Group Title: Myth and the reality
Title: The Myth and the reality
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086876/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Myth and the reality
Physical Description: 3 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Women's Bureau
Publisher: U.S. Dept. of Labor, Employment Standards Administration, Women's Bureau :
For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington D.C
Publication Date: 1974
Edition: Rev.
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Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086876
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 21790949

Full Text




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
WOMEN's BUREAU
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20210



THE MYTH AND THE REALITY

The Reality


The Myth


A woman's place is in the home.


Women aren't seriously attached
to the labor force; they work
only for extra pocket money.







Women are out ill more than
male workers; they cost the
company more.


Homemaking in itself is no longer a
full-time job for most people. Goods
and services formerly produced in the
home are now commercially available;
laborsaving devices have lightened or
eliminated much work around the home.

Today more than half of all women
between 18 and 64 years of age are
in the labor force, where they are
making a substantial contribution
to the Nation's economy. Studies
show that 9 out of 10 girls will
work outside the home at some time
in their lives.

Of the nearly 34 million women in
the labor force in March 1973, nearly
half were working because of pressing
economic need. They were either
single, widowed, divorced, or sepa-
rated or had husbands whose incomes
were less than $3,000 a year. Another
4.7 million had husbands with incomes
between $3,000 and $7,000.1/

A recent Public Health Service study
shows little difference in the absen-
tee rate due to illness or injury: 5.6
days a year for women compared with
5.2 for men.


I/ The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimate for a low standard of living
for an urban family of four was $7,386 in autumn 1972. This estimate is
for a family consisting of an employed husband aged 38, a wife not employed
outside the home, an 8-year-old girl, and a 13-year-old boy.






Women don't work as long or
as regularly as their male
coworkers; their training
is costly-and largely
wasted.


Married women take jobs away
from men; in fact, they ought
to quit those jobs they now
hold.


Women should stick to "Women's
jobs" and shouldn't complete
for "men's jobs."


A declining number of women leave
work for marriage and children. But
even among those who do leave, a
majority return when their children
are in school. Even with a break in
employment, the average woman worker
has a worklife expectancy of 25 years
as compared with 43 years for the
average male worker. The single
woman averages 45 years in the labor
force.

Studies on labor turnover indicate
that net differences for men and
women are generally small. In manu-
facturing industries the 1968 rates
of accessions per 100 employees were
4.4 for men and 5.3 for women; the
respective separation rates were
4.4 and 5.2.

There were 19.8 million married women
(husbands present) in the labor force
in March 1973; the number of unemployed
men was 2.5 million. If all the married
women stayed home and unemployed men
were placed in their jobs, there would
be 17.3 million unfilled jobs.

Moreover, most unemployed men do not
have the education or the skill to
Qualify for many of the jobs held by
women, such as secretaries, teachers,
and nurses.

Job requirements, with extremely rare
exceptions, are unrelated to sex.
Tradition rather than job content has
led to labeling certain jobs as women's
and others as men's. In measuring 22
inherent aptitudes and knowledge areas,
a research laboratory found that there
is no sex difference in 14, women excel
in 6, and men excel in 2.






Women don't want responsibility
on the job; they don't want
promotions or job changes which
add to their load.








The employment of mothers leads
to juvenile delinquency.


Men don't like to work for
women supervisors.


May 1974 (revised)


Relatively few women have been offered
positions of responsibility. But when
given these opportunities, women, like
men, do cope with job responsibilities
in addition to personal or family
responsibilities. In 1973, 4.7 million
women held professional and technical
jobs, another 1.6 million worked as
nonfarm managers and administrators.
Many others held supervisory jobs at
all levels in offices and factories.

Studies show that many factors must
be considered when seeking the causes
of juvenile delinquency. Whether or
not a mother is employed does not
appear to be a determining factor.

These studies indicate that it is
the quality of a mother's care
rather than the time consumed in
such care which is of major signif-
icance.

Most men who complain about women
supervisors have never worked for
a woman.

In one study where at least three-
fourths of both the male and female
respondents (all executives) had
worked with women managers, their
evaluation of women in management
was favorable. On the other hand,
the study showed a traditional/
cultural bias among those who
reacted unfavorably to women as
managers.

In another survey in which 41 percent
of the reporting firms indicated
that they hired women executives,
none rated their performance as un-
satisfactory; 50 percent rated them
adequate; 42 percent rated them the
same as their predecessors; and 8
percent rated them better than their
predecessors.


-3-


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICi 1974 0-550-115
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402 Price 25 cents
Stock Number 2916-00015











U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
WOMEN'S BUREAU
WASHINGTON. D.C. 20210

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE. 5300


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