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 Front Cover
 Program narrative
 Metrics
 Non-recurring requests
 Recurring requests






Group Title: Budget report, Harn Museum of Art
Title: Budget report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086998/00001
 Material Information
Title: Budget report
Series Title: Budget report
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida
Publisher: University of Florida Harn Museum of Art
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007-2008
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00086998
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Holding Location: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Program narrative
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Metrics
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Non-recurring requests
        Page 30
    Recurring requests
        Page 31
Full Text




Annual
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UNIVERSITY of
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Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Annual Program/Budget Review
Submitted by Rebecca Martin Nagy, Director
March 14,2007


1. Mission and purpose of the Ham Museum of Art and its programs

The Ham's mission and vision statements clearly express the shared understanding of the
director, staff, advisory councils and volunteers about the purpose of the museum as a unit of the
university, a vital community and statewide resource, and a major player in the museum field
nationally.

Mission Statement
The Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art promotes the power of the arts to inspire and educate people
and enrich their lives. To this purpose the museum builds and maintains exemplary art
collections and produces a wide variety of challenging, innovative exhibitions and stimulating
educational programs. As an integral part of the University of Florida, the museum advances
teaching and research and serves as a catalyst for creative engagement between the university
and diverse local, state, national and international audiences.

Vision Statement
The Harn Museum of Art will be known across the country for its beautiful facilities and grounds
and its exemplary collections, exhibitions and educational programs. Above all, the museum will
be recognized as a national leader among university-affiliated museums through its work in the
development of innovative programs that engage university faculty and students with the
museum in research, teaching, and service to diverse audiences.

2. Goals and expected outcomes

General. The Ham's Five Year Performance Plan (Strategic Plan) for 2003-2008 spells out
broad institutional goals for the museum as well as specific goals and strategies for each museum
department and indicates the year in which each goal is to be accomplished. We are now nearing
the end of the third year of the plan and have realized the majority of the goals designated for
that period. We are on track to accomplish the goals of the current Strategic Plan by the end of
fiscal year 2007/08 and will begin development of a new Strategic Plan for 2008-2013 this fall.
The goals and outcomes summarized below are taken from the Ham's Strategic Plan. I am
combining "teaching" and "service" here because they are so closely linked for us at the Ham.

Teaching and Service. The Strategic Plan includes numerous goals that relate to teaching and
service, particularly in the section devoted to the Education department. This report highlights a
selection of the most notable goals and accomplishments in this area. A goal for year one of the
plan was establishment of an Education Department Advisory Council to meet annually and with
ad hoc subcommittees to meet as needed. The Council advises Ham educators on all aspects of
the museum's educational programming and ensures that the museum fulfills its mission with
regard to teaching and service. It consists of 35 members representing UF faculty and students,









potential funders, leaders of relevant constituencies, docents, and experts in museum education.
Formed in 2005, the Council recently held its third annual meeting. Members are so enthusiastic
that the majority chose to be reappointed at the end of their initial two-year terms.

Another Education department goal was expansion and standardization of the museum's
internship program for UF and other university and college students. The museum's well
organized internship program has grown steadily, with the number of interns ranging from 12 -
20 per semester. Interns come to the Ham from many departments and programs, including art
and art history, anthropology, museum studies, journalism, business, recreation, English,
education, law and others. The Harn has two paid internships: Criser Internships are open to UF
students from any academic program; Neilson Internships are open to graduate students
interested in museum registration from any college or university. In addition Langley Interns are
placed at the Ham and paid from an endowment in the School of Art and Art History; and
business students are placed at the Ham and paid from an endowment in the College of Business
Administration established by Wachovia for that purpose. Many Harn Museum interns receive
course credit for their internships. In addition, internships provide professional training
opportunities and expose students to a variety of career options. A number of our interns have
gone on to receive internships and jobs at prestigious museums across the country such as the
Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Getty Museum.
Other former Harn interns currently hold professional positions at the NY Public Library and
Christie's. We are proud of our former interns and believe that their experiences at the Harn
helped prepare them for their professional success.

Of particular relevance to the Ham's mission are our goals to sustain and expand partnerships
with UF and community organizations, and to engage the university community in programs at
the Harn as the museum advances teaching and research and serves as a catalyst for creative
engagement between the university and diverse audiences. The Ham partners with many
departments and units across campus and in the community on projects ranging from co-
sponsoring and jointly organizing lecture series, film series, workshops and symposiums, to
organizing and co-hosting major popular festivals and professional and scholarly conferences.
The Ham's partners at UF in the past year included, in no particular order and among others, the
International Center; the Centers for African, Asian, European, Latin American and Jewish
Studies; the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies; the Department of Film and Media
Studies; the Florida Museum of Natural History; UF Performing Arts; UF Student Government;
the School of Art and Art History; the Center for the Arts in Healthcare Research and Education;
and the Center for the Study of Hindu Traditions. Community partners have included, among
others, the Hippodrome; the Institute of Learning in Retirement; the Matheson Museum, the
Thomas Center Galleries; Santa Fe Community College; and the Alachua County School Board.

Another way the Ham contributes to teaching is through university classes taught at the museum.
The director and all senior staff members present guest lectures to classes in museum studies and
arts administration offered by the College of Fine Arts. This semester the director and several
Ham senior staff are also presenting guest lectures for a journalism course on "Covering the
Arts" taught by telecommunications professor Johanna Cleary. The director and senior staff
regularly teach classes for Professor Kathie Price's course on Art Law in the Levin College of
Law. The director and curators present guest lectures for courses in art history, anthropology,









literature, religion and other academic areas upon request. Some professors teach courses at the
Ham using the collection and exhibitions as an integral part of the learning experience. Notable
is the creative writing/poetry class taught at the museum by Professor Debora Greger. Education
Professor Jane Townsend also taught a graduate course in literacy and the arts at the Harn this
year.

Professors in various departments and programs use the Ham as a learning laboratory for
students. For example, journalism students are assigned to cover exhibitions and programs at the
museum. Dance students use the museum as a choreography lab and performance space,
responding in their work to the building's architecture as well as to works of art on view. Also
this year, an interior design class taught by Professor Jo Hasell worked closely with Ham staff on
a proposal to redesign our administrative office areas to reduce crowding, promote efficiency and
create a healthier workplace environment.

The Harn Eminent Scholar Endowment Lecture series on which the Ham partners with the
School of Art and Art History provides opportunities for each visiting scholar in the series to
meet in seminar and round table settings with UF faculty and students.

Research. Curators are engaged in ongoing scholarly research on the collections and on
proposed acquisitions as they develop their collections. The collections are also used by UF
faculty and students and other scholars in their research. The main institutional goal relating to
research as stated in the Ham's Strategic Plan is to increase exhibitions originated by Harn
Museum curators, with scholarly exhibition catalogues, which travel nationally to other
prestigious venues. Achievement of this goal is key to ensuring that the Harn makes significant
contributions to the field and to establishing the Ham's national and international reputation as a
leading university museum. I am happy to report that we have made significant progress on this
goal in the past year. The Harn has published scholarly catalogues for four exhibitions organized
by Ham curators:
Spinach Green and Mutton-Fat White: Chinese Jades of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) by
Charles Mason
Resonance and Inspiration: New Works by Magdalene Odundo by Susan Cooksey
Continuity and Change: Three Generations ofEthiopian Artists by Rebecca Nagy
Cuba Avant-Garde: Contemporary Cuban Art from the Farber Collection by Kerry Oliver-
Smith
In addition, an innovative exhibition of photography, Aura of the Photograph: The Image as
Object, was accompanied by a handsome color brochure with an insightful essay by the curator,
Tom Southall. Of these exhibitions, Magdalene Odundo will travel to the Hood Museum at
Dartmouth, Continuity and Change will travel to the Diggs Gallery at Winston-Salem State
University, and Cuba Avant-Garde will travel to the Ringling Museum. In addition, the
exhibition Jacques-Henri Lartigue: A Boy, A Camera, An Era, co-curated in 2004 by Harn
curator of contemporary art Kerry Oliver-Smith and Professor John Cech, and which previously
traveled to the Chazen Museum at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, is now at the Miami
Public Library.

Also this year the Ham was awarded a highly competitive and prestigious grant from the Luce
Foundation for the publication of a guide to the museum's American collection, including









modern and contemporary art and photography, which will be written by the three curators
responsible for these areas of the collection-Dulce Roman, Kerry Oliver-Smith and Tom
Southall. This publication will have a tremendous impact on national recognition of the museum
and its collections.

Diversity. The Harn emphasizes the artistic expressions of diverse international cultures in its
permanent collection and temporary exhibitions, publications and programs. In so doing, the
museum produces a variety of offerings that attract large and diverse audiences of all ages. We
are now serving audiences that the Harn had not served effectively in the past, such as families
with young children and senior citizens. This year we expanded our outreach to senior citizens
through the Vital Visionaries Program for which the Harn partnered with the Center for the Arts
in Healthcare Research and Education and the College of Medicine (described elsewhere in this
report); and a special lecture and discussion series taught by the Harn director, director of
education and curators for seniors in partnership with the Institute for Learning in Retirement. In
addition, we initiated a new program for the visually impaired called "Looking beyond Sight,"
for which specially trained docents provide visually impaired and blind visitors a learning
experience in the galleries followed by a hands-on art-making activity in one of the museum's
classrooms. Pilot groups for this new program were from a community group called the Society
for the Blind and a group from the VA Hospital. The program will now be advertised and made
available to a wider audience.

Fundraising. The Ham's fundraising successes of the past year support the goals of the
museum's Strategic Plan for 2005-2008 and provide the foundation for our capital campaign
goals. First and foremost among our goals is to build the endowments that will ensure future
stability and growth of the museum. Specifically, the current Strategic Plan calls for the addition
of 15 new endowments to support acquisitions, exhibitions, programs, research and travel, and
art conservation. To date, 13 endowments have been established towards this goal, three of
which are pledged and one of which is a bequest.

The museum's strategic initiatives include extending the presence of the Harn throughout the
country, especially among UF alumni and friends as a way to expand the donor base. A
pioneering event for alumni, donors and prospective donors was hosted in New York in April
2006 with marked success. A parallel event will be held in New York during Asia Week in
March 2007 and will include UF alumni and prospective donors from New York, Gainesville
and Chicago.

Ham National Council members are also involved in extending the Ham's national reputation.
An event in February 2007 in Naples, Florida, hosted by Adria and Jerry Starkey, introduced the
Ham's director, curators and development officer to over 100 potential donors to the museum.
The Ham's National Council continues to meet bi-annually, with fall meetings organized during
the UF Fall Foundation Board Weekend. The upcoming spring meeting will be held in Aspen,
Colorado and hosted by Bob and Nancy Magoon, important and nationally recognized
contemporary art collectors. The spring 2008 meeting is already being planned to be held in San
Francisco with UF alumnus Ron Shore hosting. Each meeting hosted out of Gainesville includes
an intimate event to introduce the Harn to area alumni and potential donors identified by Council
hosts.










3. The strategic fit of the Harn Museum of Art with the University' Strategic Work Plan
and the Board of Governor's Strategic Plan

UF's Mission Statement. The mission, vision and goals of the Harn Museum of Art embrace
and support UF's threefold mission of education, research and service. As part of the university,
the Ham is committed to being a leader among museums, particularly university-based
museums, statewide and internationally, and to have an international impact as well through
publication of original scholarship on the collection and exhibitions, through its Web presence,
and through participation of the director and staff in international professional organizations and
conferences.

Goals and Principles of UF's Strategic Work Plan. The Harn Museum of Art supports the first
principle of UF's work plan, "that strategic planning represents the highest level of planning in
pursuit of the university's long range goals." The Ham engages in rigorous strategic planning, is
conscientious in implementing its long range plan and carefully tracks progress through annual
review and assessment to ensure achievement of its specific goals.

Faculty. We share UF's commitment to invest in faculty and are aggressively pursuing
endowments for the directorship, five curatorial positions, and director of education at the Ham.
We have secured one such endowment to date, a pledge for $1.5 million to name and endow the
Cofrin Curator of Asian Art. In building the best possible staff, the Ham also seeks to diversify
the staff, especially at the senior and mid-management levels. At present our curator of modern
art is Puerto Rican-American and the director of museum technology is Jamaican-American. Our
development assistant (half-time position) is African American.

In support of the university's goal to provide the best possible quality of life in Gainesville and
the surrounding communities, the Harn Museum of Art and its neighbors at the Cultural Plaza
make a tremendous contribution. Newly recruited faculty and other visitors to the university
routinely observe that the Cultural Plaza institutions rival those in much larger urban areas.
People are incredulous that a public university offers such world-class cultural amenities. This is
surely a tremendous boon to recruitment and retention of top faculty.

The Harn supports UF's commitment to strengthening its programs to ensure the quality and
academic success of its undergraduate, graduate and professional students by providing
professional-level internship, graduate assistantship and practicum experiences for students in a
number of academic majors and graduate and professional programs. Other students benefit from
a range of experiences at the museum through participation as volunteers, MUSEs (Museum
University Student Educators), part-time paid staff, and as members of the Museum Nights
Committee of Student Government. The academic experience of many students is enriched
through participation in classes taught at the museum, guest lectures provided by museum staff,
and class assignments based on the museum's permanent collections, temporary exhibitions, and
public programs.

We are fully committed to continued improvement of compensation structure for all Harn
Museum staff and have made slow, steady progress in improving staff salaries and benefits. Staff









are encouraged to take advantage of training opportunities on campus and off-site and flex-time
is provided for those who wish to pursue degrees or certificate programs.

Facilities. With the addition of the Cofrin Pavilion in 2005 and the renovation of the original
museum building during summer 2006, the Ham has developed and maintained an exemplary art
museum facility. In addition, we are currently implementing an NEH-funded project to renovate
and enlarge art storage, as described later in this report.

Our greatest facilities need at present is to improve our security systems, particularly in the
original 1990 building. Necessary security upgrades and associated costs are described below in
the budget request section of this report.

In addition, we very much need a dust removal system for the woodworking shop to protect the
health of our staff and for better preservation and conservation of works of art which are stored
in areas adjacent to the wood shop. The equipment required and associated costs also are
described below in the budget request section of this report.

Libraries. In keeping the university's plan to bring library resources at UF in line with top ten
public AAU universities, the Ham Museum of Art has just entered into a cooperative program
for the integration of our Bishop Study Center (BSC) holdings into the online library catalogue
of the university. The goal of this effort is to expand access and university awareness of the
resources held in the BSC library, which houses works on art, art history, museum studies and art
education directly related to the museum's permanent collections. The BSC is available to UF
faculty, staff, students and the general public. Most books and IT materials are for use in the
BSC only. However, certain resource materials for educators may be borrowed for classroom
use.

Information Technology. With regard to building a state-of-the art IT system to meet the needs
of faculty and students in research and teaching, the Ham is developing a Web-based database on
the permanent collections as a resource for faculty, students and other researchers. We are
currently conducting IRB-approved surveys of various user groups (K-12 educators; UF and
SFCC faculty, UF and SFCC students, docents, museum visitors, media and Ham staff) in
preparation for submission of a grant application to the Institute of Museum and Library Services
(IMLS). Grant funds will support digitization of the collection and enhance development of the
eMuseum system for Web-based collections database access, already under development by the
Ham. Meanwhile, the Luce Foundation grant for publication of the Ham's American collection
provides funds for digitization of American works of art.

Strategies for Maximum Impact: The Arts and Humanities. Through numerous partnerships
with departments and faculties in the arts and humanities (some of which are described below)
the Ham supports the following goals of UF's work plan: Develop faculty resources ... by (i)
providing a supportive research environment to increase faculty productivity, (ii) recruiting and
retaining the best faculty possible ., and (iii) developing a plan to build the size of arts and
humanities programs to achieve parity with top ten public AAU universities. The Ham also
supports the goal to promote the arts and humanities to the university community, the national
and international academic communities, and to the public at the local, state and national level.










Strategies for Maximum Impact: Internationalization. The Ham Museum of Art contributes
in a major way to UF's "obligation both to develop resources for understanding different cultures
and societies so that we are prepared as a state and as a nation for the increasing integration of
the global community and to inculcate this understanding in its students." All five core collecting
areas of the museum are international in scope: African art, Asian art, Modem art of Europe and
the Americas, International Contemporary art, and Photography. Correspondingly, the museum's
exhibition, education and publication programs are international and draw on the expertise of UF
faculty in African, Asian, Latin American, European and other area studies. International
scholars contribute to the museum's programs as consultants and as guest authors for museum
publications. Student inters and graduate assistants assist curators with research for
international exhibitions and frequently have occasion to interact in meaningful ways with
visiting international scholars and artists. The director and curators pursue research abroad for
exhibitions and publications. In the past year the curator of African art conducted research in
Ghana, Mali and Burkina Faso for the current exhibition African Arts ofHealing and Divination;
the curator of contemporary art pursued research in Germany and Switzerland for a 2008
exhibition on contemporary European art; and the director completed research in Ethiopia for the
current exhibition Continuity and Change: Three Generations ofEthiopian Artists, and the
accompanying scholarly catalogue.

The Har Museum of Art partners with and supports the work of the Title VI centers in various
and numerous ways. The director and curators frequently teach classes for affiliated faculty in
the centers and faculty also use the collections and exhibitions in their instruction. The directors
of the centers bring distinguished visiting scholars and prospective faculty members to the
museum, which is a valuable recruiting tool for them.
The Har partners with the centers in presenting symposia, lectures and film programs for the
university and wider community. Graduate students in foreign area studies benefit from
internships in the Harn Museum of Art. The Ham's Education Department joins with the
outreach programs of the Centers for African and Latin American studies (as well as the
International Center and Centers for Asian and European Studies) to present teacher workshops
and institutes as a service to the wider community. In turn, the Ham receives financial support
from the Centers for African, Latin American and European Studies as well as the International
Center to enhance curatorial research and travel, public programming and the hosting of
international scholarly conferences at the museum.

Strategies for Maximum Impact: Energy. The Har is proud that the Cofrin Pavilion is
LEEDs certified and has been designated officially as a Green Building, joining the much-
heralded Rinker School of Building Construction in gaining this status. Our colleagues in
Facilities Planning inform us that very few museums achieve this distinction.

Professional Preparation. As mentioned elsewhere in this report, the Ham provides
undergraduate and graduate students opportunities for professional development and preparation
through internships, graduate assistantships, practicums, and volunteer activities. Particularly
relevant to the emphasis in UF's work plan on "the need for information technology
professionals trained in the departments of Computer and Information Science, Engineering,
Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Decision and Information Sciences," the Har has a









joint program with the College of Business Administration in the area of DIS. Each semester a
graduate student in DIS is awarded a graduate assistantship at the Harn. To date these students
have worked in our Registration department, where they write crystal reports that enhance access
to and use of our collections database for various in-house functions. Stipends for these graduate
assistantships are paid by the College of Business from an endowment established by Wachovia
to benefit both the College and the Harn Museum of Art.

Education, Children and Families. The Ham is particularly active in support of the
university's goals in this area and partners with colleges and centers on campus in
interdisciplinary programs that expand and improve the university's service to the pre-K to 20
education system and to families and children. The Ham Museum of Art and the Alachua County
School Board collaborate each year on curriculum resource units, in accordance with Florida
State Educational Standards, and arrange for school tours that interpret curricula. Family Days at
the Harn have been expanded from a once-a-month program during the summer months to
monthly January through October. Family Days incorporate informative tours of the museum
with hands-on art activities centered on a common theme. Tot Time was expanded from once-a-
month to twice monthly due to popular demand. This program serves preschoolers and their
parents or other guardians and includes docent-led interactive tours of the museum combined
with hands-on, age-appropriate activities. This year the Harn partnered with the Centers for
African, Asian, and Latin American Studies and the International Center to present five
workshops for teachers from Alachua and surrounding counties. A three-day Summer Teacher
Institute held at the Ham each year offers in-depth learning opportunities and draws participants
from all over the state. The popular annual School Board of Alachua County Student Art
Exhibition and Reception at the Harn displays student art created in response to works of art
from the Harn featured in the museum's Curriculum Resource Units. Director of Education
Bonnie Bemau is a consultant to Duval Elementary School, the arts magnet school in East
Gainesville noted for turning its F rating one year into an A rating the following year by
integrating the arts into the curriculum in a way that greatly enhanced student learning. She
conducted an in-service workshop for Duval teachers this year. Bonnie also serves on the
Literacy and the Arts Advisory Council of the College of Education and is working closely with
Professor Jane Townsend to develop the Masters Degree track in literacy and the arts. In
addition, Bonnie serves on the Arts in Education Task Force in the College of Fine Arts, which
has been charged by Dean Lavelli with developing a plan to make UF a Creative Campus in the
true and full sense of the term.

Aging. The Harn also contributes to the university's goal to "enhance faculty, resources, and
interdisciplinary connections between relevant units to address the social, medical and legal
aspects of aging." Development of the Ham's Art for Life program for seniors in retirement
residences and group facilities who are unable to visit the museum in person was funded by a
grant from the MetLife Foundation. Specially trained docents use twelve educational modules to
engage senior audiences in visual analysis and discussion of artworks and artists. Art also serves
as a catalyst for interaction among residents, docents and staff and results in conversation and
social engagement even for individuals who are typically reticent and withdrawn. Bonnie Bernau
serves on the Oak Hammock/Institute for Learning in Retirement (ILR) Curriculum Committee
and promotes participation by seniors in the Ham's educational programs. In addition, this year
she developed a six-part course on contemporary art taught at the Harn by Bonnie, the director









and curators for seniors in the ILR program. During spring semester last year the Ham
collaborated with the Center for the Arts in Healthcare Research and Education (CAHRE) and
the College of Medicine in a National Institutes on Aging-funded program called Vital
Visionaries. Piloted in Baltimore by Johns Hopkins College of Medicine, the project pairs first
and second year medical students with elderly members of the community and helps students to
develop empathy for older patients while encouraging seniors to develop their creative
possibilities. Another long-term goal of the program is to develop positive attitudes in medical
students toward geriatric practice or general medicine treating older patients. Photographs and art
created by the seniors and medical students were exhibited in the Maren Room at UF's Health
Center Complex last summer.

The Board of Governors Strategic Plan. The Ham's role at the University of Florida and in
our region, as outlined in other sections of this report, supports the BOG's system goal 3-
building world-class academic programs and research capacity; and goal 4-meeting community
needs and fulfilling unique institutional responsibilities. In the section of the BOG Strategic Plan
devoted to the University of Florida, the Ham makes specific contributions in the areas of
supporting the university's mission (p. 23); meeting the challenge of recruiting faculty and
students (p. 34); and taking advantage of the opportunities provided by rising student
achievement and interest in Florida public higher education (p. 35); and our state's quality of life
and growing economy (p. 35). The Ham's success in securing federal and other grants
contributes to UF's meeting BOG accountability measures (p. A8), as does the Ham's
commitment to achieving recognition as a museum of world-class status (pp. A12-13).

4. The Ham Museum of Art's top five achievements in 2006-2007

1) Maximizing the impact of the Cofrin Pavilion. After opening the Cofrin Pavilion in October
2005 with great fanfare the Harn has focused in the subsequent period on developing the
potential of the new spaces for collection building, collection exhibition, educational
programming, donor cultivation, and audience building. Securing corporate support for
exhibitions and programs is one of the greatest challenges for the Ham (see discussion below),
yet we secured generous support for exhibitions in the new Pavilion from Christie's, Shands
HealthCare, and the Nationwide Foundation. The beauty and drama of the new exhibition space
inspired Deirdre and Russ Fogler to establish an endowment for art acquisitions and to name the
Fogler Promenade in the new wing. The charming enclosed garden courtyard of the new wing
inspired a gift from prominent collectors and Ham National Art Council members Bob and
Nancy Magoon to name the Magoon Garden. Other works of art have been donated to the Harn
for exhibition in the Pavilion and leading collectors have loaned major works of art for
exhibition as well, which strengthens the museum's bonds with those collectors and positions us
well for future gifts. Recently the family of Harold and Margaret Goforth established an
endowment for educational programs and named the classroom spaces of the Pavilion the
Goforth Learning Center. In January 2007 David and Mary Ann Cofrin created the Gladys Ham
Harris Art Acquisition Endowment in memory of Mary Ann's sister and named the Gladys Ham
Harris Alcove adjacent to the SFI Gallery. The alcove provides a beautiful view of the Magoon
Garden of the Cofrin Pavilion. The Camellia Court Caf6, educational programs in the Goforth
Learning Center and the beautifully landscaped gardens surrounding the Pavilion have









significantly impacted attendance and audience participation. Attendance at the Harn increased
almost 10,000 in calendar year 2006 to over 93,000, the highest ever for the museum.

2) Renovating, expanding and improving facilities. During summer 2006 we completely
renovated the 1990 Ham Museum of Art building, which involved removing all works of art on
view and relocating all staff to temporary work spaces. The costs of renovation were shared by
the Harn and UF's Physical Plant Division and included painting all interior spaces, refinishing
wood and stone floors and replacing carpet. In addition, a new curatorial office was constructed
so that all five curators have office space. With consultation from UF's environmental
horticulture department, the Ham and PPD renovated landscaping at the Ham's main entrance,
completely replacing palms and other plantings for the first time in 17 years. Most importantly,
the renovations and corresponding reallocation of interior spaces made possible for the first time
in the Ham's history permanent exhibition galleries for all five of the Ham's core collections:
African art, Asian art, modern art of Europe and the Americas, international contemporary art,
and photography. Each curator reinstalled his or her collection to highlight recent acquisitions by
gift and purchase and to create intellectually and aesthetically stimulating groupings and
juxtapositions. In addition, we began the renovation and expansion of the museum's art storage
facilities, using funds from an NEH grant and matching funds from a private donor and the state
of Florida. These renovations, to be completed in 2008, will effectively double the museum's art
storage capacity. Thus we will be able to safely store and care for the collections while also
making them more accessible for study by faculty and staff and for use in our exhibitions and
programs. Equally importantly, these renovations will make possible the continuing growth of
the collections by purchase and gift.

3) Success of the Ham's original exhibitions and publications. As outlined above, the Harn has
achieved one of the key goals of its Strategic Plan in establishing a pattern of organizing a
number of original exhibitions each year. Several original exhibitions in the past year and
currently are accompanied by scholarly exhibition catalogues and will travel to other prestigious
venues. Museum colleagues, scholars, collectors and the general public are taking notice of these
outstanding exhibitions and publications. This notice helps the Harn realize its goal of national
and international recognition for its collections and the scholarly work of its curators.

4) Expanding the Ham's donor base and potential donors. This has been a banner year for the
Ham in securing commitments from existing donors, bringing in new donors, and establishing
new relationships with potential donors. Newly established and maturing endowments have been
outlined above. A large cash donation came in from Ham National Art Council members Bob
and Nancy Magoon and important works of art from David Cofrin, Mickey Singer, Steve and
Carol Shey and other donors. Major collectors who have loaned valuable works of art to the
museum include an anonymous local collector, who loaned six bronze sculptors by Fernando
Botero; Naples collectors Michael and Joan Salke, whose collection of contemporary art is
internationally noted; and Norman and Irma Braman, who are among the top collectors of
modern and contemporary art in the world. The Harn hosted highly successful donor and alumni
cultivation events in New York in April 2006 and Naples in February 2007. The Naples event
with over 100 people in attendance was hosted and funded by Harn National Art Council
member Adria Starkey and her husband Jerry. Among the new contacts established at this event
were Michael and Joan Salke, mentioned above, and collector Olga Hirshhom (of Washington's









Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden), who has since invited the Harn director and curators
to visit her home and collection in Naples. Notably, San Francisco collector, Ham donor and UF
alumnus Ron Shore joined the Harn National Art Council this year and Christie Powell agreed to
serve on the Ham's Capital Campaign Committee.

5) Completion of the AAM Reaccreditation Process. Although the final ruling of the
Accreditation Commission of the American Association of Museums is not expected until
summer, Harn staff is breathing a collective sigh of relief upon completion of the self study
phase and the on-site visit of the peer review team for our decennial reaccreditation. Completion
of the extensive self study workbook and compilation of the supporting materials provided an
opportunity to examine and evaluate every aspect of our operations and programs in light of the
Ham's mission, vision and goals. We look forward to the peer review team's report as an
opportunity to learn and grow as an institution.

The Ham's strategy for future achievements

Through academic year 2007/2008, the Harn will focus on the goals and strategies outlined in the
current Strategic Plan, on which we are making excellent progress. We are on track to
accomplish almost all of the goals outlined in the current plan. At the same time, we will be
developing a new Five-Year Performance Plan/Strategic Plan for 2008-2013 with the assistance
of a museum planning consultant. The new plan will build on the successful completion of the
current plan and will support the Ham's ambitious fundraising goals for the capital campaign.
(See request for funds for consultant below.)
I anticipate that the new Strategic Plan will focus, among other things, on the following
institutional priorities, which we have already begun to address as we look forward to future
achievements:
Continuing growth of endowments to support all aspects of the museum's programming
Expanded integration of the Ham into UF's academic curriculum
Advancement of the Ham's national and international reputation
Development of the Cultural Plaza as a gateway between UF and the community and as a
major destination for art, culture, nature and leisure activities
Planning for future expansion of the museum building to accommodate collections growth
and expanded programming

5. Challenges: The top five impediments to the Ham's success

There is considerable consensus among Ham Museum senior staff that the following
impediments hinder our success in the short term:
Insufficient funds for planning and implementation of exhibitions and corresponding
publications, programming and marketing
Limited funds for acquisitions, especially given the inflationary prices of today's art market
The Harn is still a well-kept secret even in Florida and especially nationally
The museum's distance from central campus compounded by difficulty parking here and
elsewhere on campus negatively impacts use of the collections, exhibitions and programs
by faculty and staff









Crowded art storage and limited on-line access to collections information and images limit
use of the Ham's collections and exhibitions by faculty, students and other researchers

The Ham's strategies for dealing with these impediments

We are addressing funding for exhibitions through several strategies. Because the corporate base
is small in Gainesville, we are developing relationships with local affiliates of national
corporations that can leverage grants from national-level corporate foundations or marketing
divisions, such as Nationwide and Target. We have had excellent success with Nationwide and
limited success with Target, but will continue to pursue this strategy. In addition we are building
relationships with program officers at leading foundations, as we have found that getting one's
institutional foot in the door is the first step to major grants. For example, we now have a
relationship with the Luce Foundation, which has funded the publication of the Ham's American
collection, and have just established a good connection with the Warhol Foundation and are
expecting a visit from the program officer on March 29. As we pursue these funding sources, we
are building endowments to provide a steady and increasing income stream for exhibitions and
related publications, programming and marketing.

Funds for acquisitions are best secured through large endowments. At present the Harn has
$6,964,635 in acquisition endowments, which generate only $228,625 in spendable income
annually. More funds will become available when additional pledges for endowments are paid in
full and state matching funds are secured. However, we need to continue to grow endowments
aggressively. There are a few foundations that provide funds for acquisitions such as the Judith
Rothschild Foundation and the Carpenter Foundation. Our grant applications to these
foundations have not yet yielded fruit, but we will continue to apply at every opportunity.

To increase our exposure in Florida, nationally and internationally the Harn will continue the
successful strategy of publishing scholarly exhibition catalogues for wide distribution to
museums, libraries and colleagues, and traveling exhibitions organized by Ham curators to other
prestigious venues. The Harn director and staff will increase their active participation in
statewide and national professional organizations including making presentations, serving on
committees, holding offices, and hosting conferences and meetings at the Ham. In the area of
donor cultivation we will continue and expand our successful strategy of hosting events for
alumni and other potential donors in other cities in Florida and across the country such as our
events in New York and Naples in the past year, a recent event in Fort Lauderdale, and an
upcoming vent in Aspen. In the area of marketing, we are strategically placing ads for Ham
exhibitions and programs in national publications and will increase this exposure as funding
allows. I also believe that securing the donation or promise of major art collections will put the
Ham on the map, as will development of the Cultural Plaza as a gateway to UF's campus and an
art and nature park.

To overcome the disadvantage of being removed from central campus, the Ham will redouble its
efforts to reach out to faculty and students through further integration of the museum's
collections and exhibitions into the curriculum and collaboration with faculty and students in
organizing exhibitions and programs. The Madelyn Lockhart Faculty Focus Exhibitions, which
are co-curated by a UF faculty member and a Ham curator, often with student participation, are









good models for future projects. Similarly, Museum Nights, which is planned and administered
by a committee made up of museum professionals and students, is a successful model for
working with students to develop programs that interest them and meet their needs. With regard
to parking, the Ham will promote use of the convenient bus service to the Cultural Plaza while
seeking other creative solutions in conversation with advisory groups such as the director's Harn
Museum Faculty Council, the Education Department Advisory Council, and the Provost-
appointed Cultural Plaza Advisory Committee chaired by the Ham Museum director.

Increasing art storage and on-line access to collections are being accomplished by grant-funded
projects. The NEH stabilization grant with a total budget of approximately $700,000 will result
in doubling of available space for art storage, thereby improving safe and convenient access to
the collection by faculty, students and other researchers. Digitization of the collection is
facilitated by the Luce Foundation grant for publication of American modern and contemporary
art and photography. We are currently preparing an application for funding from the IMLS for a
more extensive digitization project to make significant portions of the collections available for
research on line. Computer hardware and software for this purpose, known as eMuseum, is
already in-house and is being programmed to make the museum's collections database available
via the Web.

6. The Ham's strategies for improvement

Strategies for gauging success on goals, assessment data on goal achievement, and improvements
already made.

The Ham's Strategic Plan is broken down into year-by-year goals and strategies. Formal review
of progress-to-date occurs every August, with accomplishments of specific goals explained and
plans for next year's goals submitted in writing to the director by department heads and then
discussed among senior staff. Department heads are held accountable for progress during their
annual performance appraisal with the director.
The Harn also relies on annual statistical and salary surveys conducted by the Association of Art
Museum Directors (AAMD) for charting our progress in comparison to peer institutions (see
attached comparison tables). Improvements made during the first three years of the current
Strategic Plan are discussed throughout this report in response to specific questions. As stated
above, the Harn is on track to realize the majority of goals in the Strategic Plan by the end of
fiscal year 2007/2008 and will segue seamlessly into pursuit of ambitious goals in the next five-
year plan.

7. The culture of the Ham Museum of Art

Mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students. Extensive mentoring of students by Harn
Museum staff occurs through the internship program, described elsewhere in this report. In
addition, students in the Ham's popular MUSE (Museum University Student Educator) program
receive extensive mentoring from museum educator Brandi Breslin. MUSEs are one-semester
interns at the Ham Museum of Art who are dedicated to exploring the museum's collections and
creating engaging and dynamic public programs for university audiences. Ham Museum staff
also mentor the Museum Nights chairperson and committee members appointed by UF Student









Government, who develop valuable leadership, management, organizational and social skills
through their experience of planning and implementing Museum Nights events. This year
Curator of African Art Susan Cooksey is a mentor in UF's Minority Mentor Program and the
director is the liaison for her Rotary Club to UF's Rotaract group, through which she mentors UF
students in leadership and service.

The intellectual life of the Ham's programs and departments. The intellectual vitality of the
Ham Museum of Art is evident in the groundbreaking exhibitions and publications produced by
the curatorial staff and in the innovative and stimulating educational programming presented in
collaboration with many partners at UF and in the community. Faculty and students who
participate in and work with Harn staff on exhibitions, publications and programs contribute to
the intellectual energy that drives everything we do at the Ham.

The Ham's partnerships across campus. I have discussed the Ham's partnerships across
campus in the preceding pages. In addition to the numerous partnerships already mentioned and
described above, I would like to highlight one additional partnership among numerous units of
the University and with the community. The University of Florida is hosting an international
conference of Africanist scholars in a few weeks, March 28-April 1, 2007. The Fourteenth
Triennial Symposium on African Art of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
(ACASA) is hosted by the Center for African Studies, College of Fine Arts, Samuel P. Ham
Museum of Art, and School of Art and Art History. We are expecting over 300 participants for a
rich and stimulating schedule of panels, roundtables and workshops with a keynote address on
Thursday evening, March 29, by internationally renowned curator and art critic Okwui Enwezor.
In addition to the organizing units, UF partners include the Center for Latin American Studies,
the International Center, the Florida Museum of Natural History, and Smathers Library. In the
community we are partnering with the Thomas Center Galleries of the City of Gainesville
Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs. A total of 13 exhibitions of African art
will be installed on campus and one at the Thomas Center Galleries to enrich the intellectual
impact of the conference. This event will greatly increase the national visibility of the Ham as
well as other units on campus, especially in the area of African Studies.

Service to the professional/academic disciplines by the Harn. The director is active in and
serves on various committees of the Association of Art Museum Directors, the Southeastern Art
Museum Directors Consortium, the Florida Art Museum Directors Association, the Arts Council
of the African Studies Association (ACASA), and locally serves on the board of the Art in Public
Places Trust of the City of Gainesville and Alachua County. After the director rotated off the
Board of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association in 2005, Curator of African Art
Susan Cooksey was elected to this national board. She also serves as editor of the ACASA
Newsletter, which has international distribution. Director of Education Bonnie Bemau is active
in the Florida Art Education Association and the National Art Education Association (NAEA)
and regularly presents papers at conferences of these and other art education and museum
education organizations in Florida and nationally. At the last NAEA national conference in
Chicago she represented our state as Florida's Art Educator of the Year. Other staff members
belong to their respective professional organizations (for curators, registrars, development
officers, etc.) and attend professional meetings. One of our institutional goals in years four and
five of the current Strategic Plan is to increase participation by Harn Museum senior staff in









professional organizations through presenting papers, holding office, chairing and serving on
committees and hosting conferences and meetings.

8. Budget requests for new funding in 2007-2008 and justifications

Non-recurring costs

Consultant for strategic planning. The Harn has been guided for the past three years by a
detailed Strategic Plan with ambitious and specific goals in support of the museum's mission and
vision. As we approach successful completion of the 2003-2008 Strategic Plan, we look forward
to developing another ambitious plan for 2008-2013 that will build on past successes and propel
the Harn into national and international prominence. As with the previous plan, I believe the
Ham will benefit from working with highly qualified, nationally recognized museum
consultants. For development of the new plan, we solicited proposals from three consultants, two
of whom have worked with the Ham in the past. Rena Zurofsky Consulting worked with the
Ham on our current plan. Thomas and Associates assisted the Harn with planning for our art
storage renovation and expansion. The third, Alexander Haas Martin and Partners, Inc.
(AHM&P) was introduced to the Harn when Director of Development Phyllis DeLaney and
another member of our development staff attended a workshop they conducted earlier this year.
After careful review of the three proposals, I propose to work with AHM&P. Their client list is
impressive and the results have been dramatic. Their proposal includes development of a
business plan in conjunction with the strategic plan, or "resourcing the plan," in their parlance.
Although there might be some advantages in working with consultants who know the Ham and
with whom we have a comfort level, I believe the Harn is at a stage in its development when we
need to work with consultants who will bring fresh perspectives and insights and who will
challenge and stretch us. In this way the Harn will be prepared to soar from the solid foundation
we have established through implementation of the current five-year plan.

Our advisory council members and donors have been highly complimentary of our current
Strategic Plan and our use of the plan as the basis for action. I am requesting that the university
pay $37,500 or half of the estimated $75,000 cost for AHM&P's contract. The Ham will seek
private funding for the other half of the estimated cost.

Facilities improvement: Dust removal system for carpentry shop. Director of Finance and
Operations Mary Yawn and I realized as we prepared for the Ham's reaccreditation that we must
move to the top of the museum's priority list for facilities improvement the addition of a dust
removal system for the carpentry shop. This is the shop where construction of exhibition
furniture, frames, art shipping crates and other woodworking is done. We have been concerned
about excessive amounts of wood dust for reasons of the health of employees and potential fire
hazard. In the course of renovation and expansion of art storage we have become increasingly
aware that the wood dust generated by the shop is also affecting art storage areas, where
accumulation of dust can be detrimental to the preservation and conservation of the collection.
One of the rooms that is being retrofitted (addition of climate controls, etc.) for art storage is
directly adjacent to the woodworking shop. Fortunately our research has indicated that the cost
of a dust collection system is much less than we had previously estimated due to the fact that a
contractor has devised a way to install such a system without constructing a separate room to









house it. Accordingly, I am requesting $4000 for installation of a dust removal system that will
improve working conditions for our preparation staff and art storage conditions for the
collection. Chief Preparator Michael Peyton worked with Oneida Air Systems for the proposal
for this work.

Security upgrades. We continue to be concerned about the aging security system in the original
Ham Museum of Art, which opened in 1990. Although components of the system such as motion
sensors and alarms are still functioning, it is increasingly difficult to obtain parts for repairs as
the system becomes obsolete. We would like to replace the old system and at the same time
make improvements that bring the system in the original 1990 building at least to the standard of
the system in the new Cofrin Pavilion, which opened in 2005.

In addition, our peer reviewers for reaccreditation pointed out minor inadequacies in the original
Ham Museum building and the Cofrin Pavilion that they feel should be addressed immediately.
Security and Facility Coordinator Cecil Courtney has determined that these needs can be
addressed for $3000. These funds will cover the cost of installing glass break and shock sensors
on windows opening into galleries in the original building and the new wing. In addition, these
funds will cover the cost of activating daytime alarms on exist doors from the Cofrin Pavilion
that currently are alarmed only when the building is locked down at night. Cecil Courtney will
do much of the work himself, which is why the cost for these improvements is so reasonable.

A new security system for the original building has been designed by Steven Keller and
Associates, one of the top museum security firms in the country. Mr. Keller has proposed a
phased installation of the system over four years, with an estimated cost for year one of $42,000.
(Year 2: $55,000; Year 3: $45,000; Year 4: $45,000). With this initial investment by the
university, the Harn will be well positioned to seek grant funding or private donations for
subsequent phases of the project.

Recurring costs

Last year's allocation went a long way to help the Harn realize its goals with regard to
stabilization of important staff positions and raising salaries to be more in keeping with those of
our peer institutions. During implementation of the current five-year plan, we have succeeded in
realizing our goal of increasing the following positions to permanent full-time status: director of
museum technology (state funds); store manager (private dollars); curator of African art (state
funds); Bishop Study Center manager (combination of state and private funds). During the same
period, one security guard position has been added, other positions have been reclassified and
salaries across the board at the Ham have been improved to greater or lesser degrees.

Given the anticipated tight budget year for the state and the university, I am requesting a modest
amount in recurring funds this year in order to pay the salary and benefits of the Bishop Study
Center manager with state funds, freeing the private dollars currently used for a portion of her
salary and benefits to meet other urgent needs of the museum. I would also like to make the
position of the education department secretary permanent half-time with benefits. The requested
recurring funds will be applied to the OPS funds currently in use for this position. Together these
funds will underwrite the amount needed for the position.










Harn Museum of Art
COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM STATISTICAL COMPARISON



A Comparison between the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and:


Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley)
Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota)
Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia)
Hammer Museum of Art (UCLA)
Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle)
Indiana University Art Museum
Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin)
Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase)
University of Iowa Museum of Art
University of Michigan Museum of Art
Wexner Center for the Arts (Ohio State University)

*The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
did not respond to the survey this year.


Based on the Association of Art Museum Directors 2006 Statistical Survey
(The 2006 Survey presents data for the period July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2005)




The AAMD (The American Association of Museum Directors) is a prestigious,
invitation only selection of North America's top art museums.
Membership includes the U.S., Canada and a small portion of Mexico.


The Ham Museum was admitted to the AAMD in 1987,
three years before the museum opened to the public.









Securing the Ham's Place among the Top Public University Art Museums


University art museums statistical comparison based on the following significant characteristics:


Category 2006 Rank 2005 Rank 2004 Rank

* Building Space Total 6 5 4
* Exhibition Space Total 1 3 6
* Membership Total 11 10 10
* Annual Attendance 6 7 5
* Number of Volunteers 4 1 4
* College/University Support (but see State Support) 7 7 7
* State Support 2 5 4
* Private Support Total 10 8 11
* Corporate Contributions 6 3 3
* Foundation/Trust Contributions 5 5 8
* Endowment Income Spent for Operations 10 8 8
* Earned Income Total Gross 6 8 8
* Earned Income: Museum Store Total 6 6 5
* Program and Support Costs Total 6 8 10
* Program Costs Education 7 9 6
* Program Costs Curatorial 5 5 9
* Total Operating Expenditure per Square Foot 9 9 9
* Total Operating Expenditure per Visitor 9 8 10
* Number of Full Time Employees 5 6 3
* Number of Part Time Employees 8 7 8
* Personnel Expenses Salaries and Benefits 5 7 7
* Staff Salaries and Wages 6 6 8
* Value of Works of Art Donated this Fiscal Year 10 3 1
* Cost of Works of Art Purchased this Fiscal Year 5 1 2
* Retained Endowment 1 1 2








ASSOCIATION OF ART MUSEUM DIRECTORS
2006 STATISTICAL SURVEY

A. FACILITIES

BUILDING SPACE (SQUARE FEET) TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # SQ FT
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 175,135
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 141,990
3 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art 133,448
4 Indiana University Art Museum 105,047
5 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 91,500
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 90,708
7 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 79,000
8 University of Iowa Museum of Art 65,000
9 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 54,440
10 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 46,201
11 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 44,500
12 University of Michigan Museum of Art 41,676
13 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) 27,334

EXHIBITION SPACE (SQUARE FEET) TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # SQ FT
1 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 35,675
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 33,300
3 Indiana University Art Museum 29,943
4 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 29,311
5 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 26,600
6 University of Iowa Museum of Art 26,024
7 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art 15,470
8 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 14,970
9 University of Michigan Museum of Art 13,898
10 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 12,574
11 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 12,000
12 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) 10,455
13 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 9,000


B. MEMBERSHIP

MEMBERSHIP TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # MEMBERS
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 2,616
2 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 2,445
3 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 2,397
4 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art 1,788
5 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 1,344
6 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 1,204
7 University of Michigan Museum of Art 1,181
8 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 1,180
9 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 1,146
10 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) 1,100
11 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 784
12 University of Iowa Museum of Art 561
(Indiana University Art Museum) NR


C. PARTICIPATION









ANNUAL ATTENDANCE TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # VISITORS
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 179,742
2 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 160,866
3 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 146,641
4 University of Michigan Museum of Art 137,439
5 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 90,000
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 79,844
7 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 67,253
8 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 60,244
9 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 39,738
10 Indiana University Art Museum 36,056
11 University of Iowa Museum of Art 33,975
12 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) 23,296
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR

VOLUNTEERS

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # VOLUNTEERS
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 194
2 University of Iowa Museum of Art 170
3 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 160
4 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 159
5 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 102
6 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 100
7 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 90
8 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 76
9 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 58
10 Indiana University Art Museum 50
11 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art 20
(Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art University of Texas, Austin) NR
(University of Michigan Museum of Art) NR


D. COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY SUPPORT

COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY SUPPORT

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $9,001,985.00
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $3,594,673.00
3 University of Michigan Museum of Art $3,010,771.00
4 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $2,368,083.00
5 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $2,185,856.00
6 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $2,177,378.00
7 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $1,848,498.00
8 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $1,753,359.00
9 Indiana University Art Museum $1,677,263.00
10 University of Iowa Museum of Art $1,481,897.00
11 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $884,955.00
12 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $731,986.00
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR








E. STATE SUPPORT

STATE SUPPORT

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $330,675
2 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $79,060
3 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $64,825
4 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $59,943
5 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $42,263
6 University of Michigan Museum of Art $22,700
7 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $14,200
8 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $13,467
9 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $5,857
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR
(Indiana University Art Museum) NR
(University of Iowa Museum of Art) NR
(Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art University of Texas, Austin) NR
-


F. PRIVATE SUPPORT

PRIVATE SUPPORT TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $3,132,320.00
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $2,604,261.00
3 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $1,072,516.00
4 University of Michigan Museum of Art $895,389.00
5 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $800,542.00
6 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $735,250.00
7 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $471,804.00
8 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $413,461.00
9 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $412,392.00
10 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $359,301.00
11 University of Iowa Museum of Art $136,650.00
12 Indiana University Art Museum $116,000.00
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR


G. CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS

CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $2,182,316
2 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $169,050
3 University of Michigan Museum of Art $130,250
4 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $100,465
5 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $50,950
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $20,000
7 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $12,500
8 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $10,100
9 University of Iowa Museum of Art $7,615
10 Indiana University Art Museum $7,000
11 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $2,600
(Berkeley Art Museum University of California, Berkeley) NR
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR









H. FOUNDATION/TRUST CONTRIBUTIONS

FOUNDATION/TRUST CONTRIBUTIONS TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $1,353,815
2 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $326,516
3 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $173,267
4 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $165,544
5 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $165,250
6 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $145,011
7 University of Michigan Museum of Art $126,050
8 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $83,742
9 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $56,865
10 University of Iowa Museum of Art $31,400
11 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $13,372
12 Indiana University Art Museum $5,000
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR


I. INVESTMENTS, ENDOWMENTS AND TRUSTS

ENDOWMENT INCOME SPENT FOR OPERATIONS (including Exhibitions)

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $1,417,270.00
2 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $1,359,588.00
3 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $746,873.00
4 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $636,639.00
5 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $566,846.00
6 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $325,362.00
7 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $290,134.00
8 Indiana University Art Museum $266,707.00
9 University of Michigan Museum of Art $153,791.00
10 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $107,106.00
11 University of Iowa Museum of Art $10,450.00
(Chazen Museum of Art University of Wisconsin-Madison) NR
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR










J. EARNED INCOME

EARNED INCOME TOTAL GROSS

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $862,881.00
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $720,083.00
3 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $659,458.00
4 University of Michigan Museum of Art $419,477.00
5 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $229,171.00
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $224,891.00
7 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $213,475.00
8 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $200,902.00
9 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $140,017.00
10 University of Iowa Museum of Art $109,111.00
11 Indiana University Art Museum $67,532.00
12 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $64,287.00
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR

EARNED INCOME: MUSEUM STORE TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION SUPPORT
1 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $375,742
2 University of Michigan Museum of Art $293,390
3 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $268,764
4 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $178,089
5 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $126,203
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $104,959
7 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $89,346
8 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $63,249
9 University of Iowa Museum of Art $46,871
10 Indiana University Art Museum $44,592
11 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $2,183
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR
(Henry Art Gallery University of Washington, Seattle) NR


K. PROGRAM COSTS

PROGRAM AND SUPPORT COSTS TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $8,136,280.00
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $6,592,727.00
3 University of Michigan Museum of Art $3,576,315.00
4 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $2,905,787.00
5 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $2,754,259.00
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $2,743,208.00
7 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $2,611,816.00
8 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $2,482,620.00
9 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $2,391,198.00
10 Indiana University Art Museum $2,304,272.00
11 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $2,139,376.00
12 University of Iowa Museum of Art $1,655,036.00
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR








K. PROGRAM COSTS continued
PROGRAM COSTS EDUCATION

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $576,781.00
2 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $390,168.00
3 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $265,411.00
4 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $247,771.00
5 University of Michigan Museum of Art $240,364.00
6 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $218,214.00
7 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $102,981.00
8 Indiana University Art Museum $102,864.00
9 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $95,034.00
10 University of Iowa Museum of Art $93,406.00
11 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $93,336.00
12 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $51,452.00
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR

PROGRAM COSTS CURATORIAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Indiana University Art Museum $978,895.00
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $676,505.00
3 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $554,738.00
4 University of Michigan Museum of Art $425,637.00
5 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $368,662.00
6 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $365,987.00
7 University of Iowa Museum of Art $202,997.00
8 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $160,650.00
9 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $138,929.00
10 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $104,221.00
(Henry Art Gallery University of Washington, Seattle) NR
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR
(Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U.) NR










L. OPERATING EXPENDITURES

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE PER SQUARE FOOT

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 University of Michigan Museum of Art $97.46
2 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $90.83
3 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $65.38
4 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $53.38
5 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $51.76
6 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $46.43
7 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $44.72
8 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $33.06
9 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $26.17
10 University of Iowa Museum of Art $25.46
11 Indiana University Art Museum $22.44
(Chazen Museum of Art University of Wisconsin-Madison) NR
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE PER VISITOR

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $127.01
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $94.53
3 Indiana University Art Museum $76.27
4 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $69.62
5 University of Iowa Museum of Art $53.82
6 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $51.02
7 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $48.98
8 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $34.19
9 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $33.78
10 University of Michigan Museum of Art $33.10
11 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $21.39
(Chazen Museum of Art University of Wisconsin-Madison) NR
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR








M. STAFFING

NUMBER OF FULL TIME EMPLOYEES

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # FT EMPLOYEES
1 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 70
2 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 67
3 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art 65
4 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) 37
5 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 31
6 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 30
7 Indiana University Art Museum 29
8 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 27
9 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 24
10 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 18
11 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 15
12 University of Iowa Museum of Art 7
(University of Michigan Museum of Art) NR

NUMBER OF PART TIME EMPLOYEES

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION # PT EMPLOYEES
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) 177
2 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. 82
3 Indiana University Art Museum 37
4 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art 36
5 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) 33
6 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) 22
7 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) 20
8 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 17
9 University of Iowa Museum of Art 14
10 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) 13
11 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) 8
12 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) 5
(University of Michigan Museum of Art) NR

PERSONNEL EXPENSES TOTAL

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $5,109,360.00
2 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $4,931,243.00
3 Indiana University Art Museum $1,978,020.00
4 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $1,832,867.00
5 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $1,631,507.00
6 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $1,549,390.00
7 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $1,540,017.00
8 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $1,332,740.00
9 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $1,332,544.00
10 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $991,839.00
11 University of Iowa Museum of Art $650,835.00
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR
(University of Michigan Museum of Art) NR








M. STAFFING continued
PERSONNEL EXPENSES STAFF SALARIES AND WAGES

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $4,188,000.00
2 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U. $3,632,683.00
3 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art $2,606,798.00
4 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $1,582,791.00
5 Indiana University Art Museum $1,519,177.00
6 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $1,298,187.00
7 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $1,236,764.00
8 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $1,174,242.00
9 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $1,033,026.00
10 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $936,673.00
11 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $756,760.00
12 University of Iowa Museum of Art $475,760.00
(University of Michigan Museum of Art) NR


N. COLLECTION

COLLECTION ART DONATED THIS FISCAL YEAR VALUE

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION VALUE
1 University of Michigan Museum of Art $2,961,505.00
2 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art $2,015,706.00
3 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $809,550.00
4 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $724,265.00
5 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $459,000.00
6 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $449,675.00
7 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $276,900.00
8 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $246,265.00
9 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $213,550.00
10 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $200,863.00
11 University of Iowa Museum of Art $112,750.00
(Indiana University Art Museum) NR
(Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U.) NR

COLLECTION ART PURCHASED COST

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION COST
1 Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art (University of Texas, Austin) $1,752,060.00
2 University of Michigan Museum of Art $485,513.00
3 Berkeley Art Museum (University of California, Berkeley) $475,325.00
4 UCLA Hammer Museum of Art $411,963.00
5 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art $398,892.00
6 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $340,337.00
7 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $80,000.00
8 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $67,965.00
9 University of Iowa Museum of Art $56,600.00
10 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $41,121.00
11 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $5,200.00
(Indiana University Art Museum) NR
(Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U.) NR










O. ENDOWMENT

RETAINED ENDOWMENT GAIN/LOSS

RANK NAME OF INSTITUTION VALUE
1 Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art $1,440,307.00
2 Henry Art Gallery (University of Washington, Seattle) $1,264,037.00
3 University of Michigan Museum of Art $1,220,889.00
4 Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, Purchase) $745,824.00
5 Chazen Museum of Art (University of Wisconsin-Madison) $648,684.00
6 Georgia Museum of Art (University of Georgia) $327,433.00
7 Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum (University of Minnesota) $286,096.00
8 University of Iowa Museum of Art $134,868.00
9 Wexner Center for the Arts, O.S.U.. $30,497.00
(Berkeley Art Museum University of California, Berkeley) NR
(Indiana University Art Museum) NR
(Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art University of Texas, Austin) NR
(UCLA Hammer Museum of Art) NR





2007-08 Program Review
Budget Request


College/Unit:


Harn Museum of Art


Non-Recurring Requests:
Projects:
Funding Office/Lab
Justification Description of Project Amount Space
(Page location Availability
of narrative) (yes/no)
16 Consulant for strategic planning $37,500 --
17 Dust collection/removal system $4,000 --
17 Security upgrades $45,000


Personnel
Department/Focus
Funding Area Salary Plan Months Salary Resoucesl Office/Lab
Justification (If interdiscplinary, (Faculty,TEAMS,G Title Appointed FTE (Includes renovation Space
(Page location note RA OPS) (9,12) fringe anor Availability
of narrative) College/Department benefits) equipment) (yes/no)
Connection)





2007-08 Program Review
Budget Request


College/Unit:


Harn Museum of Art


Recurring Requests:

Expenses
Funding
Justification Description of Request Amount
(Page location
of narrative)





Personnel
Department/Focus
Funding Area Salary Plan Months Salary esourceab Support Office/Lab
Justification (If interdiscplinay (office/lab c
Justification (If interdiscplinary, (Faculty, TEAMS,G Title Appointed FTE (Includes renovation (office Space
(Page location note RAPS) (912) fringe and/or support, Availability
of narrative) College/Department benefits) equipment) travel) (yes/no)
Connection)
18 Education TEAMS Secretary 12 0.5 $8,887.05 -- -- --
18 Education TEAMS Bishop Study Center Manager 12 1.0 $27,580.33 -- -- -




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