
and the availability of outstanding datasets to conduct analyses related to children's health and
well-being. We strive to maintain an atmosphere of academic freedom for faculty and students
to explore new ideas. We provide faculty with support for developing new methods for their
research. We also foster multidisciplinary collaboration with colleagues across campus and
currently enjoy collaborative relationships with faculty in the College of Business (economics),
the College of Health and Human Performance (alcohol-related research), the College of
Nursing (palliative care), the College of Education (transition to adulthood for children with
special health care needs), and the College of Medicine (child health outcomes).

The addition of the Steering Committee, inviting outside experts to attend the Steering
Committee meetings and to work with groups of faculty from colleges across campus, and the
enhanced opportunity to provide core support to foster multidisciplinary collaboration with the
College of HHP and other colleges on campus will only add to the intellectual life of faculty
conducting research related to children's health and well-being.

7.3. Partnerships Across Campus

As described in Section 4.1.1. Research: Maintaining a Mixed Portfolio of Extramural Funding
and Fostering Multidisciplinary Collaboration, the Institute for Child Health Policy primary faculty
are multidisciplinary and include health services researchers, economists, epidemiologists, a
psychologist, and a social demographer. We currently collaborate with colleges across campus
including the College of Health and Human Performance (alcohol-related research), the College
of Nursing (palliative care), the College of Business (Economics social capital and children's
well-being), the College of Medicine (children's health outcomes), the College of Public Health
and Health Professions (Clinical Psychology item response theory and children's health-
related quality of life), and the College of Education (transition to adulthood for children with
special health care needs). We plan to expand these collaborations during the 2007-2008
academic year as described in Section 4.2. Strategy for Future Achievement. In addition, as
described in Section 4.1.2. Education: Offer Assistantships to Graduate Students and Offer

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Formal Course Material, we are providing assistantships to five graduate students from various
areas (Business, Health and Human Performance, Anthropology, and IFAS).

7.4. Service to the Professional/Academic Disciplines

Institute for Child Health Policy primary faculty serve as reviewers for the following journals:

Addiction
American Journal of Public Health
Applied Developmental Science
Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
Child Development
Family Relations
Health Education and Behavior
Health Services Research
JAMA
Journal of Adolescent Health
Journal of Developmental Psychology
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Journal of Research on Adolescence
Journal of Safety Research
Journal of Urban Health
Maternal and Child Health Journal
Milbank Quarterly
Pediatrics
Preventive Medicine
Prevention Science
Public Health Reports
Quality of Life Research

Institute faculty members also serve as Editors and on Editorial Boards for the following
journals:

Addiction (Wagenaar, Assistant Editor)
Journal of Safety Research and Prevention Science (Wagenaar, Editorial Board)
Quality of Life Research (Huang, Editorial Board)

Institute faculty members served on the following review panels in 2006-2007:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
NIH National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
NIH National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research
NIH National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
NIH Social and Community Influences on Health Behavior
United Kingdom's National Prevention Research Initiative, Medical Research Council





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Institute faculty are active in the following professional societies:


AcademyHealth
American Public Health Association
American Society of Health Economists
Canadian Society for Adolescent Medicine
Early Career Preventionist Network
Global Alcohol Policy Alliance
International Health Economics Association
National Advisory Board for Mothers Against Drunk Driving
National Hispanic Science Network
Pediatric Academic Societies
Population Association of America
Society for Clinical Research
Society for Prevention Research
Southern Demographic Association
Substance Abuse Policy Research Program
World Future Society

Dr. Herndon was elected to the Advisory Committee for the AcademyHealth Economics Interest
Group. AcademyHealth is the most highly regarded scientific organization for health services
research. In addition, Dr.Herndon is on the Scientific Committee for the American Society of
Health Economists and the International Health Economics Association. Dr. Shenkman is an
elected member of the Pediatric Academic Societies: Society for Pediatric Research. Dr. Komro
is a member of the Scientific Committee, United Kingdom's National Prevention Research
Initiative, Medical Research Council.

Dr. Wagenaar is a Fellow of the World Innovation Foundation, a collaboration of scientists and
engineers throughout the world, include seventy-one Nobel Laureates, consulting with
governments worldwide to apply science to policy in the service of peace and human well-being.
He also was named by Institute for Scientific Information in 2004 as a Highly Cited Researcher,
awarded to less than one-half of one percent of published scientists.

8. Budget Requests for 2007-2008

No new funds are requested for 2007-2008 above the already existing allocation for ICHP and
the already existing allocation for ICARE. We want to focus on implementing, evaluating, and
subsequently refining the strategies that we proposed in Section 4.2. Strategy for Future
Achievement.











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Appendix A. 2006-2007 Grant Funding for the Institute for Child Health Policy

Project # PI Title Agency


2006-2007
Funding*


Current Awards
62675 Aydede Health Plan Turnover and Disenrollment, Health Care Quality HRSA $49,998
59123 Komro An Adaption of Project Northland for Urban Youth** Univ. of Minnesota $210,581
33474 Reiss Distance Learning for MCH Training HRSA $120,935
62323 Reiss CMS Youth Transition YR 4 Dept of Health $87,745
61022 Reiss Developmental and Disability Health Care Transition FDDC $37,157
State of Texas/ Center
for Medicare and
33461 Shenkman Evaluating Health Care Quality in Texas Medicaid Medicaid Services $2,653,069
Dept of Health/Centers
for Medicare and
61805 Shenkman Quality of Care for CSHCN in Medicaid Reform Medicaid Services $410,169
62351 Shenkman Evaluation of the Florida KidCare Program AHCA $468,724
62614 Shenkman Florida Healthy Kids Program Evaluation FL Healthy Kids $213,855
62911 Shenkman Healthy Start AHCA $44,288
Dept of Health/Centers
for Medicare and
62896 Shenkman Partners in Care Program Medicaid Services $184,999
58295 Terza A New Method of Measuring the Public Health Impact RWJF $30,559
59884 Wagenaar State Alcohol Tax Policy, Effects on Risky Behaviors & Health Outcomes RWJF $50,933
61476 Youngblade Medical Home in the Safety Net HRSA $198,575
New/Pending Awards
Care Coordination, Disease Management Guidelines and Web Based
TBD Aydede Development DOH CMS $76,000
TBD Reiss Integrating Families, Communities and Providers FIFI $30,893
TBD Terza Medicare Beneficiary Response to Benefit Gaps versus Continuous Coverage U Maryland (RWJF) $41,994
Total $4,910,474
*Funding for the 2006-2007 year only and not the total award amount
** Original award from NIAAA made to Dr. Komro when she was at the University of Minnesota. The project has remained at the University of
Minnesota with a subcontract to UF. Dr. Komro is the PI.



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Appendix B
Institute for Child Health Policy
Peer-Review Publications 2006-2007


I-Chan Huang

Huang IC, Wu AW, Frangakis C. Do the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF measure the same
constructs? Quality of Life Research 2006;15(1):15-24.

Huang IC, Frangakis C, Wu AW. The relationship of excess body weight and health-related
quality of life. International Journal of Obesity 2006;30(8):1250-9.

Wu AW, Snyder CF, Huang IC, Skolasky R, McGruder HF, Celano SA, Selnes OA, Andrade
AS. A randomized trial of the impact of a programmable medication reminder device on quality
of life in patients with AIDS. AIDS Patient Care STDS 2006;20(11):773-81.

Youngblade LM, Theokas C, Schulenberg J, Curry L, Huang IC, Novak M.
Risk and promotive factors in families, schools, and communities: a contextual model of positive
youth development in adolescence. Pediatrics 2007;119 Suppl 1:S47-53.

Plantinga LC, Fink NE, Jaar BG, Huang IC, Wu AW, Meyer KB, Powe NR.
Relation between level or change of hemoglobin and generic and disease-specific quality of life
measures in hemodialysis. Quality of Life Research 2007 Feb 8; [DOI 10.1007/s11136-007-
9176-6].

Kelli Komro

Hearst, M.O., Fulkerson, J.A., Maldonado-Molina, M.M., Perry, C.L., & Komro, K.A. Who needs
liquor stores when parents will do? The importance of social sources of alcohol among young
urban teens. Preventive Medicine In Press.

Maldonado-Molina, M.M., & Komro, K., Prado, G. Prospective association between dieting and
smoking initiation among adolescents. American Journal of Health Promotion In Press.

Pasch, K.E., Komro, K.A., Perry, C.L., Hearst, M. & Farbakhsh, K. Outdoor alcohol advertising
near schools: What does it advertise and how is it related to intentions and use of alcohol
among young adolescents? Journal of Studies on Alcohol & Drugs In Press.

Wagenaar, A.C., Maldonado-Molina, M.M., Erickson, D.J., Ma, L., Tobler, A.L. & Komro, K.A.
General deterrence effects of U.S. statutory DUI fine and jail penalties: Long-term follow-up in
32 states. Accident Analysis & Prevention In Press.

Komro, K.A., Perry, C.L., Veblen-Mortenson, S., Farbakhsh, K., Kugler, K.C., Alfano, K.A.,
Dudovitz, B.S., Williams, C.L. & Jones-Webb, R. Cross-cultural adaptation of a home-based
program for alcohol use prevention among urban youth: The Slick Tracy Home Team Program.
Journal of Primary Prevention 2006;27(2): 135-154.




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Stigler, M.H., Kugler, K.C., Komro, K.A., Leshabari, M.T., & Klepp, K.I. (2006). AIDS education
for Tanzanian youth: a mediation analysis. Health Education Research: Theory & Practice
2006;21(4): 441-451.

Stigler, M.H., Perry, C.L., Komro, K.A., Cudeck, R. & Williams, C.L. Teasing apart a multiple
component approach to adolescent alcohol prevention: What worked in Project Northland?
Prevention Science 2006;7(3):269-80.

Mildred Maldonado-Molina

Wagenaar, A.C., Maldonado-Molina, M.M., Erickson, D.J., Ma, L., Tobler, A.L. & Komro, K.A.
General deterrence effects of U.S. statutory DUI fine and jail penalties: Long-term follow-up in
32 states. Accident Analysis & Prevention In Press.

Maldonado-Molina, M.M., & Komro, K., Prado, G. Prospective association between dieting and
smoking initiation among adolescents. American Journal of Health Promotion In Press.

Hearst, M.O., Fulkerson, J.A., Maldonado-Molina, M.M., Perry, C.L. & Komro, K. Who needs
liquor stores when parents will do? The importance of social sources of alcohol among young
urban teens. Preventive Medicine In Press.

Maldonado-Molina, M.M., Reyes, N., & Espinosa-Hernandez, G. (2006). Prevention research
and Latino families: Resources for researchers and practitioners. Family Relations 2006;55,
403-414.

John Reiss

Repetto J, Gibson R, Lubbers J, Grtiz S, Reiss J. Practical Applications of Confidentiality Rules
to Health Care Transition Instruction. Remedial and Special Education In Press.

Repetto J, Gibson R, Lubbers J, Grtiz S, Reiss J. Statewide Study of Knowledge and Attitudes
Regarding Health Care Transition. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals In Press.

Knauth A, Verstappen A, Reiss J, Webb G. Transition and Transfer from Pediatric to Adult Care
of the Young Adult with Complex Congenital Heart Disease. Cardiology Clinics 2006; 24:619-
629.

Reiss J, Gibson RW. At What Cost? (Editorial). Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
2006;160:1079-1080.

Reiss, J and Gibson R. Development of Transition Health Care Plans in C Betz and W Nehring
(Eds.) Promoting Health Care Transitions for Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs and
Disabilities. Baltimore, MD. Brookes (in press).

Reiss J and Gibson R. (2006) Health Care Transition of Adolescents and Young Adults with
Disabilities and Special Health Care Needs: New Perspectives in M Field, A Jette and L Martin
(eds). Workshop on Disability in America: A New Look. Washington, DC: National Academies
Press.



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Elizabeth Shenkman


Youngblade LM, Curry L., Vogel WB, Novak MA, Shenkman E. Effects Of Community
Characteristics on Adolescents' Risky Behavior and Health-Care Utilization and Expenditures.
Journal of Adolescent Health 2006;38(5):486-494.

Sappington D, Aydede S, Dick AW, Vogel WB, Shenkman E. The Effects of Reinsurance in
Financing Children's Health Care. Inquiry 2006;43(1):23-33.

Klein JD, Shenkman E, Brach C, Shone LP, Col J, Schaffer VA, Dick AW, VanLandeghem K,
Szilagyi PG. Prior Health Care Experiences of Adolescents who Enroll in SCHIP. J Health Care
Poor Underserved 2006;17(4):789-807.

Shenkman E, Knapp C. Sappington D, Aydede S, Vogel B, Schatz D. Persistence of High
Health Care Expenditures Among Children in Medicaid. Medical Care Research and Review In
Press.

Joseph Terza

Terza J, Kenkel DS, Lin T, and Sakata S. Care-Giver Advice as a Preventive Measure for
Drinking During Pregnancy: Zeros, Categorical Outcome Responses, and Endogeneity. Health
Economics. In Press.

Shea DG, Terza JV, Stuart BC, Briesacher B. Estimating the Effects of Prescription Drug
Coverage for Medicare Beneficiaries," Health Services Research. In Press.

Terza J. Estimation of Policy Effects Using Parametric Nonlinear Models: A Contextual Critique
of the Generalized Method of Moments. Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology.
2006;6:177-198.

Terza J. and Tsai W. Censored Probit Estimation with Correlation Near the Boundary: A Useful
Reparameterization. Review of Applied Economics.2006;2:1 -12.

Krause JS. and Terza JV. Injury and Demographic Factors Predictive of Disparities in Earnings
After Spinal Cord Injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2006; 87: 1318-1326.

Terza J. Optimal Discrete Prediction in Parametric Binary Response Models. Economics
Letters. 2006; 91:72-75.

Alex Wagenaar

Britt, H., Toomey, T.L., Dunsmuir, W., Wagenaar, A.C. Propensity for and correlates of alcohol
sales to underage youth. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 2006;50(2):25-42.

Toomey, T.L., Fabian, L.E.A., Erickson, D.J., Wagenaar, A.C., Fletcher, L., and Lenk, K.
Influencing Alcohol Control Policies and Practices at Community Festivals. Journal of Drug
Education 2006;36(1):15-32.

Toomey, T.L., Lenk, K.M. and Wagenaar, A.C. Environmental policies to reduce college
drinking: An update of research findings. Journal of Studies on Alcohol2007;68(2):208-219.

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Wagenaar, A.C., Erickson, D.J., Harwood, E.M., & O'Malley, P.M. Effects of state coalitions to
reduce underage drinking: A national evaluation. American Journal of Preventive Medicine
2006;31(4):307-315.

Wagenaar, A.C., Maldonado-Molina, M.M., Erickson, D.J., Ma, L., Tobler, A.L. & Komro, K.A.
General deterrence effects of U.S. statutory DUI fine and jail penalties: Long-term follow-up in
32 states. Accident Analysis & Prevention In Press.

Jones-Webb, R., McKee, P., Hannan, P., Wall, M., Pham, L., Erickson, D. & Wagenaar A.
Alcohol and malt liquor availability and promotion and homicide in inner cities. Substance Use
& Misuse. In Press.

Wagenaar, A.C. and Tobler, A.L. Alcohol sales and service to underage youth and intoxicated
patrons: Effects of RBS training and enforcement interventions. Transportation Research
Circular. In Press.






































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Appendix C
Institute for Child Health Policy
Selected Presentations at Scientific Meetings 2006-2007

I-Chan Huang

Huang I, Chyng-Chuang H, Boyer JG, Wu AW. (2006). Development and Validation of a
Quality of Life Instrument for Patients with Diabetes (D39-T). The 13th Annual Conference of
the International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL), Lisbon, Portugal.

Kelli Komro

Komro KA. (February, 2007). Project Northland: A school, family and community intervention to
prevent alcohol use among young adolescents. Invited presentation at the Department of
Nutrition, College of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.

Komro KA. (June, 2006). Prevention of Alcohol Use Among Adolescents: Successes and
Challenges. Invited presentation at the 2nd Symposium on Addictive and Health Behaviors
Research, Jacksonville, Florida.

Komro KA. (June, 2006). Establishing Mentoring Relationships in Prevention Research. Invited
panelist at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research, San Antonio,
Texas.

Komro KA. (June, 2006). Defining Success in Prevention Research. Invited panelist at the 14th
Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research, San Antonio, Texas.

Perry CL, Williams CL, Komro KA, Veblen-Mortenson S. (2006, March). Project Northland:
Phase I, II, and Project Northland Chicago. Invited presentation at the BluePrints Conference,
Denver, CO.

Mildred Maldonado-Molina

Maldonado-Molina MM, Collins LM, Lanza ST, Ramirez R, & Canino G. Patterns of substance
use onset among Hispanic adolescents. Presented at the Critical Research Issues in Latino
Mental Health, Special Topics in Latino Mental Health Research. Santa Fe, New Mexico,
November 20-22, 2006.

Maldonado-Molina MM. Preventing alcohol and substance use among adolescents. Invited
presentation at the 22nd Annual McKnight Fellows Meeting and 10th Annual graduate School
Conference, Tampa, Florida, November 10-12, 2006.

Prado G, Maldonado-Molina MM, Schwartz S, & Pena J. The interface between epidemiology,
prevention, and statistical methods in preventing drug abuse and HIV in Hispanic adolescents:
Designing the research studies of tomorrow. Roundtable Breakout Session at the 6th NHSN
Annual Conference. Scottsdale, Arizona, September 13-16, 2006.

Maldonado-Molina MM, Komro K, Stigler M, & Farbakhsh K. Evaluating patterns of substance
use involvement among Latino and African American urban youth. Presentation at the 14th


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Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research. San Antonio, Texas, May 30 June 2,
2006.

Maldonado-Molina MM, & Collins LM. (March 2006). The Gateway Hypothesis of Substance
Use: an operational definition. Presentation at the 2006 Society for Research on Adolescence
Biennial Meeting, San Francisco, California, March 23-26, 2006.

John Reiss

Reiss J and Utens E. (2006). Coping Strategies for Parents and Siblings of ACHDers (invited
breakout session). Adults with Congenital Heart National Conference. San Francisco, CA.

Reiss J. Transition Challenges. (2006). (invited plenary panel presentation on Psychosocial
Challenges of Adult Congenital Heart Disease) Adults with Congenital Heart National
Conference. San Francisco, CA.

Reiss J. (2006). Flying Without Instruments: Day-to Day Aspects of Caring for a Child with a
Chronic Health Condition. (invited panel presentation).. (Family Track) Barth Syndrome
International Scientific/Medical and Family Conference. Lake Buena Vista, Florida.

Reiss J and Gibson R. (2006). Health Care Transition and Active Participation in Life Long
Care for Childhood Cancer Survivors: Implication for Long Term Follow-up (Invited) Children's
Oncology Group Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois. March, 2006.

Elizabeth Shenkman

Shenkman E. (2006). Invited Presenter Federal Cost-Sharing Policies: Implications for
Children in Public Health Insurance Programs. Academy of Health Services Research National
Meeting. Seattle, Washington.

Shenkman E. (2006). Invited Discussant The Impact of SCHIP on CSHCN. Academy of
Health Services Research National Meeting. Seattle, Washington.

Alex Wagenaar

Wagenaar AC. Alcohol sales and service to underage youth and intoxicated patrons: Effects of
RBS training and enforcement interventions. Invited presentation at the summer symposium of
the National Academies of Science, Transportation Research Board, Committee on Alcohol,
Other Drugs and Transportation, Irvine, CA, June 5-6, 2006.

Wagenaar AC, Maldonado-Molina MM, Erickson DJ, Ma L, Tobler AL, & Komro KA. General
deterrence effects of U.S. statutory DUI fine and jail penalties: Evaluation of policy changes in
32 states. Presented at the annual meeting of the Substance Abuse Policy Research Program.
Hilton Head, South Carolina, November 28-December 1, 2006.








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Appendix D


RESTRUCTURING OF INSTITUTE FOR CHILD AND ADOLESCENT
RESEARCH AND EVALUATION (ICARE)



Background

ICARE was conceived as an umbrella entity that would promote cross-campus collaboration
and research around children and families by building upon the strengths of existing programs.
Three broad thematic areas were identified: 1) early childhood, 2) children and adolescents in
transition, and 3) vulnerable populations. Although ICARE enjoyed some success in fostering
multidisciplinary collaboration, it sought to do too much relative to the resources available. In
addition, the diverse and loosely related thematic areas created problems in establishing an
identity and in focusing the efforts of ICARE. Finally, the umbrella concept proved unwieldy and
inefficient.

Restructuring ICARE as an Initiative within the Institute for Child Health Policy

Rather than continuing to develop ICARE as a separate umbrella-like entity or "Institute," we
believe the goals of ICARE can be best pursued by devoting its fiscal resources to a narrower
and more defined "Initiative" within the Institute for Child Health Policy (ICHP). Rather than
calling for additional resources, the new initiative would utilize existing ICARE resources more
efficiently and effectively by:

1) Building upon the resources and successful national reputation enjoyed by the Institute
for Child Health Policy (ICHP);
2) Focusing on a more restricted range of research themes that build upon existing
strengths at ICHP;
3) Enhancing core support currently available through ICHP in the area of research design
and analysis, database management, access to existing datasets, and access to
expertise in child health services research, epidemiology, biostatistics, and policy
analysis to develop pilot and exploratory studies leading to R21, R03, R01, and Program
Project grant funding, with an emphasis on peer reviewed funding from federal sources
or other sources of national stature;
4) Building upon existing infrastructure at ICHP to hold targeted invitational research
consultations with a consortium of UF faculty to assist in the development of research
themes that are specifically targeted for proposal development for extramural funding.
National experts in the particular research topic will be invited to present and consult
with participants.
5) Offering multidisciplinary training opportunities to doctoral students and career
development opportunities to junior faculty. These opportunities can include access to
core support and mentoring from senior faculty.






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Structure


The current ICARE funding will be allocated to the categories listed below with a particular
emphasis on fostering and further developing existing collaborations with the College of Health
and Human Performance, but we also want to include faculty from other colleges as appropriate
for the research. The Director of ICHP will provide an annual report to the Provost on new
funding pursued and obtained, scores on proposals not funded when such scores are provided,
on publications, and on mentoring of graduate and junior faculty.

Funding Allocation Categories for Restructured Initiative: SFY 2007-2008*

.5 economist (Damon Clark Prior Commitment to the College of Business)

Personnel
.5 biostatistician
.25 project coordinator
.5 graduate research assistant**
.5 graduate research assistant**
Travel & Honoraria (2 experts)
Meeting expenses
Pilot Proposal Grants (involving at least two different colleges for research and data
collection, in addition to staff time, data collection, data analysis, etc.)


Notes:
*Not reflected in the budget categories are additional necessary resources such as
programming support, Research Data Coordinating Center data management, staff support,
office space, and routine IT support, which will be absorbed by ICHP to foster pilot project
development and multidisciplinary collaboration across multiple colleges.
**Faculty will only be able to work with graduate students if they are able to fund 50% of the
graduate student assistantship for at least one year. Effectively, this will allow us to support four
graduate students.




















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Specific Strategies


The following strategies build upon the prior accomplishments of ICHP and will help ICHP
faculty to further develop collaborative relationships with faculty throughout campus who are
interested in children's health and well-being. Building on the strengths of ICHP will allow us to
better leverage the relatively small amount of funds that were allocated to ICARE by serving as
a catalyst for research and grant acquisition.

1. Form an ICHP Steering Committee, comprised of UF faculty from a diverse set of
colleges, to recommend and provide feedback on strategic goals, seek common grant
funding opportunities, and select proposed pilot projects for further development. The
Steering Committee will meet twice each year, in conjunction with ICHP research
development meetings. A national expert will be invited to these meetings to consult on
specific research themes and to provide expertise on research opportunities. The following
UF faculty have been invited to be members of the ICHP Steering Committee:

Rick Bucciarelli, MD, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
(accepted)
Veronica Feeg, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Chair, Department of Women, Children
and Family, College of Nursing (accepted)
Julie Graber, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences (contacted and awaiting a response)
David Figlio, PhD, Knight-Ridder Professor of Economics, College of Business (on
sabbatical for Spring Semester)
Robert Cook, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
College of Public Health and Health Professions (accepted)
Nayda Torres, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Family, Youth and Community
Sciences, IFAS (contacted and awaiting a response)
Chudley (Chad) Werch, PhD, Professor, College of Health and Human Performance and
Director, Addictive and Health Behaviors Research Institute (accepted)
Desmond Schatz, MD, Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Pediatrics,
College of Medicine (accepted)
Natalie C.G. Freeman, Ph.D., M.P.H., Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology,
Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (contacted and
awaiting a response)


2. ICHP will host 2-3 faculty research exploratory lunches per year at various
departments/colleges throughout the University. The first research exploratory lunch will be
held with faculty in the College of Health and Human Performance (HHP) in April, 2007. The
purposes of the lunch meetings are (1) to further connect ICHP faculty with other faculty
members throughout campus who are interested in children's health and well-being and
child health policy issues, and (2) to develop collaborative relationships toward the goal of
multidisciplinary proposal development. Potential areas of research collaboration between
ICHP and HHP include: adolescent risk reduction (including alcohol use and suicide
prevention), health literacy, obesity, and shared decision making between parents and
providers. It is expected that several meetings will be held with HHP faculty to further
develop collaborations.



Institute for Child Health Policy
Annual Report March 2007
Page 24 of 25









3. Expand the core services offered through ICHP, which include analytic support, data
management, access to a rich child health and well-being data repository, and
multidisciplinary expertise, to develop multidisciplinary research pilot studies and proposals
related to children's health and well-being. To do so, we proposed that funds be used for
the following:

* A biostatistics faculty member assigned 0.50 FTE to strengthen the design and analysis
component of the core.
* A research coordinator assigned 0.25 FTE to participate in proposal development and
research dissemination for those projects that involve faculty from other colleges.
* Travel and honoraria for two national experts in children's health and well-being to meet
with ICHP, the Steering Committee, and affiliate faculty around focused themes that are
targeted for proposal development. These sessions would be small, invitational
meetings designed to critique pilot work and full proposals prior to submission to federal
funding agencies.
* Pilot proposal development that involves collaborators from other colleges with a
particular emphasis on collaboration with the College of Health and Human
Performance. Pilot projects that require development funds and biostatistics support will
be selected in collaboration with the Steering Committee.
* Graduate students from different colleges who are focused on child health research.
These students will apply for assistantships at ICHP and applications will be reviewed in
collaboration with a subcommittee of the Steering Committee to make final selections.
Two major criteria must be met for a faculty member to work with a graduate student: 1)
the faculty member must have current extramural funding and 2) the faculty member
must have sufficient funding to support 50% of the student's stipend for at least one
year.

4. Foster development of co-authored publications involving authors from different
colleges and departments in peer-reviewed scientific journals, social science journals and
other multidisciplinary journals of national stature.






















Institute for Child Health Policy
Annual Report March 2007
Page 25 of 25





2007-08 Program Review
Budget Request


College/Unit: Institute for Child Health Policy
Non-Recurring Requests:
Projects:

Funding Office/Lab
Justification Description of Project Amount Space
(Page location Availability
of narrative) (yes/no)

We have no requests.

Please refer to the accompanying
narrative for proposed use of current
funds. __


*1. +


Personnel
Department/Focus
Funding Area Salary Plan Months Salary Resources Office/Lab
Justification (If interdisplinary, (Faculty, TEAMS, G Title Appointed FTE (Includes (office/lab Space
(Page location note RAOPS) (9,12) fringe renovation and/or Availability
of narrative) College/Department benefits) equipment) (yes/no)
Connection)





2007-08 Program Review
Budget Request

College/Unit: Institute for Child Health Policy
Recurring Requests:

Expenses
Funding
Justification Description of Request Amount
(Page location
of narrative)




Personnel
Department/Focus
Funding Area Salary Plan Months Salary Resources Support Office/Lab
Justification (If interdisciplinary, (Faculty, TEAMS, G Title Appointed FTE (Includes (office/lab (office Space
(Page location note RAOPS) (9,12) fringe renovation and/or support, Availability
of narrative) College/Department benefits) equipment) travel) (yes/no)
S Connection) _




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