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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 The College of Engineering at a...
 Annual budget review
 2007-2008 budget request
 Engineering metrics
 National comparisons
 U.S. News and World Report...
 Enrollment and degree charts
 Average GRE scores
 Research expenditures -- 1992-...
 Federal expenditures
 Faculty salary compensation
 Tenured/tenure-track faculty hired...
 New faculty hires analysis
 Faculty diversity benchmarking
 Engineering buildings by age






Group Title: Annual budget review, College of Engineering
Title: Annual budget review, College of Engineering 2007.
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Title: Annual budget review, College of Engineering 2007.
Series Title: Annual budget review, College of Engineering
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: College of Engineering, University of Florida
Publisher: University of Florida College of Engineering
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007-2008
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Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00086991
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    The College of Engineering at a glance
        Page ii
    Annual budget review
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    2007-2008 budget request
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Engineering metrics
        Page 10
        Page 11
    National comparisons
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    U.S. News and World Report rankings
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Enrollment and degree charts
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Average GRE scores
        Page 33
    Research expenditures -- 1992-2006
        Page 34
    Federal expenditures
        Page 35
    Faculty salary compensation
        Page 36
    Tenured/tenure-track faculty hired since July 2001
        Page 37
        Page 38
    New faculty hires analysis
        Page 39
    Faculty diversity benchmarking
        Page 40
    Engineering buildings by age
        Page 41
Full Text




College of Engineering
University of Florida






FG A 17 0T O RG
Engoinee
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Annual Budget Review
March 2007











Annual Budget Review

Contents

The College of Engineering At a Glance

Annual Budget Review

2007-08 Budget Request

Engineering Metrics

Appendices

1. National Comparisons 2005-06 (Peer Institutions)
2. U.S. News Rankings
A. America's Best Graduate Schools 2007 Overall
B. America's Best Graduate Schools 2007 Public
C. America's Best Colleges 2007 Overall
D. America's Best Colleges 2007 Public
E. America's Best Graduate Schools 2007 Graduate Engineering Specialties
F. America's Best Colleges 2007 Undergraduate Engineering Specialties
3. Enrollment and Degree Charts
A. Undergraduate Enrollment
B. Undergraduate Enrollment Percentages UF to National
(Women-African American-Hispanic)
C. Undergraduate Degrees Granted
D. Undergraduate Degree Percentages UF to National
(Women-African American-Hispanic)
E. Graduate Enrollment
F. Graduate Enrollment Percentages UF to National
(Women-African American-Hispanic)
G. Graduate Degrees Granted
H. Graduate Degree Percentages UF to National
(Women-African American-Hispanic)
I. UF PhD Degrees Awarded by Major 2005-06
J. UF Engineering Degrees Awarded (percentage)
K. National Degrees Awarded (percentage)

4. Average GRE Scores UF to Peer Institutions (2001 2005)
5. Research Expenditures 1992 2006
6. Federal Expenditures
7. Faculty Salary Comparison (Peer Institutions)
8. Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty Hired Since July 2001
9. New Faculty Hires Analysis
10. Faculty Diversity Benchmarking
11. Engineering Buildings by Age











University of Florida

College of Engineering


At a Glance


Including Agricultural & Biological Engineering
Tenured 199
Professor 115
Aso Prof 79
Ast Prof 5
Tenure Track 88
Professor 6
Aso Professor 15
Ast Professor 67
Non-tenure Equivalent 47
Emeritus Professor 1
Research Professor 1
Research Aso Professor 1
Research Ast Professor 3
Vis Professor 1
Vis Ast Professor 4
Engineer 3
Aso Engineer 5
Ast Engineer 4
Research Engineer 1
Vis Ast Eng 1
Scientist 1
Aso Scientist 1
Ast Scientist 3
Research Scientist 1
Research Aso Scientist 1
Research Ast Scientist 12
Vis Ast Scientist 1
Ext Aso Scientist 1
Ext Ast Scientist 1
Other 104
Sr Aso In 2
Aso In 16
Ast In 16
Vis Ast In 2
Sr Lecturers 8
Lecturers 10
Post Doctoral Aso 49
Research Aso 1


Dean, Robert G.
Glicksman, Martin E.
Hench, Larry L.
Moudgil, Brij Mohan
Sah, Chih-Tang (Tom)
Schmertmann, John H.
Taylor, Charles E.


Undergraduate 4,711 (1)
Master's 962 (2)
PhD's 1,262
Unclassified (0EG's) 84

(1) Includes 138 Computer Science (outside engineering)
(2) Includes 19 Computer Science (outside engineering)




Bachelor's 936 (a)
Master's 460 (b)
PhD's 181

(a) Includes 19 BA (CIS) and 50 LS (CSC)
(b) Includes 11 LS (CSC)


L-t -" Ce it 6(,2005[2006 66.,


Lower Division
Upper Division
Graduate
Thesis/Dissertation


FEDERAL (61.59%)
FOREIGN (0.46%)
INDUSTRY (5.01%)
LOCAL (0.12%)
NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (4.34%)
STATE (6.74%)
SPECIAL STATE RESEARCH PROGRAM SUPPORT (21.73%)


I 66( 6. 6


$66,376,246
$495,578
$5,404,017
$134,637
$4,673,470
$7,261,303
$23,417,704


Total Federal
UF ranks 18th All Schools
UF ranks 12th Public Schools

Data from ASEE 2004-05



U.S. News and World Report Rankings
Industrial1 0bic iMateial),Mhni

Graduate Engineering Programs, April 2006
UF ranks 15th
UF ranks 14th in research expenditures ($92.1 million)
UF has ten ranked Engineering Specialties: Aerospace (21), Chemical (13),
Civil (16), Computer Engnr (23), Electrical (18), Environmental (16),
Industrial (10), Materials (3), Mechanical (19), and Nuclear (8)

Undergraduate Engineering Programs, August 2006
UF ranks 17th
UF has six top ranked programs: Agricultural (6), Civil (14),
Environmental (5), Industrial (12), Materials (6), Nuclear (9)*

* Nuclear ranked in 2004


Graduate Engineering Programs, April 2006
UF ranks 26th
UF ranks 20th in research expenditures ($92.1 million)
UF hasten ranked Engineering Specialties: Aerospace (29), Chemical (21),
Civil (24), Computer Engnr (39), Electrical (29), Environmental (28),
Industrial (16), Materials (6), Mechanical (31), and Nuclear (9)

Undergraduate Engineering Programs, August 2006
UF ranks 30th
UF has six top ranked programs: Agricultural (7), Civil (24),
Environmental (10), Industrial (17), Materials (10), Nuclear (10)*

* Nuclear ranked in 2004


14,340
60,907
30,650
6,928








1. Mission and Purpose


The mission of the College of Engineering at the University of Florida is to serve the State, the
Nation, and the World by fostering leading edge research, teaching, and service programs in
selected fields of engineering. This mission is accomplished through rigorous, state-of-the-art,
and innovative academic programs in all major fields of engineering at the BS, MS, and PhD
levels. The purpose of the BS program is to educate engineers for employment in industry and
graduate studies. The MS program is aimed at educating engineers with advanced knowledge for
higher level positions in industry. The PhD program prepares graduates for industrial research
laboratories and academic positions. Research programs in the College are faculty driven and
aimed toward solving important societal problems and creating new knowledge to advance the
fundamental engineering disciplines. Research programs are largely sponsored by external
funding agencies Federal, State, industry, and non-profit foundations. College faculty
collaborate with colleagues from other engineering departments as well as many other academic
units such as Arts and Sciences, Health Science Center Colleges, Agriculture, Business, Fine
Arts, Law, and Education. The service mission of the College is accomplished through
participation in Local, State, National, and International Organizations to improve multiple
aspects of society ranging from K-12 education to transferring advanced knowledge and
technologies to industry and government agencies.

2. Goals and Expected Outcomes

Goals below are medium-term goals for the next 3-5 years. These goals are derived from our
mission, UF strategic goals, and contributions from all stakeholders.

Overarching goal: To become a pre-eminent public research engineering college. To rank in the
top 20 among public and private institutions and the top 10 among public institutions in graduate
and undergraduate programs.

Research and Scholarship Goals:
To rank among the top 10 among public universities as measured by annual Federal
research expenditures per tenure-track faculty member.
20% of all full professors with tenure should be Fellows of their major professional
societies.

Teaching and Education Goals:
Improve the quality of PhD graduate students as measured by publications at graduation
and aim to have 20% of the PhD's graduated into post-doctoral or faculty positions.
Maintain graduate enrollment at current levels. Reach the top 10 among public
engineering colleges as measured by the number of PhD's graduated per year per tenure-
track faculty member.
Improve 6-year graduation rate of undergraduate students in Engineering to 55%.
Improve achievement of undergraduate learning outcomes through the ABET continuous
improvement process.

Service Goal:
Expand the outreach program to working professionals via distance education at the MS
level by doubling the number of course enrollments in the next 5 years.
Expand outreach programs to K-12 students to impact a larger number of students.
-1-








Diversity Goal: Improve diversity of the faculty and student body in terms of women and
minorities.
Specific goals:
Faculty: women 10%, African Americans 2.5%, and Hispanics 3.5%
Degrees Awarded:
Undergraduate: women-19%, African Americans-5% and Hispanics-14%
Graduate: women-23%, African Americans-4% and Hispanics-6%

Fund Raising Goal:
Meet and exceed the Florida Tomorrow capital campaign goal of $60M by the end of the
campaign.

Expected Outcomes: As these goals are strongly aligned with our mission and the University's
strategic goals, we expect the outcome to enhance our service to the State, the Nation, and the
World. In Section 6, there is a list of key indicators we monitor closely to measure the outcomes
and our progress.

3. Strategic Fit

Most programs in the College of Engineering are critical to advancing the University's strategic
work plan. Life Sciences: The recently formed BME Department along with the large number of
biology-medicine oriented faculty in CHE, CISE, ECE, ISE, MAE, MSE, and NRE advance the
life sciences agenda genetics and cancer, neuroscience, aging in the strategic plan. Faculty in
the ECE and MSE Departments are involved the Emerging Pathogens Initiative. Nanoscience
and Technology: College faculty members in the BME, CHE, ECE, EES, MAE, and MSE
Departments are leading participants in the Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering
Technologies. Ecology and Environment, Energy: This initiative of the strategic plan is very
strongly supported through our programs in energy, water, and environment in the CCE, CHE,
ECE, EES, ISE, MAE, MSE, and NRE Departments. Space Sciences: The MAE Department,
along with some ECE and EES faculty, supports the space research initiative which is also a
State level priority. Aging: Faculty from CISE and ECE are engaged in applying technology for
smarter living of the elderly. The Digital Arts and Sciences program in the CISE Department
supports the Arts and Humanities thrust. Emphasis on graduate education at the doctoral level
and externally sponsored leading edge research advances the University's plan to grow its
graduate education and research enterprise. We have very strong programs in retention and
success of under-represented minority students, thus advancing the diversity agenda at UF. Also,
the College has several programs to encourage K-12 students to pursue fields in science,
engineering, and mathematics. Engineering has been identified by the Board of Governors as a
field where there are critical shortages, thus making engineering a priority area.

4. Core Achievements

Our top 5 achievements are as follows:

1. Successful ABET visit. We expect all of our UF programs to receive full six year
accreditation. Joint UWF-UF programs will likely receive an interim visit or an interim
report. We are helping UWF meet these challenges.


-2-








2. Total number of PhD's graduated was an all time high of 181. The College now produces
31% of the total PhD's and EdD's from UF. We now rank 10th among all engineering
colleges and 15th on a per faculty basis in PhD degrees awarded. The College ranks 1st in
Hispanic-American bachelor's degrees awarded in 2005-06 in the continental United
States. Our students continue to win national and international awards as noted in the
attached metrics spreadsheet.

3. Research expenditures, from all sources, exceeded $107M. Based on 2004-05 data, the
College ranks 18th among public and private institutions and 12th among public
institutions on the basis of research expenditures from Federal sources which are a more
objective measure of national competitiveness. Seven of our faculty have or are in the
process of receiving NSF CAREER awards and one has been selected for a PECASE
award.

4. Our faculty led two winning Center of Excellence proposals in the State competition
resulting in $8.5M in new funding for UF.

5. The College ranks 26th overall and 15th among public universities at the graduate level. It
is the highest ranked College in the University at the graduate level. Nine of a possible 11
departments are ranked in the top 25 in their fields.

The College leadership team is intensely focused on building on our very strong momentum
toward the goals outlined earlier.

5. Challenges

Our top 5 challenges are as follows:

1. Quality and quantity of research space is inadequate. More generally, research
infrastructure, physical as well as human, is inadequate to compete with the top 10
engineering colleges.

2. Faculty resources are inadequate to reach the top 10 among public universities. Our
current faculty size (not counting the ABE Department which is in CALS) is 264. At
Michigan (312), Purdue (300), Georgia Tech (412), and Illinois (415), the average faculty
size is 360. Given that the University of Florida is larger than these institutions, we are
short by at least 50 tenured/tenure-track faculty members. Our graduate student to faculty
ratio is 2nd highest among our peer group, second only to UT-Austin. Also, we need to
continue to reward our most productive faculty members so that we do not lose them to
other institutions. Merit raises are absolutely critical to overcome this challenge.
Establishment of endowed chairs is also critically important. Finally, faculty diversity is a
major challenge for engineering, where women, African-Americans, and Hispanics are
three major under-represented groups.

3. We have a significant retention problem in the lower division. Many students leave
Engineering after lower division mathematics, chemistry, and physics courses. Also, we
have no input in the admissions process which exacerbates this problem.








4. The quality of PhD students needs further improvement to improve the reputation of the
graduate program.

5. The College of Engineering has developed very strong forward momentum in the last few
years. It is critical that we maintain and accelerate our progress. How to achieve this in
the face of a resource crunch at the University of Florida is a major challenge.

College Strategies to deal with these impediments:

1. New NIMET and BMS buildings will alleviate the space problem to a limited extent. We
are working on securing private funds and PECO funds for the CHE building addition
and a new MAE building. Beyond this, the University needs to focus on major
renovations of the existing buildings and spaces.

2. Securing funds for endowed chairs is the highest priority for the Capital Campaign.
Diversifying faculty through aggressive recruiting efforts is a major priority. In reality,
the faculty size cannot be increased without new recurring funds from the University of
Florida. It is not possible to make substantial reallocations within the College as there is
no significant duplication or "fat" in any department. In particular, it is absolutely critical
that we fulfill the commitment to building up the BME and Nanoscience/technology
areas to make the most of major investments represented by the NIMET and Biomedical
Sciences buildings which are under construction.

3. A major step in improving retention will be to give the College of Engineering a strong
role in undergraduate admissions decisions so that we can identify those applicants who
have the background and academic preparation for success in Engineering. Despite
energetic efforts to convince the University administration, we have not had any success
in this regard. We urge that this issue be reconsidered. A great deal of the retention
problem is in the freshman experience. We are working with the departments of
Chemistry and Mathematics on new strategies to make teaching of calculus and
chemistry more effective. We are creating "Engineering sections" in first year chemistry
and mathematics courses. Last year, we funded Engineering graduate students to serve as
TA's for chemistry courses. Student survey data suggests that this worked very well. So
far, we have been unable to convince CLAS or the Provost's office that since these
courses are not in Engineering, the Engineering TA's should be paid from either CLAS
or University funds. We are prepared to continue to push these innovative ideas to
improve our retention efforts. We are also working to beef up Engineering courses in the
freshman and sophomore years.

4. Quality of PhD students is strongly intertwined with our academic reputation and
rankings. It is also intertwined with the success and growth of our research programs. We
will increase our efforts in recruiting excellent graduate students from Florida, the
Nation, and the World. Progress in this area will take a long-term sustained effort.
Growth in graduate programs should not come at the expense of quality. We are also
strongly supporting and emphasizing mentoring of doctoral students. A particular new
initiative is to mentor a subset of PhD graduates to enter post-doctoral and academic
positions.


-4-








5. As mentioned above, while we have developed very strong momentum, it is critical that
we find ways to accelerate this momentum. It is sobering to realize that our peer
institutions are working as hard and are keen to either overtake us or to increase their
lead, in competition for research, faculty, and graduate students. We have to work
strategically just to maintain our position. The constrained resource situation at the
University level makes this a major challenge. Our strategy is to seek strong and visible
support from the University so that the College community feels encouraged to make
very strong efforts in the face of this challenging situation. We are focusing more of our
efforts on supporting newly hired faculty so that we maximize the return on investment
made in the last 5 years. Also, the push to place more of our doctoral graduates into
academic positions is not terribly resource intensive. Retention efforts at the
undergraduate level can also have significant pay-off in terms of continued momentum.

6. Improvement Strategies

We continuously monitor a number of key indicators that indicate quality, productivity, and
competitiveness of our faculty, students, and programs. We also benchmark our College against
a set of peer public engineering colleges on all publicly available information on these indicators.
The key indicators are as follows:


US News Rankings
Accredited Programs
Research Expenditures (Total/Federal) per faculty
Number of Tenured/Tenure Track Faculty
Number of NSF Career/PECASE Awards
NAE Members
Professional Society Fellows
Women Faculty
Under-represented Minority Faculty
MS and PhD Enrollment/Degrees
Graduate GRE scores/GPA
Graduate Enrollment
Distance Education Enrollments
Undergraduate Enrollment/Degrees


Women Student Enrollment/Degrees
Minority Student Enrollment/Degrees
Freshman SAT average
Undergraduate Retention
Student Success in Math, Chemistry, & Physics
Private Funds Raised
Number of Interdisciplinary Projects
Space Quantity, Quality, and Renovation needs
Industrial Reputation
Academic Reputation
Number of Endowed Chairs
PhD's Placed in Post-Doctoral & Faculty
Positions
Job Placement for Students


In Section 5, we have identified the most significant challenges and our strategies to deal with
them. We will not repeat that discussion here; those strategies clearly apply to this section.

Over the past 2 years, the College has implemented an extensive direct assessment methodology
at the undergraduate level to assess achievement of student learning outcomes. This
methodology fulfills the requirements of both ABET and the ALCs. The results of this
assessment combined with the evaluator findings from the recent ABET visit have given us new
insights into areas for improvement such as senior design, freshman and sophomore level courses
for Engineering majors, improvement in math, chemistry, and physics instruction in freshman
and sophomore years, degree certification processes, etc. At the graduate level, we are
emphasizing placement of PhD students into academic positions. These activities are led by our
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Cammy Abernathy.

We have substantially beefed up our Publications division with a strong focus on improving our
image among academic leaders in the Nation and the world. The leadership team of the College
including Associate Deans and Department Chairs are focused on this goal.


-5-







Research productivity is improved by supporting faculty in competing for major grants and
contracts. We help by bringing faculty groups together to compete for major new opportunities.
We also help with staff support for writing large multi-investigator grants. Our Associate Dean
for Research and Graduate Programs is focused on realizing these opportunities by working with
the Chairs and key faculty members.

Retention and diversity efforts are related as retention problems in engineering are far more acute
for women and minority students. The Step Up program has been institutionalized and has had a
very significant impact on the success of our minority undergraduate students. There is now
longitudinal data to support this conclusion. We are aggressively expanding our outreach efforts
to K-12 to increase the pool of minority students interested in engineering. We strongly feel that
community colleges represent an under-utilized source for increasing the diversity of
undergraduate students. By developing stronger relationships with key community colleges, we
can be more successful in recruiting more minority students into the upper division. Faculty
diversity is a major challenge for engineering. We have been successful in increasing the number
of women and Hispanic faculty and will continue to focus on these efforts. We have had much
less success with African-American faculty recruitment. There is a bit of good news in that we
have recently hired an African-American faculty member in Civil and Coastal Engineering who
will start in May 2007. We are asking the faculty, the search committees and the Department
Chairs to look at national labs, industry labs, and key universities to identify and actively recruit
excellent African-American faculty members. Besides recruiting, we are working to create an
environment which is conducive to success of minority and women faculty. We now have
regular meetings with women and minority faculty to understand their challenges and help them
achieve promotion and tenure.

7. Academic Culture

The College has a very vibrant and healthy academic culture in all departments. Most faculty
members are deeply engaged in nationally and internationally prominent research programs.
Prominent speakers from all over the world are brought in for seminars and conferences. As
noted earlier, all departments are engaged in collaborations across campus and are strongly
contributing to excellence in research and education.

College faculty members are sincerely dedicated to undergraduate and graduate education. Most
classes are taught by faculty. Faculty members provide daily mentoring to graduate students.
Each department has a high level staff person who manages the undergraduate student services
while faculty members provide career guidance. Also, we strongly support undergraduate
research opportunities with our resources to supplement the University Scholars program.

Over the past calendar year, faculty in the College developed, approved and implemented a new
constitution. This has led to the formation of a new advisory group, the Faculty Advisory
Council, to provide advice to the College administration. One important function performed by
this group this year was the implementation of systematic faculty evaluation of Department
Chairs and College Administrators.

Eighty percent of the College Tenure and Promotion Committee members are now elected. By
the end of this semester, the Committee will be entirely elected, as called for in the new
constitution.







8. Budget Request


Before describing the specific budget request for this year, we would like to propose certain
ideas for the Central Administration which can be helpful to the entire university.

1. Multidisciplinary research is a very important strategy for the University to move
forward. A significant portion of the strategic plan resources (faculty lines, funds for
space renovations, cost-sharing funds) should be allocated as cost-sharing on large-scale
multi-investigator Federal grant proposals to make them more competitive. The
advantage of this approach is that it automatically rewards our most competitive and
successful programs which are able to win in national competitions. This gets the
University out of having to select winners and losers a priori. The national marketplace of
ideas and talent is a much better mechanism for allocation of scarce resources.
2. PECO funds are being largely used for new buildings while a large number of existing
buildings are deteriorating. We need to allocate some resources to refurbishing existing
space. Again, this could be decided through a campus-wide competition with a joint
faculty, student, administration, and staff committee.

We recognize that the University is constrained for new resources. However, we would like to
strongly point out that the College of Engineering does not have sufficient faculty resources to
compete with the best engineering colleges. As noted elsewhere, we are short 50 faculty
positions compared to our peers. We also point out that investments in Engineering will give
excellent return in terms of improved national standing, improved research excellence, improved
graduate education growth, and improved success in multi-disciplinary research. Growth in
Engineering graduate education comes, in large part, through externally funded grants and
contracts, thus leveraging our University investment.

Non-Recurring Request:

1. Space Needs for the College of Engineering

Quality of space and facilities is a major limitation for the College. Many of the Engineering
buildings do not meet current ADA and building codes and do not have adequate utilities to
accommodate modern research labs. Thus even small renovation projects become
prohibitively expensive due to the need to upgrade the infrastructure to meet current codes.
It is far more cost effective to perform large building wide renovations than piecemeal
upgrades. In order for the College to keep pace with other universities it is essential that
several building and renovation projects be undertaken.

A. Chemical Engineering Addition Estimated Cost: $29,000,000

B. New Building for Mechanical and Aerospace Estimated Cost: $50,000,000

C. Building Renovation Estimated Cost: $95,000,000

D. Transfer of CIRCA space to CISE No Cost

The Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Department remains severely
under supported in terms of space. Though the recent transfer of space on the 5th floor of the
CISE Building is helpful, another 10,000 sq. ft. of space is needed in order to bring this
Department up to the level necessary to accommodate faculty needs. Currently CIRCA owns







the majority of the space in the 2nd floor of this building. With the recent renovation of
Library West and the addition of the Internet Cafe to the Hub, a large computer user facility
is not needed in this building. The approximately 10,000 sq. ft. of space currently occupied
by CIRCA in this area would be more productively used by the CISE Department for student
instruction and research.

2. Start-up Funds $6,000,000

The College anticipates hiring approximately 15 new faculty during the next academic year
(either new positions or replacements for retirements, terminations, etc.). The estimated cost
of start-up funds for these new faculty members is approximately $400,000 each or a total of
$6,000,000 of non-recurring funds. Start-up funding is our single greatest need of non-
recurring funds.

3. Modernization of Undergraduate Labs $1,000,000

Undergraduate Labs have outdated computers and other equipment, which are in dire need of
replacement. Team-oriented projects need larger full-featured workstations that are
accessible by more than one person at a time. The need to enhance our educational offerings
in support of team projects has been emphasized by our faculty, industrial advisory boards
and students. The creation of the team-oriented project labs also will alleviate scheduling
limitations currently encountered with the existing labs.


Recurring Request:

1. Biomedical Engineering Faculty Positions $375,000

It is absolutely critical that we fulfill the commitment to building up the Biomedical
Engineering Department if we are to make the most of major investments represented by the
Biomedical Sciences Building which is under construction. Three additional faculty positions
will bring the total tenured/tenure track faculty to 14. The cost of the three hires for the
coming year is estimated at $375,000 (salary rate and fringe benefits) which would allow
hiring a senior faculty member and two junior faculty.


2. NIMET Faculty and Technician Positions $695,000

The new Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology (NIMET) Building is under
construction and will be completed soon. There is a need to hire a Director, faculty and
technician positions to properly operate the new facility and to fulfill the commitments to
NIMET. The positions would be joint positions involving Engineering and Liberal Arts &
Sciences with the College of Medicine also being active in the program. The cost is
estimated to be $250,000 for the Director, $250,000 for the two additional faculty positions,
and $195,000 for three technician positions. These amounts include salary rate and fringe
benefits.

3. Interdisciplinary Teaching Award for Improved Retention $342,200

This program is designed to simultaneously impact two major issues: improved retention of








Engineering freshmen and preparing doctoral students for academic careers. Retention of
Engineering students is critically affected by the lower division educational experience in
chemistry, mathematics, and physics. During the last two years, we have demonstrated
significant improvement in the teaching of chemistry through the creation of special sections
of chemistry for Engineering students with teaching assistants drawn from the best graduate
students in Engineering.

In the proposed program, all alumni graduate award recipients in the College of Engineering
will be eligible to apply for a special award provisionally entitled Interdisciplinary Teaching
Award for Improved Retention. Winners will be given special training at the beginning of
the year which will be aimed at preparing them for a future career in academia. The training
will be modeled after the current New Faculty Workshop given to newly hired faculty in the
College. Recipients will spend one semester serving as a TA for the Engineering discussion
sections of one of the freshman year service courses. Students participating in this program
will serve their TA assignment in either their 2nd or 3rd year. Approximately 60 students per
year will be needed in order to provide an Engineering TA for all freshman and sophomore
year math, chemistry and physics courses. In order to attract the most promising students to
this program, the stipend paid to Award recipients will be increased by $2,600 over the
minimum stipend for the semester they spend in the classroom. Alumni Graduate Awardees
in Engineering receive $8,500 per year of Alumni Graduate Award funds with other sources
providing the funding to equal the minimum stipend of $17,000 per year. The cost for this
program would be an additional $5,800 per student. We strongly believe that the graduate
students who go through this program will become more competitive in the academic job
market.


TA's Needed per Semester Cost
Phase 1
Calc I 9 $52,200
Calc II 9 $52,200
CHM 2045 9 $52,200
Total for Tier 1 26 $156,600

Phase 2
CHM 2046 5 $29,000
Calc III 9 $52,200
Total for Tier 2 14 $81,200

Phase 3
Phys I 9 $52,200
Phys II 9 $52,200
Total for Tier 3 18 $104,400

Grand Total 59 $342,200


4. Student Assistant/Temporary OPS $100,000

This funding will allow us to monitor pools of Engineering freshmen, especially minority
students. The funds will provide tutoring and other support activities for them to improve
retention in Engineering.










College/Unit: ENGINEERING
Non-Recurring Requests:
Projects:

Funding Office/Lab
Justification Description of Project Amount Space
(Page location Availability
of narrative) (yes/no)


7 Chemical Engineering Bldg Addition $29,000,000

7 New Building MAE $50,000,000

7 Building Renovations $95,000,000

7 Transfer CIRCA Space to CISE No Cost

8 Start-up Funds for 15 new hires at
$400,000 per new faculty hire $6,000,000

8 Modernization of Undergraduate Labs $1,000,000

Personnel

undn Department/Focus Area Months Salary Resources Office/Lab
Justification (If nterdscplnary note Salary Plan Title Appointed FTE (Includes (office/lab Space
(Page location department onne (Faculty TEAMS, GRA,OPS) ( fringe renovation and/or Availability
of narrative) benefits) equipment) (yes/no)




Recurring Requests:

Expenses

Funding
Justification Description of Request Amount
(Page location
of narrative)
8 Interdisciplinary Teaching Award for Improved Retention $342,200
9 Retention Student Assistants/Temp OPS $100,000
Personnel

Funding Department/Focus Area Months Salary Resources Support Office/Lab
Justification nterdscplnary note Salary Plan Title Appointed FTE (Includes (office/lab (office Space
(Page location CollegeDepartment Connecton) (Faculty, TEAMS, GRA, OPS) fnnge renovation and/or support, Availability
of narrative) benefits) equipment) travel) (yes/no)
8 Biomedical Engineering Faculty Asst/Assoc/Full Professor 9 3.00 $ 375,000
8 NIMET EG/LS/COM Faculty Director* 12 1.00 $ 250,000
8 NIMET EG/LS/COM Faculty Asst/Assoc/Full Professor 9 2.00 $ 250,000
8 NIMET EG/LS/COM Staff Technicians 12 3.00 $ 195,000_


NIMET = Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technologies


* This is a joint program with CLAS. It will also support COMI activities.

















Metrics for 2007-08 Budget Request Cycle Engineering
http://www.ir.ufl.edu/progrev.htm


University Summary
1. Students Taught
Annual Fundable Credit Hours
Lower
Upper
Grad I
Grad II
Total
Annual Total Credit Hours
Lower
Upper
Grad I
Grad II
Grad III
Total
Annual Offbook non-Fundable Credit Hours
Lower
Upper
Grad I
Grad II
Total
Total Degrees awarded
Undergraduate
Graduate Total
Master's
PhD's
Professional
Total
State Expenditures $
Ranked State Faculty Personyears
State Expenditures per Fundable SCH
Fundable SCH's per State Ranked Faculty Personyear
Auxiliary Exp per non-funded Offbook SCH Research Underway
Class Size Average
2. External Funding
Contract and Grant Expenditures $
Increase over Prior Year C&G Expenditures
Total Engineering Research Expenditures
Increase over Prior Year Total Eng. Res Expend.
Ranked Faculty Personyears
C&G Expenditures per Faculty Personyear
Total Eng. Res. Expend. per Faculty Personyear
3. Funds Raised
Gifts and Pledges
Prior Year Endowment Dollars Research Underway
Prior Year Annual Fund Raising Dollars Research Underway
4. Other Generated Income
Auxiliary Revenues by Source $
DOCE $
Other Funds
Other Activities
Service Centers
Material & Supply Fee $


2004-05
% Change
Over Prior
Total Year


13,849
64,268
17,360
17,634
113,111


14,026
65,069
18,142
17,662

114,899



18
542

560

883
651
506
145

2,185
$ 54,931,035
1907
$486
593 1

31 7


$ 53,141,148

$92,101,700

258 1
$205,894
$356,845


$ 5.012.754


(147%)
(7 9%)
(20 8%)
36%
(9 5%)


(14 1%)
(7 4%)
(20 0%)
36%

(9 0%)




(8 3%)

(5 2%)


(5 2%)
(20 5%)
(26 9%)
142%

(149%)


(4 3%)








16%

25%
(3 2%)


5,631,442
3,711,615
102,542

1,700,058
117.228


2005-06
% Change
Over Prior
Total Year




14,340 35%
60,907 (5 2%)
18,567 70%
19,011 78%
112,825 (03%)


14,479 32%
61,679 (5 2%)
19,499 75%
19,052 79%

114,709 (02%)


16,228
69,763
21,914
17,021
124,926


16,336
70,255
22,680
17,048

126,319




591

591


105 6%
245%

29 5%


(22%)
(3 4%)
(11 5%)
248%

(29%)

09%








167%

170%
33%


I I


2003-04


Measures


Total


37
675
13
725

864
629
448
181

2,122
$56,722,873
1924
$503
586 4

300


$62,022,100

$107,762,954

2666
$232,641
$404,212


$13,492,490




$6,791,676
$3,390,488
$434,066
$0
$2,847,399
$119.723


931
819
692
127

2,569
54,819,022
1992
$439
627 1

33 1


52,294,084

$89,877,918

2667
$196,078
$337,000







1,160,463
1,043,824




116.639













5. Diversity Achieved


Minority % of Overall Ranked Faculty
% of Overall Staff
% of New Faculty Hires
% of Degrees Awarded
Undergraduate
Graduate
Professional


2003-04
Total


-I q _


2004-05
Total

30 9%
168%
42 1%


28 7%
160%


2006-07 2007-08
Target Target

Board -funded Target FTE's (-> SCH)
Lower 14,313 14,638
Upper 63,556 65,003
Grad I 18,242 18,657
Grad II 18,606 19,030
Total 114,717 117,327

Note: The University of Florida's pattern in the last two years is to have higher lower division and Graduate I FTE while falling short on upper division and
Graduate II FTE. College targets are based on the College's average percent share of FTE by level over the last two years.
Taken as a whole the College targets will hit the overall Board funded target but not assure that the target for each individual level will be achieved.
New enrollment growth in doctoral programs and upper division is needed to stay within the Board funding corridor.
In some cases, a College's projected 06-07 FTE may exceed the calculated target if there as been a large recent FTE increase (ex: Medicine).
6. Reputation Achieved
Please provide 2006-07 data if available. Space provided to allow feedback.
Faculty in International or National Academies

Members of the National Academy of Engineering (7)
Dean, Robert G. Sah, Chih-Tang (Tom)
Glicksman, Martin E. Schmertmann, John H.
Hench, Larry L. Taylor, Charles E.
Moudgil, Brij Mohan

National Rankings for Programs


V US News Public Institution Rankings

Graduate Engineering Programs, April 2006
UF ranks 15th
UF ranks 14th in research expenditures ($92.1 million)
UF has ten ranked Engineering Specialties: Aerospace (21), Chemical (13),
Civil (16), Computer Engnr (23), Electrical (18), Environmental (16),
Industrial (10), Materials (3), Mechanical (19), and Nuclear (8)

Undergraduate Engineering Programs, August 2006
UF ranks 17th
UF has six top ranked programs: Agricultural (6), Civil (14),
Environmental (5), Industrial (12), Materials (6), Nuclear (9)

*Nuclear ranked in 2004


V US News Public & Private Institution Rankings

Graduate Engineering Programs, April 2006
UF ranks 26th
UF ranks 20th in research expenditures ($92.1 million)
UF hasten ranked Engineering Specialties: Aerospace (29), Chemical (21),
Civil (24), Computer Engnr (39), Electrical (29), Environmental (28),
Industrial (16), Materials (6), Mechanical (31), and Nuclear (9)

Undergraduate Engineering Programs, August 2006
UF ranks 30th
UF has six top ranked programs: Agricultural (7), Civil (24),
Environmental (10), Industrial (17), Materials (10), Nuclear (10)*

*Nuclear ranked in 2004


Rankings from ASEE and EWC
UF-CoE ranks 18th in Federal research expenditures among public & private institutions and 12th among public institutions

UF-CoE ranks 10th as measured by number of PhD's awarded in 2005-06 and 15th as measured by number of PhD's awarded per faculty member2

Among the Top 50 U.S. News Ranked Schools (April 2006)
UF-CoE ranks 5th in Hispanic PhD Degrees Awarded3
UF-CoE ranks 5th in African American PhD Degrees Awarded3

1 ASEE 205 (an engineerg school)
2 EWC 2006 (among 186 PhD school) & ASEE 205
3 EWC 2006


2005-06
Total

31 5%
177%
47 8%


30 1%
148%













National or International Awards Received

The College of Engineering currently has 40 Fellows

Dr. Panos Pardalos was named an honorary member of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences

UF College of Engineering The first annual Education and Public Service Award of the 100 member Universities Council on Water Resources (UCOWR) for outstanding water resources education programs was
presented to the Johns Hopkins University, Southern Illinois University, The University of Arizona, and the University of Florida

Dr. Jose Principe to receive the 2006 Gabor Award from the International Neural Network Society.

Drs. W. R. Eisenstadt and Robert M. Fox received the SRC Inventor Recognition Awards for 2005

Dr. Jose Principe to receive the 2005 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society's Career Service Award at the 27th International Conference of the EMBS on September 2, 2005 in Shanghai, China

Dr. Jose Principe received the laurea ad Honoris Causa in Ingegneria Elettronica from Universita degli Studi di Reggio Calabria Mediterranea on June 24, 2005.

Dr. Rick Lind of our MAE Department has been selected to receive the 2007 SAE Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award for the Aerospace category from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)

Dr. Ravi Ahuja and his former doctoral students, Krishna C. Jha and Jian Liu, received the INFORMS Daniel H. Wagner Prize for Excellence in Operations Research Practice

Dr. Jenshan Lin from our ECE Department has been selected to receive the 2007 N. Walter Cox Award from the IEEE Microwave Theory and and Techniques Society

Dr. Tony Ladd, Professor in our Chemical Eng Department, has been selected to receive the Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany

Dr. Benjamin Lok from our CISE Department has been selected to receive an NSF CAREER Award

Dr. Mark Law, Professor and Chair of our ECE Department has received the 2006 Aristotle Award from the Semiconductor Research Corporation

Dr. R. Bashirullah, ECE Dept. selected to receive NSF CAREER award

Dr. W. Dixon, MAE Dept. selected to receive NSF CAREER award

Dr. Warren Dixon from our MAE Dept has won the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (RAS) Early Career Award

Dean and Professor Emeritus Dr. Robert Uhrig was awarded the ASME Medal

Highly Cited Faculty on National Index

Stephen Pearton, Distinguished Professor, Materials Science & Engineering Pramod Khargonekar, Professor & Dean, Electrical & Computer Engineering
Jerry Fossum, Distinguished Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering Sartaj Sahni, Distinguished Professor & Chair, Computer & Information Science & Engineering

Major Student Achievements Test Scores, Awards, etc.

Integrated Product & Process Design (IPPD) students won first place in the 2006 International Conference on Manufacturing Science and Engineering student design competition by designing BIC's cube-printing
process.

Average GPA of incoming Gator Engineering Students is 4.06

Average SAT score of incoming Gator Engineering Students is 1314

100% of incoming Gator Engineering Students are in the top 25% of their high school class


The UF Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) team won the International Micro Air Vehicle competition in May 2006 for the eighth year in a row. In January 2007 the UF MAV team presented a demonstration to Congress to
expand and strengthen the federal investment in university based research.

SubjuGator, an autonomous submarine designed and built by Gator Engineering Students is a two time winner of the International Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Competition.

The Society of Women Engineers at UF was named the Most Outstanding Student Section in the nation for 2004-05.

Nationwide, 323 Goldwater Scholarships were awarded for 2006-07 of which 47 went to engineers and Materials Science & Engineering student Lauren Culver received one.

Undergraduate students are entirely responsible for Engineers Week at UF and their mission is to educate and inspire elementary and middle school students about engineering.

Engineers Without Borders at UF is comprised of undergraduate students bettering communities around the world. In Macedonia, a project for solid-waste management began in May 2006. In Cambodia, the UF team is
designing a well system.








Appendix 1


University of Florida
College of Engineering
National Comparisons 2005-06
(Preliminary as of 02/05/2007)

Excludes Agricultural Engineering at the University of Florida


Teaching Quality and Productivity
Tenure &
# # Undergrad # Undergrad # Undergrad Tenure-Track
Undergraduate Majors per Degrees Degrees per # Grad Majors # Grad Degrees # Grad Degrees # MS Degrees # MS Degrees # PhD Degrees # PhD Degrees Teaching
Majors Faculty Awarded Faculty # Grad Majors per Faculty Awarded per Faculty Awarded per Faculty Awarded per Faculty Faculty
Georgia Tech Texas Georgia Tech Texas Illinois Texas Georgia Tech Michigan Georgia Tech Michigan Georgia Tech Texas Georgia Tech
8,081 20.60 1,643 4.00 2,472 8.67 1,027 3.04 751 2.34 276 0.78 481
Purdue Purdue Penn State Penn State Michigan Michigan Texas Michigan Texas Illinois Michigan Illinois
6,754 20.16 1,319 3.95 2,450 72 948 2.60 730 1.82 240 0.70 415
Penn State Penn State Purdue Washington Purdue Michigan Illinois Illinois Michigan Purdue
5,831 17.46 1,238 3.83 2,255 7.85 794 3 554 3 218 3 335
Illinois Illinois Purdue Washington Purdue Washington Purdue Washington Purdue Purdue Penn State
5,597 4 1,237 3.70 14 7.54 699 2.17 490 1.61 209 0.62 334
Texas Georgia Tech Michigan Michigan Texas Minnesota Texas Georgia Tech Texas Wisconsin Texas Illinois Michigan
5,047 16.80 1,094 3.51 2,125 7.44 638 2.14 447 1.60 191 0.58 312
Michigan Michigan Texas Minnesota Purdue Purdue Georgia Tech Penn State Georgia Tech
4,972 15.94 980 1,824 6.73 2.09 i6 1.56 176 0.57
Ohio State Georgia Tech Geogia Tech Illinois Penn State Wisconsin Minnesota Minnesota Washington Ohio State
7 15.24 7 3.42 1,712 5.96 506 2.05 360 1.47 7 0.56 259
Ohio State Wisconsin Ohio State Ohio State Penn State Penn State Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin Purdue Ohio State Minnesota Minnesota
3,948 14.45 848 3.27 1,611 4.82 491 2.00 353 1.46 136 0.53 245
Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Washington Ohio State Wisconsin Illinois Penn State Illinois Minnesota Ohio State Texas
3,383 13.81 738 3.01 1,440 4.67 450 1.91 330 1.33 131 0.53 245
Wisconsin Illinois Washington Illinois Ohio State Georgia Tech Washington Ohio State Washington Ohio State Washington Penn State Wisconsin
3,179 13.49 731 2.98 1,209 3.56 415 1.58 308 1.05 107 0.53 220
Washington Washington Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Ohio State Penn State Ohio State Penn State Wisconsin Wisconsin Washington
1,946 10.19 641 2.91 741 3.37 408 1.51 272 0.99 97 0.44 191

Enrollment includes Full-time and Part-time
Includes Computer Science (outside engineering)
Source: The ASEE website 2006 Survey of Engineering & Engineering Technology Programs and Research







Appendix 1


University of Florida
College of Engineering
National Comparisons 2005-06
(Preliminary as of 02/05/2007)

Excludes Agricultural Engineering at the University of Florida


Research Productivity
# Grad 0.5 FTE Grad
Research # Grad Research Research
Research Expend per Research Assistants per Assistant
Expend Faculty Assistants Faculty Stipend (year)
Georgia Tech Texas Georgia Tech Purdue Michigan
$203,677,000 $506,329 2,112 4.90 $23,196
Illinois Wisconsin Illinois Georgia Tech Washington
$200,118,000 $491,014 1,682 4.39 $22,428
Michigan Washington Purdue Illinois Illinois
$145,730,000 $482,634 1,643 4.05 $22,183
Texas Illinois Wisconsin Minnesota
$124,050,716 $482,212 4 3.54 $21,497
Penn State Michigan Texas Georgia Tech
$118,081,804 $467,083 807 5 $20,415
Purdue Georgia Tech Michigan Texas 6
$112,306,882 $423,445 804 3.29
Ohio State Ohio State Wisconsin Washington Ohio State
$108,378,000 $418,448 779 2.82 $19,183
Wisconsin 8 Penn State Michigan Wisconsin
$108,023,000 646 2.58 $18,480
9 Penn State Ohio State Ohio State Texas
$352,483 577 2.23 $17,420
Washington Purdue Washington Minnesota Penn State
$92,183,000 $335,244 538 2.12
Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Penn State Purdue
$71,661,344 $292,495 519 1.93


Includes Computer Science (outside engineering)
Source: The ASEE website 2006 Survey of Engineering & Engineering Technology Programs and Research









Appendix 2-A


U.S. News and World Report
America's Best Graduate Schools
2007 Edition (April 2006)


Schools of Engineering Sorted b overall rank and score


5E 9 o

o .- Io Io .,
oE .9 cP

2 u r u i o "t 2 2
School^ a ___________s "sg Pa.
1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 100 49 4 8 775 25 4% 44 13 2% $2248 $6227 273 2,717
2 Stanford University (CA) 95 49 46 778 358% 5 1 148% $1427 $6893 260 3,218
3 University of California-Berkeley 86 48 46 773 175% 45 21 0% $1180 $4778 201 1,694
4 Georgia Institute of Technology 85 45 43 760 33 8% 4 1 50% $2022 $4266 275 3,685
5 University of llinois-Urbana-Champaign 82 45 43 773 19 9% 4 1 22% $1958 $4730 220 2,507
6 Purdue University-West Lafayette (IN) 80 42 41 751 365% 4 51% $211 6 $6760 183 2,273
6 University of Michgan-Ann Arbor 80 45 4 1 770 42 3% 44 40% $1574 $5076 226 2,390
8 Carnegie Mellon University (PA) 78 43 43 772 24 8% 44 86% $142 3 $711 7 136 1,570
9 University of Southern California (Viterbi) 76 37 36 749 485% 57 14 1% $1574 $9654 91 3,560
10 California Institute of Technology 75 47 46 790 109% 53 10 1% $51 2 $538 5 74 577
11 Cornell University (NY) 73 43 43 760 224% 42 87% $1122 $5448 116 1,234
11 University of California-San Diego (Jacobs) 73 38 39 764 21 8% 49 11 0% $1288 $8052 68 1,147
13 University of Texas-Austin 69 42 4 1 760 28 6% 37 88% $1069 $4646 143 2,059
14 Texas A&M University-College Station (Look) 68 37 37 740 44 4% 3 35% $1790 $6754 148 2,187
15 University of California-Los Angeles (Samueli) 66 37 38 766 34 6% 52 11 4% $883 $605 1 137 1,256
15 University of Maryland-College Park (Clark) 66 36 37 760 240% 45 53% $1453 $637 1 149 1,943
15 University of Wisconsin-Madison 66 4 1 38 779 21 2% 34 45% $1232 $5289 72 1,517
18 Princeton University (NJ) 63 4 1 42 782 170% 33 126% $547 $4379 72 449
19 Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park 60 39 38 752 34 1% 28 28% $121 0 $3879 150 1,549
20 Columbia Universty (Fu Foundation) (NY) 58 36 38 767 37 8% 38 90% $750 $5638 58 1,220
21 Harvard University (MA) 57 36 39 772 128% 45 136% $332 $581 6 20 302
21 Johns Hopkins University (Whiting) (MD) 57 4 39 767 18 4% 39 1 5% $532 $3854 71 2,723
21 Northwestern Un sity (McCormick) (IL) 57 39 38 751 25 1% 38 51% $782 $4467 83 1,195
21 Uniersity of California-Santa Barbara 57 35 35 762 208% 44 165% $69 1 $544 3 78 694
21 University of Washngton 57 37 37 733 345% 42 53% $91 8 $4829 95 1,451
26 University of Florida 55 3.5 3.7 752 53.6% 4.2 1.8% $92.1 $341.1 145 2,041
26 Ohio State University 55 36 35 762 254% 28 24% $1068 $4206 96 1,235
28 University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 54 38 37 761 403% 38 59% $63 1 $2804 115 1,631
29 Rice University (Brown) (TX) 53 37 38 757 21 7% 48 78% $33 1 $337 3 65 548
30 Duke University (NC) 52 36 38 760 26 6% 36 1 8% $554 $5224 47 514
30 Virginia Tech 52 37 38 770 26 7% 26 21% $561 $1834 113 1,817
32 University of Pennsylvania 51 3 36 757 31 4% 42 61% $47 1 $457 1 41 1,036
33 North Carolina State University 50 34 34 751 257% 3 38% $930 $3308 97 1,795
33 Washington University in St Louis (Sever) 50 33 36 760 32 5% 32 68% $53 3 $605 2 33 862
35 University of California-Davis 49 34 35 756 31 5% 4 1 56% $600 $3409 72 1,116
35 University of Rochester (NY) 49 27 3 763 15 7% 34 1 2% $99 1 $1,2089 42 368
37 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (NY) 48 36 38 754 31 5% 3 55% $41 7 $2495 82 1,083
38 Universty of Virginia 47 34 34 741 205% 33 68% $506 $3834 55 767
39 University of Colorado-Boulder 46 34 34 745 63 5% 3 48% $576 $3646 69 1,461
39 Yale University (CT) 46 33 38 769 136% 28 82% $244 $321 4 22 222
41 University of California-rvine (Samueli) 44 32 34 751 24 1% 45 53% $445 $3159 45 965
42 Boston University 43 29 32 767 267% 39 34% $51 4 $4720 56 682
42 Case Western Reserve Universty (OH) 43 33 34 758 280% 24 26% $406 $3692 65 634
42 Dartmouth College (Thayer) (NH) 43 3 1 35 767 147% 23 24% $192 $4930 22 186
42 Iowa State University 43 33 36 742 18 7% 23 1 0% $586 $2776 62 878
42 University of Delaware 43 29 35 749 263% 45 32% $35 1 $3695 61 708
47 Arizona State University (Fulton) 42 33 3 4 751 45 2% 3 1 3 2% $44 9 $245 5 63 1,498
47 Lehigh University (Rossi) (PA) 42 3 1 35 766 31 6% 28 75% $31 3 $256 7 53 576
47 Rutgers State University-New Brunswick (NJ) 42 3 1 32 745 23 5% 1 5 39% $82 7 $397 8 51 890
47 Vanderbilt University (TN) 42 32 34 757 13 5% 36 1 2% $337 $4009 23 386
51 Brown University (RI) 39 33 36 N/A 27 1% 3 1 68% $157 $271 5 19 252
52 Michigan State University 38 32 34 756 174% 25 00% $242 $1637 55 558
52 University ofArizona 38 33 33 747 48 1% 27 31% $269 $1714 60 716



UF RANKING IN EACH CATEGORY 26 31 26 43 81 16 58 20 $45.0 11 11

A A School was unable to complete the survey because of damage from Hurricane Katrina Last year's data was used to calculate the school's ranking and is displayed here, with the exception of tuition








Appendix 2-B


U.S. News & World Report
America's Best Public Graduate Schools 2007
Top Engineering Schools


Public Schools of Enarineerinar


Sorted by overall rank and score


8 Texas A&M Uners-Collee Staon (Look) 68 3 7 3 7 740 44 4% 3 3 5% $179 0 $675 4 148 2,187












9 Unerst of Wsconsn-Madson 66 4 1 3 8 779 21 2% 3 4 4 5% $123 2 $528 9 72 1,517













12 Pennsylvania State University-Unversty Park 60 3 9 3 8 752 34 1% 2 8 2 8% $121 0 $387 9 150 1,549
13 Unversit of Calhforn1a-Santa Barbara 57 3 5 3 5 762 20 8% 4 4 16 5% $69 1 $544 3 78 694
15 Oho State University 55 3 6 3 5 762 25 4% 2 8 2 4% $106 8 $420 6 96 1,235















17 Unersty of Minnesota-Twin Cles 54 3 8 3 7 761 40 3% 3 8 5 9% $63 1 $280 4 115 1631















18 VWrqna Tech 52 3 7 3 8 770 26 7% 2 6 2 1% $56 1 $183 4 113 1,817
19 North Carona State Unersty 50 3 4 3 4 751 25 7% 3 3 8% $93 0 $330 8 97 1,795
E' =- E





















20 University of Calfornia-Das 49 3 4 3 5 756 31 5% 4 1 5 6% $600 $340 9 72 1,116
21 UnGersint t of rna 47 38 4 3 4 7641 20 5% 3 3 6 8% $50 6 $383 4 5 5 767
















22 University of Colorado-Boulder 46 3 4 3 4 745 63 5% 3 4 8% $57 6 $364 6 69 1,461
23 Universivt of Cahfornia-Irvwne (SamuelN) 44 3 2 3 4 751 24 1% 4 5 5 3% $44 5 $315 9 45 965
24 Iowa State Univ ersity 43 3 3 3 6 742 18 7% 2 3 1 0% $58 6 $277 6 62 878
24 University of Delaware 43 2 9 3 5 749 26 3% 4 5 3 2% $35 1 $369 5 61 708
26 A7zona State Unverstty (Fulton) 42 3 3 3 4 751 45 2% 3 1 3 2% $44 9 $245 5 63 1,498
26 Ruters State University-New Brunswick (NJ) 42 3 1 3 2 745 23 5% 1 5 3 9% $82 7 $397 8 51 890
E Ec

School 0 Q. W L 6 2 PE 9 4







1 University of Californa- ele 86 48 3 46 773 17 % 2 5 21 0% $1180 $4778 201 15694
2 Georgia Institute of Technology 85 45 43 760 33 8% 41 5 0% $202 2 $426 6 275 3,685







2 University of Ilinis rbanahamonpi 82 45 3 773 48 1% 41 2 % $1958 $4730 220 507
4 Purde University West LafBuf Y 3) 80 2 9 31 751 36 6% 24 51% $211 6 $6760 183 2273
4 University of Massachiganusetts-Ann Arbor 80 45 41 770 424 83% 44 4 0% $15739 34 $5076 226 695
6 University of California-San Diego (Jacobs) 73 38 39 764 21 8% 49 11 0% $1288 $8052 68 1,147






3 University of TexasAustin 69 42 41 760 284 % 37 8 1 % $106 $4646 143 2059
8 Texas A&M University College Station (Look) 68 37 37 740 44 4% 3 35% $1790 $6754 148 2,187

9 University of California-Los Angeles (Samueli) 66 37 38 766 34 6% 52 11 4% $883 $605 1 137 1,256






SUniversity of Ma n o Park (ClaA 66C 3 37 760 241 1 453 35 $1453 $637 149
9 Universityof Wisconsin- Madison 66 41 38 779 21 2% 34 45% $1232 $5289 72 1,517
12 Pennsylvania State University university Park 60 39 38 752 341% 28 2 8% $121 0 $3879 150 1,549






13 University of California-Santa Barbara 57t 35 35 762 208% 44 16% $691 $5443 78 694t

13 University of shol 57 3 3 733 345% 42 53 $91 8 $4829 95 1451
15 University of Florida 55 3.5 3.7 752 53.6% 4.2 1.8% $92.1 $341.1 145 2,041

15 Ohio State University 55 36 35 762 25 4 28 2 4 $1068 $4206 96 1,235
17 University of MinnesotaTwin Cities 54 38 37 761 40 3 38 5 9 $63 1 $2804 115 1631
18 VirginiaTech 52 37 38 770 2677% 26 21% $561 $1834 113 1817
19 North Carolina State University 50 34 34 751 25 7% 3 3 8% $930 $3308 97 1,795
20 Uiversity of California-Dav is 49 34 35 756 31 5% 41 56% $600 $3409 72 1116
21 University of Virginia 47 34 34 741 20 5% 33 6 8% $50 6 $383 4 55 767
22 University of Colorado-Boul der 46 34 34 475 63 5% 3 48% $576 $3646 69 1461
23 University of California-Irvine (Samueli) 44 32 34 751 24 1% 45 53% $445 $3159 45 965
24 Iowa State University 43 33 36 742 18 7% 23 1 0% $586 $2776 62 878
24 University of Delaware 43 29 35 749 26 3% 45 3 2% $35 1 $3695 61 708

26 Arizona State University (Fulton) 42 33 34 751 45 2% 31 3 2% $449 $245 5 63 1498
26 Rutgers State University-New Brunswick (NJ) 42 3 1 32 745 23 5% 1 5 3 9% $82 7 $397 8 51 890
28 Michigan State University 38 32 34 756 17 4% 25 0 0% $242 $1637 55 558
28 U fniversityofArizona 38 33 33 747 48 1% 27 31% $26 9 $171 4 60 716
30 University at Buffalo SUNY 37 29 31 757 46 6% 27 0 9% $37 7 $3309 63 922
30 University of Massachusetts-Amherst 37 3 33 740 24 8% 3 0 %% $39 3 $286 5 46 695
30 of 37 3 31 739 345% 25 16% $46 1 $387 2 46 621



UF RANKING IN EACH CATEGORY 15 17 12 21 53 9 35 14 26 9 7

A A School was unable to complete the survey because of damage from Humcane Katnna Last year's data was used to calculate the school's ranking and is displayed here, with the exception of tuition
N/A Not available from school








Appendix 2-C


America's Best Colleges 2007


Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs (August 2006)
(At schools whose highest degree is a doctorate)


* denotes a public school.


F


I


j


L


University of Pennsylvania 3.5
34 Brown University (RI) 3.4
University of California-Davis 3.4
Univ. of California-Santa Barbara 3.4
University of Colorado-Boulder 3.4
University of Virginia 3.4
39 Arizona State University 3.3
Case Western Reserve Univ. (OH) 3.3
Iowa State University 3.3
Washington University in St. Louis 3.3
43 Lehigh University (PA) 3.2
Michigan State University 3.2
University of Notre Dame (IN) 3.2
Vanderbilt University (TN) 3.2
Yale University (CT) 3.2
48 Dartmouth College (NH) 3.1
Rutgers-New Brunswick (NJ)* 3.1
University of Arizona 3.1
University of California-lrvine 3.1
University of Missouri-Rolla 3.1


tank School
1 Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
2 Stanford University (CA)
University of California-Berkeley *
4 California Institute of Technology
U. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign *
6 Georgia Institute of Technology *
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor *
8 Carnegie Mellon University (PA)
Purdue Univ.-West Lafayette (IN)*
10 Cornell University (NY)
11 Princeton University (NJ)
University of Texas-Austin *
13 Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison *
14 Johns Hopkins University (MD)
Northwestern University (IL)
Pennsylvania State U.-University Park *
17 Texas A&M Univ.-College Station *
Virginia Tech *
19 Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (NY)
Rice University (TX)
Univ. of California-Los Angeles *
Univ. of California-San Diego *
Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities *
University of Washington *
25 Columbia University (NY)
Duke University (NC)
North Carolina State U.-Raleigh *
Univ. of Maryland-College Park *
Univ. of Southern California
30 Harvard University (MA)
Ohio State University-Columbus *


Peer
assessment
score(5.0 =
highest)
4.8
4.7
4.7
4.5
4.5
4.4
4.4
4.3
4.3
4.2
4.1
4.1
4.0
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.8
3.8
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.5
3.5





Rank School
53 Colorado School of Mines *
Drexel University (PA)
Michigan Technological University *
Northeastern University (MA)
University of Iowa *
Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst *
University of Pittsburgh *
60 Auburn University (AL)*
Boston University
Clemson University (SC)*
Illinois Institute of Technology
Rochester Inst. of Technology (NY)
SUNY-Stony Brook *
University at Buffalo-SUNY *
University of Delaware *
University of Illinois-Chicago *
University of Utah *
Worcester Polytechnic Inst. (MA)
71 Colorado State University *
Kansas State University *
Polytechnic University (NY)
Syracuse University (NY)
Tufts University (MA)
University of Kansas *
University of Tennessee *
Washington State University *
79 Oregon State University *
University of Cincinnati *
University of Connecticut *
University of Houston *
University of New Mexico *
U. of North Carolina-Charlotte *
University of Rochester (NY)
86 Brigham Young Univ.-Provo (UT)
Clarkson University (NY)
Louisiana State U.-Baton Rouge *
New Jersey Inst. of Technology *
Oklahoma State University *
Southern Methodist University (TX)
Stevens Institute of Technology (NJ)
Texas Tech University *
University of Kentucky *
Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln *
University of Oklahoma *
97 CUNY-City College *
George Washington University (DC)
Indiana U.-Purdue U.-Indianapolis *
Univ. of California-Riverside *
University of Central Florida *
Univ. of Missouri-Columbia *
University of Rhode Island *
Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee *
Wayne State University (MI)*


Peer
assessment
score(5.0 =
highest)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5








Appendix 2-D


America's Best Colleges 2007


Best Public Undergraduate Engineering Programs (August 2006)
(At schools whose highest degree is a doctorate)


* denotes a public school.



Rank School
1 University of California-Berkeley *
2 U. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign *
3 Georgia Institute of Technology *
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor *
5 Purdue Univ.-West Lafayette (IN)*
6 University of Texas-Austin *
7 Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison *
8 Pennsylvania State U.-University Park *
9 Texas A&M Univ.-College Station *
Virginia Tech *
11 Univ. of California-Los Angeles *
Univ. of California-San Diego *
Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities *
University of Washington *
15 North Carolina State U.-Raleigh *
Univ. of Maryland-College Park *
17 Ohio State University-Columbus *


B


Peer assessment
score(5.0 =
highest)
4.7
4.5
4.4
4.4
4.3
4.1
4.0
3.9
3.8
3.8
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.6
3.6
3.5


19 Univ. of California-Santa Barbara 3.4
University of California-Davis 3.4
University of Colorado-Boulder 3.4
University of Virginia 3.4
23 Arizona State University* 3.3
Iowa State University 3.3
25 Michigan State University* 3.2
26 Rutgers-New Brunswick (NJ)* 3.1
University of Arizona 3.1
University of California-lrvine 3.1
University of Missouri-Rolla 3.1
30 Colorado School of Mines 3.0
Michigan Technological University* 3.0
Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst 3.0
University of Iowa 3.0
University of Pittsburgh 3.0


Rank School
35 Auburn University (AL)*
Clemson University (SC)*
SUNY-Stony Brook *
University at Buffalo-SUNY *
University of Delaware *
University of Illinois-Chicago *
University of Utah *
42 Colorado State University *
Kansas State University *
University of Kansas *
University of Tennessee *
Washington State University*
47 Oregon State University *
U. of North Carolina-Charlotte *
University of Cincinnati *
University of Connecticut *
University of Houston *
University of New Mexico *
53 Louisiana State U.-Baton Rouge *
New Jersey Inst. of Technology *
Oklahoma State University *
Texas Tech University *
Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln *
University of Kentucky *
University of Oklahoma *
60 CUNY-City College *
Indiana U.-Purdue U.-Indianapolis *
Univ. of California-Riverside *
Univ. of Missouri-Columbia *
Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee *
University of Central Florida *
University of Rhode Island *
Wayne State University (MI)*


II


Peer assessment
score(5.0 =
highest)
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5






Appendix 2-E


U.S. News
America's Best Graduate Schools
2007 Edition (April 2006)

Graduate Engineering Specialties


Aerospace 29 21

Agricultural NR NR

Biomedical

Chemical 21 13

Civil 24 16

Computer Eng 39 23

Electrical 29 18

Environmental 28 16

Industrial 16 10

Materials 6 3

Mechanical 31 19

Nuclear 9 8


College Ranking 26 15


NR U.S. News did not rank these specialties for the indicated year.






Appendix 2-F


U.S. News
America's Best Colleges
2007 Edition (August 2006)

Undergraduate Engineering Specialties


Aerospace

Agricultural 7 6

Biomedical

Chemical

Civil 24 14

Computer Eng

Electrical

Environmental 10 5

Industrial 17 12

Materials 10 6

Mechanical

Nuclear 10 9

College Ranking 30 17

* Nuclear ranked in 2004





Appendix 3-A


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Undergraduate Enrollment


6,000


5,000


4,000


3,000


2,000


1,000


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Freshman and sophomore college enrollment started in the Fall of Fall of Year
1996. Enrollment previousto this was essentially upper division.









Appendix 3-B


WOMEN UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT
UF and National Data


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006


* Undergrad (UF)


O Undergrad (National)


AFRICAN AMERICAN UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT
UF and National Data


8%

7%

6%

5%

S4%

3%

2%

1%

0%


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006


0 Undergrad (UF)


U Undergrad (National)


HISPANIC UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT
UF and National Data


Includes Full-time and Part-time Enrollment


2 8%

6%

4%

2%


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006


Undergrad (UF) U Undergrad (National)






Appendix 3-C


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Undergraduate Degrees Granted


1,200

0 1,000
_U


Q< 800
U)

0) 600

0 400

E 200
Z
0
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06

Year


SBS









Appendix 3-D


UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING DEGREES
WOMEN


tttl t- ---|






1987- 1988- 1989- 1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005-
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06


U Undergrad (UF)


Undergrad (National)


UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING DEGREES
AFRICAN AMERICAN


1987- 1988- 1989- 1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005-
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06


Undergrad (UF)


U Undergrad (National)


UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING DEGREES
HISPANIC


Undergrad (UF) U Undergrad (National)


30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%


7%

6%

5%
4ob


I 3%

2%

1%

0%


10%
-
S8%
6%
4%
2%
0%


1987- 1988- 1989- 1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005-
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06





Appendix 3-E


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Graduate Enrollment


2,500


2,000


1,500


1,000


500


0
1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006


Fall of Year














WOMEN GRADUATE ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT
UF and National Data


Includes lull-ti e and art-ti e


25%



20%



E 15%

0.
10%



5%



0%


AFRICAN AMERICAN GRADUATE ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT
UF and National Data


Includes Full-time and Part-tinie


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Graduate (UF) U Graduate (National)


HISPANIC GRADUATE ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT
UF and National Data


Incl des Full-tim and Iart-tine


Appendix 3-F


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

*Graduate (UF) Graduate (National)


4%




3%

-


2 2%




1%




0%


3%


2%


1%


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Graduate (UF) E Graduate (National)






Appendix 3-G


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Graduate Degrees Granted

800

S700 -

600
500 -- -




100
cm 400 -











Year

I MS o PhD
o MS oFPhD









Appendix 3-H


GRADUATE ENGINEERING DEGREES
WOMEN


25%


20%


15%


10%


5%


0%
1987- 1988- 1989- 1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005-
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06


SGraduate (UF) Graduate (National)





GRADUATE ENGINEERING DEGREES
AFRICAN AMERICAN
5%

4%

4%

3%

3% 3-

C 2%

2%-

1%-

1%

0%:f
1987- 1988- 1989- 1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005-
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06

Graduate (UF) Graduate (National)




GRADUATE ENGINEERING DEGREES
HISPANIC
7%

6%

5%

S4Oo


2% 3- -




1%

0%
1987- 1988- 1989- 1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005-
88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06


Graduate (UF) U Graduate (National)









Appendix 3-I


University of Florida
UF PhD Degrees Awarded by Major
2005-2006


Major


Doctoral
Degree


L I i ilii i -I i I
I h.' l.ii ., ii L_ ,1 ,i1 n l.l i ii .
. I i l_ i i i \' i ,. i II.
I Il' I III I ii. i I l'l l .I .l_ ll '%





I 1. l II

I.


I I 1.'I. 111110 I i IIi.' .l I


i ii II. Iil ,iC II II II.' .I -
S II ] IliIli.' lil. III. II' I
S I ._,,lII I lin g In 11I,, 111


i i. Il .I. L. I II




! I \ I-in nil ni,,,i,. l.,._ ,. !, ,1.,1.. h1. _


II illi' 'li t.




( II I. i l lll l i .II IIIIl II.' II i


! il I ,I i i. l l l I Ii






I I. N IL'I. L

li. I. I i L_ L, ,IIil



I i cl i II i.'I.'*
S. Ill II IL ICI '.
i 1111l I I Ii*
III i ,Ii lit

I h._I ll Ii i .





i )' 1._11 (. .I IIIc i l,, I, ,Ii ,, !' ,iliiI


Major







I' I .l l l i.. l Iii l I .' 1. i ll ll ll I




I I.', i I I. I ,11 n Ii I i i 1
'11 \1 1.1 .. 1..- i .l. ..








i i. i.i lli Icl it. i \ _.i ,,i i I,





S 111 11 i. I 'l ,h i i i 1 I 111 1 1 i .
S 1110I, .1 1 1 L lI










. I i.. l ii \ l Ii lL


, I II l. .1
I i, i i,,,i i t I ..I I I I, 111l,._i









L ..ii. I 1 1- .' l








I i III 1 1I,1 I \. l
I l II L,,.1 1- I 11'.I 1 I I .I 1 II-1
















I.N'l 'i L I I L LI I, L





Tiirial.
i i I ,iIuI IIiI iz















EnIn'_ l II l'I I_


SEll'i.'lllmiii Price I PhD'-
I


Doctoral
Degree


-1
4
4

4
4
4
41
41
41


0.30835
31%


V% h I I I k I d- --- I I- I L_ 11 0 1111- 1








Appendix 3-J


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEGREES AWARDED
PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL
BY GENDER & ETHNICITY


BACHELOR'S
ACADEMIC AFRICAN ALL
YEAR WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL

1987-88 15.73% 1.34% 7.12% 91.54% 100.00%
1988-89 15.17% 1.50% 10.66% 87.84% 100.00%
1989-90 18.25% 2.87% 8.60% 88.54% 100.00%
1990-91 13.99% 2.20% 7.08% 90.72% 100.00%
1991-92 14.63% 3.94% 9.94% 86.12% 100.00%
1992-93 16.46% 4.11% 6.80% 89.08% 100.00%
1993-94 15.68% 3.26% 9.47% 87.27% 100.00%
1994-95 16.38% 3.94% 6.93% 89.13% 100.00%
1995-96 16.74% 3.29% 7.47% 89.24% 100.00%
1996-97 14.73% 3.79% 8.98% 87.24% 100.00%
1997-98 16.50% 3.27% 10.24% 86.49% 100.00%
1998-99 16.64% 5.01% 11.23% 83.76% 100.00%
1999-00 18.90% 5.12% 11.42% 83.46% 100.00%
2000-01 18.87% 3.31% 11.85% 84.85% 100.00%
2001-02 23.83% 4.82% 15.15% 80.03% 100.00%
2002-03 20.57% 3.52% 10.12% 86.36% 100.00%
2003-04 20.55% 4.00% 11.70% 84.30% 100.00%
2004-05 20.33% 5.75% 12.94% 81.31% 100.00%
2005-06 17.95% 4.06% 15.71% 80.24% 100.00%

PHD'S
ACADEMIC AFRICAN ALL
YEAR WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL


1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06


8.96%
5.33%
7.69%
15.46%
15.48%
4.35%
4.26%
5.26%
11.11%
5.88%
4.90%
13.00%
9.41%
11.58%
23.00%
10.87%
14.17%
11.72%
22.65%


0.00%
0.00%
2.56%
4.12%
1.19%
5.43%
1.06%
3.16%
0.00%
0.98%
0.98%
4.00%
1.18%
0.00%
0.00%
1.09%
2.36%
2.76%
2.76%


1.49%
2.67%
2.56%
3.09%
3.57%
1.09%
1.06%
2.11%
1.11%
2.94%
2.94%
1.00%
0.00%
1.05%
2.00%
6.52%
2.36%
2.07%
2.76%


98.51%
97.33%
94.87%
92.78%
95.24%
93.48%
97.87%
94.74%
98.89%
96.08%
96.08%
95.00%
98.82%
98.95%
98.00%
92.39%
95.28%
95.17%
94.48%


100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%


MASTER'S
AFRICAN ALL
WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL

10.32% 0.79% 1.19% 98.02% 100.00%
12.71% 0.42% 2.54% 97.03% 100.00%
10.40% 4.40% 3.20% 92.40% 100.00%
10.93% 2.43% 0.81% 96.76% 100.00%
12.58% 1.66% 4.30% 94.04% 100.00%
12.94% 1.62% 2.96% 95.42% 100.00%
8.54% 0.63% 2.08% 97.29% 100.00%
14.08% 1.94% 4.13% 93.93% 100.00%
15.58% 3.12% 3.12% 93.77% 100.00%
16.67% 1.52% 3.64% 94.85% 100.00%
20.40% 2.27% 6.23% 91.50% 100.00%
17.92% 2.60% 6.49% 90.91% 100.00%
20.48% 2.39% 7.98% 89.63% 100.00%
18.28% 3.01% 5.59% 91.40% 100.00%
21.70% 4.15% 5.28% 90.57% 100.00%
19.50% 2.67% 4.50% 92.83% 100.00%
21.33% 2.54% 6.07% 91.38% 100.00%
20.64% 3.03% 6.06% 90.91% 100.00%
22.61% 3.91% 5.65% 90.43% 100.00%

Total Graduate
AFRICAN ALL
WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL


10.03%
10.93%
9.76%
12.21%
13.21%
11.23%
7.84%
12.43%
14.74%
14.12%
16.92%
16.91%
18.44%
17.14%
21.90%
18.35%
20.24%
18.72%
22.62%


0.63%
0.32%
3.96%
2.91%
1.55%
2.38%
0.70%
2.17%
2.53%
1.39%
1.98%
2.89%
2.17%
2.50%
3.49%
2.46%
2.51%
2.97%
3.59%


1.25%
2.57%
3.05%
1.45%
4.15%
2.59%
1.92%
3.75%
2.74%
3.47%
5.49%
5.36%
6.51%
4.82%
4.76%
4.77%
5.51%
5.20%
4.84%


98.12%
97.11%
92.99%
95.64%
94.30%
95.03%
97.39%
94.08%
94.74%
95.14%
92.53%
91.75%
91.32%
92.68%
91.75%
92.77%
91.98%
91.83%
91.58%


100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%


Degrees awarded are for an academic year (summer, fall, and spring semesters).








Appendix 3-K


NATIONAL DEGREES AWARDED
PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL
BY GENDER & ETHNICITY


BACHELOR'S
ACADEMIC AFRICAN ALL
YEAR WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL

1987-88 15.33% 3.10% 3.42% 93.48% 100.00%
1988-89 15.30% 3.08% 3.67% 93.24% 100.00%
1989-90 15.36% 3.29% 3.75% 92.96% 100.00%
1990-91 15.65% 3.60% 4.16% 92.24% 100.00%
1991-92 15.67% 3.73% 4.25% 92.02% 100.00%
1992-93 16.08% 4.06% 4.38% 91.57% 100.00%
1993-94 16.63% 4.26% 4.69% 91.05% 100.00%
1994-95 17.46% 4.47% 5.26% 90.26% 100.00%
1995-96 17.98% 4.78% 5.45% 89.77% 100.00%
1996-97 18.68% 4.92% 6.15% 88.93% 100.00%
1997-98 18.65% 4.97% 6.22% 88.81% 100.00%
1998-99 19.78% 5.07% 6.52% 88.41% 100.00%
1999-00 20.65% 4.95% 6.48% 88.57% 100.00%
2000-01 20.24% 4.88% 6.37% 88.75% 100.00%
2001-02 20.54% 4.89% 6.26% 88.85% 100.00%
2002-03 20.14% 4.57% 6.20% 89.23% 100.00%
2003-04 20.11% 4.87% 6.33% 88.80% 100.00%
2004-05 19.58% 4.92% 6.45% 88.63% 100.00%
2005-06 19.27% 4.80% 6.53% 88.67% 100.00%

PHD'S
ACADEMIC AFRICAN ALL
YEAR WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL


1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06


6.85%
8.77%
9.13%
9.70%
9.94%
9.68%
11.01%
12.13%
12.54%
12.32%
12.33%
14.71%
15.80%
16.92%
17.47%
17.26%
17.47%
18.16%
19.61%


0.63%
0.62%
0.66%
0.76%
0.65%
0.74%
0.98%
1.03%
1.15%
1.42%
1.45%
1.95%
1.62%
1.68%
1.60%
1.61%
1.57%
1.53%
1.49%


0.79%
0.74%
0.98%
0.90%
1.04%
0.89%
0.74%
1.03%
1.67%
1.29%
1.55%
1.63%
1.43%
1.37%
1.91%
1.78%
1.49%
1.47%
1.22%


98.58%
98.64%
98.36%
98.35%
98.30%
98.37%
98.28%
97.94%
97.18%
97.29%
97.00%
96.42%
96.95%
96.95%
96.49%
96.62%
96.94%
97.00%
97.29%


100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%


MASTER'S
AFRICAN ALL
WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL

13.18% 1.42% 1.87% 96.71% 100.00%
13.57% 1.61% 1.77% 96.62% 100.00%
14.30% 1.58% 1.94% 96.49% 100.00%
14.83% 1.74% 1.79% 96.47% 100.00%
15.47% 1.81% 1.85% 96.35% 100.00%
15.68% 2.05% 2.02% 95.93% 100.00%
16.06% 2.11% 2.13% 95.76% 100.00%
16.69% 2.21% 2.20% 95.59% 100.00%
17.72% 2.42% 2.48% 95.11% 100.00%
18.97% 2.50% 2.73% 94.77% 100.00%
20.27% 2.58% 2.83% 94.59% 100.00%
20.53% 2.77% 2.66% 94.57% 100.00%
21.12% 2.55% 2.79% 94.65% 100.00%
21.95% 2.58% 2.55% 94.87% 100.00%
22.10% 2.71% 2.55% 94.73% 100.00%
21.92% 2.50% 2.53% 94.97% 100.00%
21.78% 2.33% 2.82% 94.85% 100.00%
22.42% 2.61% 2.91% 94.48% 100.00%
22.71% 2.62% 3.08% 94.29% 100.00%

Total Graduate
AFRICAN ALL
WOMEN AMERICANS HISPANICS OTHER TOTAL


12.22%
12.81%
13.43%
13.96%
14.51%
14.68%
15.21%
15.92%
16.79%
17.73%
18.86%
19.59%
20.25%
21.14%
21.38%
21.26%
21.19%
21.78%
22.17%


1.31%
1.45%
1.42%
1.57%
1.61%
1.83%
1.92%
2.01%
2.19%
2.30%
2.37%
2.63%
2.40%
2.44%
2.54%
2.38%
2.23%
2.45%
2.43%


1.71%
1.61%
1.77%
1.64%
1.71%
1.83%
1.89%
2.00%
2.33%
2.46%
2.60%
2.50%
2.57%
2.36%
2.45%
2.43%
2.63%
2.69%
2.76%


96.99%
96.95%
96.80%
96.79%
96.68%
96.33%
96.18%
95.99%
95.48%
95.24%
95.02%
94.87%
95.03%
95.21%
95.01%
95.20%
95.14%
94.86%
94.82%


100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%


Degrees awarded are for an academic year (summer, fall, and spring semesters).








Appendix 4


Average Entering Class GRE Scores (Master's and Doctoral) Quantitative / Analytic / Writing
Data from the U.S. News Engineering Graduate School Rankings

2006 average
2006 average 2006 average 2006 average
Peer Institution quantitative GRE Peer Institution anal G sre Peer Institution
scoreanalytic GRE score writing GRE score
score
Florida 757 Florida 688 Florida 4.00

2006 average 2005 average 2005 average
Peer Institution quantitative GRE Peer Institution G s Peer Institution w g G
S analytic GRE score writing GRE score
score
Wisconsin 779 Wisconsin 763 Wisconsin 4.75
Illinois 773 Georgia Tech 711 Georgia Tech 4.70
Michigan 770 Texas 711 Illinois 4.56
Ohio State 762 Michigan 709 Washington 4.53
Minnesota 761 Illinois 707 Michigan 4.48
Georgia Tech 760 Purdue 701 Texas 4.40
Texas 760 Penn State 690 Minnesota 4.36
Florida 752 Florida 668 Ohio State 4.35
Penn State 752 Ohio State 662 Purdue 4.30
Purdue 751 Washington 607 Penn State 4.27
Washington 733 Minnesota N/A Florida 4.17

2004 average 2004 average 2004 average
Peer Institution quantitative GRE Peer Institution G s Peer Institution w g G
o analytic GRE score writing GRE score
score
Wisconsin 786 Wisconsin 741 Wisconsin 4.95
Illinois 769 Ohio State 725 Georgia Tech 4.80
Michigan 768 Illinois 724 Washington 4.72
Ohio State 766 Purdue 718 Illinois 4.68
Texas 765 Michigan 715 Michigan 4.52
Georgia Tech 755 Texas 710 Ohio State 4.41
Penn State 754 Penn State 703 Purdue 4.41
Minnesota 752 Georgia Tech 701 Texas 4.40
Florida 744 Florida 694 Minnesota 4.33
Purdue 738 Washington 680 Florida 4.30
Washington 732 Minnesota N/A Penn State 4.28

2003 average 2003 average
Peer Institution quantitative GRE Peer Institution analc GE s3
analytic GRE score
score
Wisconsin 775 Wisconsin 743
Illinois 769 Illinois 735
Ohio State 769 Michigan 713
Michigan 768 Texas 704
Texas 763 Purdue 700
Minnesota 759 Georgia Tech 697
Purdue 752 Ohio State 696
Georgia Tech 751 Minnesota 690
Penn State 751 Penn State 687
Florida 751 Washington 686
Washington 734 Florida 681

2002 average 2002 average
Peer Institution quantitative GRE Peer Institution a G
scoreanalytic GRE score
Wisconsin 780 Wisconsin 741
Illinois 773 Illinois 722
Michigan 772 Ohio State 715
Ohio State 769 Michigan 714
Minnesota 762 Minnesota 703
Texas 761 Texas 696
Purdue 756 Purdue 688
Georgia Tech 755 Penn State 687
Penn State 755 Georgia Tech 683
Florida 750 Washington 675
Washington 733 Florida 664







Appendix 5


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
RESEARCH EXPENDITURES


External Funded
Research Expenditures


Fiscal Year


Total Research
Expenditures


$23,382,511

$25,509,069

$27,820,103

$31,041,812

$35,902,694

$35,294,373

$33,230,736

$31,849,533

$38,526,721

$46,595,003

$49,722,293

$57,680,538

$60,025,957

$52,961,085

$61,846,592


$38,560,536

$42,173,932

$45,820,956

$50,110,272

$53,266,766

$56,153,044

$56,868,718

$58,355,790

$61,033,545

$70,038,247

$75,873,795

$87,025,120

$89,877,918

$92,101,700

$107,762,954


Research Expenditures


$120

$100

$80

$60

$40

$20

$0


* Research Expenditures U Ext Res Exp


1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06


,0 Q 7,0 ,0 0 70 70 7,Q0 7,g ;R0 ,) ,O 0 ,O 0 ,O 0 ,O
0,7 O; p ov) OTy 6%O 0,9 00 0,7 '9>) '9,? p 97 '9 T
P '9 2 9 '96 96 -Q -- -Q( -Q, 0 '0









Appendix 6


ASEE 2005 Federal Expenditures


Public


Rank


School


I I...E- i ,:i.,l ll- E il-h li, i I, To : hl



l Gowarnl ,,I a To hwr,,,_lyi,







5 ~~_-,-,rl, l .hl T. _-:r,, ,-,-,,_h ,
18 Univ ersity of Florida',


9 r..-rh _..ll l. h.l Cr- ,
m.l, Ur-, .- I 1 l l l,-,ri .-r I- ,,
10 I .. _- r l -.1. .Ic .r,.. o ... l. .
l The _.'r-.l `...r ,l 1 I. aJ ,


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I. PlI.J.II. .ll.hl L _r-.,l




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18 University of Florida
19 Ther, j.l.h _r-.1,:,I To F_ oiI ll-hh







"4 Ilm C,, lhl Dllii Ur-ol.
-- II ._ J,-,l i,- t al, .I-,lki,- lhi :i r-,r,






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-6 Fri _,_l ,_ I l _ll,:, i, lI..., _r- ,l,







= O I.: .ll,:.rl-lm I al ia.lhl ~ r- l




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36 h6 Ho j. l.lhV. orvla,







S11 H Fl r ,r.j I.Iiii r-r,


IA o.,Jrt,,II C.hi o. ir,,


15 DIF I.h. m r-el, ,.,I l0i_" .,Frk .0 & M wo:I,
16 V yVI. I' I lairnt P:-,: w. vral,



19 The i- .i.. _r-,l, ,:,I le_ I le ,,:,F,
UO 0 I.J l--h-,l.'.h.,-,h l.lh. ar-,l


Federal
Expenditures Rank


$160 50 000
b 19 903 976
,b 19 069 000
'b 10 7 7: 000
*96 693 193
',b 930 000
,5 5103 510


,b 1 669
1: 07 :1 7 1
',7 1 1 000
7:1 : 1 000
$',70 ,-16 000
',$70 719 000
$,70 :57 000
$5, 507 000
$55.401.000
.5.,E 5 l,166
$51 157 14J
$,16 3041 91 1
i5 9145 000
$4,4 199000
$l-: 9;9 000
$4,: 719000
$4: 197 101
$41 333 16
,0 : 7 000
',b 9 76 000
',9 56- 000
'I,$ 901 307

'3 31 J1,1 9 6
*,7 7 15000
',b 7 106 000
',35 096 000
',35 0 0 691
$-I 953 616
$3J 079 000
b1% 77. 161'
6, 15000
31 939 000
01 7553::

,30 197 000
*:9 0411 1 I
,, J160 000
',b 15 0 91

$:6 75 000
*,5 19000
',1-1 33 000
'{,-3 .1 --1 .16


School


b.1- Oh..1, .:dI l. .. ..
G a.:.r.I., ll,-l.llll :,l Tect,.:rh,:,h ,_
Iihmi. _r- l. ,.:,iIl I,r, I .I.,J ,-,:,ll ,l P ,rk

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The P l.. m,,1 I I .I 1_1- r ,l


11..- W .1, .:d .1 r
Inr.II r ,l ,I. VV,,,
To. lI.., II- ,
1I.II- or .:. -,IIFCr.,, Earkele,
University of Florida
The .:I.Ih r_.l,.-.I To o_ m .I l .._h
1._1h r-,l, .:.l ," .I, :.rI,,o L-:-,-- i,, lol

lihll :r:_l -.:.I I hl ,l _,I.:ao T ,i.h C -i

1._-.I.-.r W .J. :. I m r:_.l,
I...hl er :.Iv.-.I ,-.-.I.-.r F.J.-.. ,I I .-...I.Jer
..r.l.l..., P .:.I,l .:l..h..: Ih :_hhll ..I..) SI,I I ..Ih ar_.l,

I.:. I _1- I.Ih r ar,_
The Ono.: D Me S... oar.,
U-.. Qr W, Q: Won.Y.


1._1 .:.I l om.ln Fl.:.r..Jo
1_1- .. ar ., .:.I PaIit...Lr-jh.
1_1 o r .:.i ..r. h. n r
l...hl a rir, ,:F, I i. :rllllll .E

l._ ll _r l ,.:.I ,IC IF.r.,,. Ir i., _
MI oI n l.lhl er _.l, .:.1 O l ..:.rk O E M wolIIFI,:,


1._1.. r .:.I E loIo, .ro
TheN.S alDl ar :_, -I a He w.:.-,
1_1-.l _ra_ .:.I -.ih :i..:h l
11, Jori_ I I.I- i eI c,:,1 T t,:r,, : ,,
The QI. r... 1 ww rh.:...


Tl-W.. a r _, Q owr,:,Fi,


wa:.., Er.:..:.k 1_1-. -ra ,
1_1- .I rl .:.I I l l .:.I
1.-l l. rm',- .:.h -.:-1 r F_ .:.r.. o
1_- -.,Iv a, .:.I T h --,-,lrel aleFIIF
1._1- -_r- .:.I It.,on o

" ,re. .: 1 m-,,e ,Ij.. r hl,


1_l-ll .-. a .:.I ._ 11- ..:.r. m C oq .i


l...lh ar-.,l,:,I I-III.-I I:n .1rFI..I,:.
1_1-. orm~, .:d .Jo.ht.:.
o::I:r .J.:. __.: h.:..:.l .:d I la Ei
CO h...: 1_1-. ori.,
1_1-. r1 .:.I -.:- hI C. wa or:I..


I Overall


$14 3300 Q Q ,Q ~a i AM 4"I


----


I


Federal
Expenditures
6-164 11; 000

0 19069 000
-110 77: 000
*2 5 10;3 510
423 21 5 669
I 1 :07 :7 1
7. 13 1 000
S7: 1:1 000
70 256 000
s70 719 000
'70 :5 7 000
$55.401.000
'54 5 :166
$51 157 21A
$4: 9;9 000
'o-, :;U000
$I9 7.6 000
$3I 901 307
bl~ 314 :96
,37 715000
7 J06 000
$35 096 000
$35024 691
'b 4 953 616
*I4 079000

'133 775 161
'b Il56 000




$:6 775000
:5 I 19 000
K' 3.31 000
291 000
'I 659 316
K:0 67 3 Oil
$10 631 000
'19 567 079
'19 4119000

so9 ::6 10:
'Su 6;09:1
1.7 975016
'17 76: 591
*17 610 000
S17 457 660
'16 N219656
6 :06 000
sbi5 7J7 6:9
*15 375 -97
$i5 100000
*b i 9:5 9J






Appendix 7


University of Florida
College of Engineering
Faculty Salary Comparisons Peer Institutions


I AverageSalary 20030


Ranking of Faculty Salaries by Institution by decreasing salary


Engineering Institution .*- Rank

Michigan $ 79,063 1
Wisconsin, Madison $ 76,976 2
Georgia Tech $ 76,150 3
Ohio State $ 75,434 4
Purdue $ 74,397 5
Illinois $ 73,552 6
Washington $ 73,377 7
Penn State $ 72,452 8
Texas, Austin $ 71,528 9
Minnesota, Twin Cities $ 70,857 10




Engineering Institution Rank

Michigan $ 129,366 1
Illinois $ 121,255 2
Georgia Tech $ 119,272 3
Wisconsin, Madison $ 118,125 4
Purdue $ 117,060 5
Penn State $ 113,307 6
Texas, Austin $ 111,473 7
Ohio State $ 109,504 8
Minnesota, Twin Cities $ 108,587 9
ashingto $ 105,381 1
Washington $ 105,381 11


Engineering Institution .* Rank

Michigan $ 94,252 1
Wisconsin, Madison $ 86,420 2
Georgia Tech $ 85,035 3
Penn State $ 84,539 4
Illinois $ 84,224 5
Purdue $ 83,302 6
Ohio State $ 83,276 7
Washington $ 82,760 8
Minnesota, Twin Cities $ 81,876 9
Texas, Austin $ 77,569 10




Engineering Institution Rank

Minnesota, Twin Cities $ 82,778 1
Washington $ 78,122 2
Wisconsin, Madison $ 76,000 3
Texas, Austin $ 75,000 4
Purdue $ 75,000 5
Georgia Tech $ 74,182 6
Penn State $ 73,381 7
Michigan $ 73,188 8
Ohio State $ 72,417 9

Illinois $ 72,050 11


Information obtained from the Engineering Dean's Group and the Big 10+ Salary Survey. All
salaries are for nine months and represent tenured/tenure track faculty.













Appendix 8


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

TENUREDITENURE-TRACK FACULTY HIRED SINCE JULY 2001

I I1ii.. -_ ii H .. J Il 1'



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Appendix 8


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

TENURED/TENURE-TRACK FACULTY HIRED SINCE JULY 2001

Continued

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Appendix 9


New Faculty Hires Analysis


Tenured/Tenure Track Faculty Hired Since 2001

* Assistant Professors 59
* Associate Professors 19
* Professors 15

Diversity Women/Men Ethnicity

* Women 7
* Men 86

* Asian 39
* Hispanic 4
* White 50






Appendix 10


Faculty Diversity Benchmarking


College (ASEE 2005) AA Hispanic Women Total AA (%) Hispanic (%) Women (%)

Berkeley 1 9 27 243 0.41% 3.70% 11.11%
Georgia Tech 14 8 50 413 3.39% 1.94% 12.11%
Illinois 5 10 32 416 1.20% 2.40% 7.69%
Michigan 8 5 36 301 2.66% 1.66% 11.96%
Purdue 6 9 38 341 1.76% 2.64% 11.14%
UCSD NA NA 14 168 8.33%
UT-Austin 5 10 26 246 2.03% 4.07% 10.57%
TAMU 6 14 38 329 1.82% 4.26% 11.55%
Wisconsin 1 5 22 188 0.53% 2.66% 11.70%
UCLA 0 2 11 149 0.00% 1.34% 7.38%

Top Ten Average 5.1 8.0 29.4 279.4 1.83% 2.86% 10.52%

Florida (2006) 6 9 25 287 2.09% 3.14% 8.71%
Florida (2005) 6 10 24 280 2.14% 3.57% 8.57%
Florida (2004) 6 9 21 269 2.23% 3.35% 7.81%
Florida (2003) 7 8 19 261 2.68% 3.07% 7.28%
Florida (2002) 4 7 20 270 1.48% 2.59% 7.41%
Florida (2001) 7 6 20 270 2.59% 2.22% 7.41%










Appendix 11


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
BUILDINGS AND SPACE ASSIGNED
SORTED BY AGE OF BUILDING OR DATE OF LAST MAJOR RENOVATION
AS OF MARCH 2004

DATE OF
BLDG NUMBER TOTAL S ASSIGN SQ ORIGINAL 1STA.TER 2NDALTER 3THATER 4THATER MAIOR
NUMBER BLDG NAME ROOMS FT FT COST YR BUILT YR YR YR YR RENOVATION

BUILDING S OVER THIRTY YEARS OLD
1619 QUALIFICATION LAB, FDOT2903&29 11 7,374 6,212 $53,783 1946 1946
0571 COASTAL ENGINEERING WAVE TANK 7 41,400 39,917 $168,380 1957 1968 1974 1957
0572 COASTAL ENGINEERING TEST LAB 4 1,140 1,012 $7,086 1957 1957
0557 NUCLEAR REACTOR 33 17,400 9,757 $423,010 1958 1962 1958
0587 SOLAR ENERGY TEST HOUSE 1 1,800 1,614 $15,909 1959 1959
0554 NUCLEAR FIELD BUILDING 18 6,460 4,835 $56,456 1960 1960
0607 COASTAL ENGINGEERING LAB 5 1,170 1,015 $3,000 1960 1960
1601 FDOT2036 11 2,661 1,807 $20,968 1960 1960
0634 NUCLEAR SCIENCES 160 72,380 44,745 $2,031,636 1964 1964
0668 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LAB 21 5,650 4,019 $35,178 1964 1969 1984 1964
0729 COASTAL ENGINEERING STORAGE 1 1,230 1,235 $4,854 1966 1966
0745 COASTAL ENGINEERING SHOPS 10 5,000 4,197 $50,961 1966 1966
0720 MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENG B 74 46,390 24,146 $1,260,000 1967 1967
0721 JOHN R BENTON HALL 54 24,670 15,541 $600,000 1967 1967
0722 MERWIN J LARSEN HALL 99 37,340 25,936 $920,000 1967 1967
0723 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 83 50,600 31,400 $1,300,000 1967 1967
0724 ALVIN P BLACK HALL 85 35,530 19,249 $900,000 1967 1967
0725 MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENG A 79 40,930 24,403 $1,000,000 1967 1967
0771 MICROFABRITECH WEST 11 2,520 3,602 $0 1967 1967
0719 MATERIALS ENGINEERING 80 31,000 19,934 $831,969 1969 1976 1969

847 432,645 284,576 $9,683,190

BUILDINGS BETWEEN 20 TO 30 YEARS OLD
1605 FDOT2088 24 5,903 4,353 $65,661 1976 1976
0726 CHEMICAL ENG SOLVENT STORAGE 4 1,820 1,678 $0 1977 1988 1977
0239 MECHANICAL ENGR TEST HOUSE 1 1,350 1,320 $0 1978 1978
0240 FORD FUEL CELL RESEARCH LAB 7 790 1,128 $0 1978 1978
0241 SOLAR ENERGY TEST HOUSE 1 1 1,960 1,630 $0 1978 1978
0249 SOLAR ENERGYWELL HOUSE 0 80 0 $0 1978 1978
0247 SOLAR ENGINEERING LABORATORY 4 1,800 1,421 $0 1979 1987 1979
0765 CIVIL ENGINEERING STORAGE 1 203 178 $0 1981 1981
0225 LIGHTNING RES FAC CAMP BLANDIN 10 2,970 2,294 $0 1983 1983

52 16,876 14,002 $65,661

BUILDINGS BETWEEN 10 TO 20 YEARS OLD
1025 SOUTH SINGLE-WIDE MODULAR 1 340 303 $0 1984 1984
1026 CENTER SINGLE-WIDE MODULAR 1 340 303 $0 1984 1984
1027 NORTH SINGLE-WIDE MODULAR 1 340 303 $0 1984 1984
1028 SOUTH DOUBLE-WIDE MODULAR 3 570 607 $0 1984 1984
1029 CENTER DOUBLE-WIDE MODULAR 1 570 622 $0 1984 1984
1030 NORTH DOUBLE-WIDE MODULAR 1 570 622 $0 1984 1984
0580 COASTAL ENGINEERING LAB 7 1,530 1,356 $0 1985 1985
0760 ENGINEERING DESIGN BUILDING 7 2,880 2,213 $0 1985 1985
0980 POLYMER RECYCLING BUILDING 5 3,330 5,891 $0 1985 1994 1985
0042 COMPUTER SCIENCES/ENGINEERING 202 112,725 70,224 $10,886,000 1986 1986
0131 PERCY L REED LABORATORY 32 15,020 10,480 $137,890 1938 1984 1986 1986
2031 WASTE MANAGEMENT CENTER 2 2,030 2,955 $0 1986 1996 1986
2054 UFRT- NORTH LAB 2 22,610 2 $0 1986 1996 1986
1253 ENVIRONMENTAL ENG SHED-ACMF 1 120 115 $0 1987 1987
2100 ENVIRONMENTAL ENG SHED-ACMF 1 120 115 $0 1987 1987
2101 ENVIRONMENTAL ENG SHED-ACMF 1 120 115 $0 1987 1987
0869 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIGESTER 2 520 450 $0 1988 1988
0226 MICROFABRITECH EAST 15 4,890 3,453 $307,000 1989 1994 1989
2060 SECURITY MINI-STORAGE 10 1,350 1,479 $0 1990 1997 1990
0183 MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENG C 55 26,980 20,673 $61,407 1948 1967 1983 1991 1991

350 196,955 122,281 $11,392,297

BUILDINGS LESS THAN 10 YEARS OLD
0462 BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING 30 12,300 8,397 $0 1994 1994
1134 MATERIALS RECYCLING RESEARCH 1 558 525 $0 1994 1994
1135 MATERIALS RECYCLING RESEARCH 1 558 525 $0 1994 1994
1137 MECHANICAL ENGR STORAGE 1 194 175 $0 1994 1994
1700 GRADUATE ENG/RES CTR (GERC) 69 45,900 30,141 $0 1995 1995
1720 LAUNCH TRAILER CAMP BLENDING 1 100 100 $0 1995 1995
1721 ISI-1 CAMP BLANDING 1 285 225 $0 1995 1995
1722 ISI-2 CAMP BLANDING 1 285 225 $0 1995 1995
1723 ISI-3 CAMP BLANDING 1 285 225 $0 1995 1995
1724 ISI-4 CAMP BLANDING 1 285 225 $0 1995 1995
1725 SIMULATED HOUSE CAMP BLENDING 1 220 190 $0 1995 1995
0033 ENGINEERING 228 140,190 79,995 $0 1997 1997
0746 PARTICLE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 34 23,700 18,694 $0 1998 1998
1176 AEROSPACE MECHANICAL STORAGE 1 360 345 $0 1998 1998
0184 FREDERICK N RHINES HALL 103 72,911 47,149 $666,490 1948 1967 1984 1999 1999
1139 FUEL CELL GARAGE 4 2,023 1,709 $0 1999 1999
0024 JOSEPH WEIL HALL 347 151,100 97,690 $1,666,600 1950 1954 1966 2002 2002

825 451,254 286,535 $2,333,090 JOSEPH WEIL HALL IS ONLY 1/2 RENOVATED AS OF 2002

SPACE NOT OWNED BY THE UNIVERSITY


1631 39TH STREET FDOT STORAGE
3097 WRIGHT LAB- TYNDALL AFB
3260 AYERS MEDICAL PLAZA
3291 ATKINS OFFICE CENTER


7,462 7,250 $0
0 1 $0
0 6,835 $0
0 64 $0

7,462 14,150 $0

1,105,192 721,544 $23,474,238


GRAND TOTAL




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