• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The big Booboo and the little...
 The little Booboo in the wind
 The play in the night
 Oh, this was a day to remember...
 Dear old Queen Ann
 A rosy-posy Christmas
 Bumble-bee and humming-bird
 The runaway story
 Who lives in the big stone...
 A rainy day story
 Another happy day
 Dear little mama
 Good-bye, little Booboo
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: The Booboo book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086848/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Booboo book
Alternate Title: Boo boo book
Physical Description: 99 p., 25 leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Smith, Gertrude, 1860-1917
Merrill, Frank T ( Frank Thayer ), b. 1848 ( Illustrator )
Relyea, C. F ( Illustrator )
Dana Estes & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dana Estes & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fathers and sons -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1898   ( local )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Citation/Reference: No bibliographical references located.
Statement of Responsibility: by Gertrude Smith ; with illustrations by C.F. Relyea and Frank T. Merrill.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086848
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237663
notis - ALH8155
oclc - 13417314

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Dedication
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
    List of Illustrations
        Page 8
    The big Booboo and the little Booboo
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 14a
    The little Booboo in the wind
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 18a
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The play in the night
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 22a
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Oh, this was a day to remember!
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Dear old Queen Ann
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 36a
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 38a
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    A rosy-posy Christmas
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 46a
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Bumble-bee and humming-bird
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 50a
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 52a
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The runaway story
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 58a
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Who lives in the big stone house?
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 62a
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 66a
        Page 67
        Page 68
    A rainy day story
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 72a
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 76a
    Another happy day
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 78a
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Dear little mama
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 86a
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 92a
    Good-bye, little Booboo
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 96a
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Back Cover
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Spine
        Page 102
Full Text
I'M MIN
ME,
.............
. . . .. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .

MRS,
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. . . . . . . . . . .




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The Baldwin Library
f lUniversity
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- W.B .CLARKE Co-,
BooKSELLERS~TrIoN-RsI
ParkSt, Church, BOSTON.|




















































LITTLE BOOBOO IN THE LAKE.


iMi:







THE BOOBOO


BOOK


BY GERTRUDE SMITH, AUTHOR
OF THE ARABELLA AND ARA-
MINTA STORIES. WITH ILLUS-
TRATIONS BY C F. RELYEA AND
FRANK T. MERRILL. ~ d



/ x .. .


BOSTON: DANA ESTES & CO.























Copyright 1898
By S. E. Cassino.
























TO __Pwb-t

JAMIE DYRENFORTH
A LITTLE BOY WHOM

I DEARLY LOVE














CONTENTS.


Page.
The Big Booboo and the Little Booboo, 9
The Booboo in the Wind, 15
The Play in the Night, 21
Oh, this was a Day to Remember, 27
Dear Old Queen Ann, 35
A Rosy-Posy Christmas, 43
Bumble-Bee and Humming-Bird, 49
The Runaway Story, 55
Who Lives in the Big Stone House ? 61
A Rainy Day Story, 69
Another Happy Day, 77
Dear Little Mama, 85
Good bye, Little Booboo, 92






LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


The Little Booboo, Title
Little Booboo in the little Lake, Facing
The Little Booboo loses his Hat,
"I didn't Blow Away "
They go out to Play in the Night,
"Look, my Son "
The King and the Prince Rode on Before,
And They Danced on the Lawn,
On the Stepping-Stones,
"Ba-Ba
" To-morrow, my Son, will be Christmas,"
They found a little Christmas Tree,
"What is that Noise, Papa? "
" Not the Bumble-Bee,"
Right through the Window the Big Round Sun
was Shining, .
The Little Booboo and the Bird's Nest,
Robbie saw Two Little Girls,
" Come Again I said the Parrot,
Playing his Six Little Tunes,
Robbie Splashed as much as he Pleased,
They Rode in the Donkey Cart,
The Little Booboo Picking Peaches,
Talking to the other Boy,
Little Booboo on his Father's Shoulder,
Little Booboo at the Lake,
Feeding the Swans, .


page
title
I5
19
23
27
31
33
37
39
43
47
5r
53

55
59
63
67
69
73
77
79
85
87
93
97







THE BIG BOOBOO AND
THE LITTLE BOOBOO.

And one morning Robbie's father
stood by Robbie's bed, and Robbie
was sleeping, and sleeping, and sleep-
ing.
Boo-boo! said Robbie's father.
Robbie opened hiseyes and sat up.
"Boo-boo! he answered sleep-
ily.
Boo-boo!" said his father
again, and jumped at him.
Boo-boo!" answered Robbie,
but now his eyes were wide open.
Then the big Booboo took the
little Booboo up in his arms and car-






The Big Booboo and


ried him down to the garden-for
they lived much of the time in sum-
rer in the garden, and only slept in
the house.
And the garden was full of roses,
and daisies, and pinks, and many,
many flowers besides.
In the shade of a great big tree
was a tiny little lake. And what do
you think ? The little Booboo took
off his nightgown and waded out in-
to the lake!
He had his bath in the little lake
in the garden-not in a bath-tub at
all, but in the little lake in the gar-
den
The water came up, up, up to his





The Little Booboo.


chin, but he wasn't a bit afraid.
"I'm a fish! I'm a fish!" he
shouted and down he splashed and
swam like a fish.
He was only four years old-the
little Booboo, but he could certainly,
certainly do a great many things for
his age. He could swim as well as
his father.
And the big Booboo sat on a rock
and watched him.
He often swam in the lake him-
self, and knew what fun it was.
And little maid Annie came down
the walk and told them that break-
fast was ready.
So out of the water Robbie came,






The Big Booboo and


and soon had his legs.in his trousers.
For the little Booboo wore trou-
sers too, and a coat, and a pair
of suspenders -all just like his
father's !
And then they went over to break-
fast, on the other side of the garden,
-they always ate in the garden.
But before they sat down to the
table the big Booboo stood on his
head! On the smooth green lawn
he stood on his head It was a way
he had, when he was glad, of sur-
prising the little Booboo.
The table was set where the roses
grew all over a shady arbor.
And little maid Annie brought out






The Little Booboo. 13
the cakes, and the toast, and the
chocolate too.
Then when big Booboo was seated
at the table, and the little Booboo
was seated at the table, big Booboo
in a big chair, and little Booboo in a
little chair, Mama, all dressed in
blue and white, jumped out into
sight from behind a bush, and said:
Boo-boo! Who knew ?-Not
you. I've been all the time in the
garden. I saw you taking your
bath!"
And the big Booboo laughed,
"Ha! ha!"
And the little Booboo laughed,
"Hel he! Did you see me?"







14 The Big Booboo
And so the day began-a happy,
happy day.
For the big Booboo and the little
Booboo always were thinking of
things to do, and having the best of
times.













































N .


THE LITTLE BOOBOO LOSES HIS HAT.








THE LITTLE BOOBOO
IN THE WIND.

And one day the wind was blow-
ing-the wind was blowing a perfect
gale, and the little Booboo went out
in the garden to ride.
He rode on the big Booboo's
shoulder, and held very tight to his
ear, for he was afraid the wind would
blow him away; and it did blow his
hat away-up-up, and away and
away. It was a nice little white
little new hat, too, but he never saw
it again!
And the big silver poplar tree
that grew by the garden gate shook






The Little 'Booboo


in the wind, and bent in the wind,
and quivered its shining leaves.
And the two little cherry-trees
that grew by the side of the lake
shook in the wind, and bent ;n
the wind, and quivered their shining
leaves.
And all of the roses on all of the
bushes nodded and bowed in the
wind.
Everything that grew in the gar-
den was moving and twisting and
dancing and turning about in the
wind. It was very exciting to Rob-
bie.
I'll catch the wind and hold it !"
he cried. "The roses do not like to






in the Wind..


shake. The trees will be tired,
papa And he threw out his little
arms and tried to catch the wind.
His father laughed.
"The wind says: 'Woo! woo!
Ill catch you, little Booboo, and.toss
you about like a leaf. But there's
not a boy or a man or a giant can
get his arms around me !'"
And Robbie rode on his father's
shoulder out through the gate, and
down the lane, and into the apple or-
chard. And all the apples that grew
on the trees shook in the wind, and
bobbed in the wind, and fell with a
bounce to the ground. The ground
was covered with apples; all over






The Little Booboo


the ground the apples lay.
And the little Booboo ran about
under the trees, and picked up
apples and put them in a basket;
and the big Booboo ran about under
the trees, and picked up apples and
put them in a basket.
And a big apple fell with a bounce
on the big Booboo's head, and a big
apple fell with a bounce on the little
Booboo's head.
And the big Booboo said: "I
wonder who will cry for a big, big,
bump on his head? "
And the little Booboo said, I'll
not cry for a big, big bump on my
head."














































































"1 DID'NT BLOW AWAY."






in the Wind.


He looked up and smiled, but the
tears rolled down his cheeks!
And mama came out with a bas-
ket and picked up apples too. And
she said:
Who ever, ever knew the wind to
blow like this ? "
And all at once Robbie's father
looked around and said:
"Where is our little 'boy?"
And all at once Robbie's mother
looked around and said:
"Where is our little boy?"
Robbie was nowhere in sight!
And his father said:
I'm afraid he has blown away !"
And.his mother said:






The Little Booboo


"I'm sure he has blown away !"
And they looked and they looked
and they looked and they looked, but
nowhere could they find him!
All of the time Robbie was hid
in one of the largest baskets-deep
down in one of the baskets! He
hid there just for fun.
And oh, how frightened his father
was, and oh, how frightened his
mother was, when he popped up
his head and cried:
Boo !' boo I I see you looking
for me. I didn't blow away 1"


20








THE PLAY IN THE NIGHT.


And one night the moon was shin-
ing-the moon was shining round
and bright! And Robbie crept out
of bed with a funny, funny little
thought in his head-what do you
think the little thought was ?
And the big Booboo sat up in his
bed, on the other side of the room,
and said, "Where are you going my
little son?"
And the little Booboo said, I
want to get up and play in the night!
I always play in the day!"
And his father laughed, Ha ha!
21







The Play in the Night..


I guess I'll get up and play myself.
It's a beautiful night to play! "
And mama woke up and said,
"Well, you two! you two! What
will you think of next! "
And the big Booboo put on all of
his clothes, and the little Booboo put
on all of. his clothes, and they went
out in the garden to play! It was a
beautiful night to play.
The moon was bright, and it was
so light you could see all the trees
in the garden-all the trees and the
flowers in the garden! But oh it
was still-so still-so still-not even
a bird was chirping, and the crickets
were all asleep.







































































LY G T P I T N .


THEY GO TO PLAY IN THE NIGHT.






The Play in the Night.


And the little Booboo said, Oh,
oh, papa, look at the moon, papa!
Look, papa, the moon is down in the
cedar trees!"
And the big Booboo said, "Yes,
yes, it is going to bed. We must
hurry and play, if we're going to play,
while the moon is smiling on us."
And Robbie said, You can't catch
me! You can't catch me."
And away he ran, and away he
ran, as fast as his little legs would
take him.
And the big Booboo ran too, but
he couldn't catch him. They ran,
and they ran, and they ran, way
down to the foot of the garden.






The Play in the Night.


But all at once the little Booboo
stood still and cried, "Oh, what is
that noise, papa? What is that
funny noise? "
"Whoo-whoo! whoo-whoo!"
That is the noise they heard.
And his father whispered, "Listen
and look, little son. Out on the limb
of that tree-an old owl sits. He's
speaking to you and me! "
And the little Booboo looked, and
there on the limb of the tree sat the
old owl-winking and blinking and
thinking.
It was very exciting to Robbie.
And all at once the owl spread his
big wings, and flew up and away







The Play in the Night. 25

and away,,and away.
And the big Booboo said, Well,
do you like to play in the night, my
son ?
And the little Booboo said, Yes,
yes, don't you, don't you ? "
And the moon went down, down,
down, and the garden was dark. So
they went into the house and went
to bed.











'ir


"LOOK, MY SON! "


~~c
-
j:
;d

L
I~








OH, THIS WAS A DAY
TO REMEMBER!

And one day when the linnets
were singing in the garden, and
down below the little lake the peach
trees and the plum trees were in
bloom, Robbie and his father had
one of the grandest times they ever
had in all their lives. But O, if you
had seen them as they walked about
the garden you never would have
known them. You surely would
have thought a king and little prince
were walking out among the flowers.
They were dressed in silks and sat-
ins and in velvets just as a king and






Oh, This was a


prince in a picture-book would be.
And why do you think they were
dressed this way?
And what do you think was to
happen that day ?
(You never can guess I'm sure.)
The big gates of the garden stood
open, wide open, and Robbie's pet
peacock sat on the wall, sat scream-
ing on the wall, his beautiful tail
spread out in the sun. He seemed
to know what was to happen that
day. He seemed to be screaming,
" 0, here they come! here they
come! What a grand sight! What
a fine sight!"
And up the road the children






Day to Remember!


came, all the little boys and all the
little girls who lived in the little
town. And they marched to the
music of a gay brass band, they
marched to the music of a gay brass
band. Through the gate they
marched, and into the garden they
marched where the King of Flowers
and the Prince of the Flowers stood
waiting and ready to greet them.
And the peacock on the wall
strutted about and spread his tail
and screamed, Thirty to-day, and
five to-day, thirty and five to-day! "
How did that silly peacock know
that this was a birthday party ? How
did he know that Robbie was five






Oh, This was a


and his father was thirty that day ?
And they danced on the lawn, on
the wide green lawn, to the music of
the gay brass band. All the little
boys and all the little girls danced
upon the lawn. Then down the
walk, and around the walk to the
long green grape-vine arbor, they
tripped and they skipped to the
chime and the time of a little silver
bell. And there was the birthday
dinner!
And the big Booboo sat at one end
of the long, long table, and the little
Booboo sat at the other end of the
long, long table. And never a king
of any land, and never a prince of























I AN,
_. ,.



















THE KING AND THE PRINCE RODE ON BEFORE.






Day to remember!


any land, looked more grand than
they. And all the little boys and
girls sat on either side.
And when they had eaten their
dinner, out in the road before the
gate they heard a great noise-
tramp, tramp, tramp, tramp-that is
the noise they heard.
And the peacock strutted along
the wall and spread his bright tail
and screamed, "Who knows, who
knows what will happen next?
Thirty to-day and five to-day! who
who knows what will happen next?"
The little Booboo, he knew, he
knew what was to happen next.
Down from his chair at the table






Oh, This was a


he slipped, and cried aloud so every-
one heard, Hurrah for the grand
parade!"
And all the children cried, Hur-
rah for the grand parade "
Out before the gate they ran, and
there, tramping and stamping, were
thirty little ponies. A little pony
for every little boy and every little
girl to ride! And beside each pony
walked a little master all dressed in
gold and white,-all dressed in gold
and white.
And when they had mounted-
when the children had mounted the
ponies the king and the prince rode
on before. All through the town





































































AND THEY DANCE ON THE LAWN.






Day to Remember! 33

did they ride and all through the
countryside.
Oh, wasn't this a grand parade?
Wasn't this a day to remember?








DEAR OLD QUEEN ANN.


And the big Booboo and the little
Booboo lived in a little valley be-
tween two high, high hills.
And one day, one clear bright day
the big Booboo said, Oh, hi, ho I
guess I'll go up the hill for a walk."
And the little Booboo said, I
guess I'll go up the hill for a walk."
And the big Booboo said, Oh, hi,
ho! I guess I'll climb Queen Ann
and see what I can see."
And the little Booboo laughed, I
guess I'll climb Queen Mary and
see what I can see."
35







36 Dear Old Queen Ann.
(One of the hills was called Queen
Mary and one of the hills was called
Queen Ann.)
And the big Booboo said, "Where
do the violets grow? And where do
the baby-blue-eyes grow? And where
do the johnny-jump-ups grow?
And the little Booboo said, "Oh,
they grow on Queen Ann! They
grow on Queen Ann!
So Robbie took his climbing-stick,
his long, white climbing-stick, and
his father took his climbing-stick,
and they went down the road and
across the meadow, by the little
meadow-path that went zig-zag, zig-
zag through the clover, white and











* .'
', ri


.4~i


ON:THE STEPPING-STONES.






Dear Old Queen Ann.


red. And they crossed the brook on
the stepping-stones. Arid there was
Queen Ann, dear Queen Ann all in
the morning sunshine with the little
path winding zig-zag, zig-zag clear to
the very top, tip top.
The little Booboo ran up the path,
but his father followed slowly. And
every now and then he would call,
"Oh, papa, look down, look down!
See how high we are! I can see the
town, and our little house in the
garden "
And his father would say, "Yes, I
see. My son, we'll soon be up at
the top, tip top."
And every now and then the little






38 Dear Old- Queen Ann.
Booboo would call, Oh, I've found
a violet, papa! Oh, here's a johnny-
jump-up !
And his father would say, "Yes,
yes, I see them. Dear old Queen
Ann is covered with flowers. She
-is beautifully dressed this morning."
And up they climbed, and up they
climbed till they came to the very
top, and then they sat down to rest.
And oh, how far they could see-
to the east, and the west, and the
north, and the south, they could see
for miles and miles.
But near, quite near, on the side of
the hill a flock of sheep was feeding.
And the little Booboo jumped up and










r-. -T--.' --





I-
'* -1
^ -


" BA-BA!"


:

'-;r a


:'P.T~


:,- t







Dear Old Queen Ann.


ran down among them. And away
-the sheep ran, this way, and that way,
and the little silver bells they wore
on their necks went tinkle, tinkle,
tinkle. But one little lamb stood still
and looked at Robbie with his soft
eyes, and said, Ba-ba, ba-ba," and
shook his head.
And the -big Booboo laughed,
"The little lamb says, 'Run away
little boy, you can frighten my
brothers, but you can't frighten
me.
And just then the lamb kicked up
his heels, and away he ran down the
hill. And the little Booboo ran after
him, and he ran so fast that he







Dear Old Queen Ann.


tripped his toe and tumbled down
and rolled over and over and over
down the hill-over and over till he
came to some bushes that stopped
him. And there he laid and screamed
and cried till his father came and
found him. (He thought he was
hurt, but he wasn't hurt-he was
only dizzy and frightened.)
And his. father said, "Jump up,
little man, jump up, little man. Dear
old Queen Ann will wonder what all
this noise means."
And Robbie sat up and looked
around. I rolled down the hill," he
said. I rolled over, and over, and
over!"


.40






Dear Old Queen Ann.


And the little lamb stood near and
looked at Robbie with his soft eyes.
" Ba-ba," he said, Ba-ba," which
meant "Why do you cry, little boy?
Why do you cry ? "
And the big Booboo and the little
Booboo went down the hill and the
little lamb followed them-all the
way down the zig-zag, zig-zag path
the little lamb followed them. And
through the meadow he followed
them-all along the zig-zag, zig-zag
path he followed them clear to the
garden gate.
So the big Booboo bought the
lamb for the little Booboo, and he
came into the garden and lived.













































I- .'-
^r^Sy


"TO-MORROW, MY SON, WILL BE CHRISTMAS"







A ROSY-POSY CHRISTMAS.


And one night when Robbie was
ready for bed, all dressed in his little
nightgown, his father stood him
upon his knee and said,
"To-morrow, my son, will be
Christmas! To-morrow, my son, will
be Christmas!"
And you should have heard the
little Booboo laugh, and you should
have heard the little Booboo scream.
He was so excited and pleased.
"Oh-o-ou he screamed.
And he jumped down on the floor,
and he ran about and he kicked up
his heels.






A Rosy-Posy Christmas.


Oh-o-ou Oh-o-ou !" he
screamed. He was so excited and
pleased.
And Robbie rode on his father's
shoulder and they went upstairs-to
bed.
(He always rode on his father's
shoulder when they went upstairs to
bed).
And mama was there, dear mama
was there waiting to hear his little
prayer and tuck him up in bed.
And the little Booboo slept and
slept, and the big Booboo slept and
slept, and mama slept too, and then
it was Christmas morning
But you never can guess, and you






A Rosy-Posy Christmas.


never can think, how Santa Claus
came to Robbie.
Listen, just listen-you do not
know. The snow never fell in the
land where the little Booboo lived!
It never snowed at Christmas!
Out in the garden the sun was
shining, and the grass was green,
and the roses were blooming-the
roses were blooming at Christmas!
And the little Booboo jumped out
of bed, as soon as it was light he
jumped out of bed and dressed and
ran into the garden. And the big
Booboo got up too, but oh, he was
very sleepy. He could hardly hold
his eyes open.






A Rosy-Posy Christmas.


And what do you think the little
Booboo found out in the garden
where the roses bloomed that sunny
Christmas morning? And what do
you think the big Booboo found out
in the garden where the roses
bloomed that sunny Christmas morn-
ing ?
They found a little Christmas
Tree-a Christmas Tree covered
with presents and toys out in the
garden!
And you should have heard the
little Booboo laugh, and you should
have heard the little Booboo scream.
Oh! oh oh! papa, Santa Claus
has been here! "






















('


. i'll "


THEY FOUND A LITTLE CHRISTMAS TREE.


r4,J -






A Rosy-Posy Christmas.


And his father said, "Yes, he cer-
tainly has been here."
Up among the green leaves of the
tree the presents and toys were
hanging-just as though they grew
there!
There was a drum and a gun and
a soldier cap and a big tin horn and
a little red cart and a book and a
ball and a jumping-jack hanging on
that tree, and many things besides.
Oh, wasn't it a happy day? Oh,
wasn't it a merry day-when mama
came out and joined them ?







BUMBLE-BEE AND
HUMMING-BIRD.


One day the little Booboo was
sailing his little ship on the little
lake in the garden, and the big Boo-
boo was lying under a tree near by.
On the soft green grass he was lying.
And all at once the little Booboo
heard a funny little noise in the
big rose-bush near by. Humble-te,
humble-te, bumble-te, hum! "-this
is the noise he heard.
And he called to his father, "What
is that noise, papa?"
And his father said, "That is a
bumble-bee, my son. It will not hurt
49






Bumble-Bee and


you, it will not hurt me, it will not
hurt anyone."
And the little Booboo said, I
can't see the bumble-bee."
And his father said, Look look!
there he flies! Now see, he lights
on the thistle close by that tree !"
And the bumble-bee-the big
black bumble-bee lit on the thistle
and sang.
And the big Booboo and the little
Booboo sat under the tree and
looked at the bumble-bee and listened
to him.
And when the bumble-bee had
flown away from the thistle the big
Booboo.sang this little song, and



























K'


" WHAT IS THAT NOISE, PAPA ?"


5

::


'~






Humming Bird.


the little Booboo sang the song too
-they sang it over and over:
A bumble-bee on a thistle sat,
He sat on a thistle and sang.
He sat in the sun,
And saw no one
And the song in our ears rang:
Humble-te, bumble-te, humble-te
hum !
Bumble-te, humble-te, bumble-te
hum!
He sat in the sun,
And saw no one,
Singing humble-te, bumble-te,
bum !
And all at once they heard a little.
humming noise.







Bumble-Bee and


And Robbie said, I hear the
bumble-bee again, papa."
And his father said, Listen!
listen That is not the bumble-bee.
Look, over the rose-bush, you will
see a tiny bird."
And Robbie clapped his hands.
"What a dear bird! he cried,
" what a dear little bird "
And his father said, That is a
humming-bird, my son. See how
his long little bill sucks the honey
out of the rose ? "
And when the humming-bird had
flown away the big Booboo sang
this little song-and the little Boo-



































































"NOT THE BUMBLE-BEE."


, p
I
y






Humming Bird. 53

boo sang it too-they sang it over
and over:

The humming-bird loves honey,
And the bee loves honey, too;
This surely isn't funny,.
For we love honey too I "














__CI.~


~i 1 :-~~~. j~


.1
A'


RIGHT THROUGH THE WINDOW THE BIG ROUND SUN WAS SHINING.


Ir
b


*- -;l:~i~'


a

I,







THE RUNAWAY STORY.


And one morning early, very early,
when the little Booboo woke up the
sun was shining in his face, right
through the window the big, round
sun was shining in his face. It
seemed to say, Here's your chance
to run away. Here's your chance,
you naughty boy! Come, creep out
softly and run, run, run. Come,
creep out quickly," said the big
round sun.
And Robbie crept out of bed, and
ran out of his room, and down the
stairs, and out of the house, and out
of the garden gate!
55






T-be Runaway Story.


And his mother didn't wake and
his father didn't wake, but little maid
Annie was up and at work in the
kitchen.
And when she heard the patter,
patter, patter of little feet on the
stairs, she dropped her broom and
threw up her hands and said, There,
there, there, I do declare, that boy is
.running away again !"
And she ran to. the window and
laughed, "Ha! ha! Yes, there he
goes, the naughty boy, in his night-
clothes "
Almost every other day the little
Booboo would run away!
And his father said, Let him go,






The Runaway Story.


let him run if he thinks it is such
fun. Some fine day he'll lose his
way, then, perhaps, he'll learn to
stay at home."
On and on down the road ran the
little Booboo, and the big round sun
was shining in his face. On and on
he ran till he came to a little brook
in a little wood..
Oh, a dear little brook with water
that bubbled, and gurgled and ran
over the bright shining stones in the
bottom. Oh, a dear little word, with
birds singing gaily, and a squirrel,
and a shy little chipmunk, and flowers
growing, far, far too many to gather.
No wonder that Robbie ran away,






The Runaway Story.


no wonder with such a fine place to
play he never could learn to stay in
bed.
When at last the big Booboo woke
up he said, "Oh, hi, ho-hi, ho-hi,
ho-I suppose I must get up and go
and find that boy again !"
And Robbie's mother said, "Well,
well, I must say, I punished him
once for running away "
And his father smiled and said
"I certainly would be discouraged
too, but it is just what I used to do
myself when I was a little boy."
So the big Booboo dressed as fast
as he could and ran down the stairs
and out of the house and out of the

























4,-


THE LITTLE BOOBOO AND THE BIRDS' NEST.


?P
%,
i
r_
'~a%-`


.~E~-~:






The Runaway Story.


garden and on down the road to the
little wood.
"Robbie? Robbie ?" he called,
"where is my little son ?"
The birds stopped their singingto
listen. They knew, every one. And
the chipmunk knew, and the squirrel
too and so did the big round sun!
"Come follow me," laughed the
little brook, "along my bank lies the
path he took."
And the big Booboo ran on down
the path by the little brook calling
and calling, Robbie! Robbie where
is my little son "
But Robbie did not answer, and
no Robbie anywhere could he see!






The Runaway Story.


"Twit, twit, twee! said a little
bird in the tree. "Come quickly,
follow me, and I will show you the
way to go, for oh, oh, oh he frightens
me so looking into my nest!"
Among tall ferns and grasses and
bright blooming flowers the big
Booboo found the little Booboo look-
ing into a bird's nest, where four
dear little birds lay fast-asleep.
And the morning was warm and
bright, and the brook and the birds
so gay they didn't go home until
dinner time, but stayed in the woods
to play!
(They forgot to go home to break-
fast!)








WHO LIVES IN THE
BIG STONE HOUSE?


Just down the road from Robbie's
home there was a beautiful big stone
house in a beautiful garden of flow-
ers.
But no one lived in the big stone
house and all of the doors were
locked.
And often, very often when Rob-
bie was walking with his father he
would look at this empty house and
say, Why doesn't some one live in
-the big stone house, papa? I wish
some little boys or girls would come
and live here."







Who Lives in the


And his father would say, Yes,
the dear old house seems lonely
without any children looking out of
the windows or running about in
the garden."
But one day when, they were .out
walking Robbie said, "Oh, look at
the big stone house, papa! All of
the windows are open, and all of the
doors are open "
And his father said, "Why, -so
they are Why, so they are Now
your wish has come true, dear little
Booboo, for some one has come to
live here!"
And Robbie said, Oh, I wonder
if there are any little boys or girls











































































ROBBIE SAW TWO LITTLE GIRLS.






'Big Stone House?


who will come and play with me! "
And his father said, Look,_ look,
there are two little girls running
around the flower beds!
And Robbie looked through the
big iron gate into the beautiful gar-
den, and there he saw two little girls,
two dear little girls running around
the flower beds!
And he .called to them, Little
girls, little girls are you going to
live in the big stone house ? "
And the little girls stopped run-
ning and looked at Robbie. And
one of them had blue eyes and one
of them had brown eyes, but they
were dressed alike, and they looked






Who Lives in the


alike and both had golden curls.
And Robbie called again, Little
girls, little girls are you going to live
in the big stone house?"
And one of the little girls called,
" Yes, we came from way, way, away
to live here, and this is our home."
And the other little girl called,
"Yes, we came from way, way, away
to live here, and this is our home."
And then they came running
down the garden path and stood just
inside the big iron gate and looked
at Robbie. And one had blue eyes
and one had brown eyes, but they
were dressed alike and they looked
alike, and both had golden curls.






Big Stone House?


And Robbie said, "Will you come
up to my house and play with me?"
And one of the little girls said,
"Yes, I'll come if my mama will
let me? "
And then the other little girl said,
" Yes, I'll come if my mama will
let me."
And Robbie's father said, You
dear little girls! What are your
names, my dears ? "
And one little girl said, My
name is Arabella."
And the other little girl said, "My
name is Araminta."
And Robbie said, I'm glad
you've come to the big stone house






Who Lives in the


to live and play with me."
Just then a parrot, a big green
parrot came hopping down the gar-
den walk. And he put his head on
one side and then on the other, and
he said, "Mother wants you, Ara-
bella. Mother wants you, Araminta.
Hurry, hurry, hurry "
And oh how Robbie laughed, and
oh how his father laughed.
But away the little girls ran, with
a hop skip and jump up the garden
walk and into the big stone house.
And then as Robbie and his father
went down the road, hand in hand,
to their own dear home, the parrot
flew up on the gate and called, "Come































































"COME AGAIN!" CALLED THE PARROT.






Big Stone House? 67

again, come again! "
But all that Robbie could talk
about, and all that Robbie could
think about were the dear little girls
who had come to live in the big
stone house.
These dear little girls you know.















































































PLAYING HIS SIX LITTLE TUNES.








A RAINY DAY STORY.


Yes, the little Booboo could cer-
tainly do a great many things for his
age. Everything that his father did
he wanted to learn to do, and he was
such a bright little boy it was really
a pleasure to teach him.
You would have been surprised, I
know, if you could have heard him
play on the grand piano. He could
play six little tunes, and play them
well !
Waldo Emerson always sat with
wonder in his blue eyes and listened
while Robbie played. (Waldo Em-
erson was Robbie's doll.)
69






A Nlainy Day Story.


And Ruben would sit with his
nose on his paws and blink and
listen too. (Ruben was Robbie's
big Newfoundland dog.)
And one day it was raining, and
Robbie was playing his six little
tunes for Waldo Emerson and
Ruben. (His father was asleep on
a couch near by with a newspaper
over his face.)
And when he had played until he
was tired, he said, Now, if you'll
sit very still I'll read to you, Waldo
and Ruben."
And all at once his father jumped
up and said, Read to me too, I'll sit
still, dear little Booboo, read to mel"






1A Rainy Day Story.


And Robbie ran and got his books
-he had two little books with beau-
tiful stories in them. He could read
all the stories in those two little
books! And out of doors it rained
harder and harder. In great bright
drops the rain came down.
And Robbie read to his father,
and to Waldo Emerson and Ruben,
and they all sat still and listened.
He was only five years old, the
little Booboo, but he could certainly,
certainly do a great many things for
his age.
And when he had read until he
was tired he said, I want to go out
and walk in the rain."






,A Rainy Day Story.


And Ruben jumped up and said,
" Bow wow! Bow wow!" which
meant, Well, now, well now, that's
just what I'd like to do! "
And the big Booboo jumped up
and said, Hurrah! I'd like to go
out too and so would Waldo Emer-
son !"
And the little Booboo put on his
little rubber cap and his little rubber
coat and his little rubber boots, and
the big Booboo put on his big rub.
ber cap and his big rubber coat and
his big rubber boots, and they all
went out into the rain to walk!
And oh how hard it rained-out
of the. sky the great bright drops



















































































ROBBIE SPLASHED AS MUCH AS HE PLEASED.


'r,
si~n

r

7 .C'
"


~s~FL?1~Z~si~~c~- ~

I


=LltZC~-

'~~E~ii~aa~5~5~~






Al Rainy Day Story.


came chasing each other and tumb-
ling down on the flower beds. And
all along beside the walks the little
brooks were running.
And Robbie waded in the little
brooks and splashed the water as
much as he pleased.
And Ruben jumped and scampered
about and barked. And Waldo
Emerson rode on the big Booboo's
arm under a big umbrella, and
looked, and looked with his big, blue
eyes-but he never said a thing.
And all at once the big Booboo
said. "Who is that coming in our
garden gate under those big um-
brellas? "






A Rainy Day Story.


And Robbie clapped his hands and
cried, Oh, oh, the little girls who
live in the big stone house have come
over to play with me !"
And the little girls came up the
walk, under their-big umbrellas, and
all you could see were their little
feet, under their big umbrellas!
And Robbie ran down the walk
to meet them.
I'm glad you came over to see
me," he called. Isn't it fun to play
in the rain ? "
And Arabella looked out from
under her umbrella and smiled, and
Araminta looked out from under her
umbrella and smiled, but they did






A Rainy Day Story.


not say a thing-I suppose they felt
a little shy.
And the big Booboo said, Come,
we'll all go out to the big red barn,
and feed the pigeons."
And when they went into the big
red barn, down the pigeons flew, with
a flutter and coo asking for some-
thing to eat. And one of the pigeons
lit on Arabella's shoulder, and one of
the pigeons lit on Araminta's shoul-
der. But, oh, you should have seen
the little Booboo-he did not know
what to do, the pigeons were all
around him! There were two on
his head, and four on each of his
shoulders 1 And Arabella laughed to







76 A Rainy Day Story.

see them, and Araminta laughed to
see them, and then they were not shy
any more, but began to feel ac-
quainted.







2' -e~


'A


THEY RIDE IN THE DONKEY CART.







ANOTHER HAPPY DAY.


And there were more warm days
and more warm days and then the
peaches were ripe. All among the
shining leaves the peaches hung
round and ripe.
And the big Booboo and the little
Booboo rode down the lane where
the berries grew and into the big
peach orchard.
They rode in the donkey cart, in
the bright red donkey cart, and of
course dear Derry drew them. Of
all the little donkeys, that ever drew
a cart, dear Derry was the wisest.
More than any other pet the little
77






Another Happy Day


Booboo _oved Derry. And so would
you if you knew him too. His eyes
were kind and tender, and though he
was so very small he could trot, trot,
trot on his strong little legs and he.
never seemed to weary.
His coat was a mousey gray, and
the hair on his funny little face was
fuzzy, wuzzy, wuzzy. Oh, to look at
his funny little, fuzzy little, wuzzy
little face would make you smile I
know.
And the big Booboo and the little
Booboo rode down the lane, where
the berries grew and into the big
peach orchard.
And the little Booboo climbed a










I -.


/ 1r_ g BOOBOC PICKING PrCH8S.






Another Happy Day. 79

step ladder and picked peaches, oh,
beautiful pink-cheeked peaches, and
put them in a basket.
And the big Booboo climbed a
step ladder. (It was the same step
ladder.), And he picked peaches, oh,
beautiful pink-cheeked peaches, and
put them in a basket.
And the little Booboo said, "I'm
going to take my basket of peaches
to little Roggie Chamberlin."
And the big Booboo said, "I'm
going to take my basket of peaches
to little Reggie Chamberlin."
And the little Booboo said, "Oh,
I love those dear little boys papa, I
love those dear little brothers."






Another Happy Day.


And iis father said, Of course
you do, the dear little boys, every-
body loves them."
And when their baskets were full,
full to the top of pink-cheeked
peaches, they climbed down the lad-
der and jumped into the donkey cart
and away dear Derry trotted-trot,
trot, trotted till they came to-the big
stone house!
And Robbie said, Oh, there is
Arabella swinging in her swing un-
der the sycamore tree, and there is
Araminta swinging in her swing
under the sycamore tree "
And they left dear Derry by the
big iron gate and went into the gar-






Another Happy Day.


den of flowers and up the walk to
the big stone house.
And the big Booboo rang the door
bell and very soon Arabella and
Araminta's mama came to the
door. (You know this dear mama.
You've seen her before?)
And the little Booboo said, "I've
come to see Arabella, and Arabella's
little brothers, and Araminta, and
Araminta's little brothers, and I've
brought them these baskets of
peaches."
And Arabella and Araminta's
mama said, Come right in.
They'll be glad to see you, and
oh, oh what fine, large peaches."






Another Happy Day.


And Robbie and his father went
in with her, went into the parlor and
waited.
And all at once they heard -little
voices talking and little voices laugh-
ing, and then the door flew open and
Roggie and Reggie ran into the
room!
They were only twelve months
old, those dear little boys, but they
could run, and they could talk quite
plainly.
Oh, but they were beautiful babies.
You could look the world over, and
you never would see finer little
fellows !
And all at once they heard little






,Anotber Happy Day.


voices talking, and little voices laugh-
ing and then the door flew open and
Arabella and Araminta ran into the
room!
And the big Booboo said to the
little Booboo, "Well, I hope you'll
have a good time to-day. Now I
must go home and leave you."
And he went home alone in the
donkey cart and Robbie stayed all
day at the big stone house. He
stayed all day and played!




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