Title: 52 job titles revised to eliminate sex-stereotyping
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Title: 52 job titles revised to eliminate sex-stereotyping
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Office of Information, U. S. Department of Labor
Place of Publication: Washington, D. C.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00086899
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
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FOR RELEASE:


USDL- 73-542
PHONE: ESA:WB 202-961-2188

after hours:
E. Coakley (h) 202-484-6061


A.M. Editions
Friday, November 9, 1973

52 JOB TITLES REVISED TO ELIMINATE SEX-STEREOTYPING


Changes in 52 sex-stereotyped job titles have been adopted in the U. S.

Census Bureau's Occupational Classifications System. They will help eliminate

the concept of so-called "men's jobs' and "women's jobs," Carmen R. Maymi,

Director of the U.S. Department of Labor's Women's Bureau,. said today.

Ms. Maymi called the new job titles "a welcome step" toward eliminating

sex discrimination in employment.

The changes were recommended by Women's Bureau and Manpower Administration

representatives of the Labor Department and other members of the Federal

Interagency Committee on Occupation Classification.

The suffix "men" has been dropped from most of the occupational titles,

and replaced by "worker" or "operator."

"It is not realistic to expect that women will apply for job openings

advertised for foremen, salesmen or credit men. Nor will men apply for job

vacancies calling for laundresses, maids, or airline stewardesses," Ms. Maymi

said.

The title for the major group, craftsmen and kindred workers, has been.

changed to craft and kindred workers. Other changes include:


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U. S. DEPART TENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF INFORMATION, WASHIBGTON, 0. C. 20210









Former title


New Title


Salesmen Sales workers
Cranemen Crane operators
Forgemen and hammermen Forge and hammer operators
Clergymen : Clergy
Public relations men Public relations specialists
Credit men Credit and collection managers
Newsboys Newspaper carriers and vendors
Office boys Office helpers
Foremen Blue collar worker supervisors
Pressmen Printing press operators
Dressmakers and seamstresses Dressmakers
Boatmen and canalmen Boat operators
Fishermen and oystermen Fishers, hunters and trappers
Longshoremen Longshore workers
Chambermaids and maids
(except private households) Lodging quarters cleaners
Busboys Waiters' assistants
Airline stewardesses Flight attendants
Firemen -.. Fire fighters
Policemen Police
''--i-Laundresses (private hbus oold) Launderers
ai -(rivate hous'hld)- Private household cleaners

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