• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 The story of giant sun
 The family of giant sun
 A ramble on the moon
 The planet Mars and the baby...
 Story of Jupiter and his moons
 The giant planets
 Comets and meteors
 Stories of the summer stars
 Stories of the winter stars
 "God bless the star!"
 Back Cover






Title: Stories of starland
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086843/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories of starland
Physical Description: 185 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Proctor, Mary, b. 1862
Potter & Putnam Company ( Publisher )
G.W. Bacon & Co ( Publisher )
Mershon Company Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Potter & Putnam Company
G.W. Bacon & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
London
Manufacturer: Mershon Company Press
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Astronomy -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Stars -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Physical sciences -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's stories
Folk tales   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
United States -- New Jersey -- Rahway
United States -- New York -- Buffalo
United States -- California -- San Francisco
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Proctor.
General Note: Cop. 2, Silver, Burdett, c1898, 185 p.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Factual material in a fictional framework.
General Note: Additional places of publication on cover: Buffalo, San Francisco.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086843
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 004218357
oclc - 09691470
lccn - 98000034

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Dedication
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Preface
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The story of giant sun
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The family of giant sun
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    A ramble on the moon
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The planet Mars and the baby planets
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Story of Jupiter and his moons
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The giant planets
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Comets and meteors
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Stories of the summer stars
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Stories of the winter stars
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
    "God bless the star!"
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
    Back Cover
        Page 186
        Page 187
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QUEEN OF THE NIGHT.

Hall'to the queen of the silent nightl
Shine clear, shine bright,
Yield thy pensive light;
Dart thy pure beams from thy throneon hblg
Beam on thro' sky,
Bobed In azure dye.






STORIES OF STARLAND









BY
MARY PROCTOR
(Daughter of late Richard A. Proctor)


NEW YORK
POTTER & PUTNAM COMPANY
LONDON
G. W. BACON & CO., LIMITED






































COPYRIGHT, 1898,

BY

POTTER & PUTNAM COMPANY.


THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J., U. S. A.






























DEDICATED


TO THE MEMORY OF MY BROTHER


HARRY.





















The heavens declare the glory of God; and the
firmament sheweth his handiwork.-PsALMS.











PREFACE.


THIS book has been a labor of love from the beginning
to the end, and I have thoroughly enjoyed conversing
with my little friends Harry and Nellie. Now that the
book is finished, I leave it with regret.
It is impossible to give all the authorities for my
legends of the stars. Many were told to me by my
father when I was a little girl, or I found them among
books in his library, which is now scattered far and wide.
Others are from Grecian mythology, Japanese folk-lore,
Hindoo legends, while some of the American Indian
stories were found in musty volumes of the Bureau of
Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution.
As for the descriptive astronomy, among my authori-
ties are Professor C. A. Young, Professor Barnard,
Agnes M. Clerke, Professor R. S. Ball, Schiaparelli,
Flammarion, Professor Todd, Mr. Lowell of Flagstaff,
Ariz., and my father, the late Richard A. Proctor.
With the kind permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co.
I have been allowed to use the following selections:
" Why the Stars Twinkle," by Oliver Wendell Holmes;




PREFACE.


"The Evening Star," by Longfellow; "Lady Moon,"
by Lord Houghton; and The New Moon," by Mrs.
Follen. The editor of St. Nicholas has kindly given me
permission to include the poems "The Four Sunbeams,"
by M. K. B.; "Estelle's Astronomy," by Delia Hart
Stone; and "Seven Little Indian Stars," by Mrs. S. M.
B. Piatt. I am indebted to the editor of Child-Study
Monthly for the little poem Is It True ?" by Morgan
Growth. The poem on "The Solar System" is taken
from the Youth's Companion, with the kind permission of
the editor. The verses about Wynken, Blynken, and
Nod" are so familiar to every child that my book of
STORIES OF STARLAND would seem incomplete without
this poem by Eugene Field. The illustration of a Part
of the Milky Way is from a photograph taken by Pro-
fessor Barnard at tne Lick observatory. Mr. Percival
Lowell has also very kindly allowed me to make use of
his excellent illustration of the Canals of Mars, taken
from Todd's "New Astronomy," published by the
American Book Company.
I now submit this little book to my young readers,
sincerely hoping its pages may inspire them with a re-
newed interest in the wonders of Starland.
MARY PRocToR.
NEW YORK CITY, June, 1898.
















CONTENTS.



PAGE
Light, F. W. Bourdillon, 13
THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.
Ancient Stories of the Sun-Heat of the Sun-Distance of the Sun-Size
of the Sun-The Sun in the Days of Its Youth, 13-33
On the Setting Sun, Sir Walter Scott, 29
The Four Sunbeams, MK. B., from St. Nicholas, 31
The Sun,.. 32
THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.
What Is a Planet?-Story of Planet Mercury-Slory of Planet Venus, 34-45
Estelle's Astronomy, Delia Hart Stone, 47
Venus, ilton, 47
The Evening Star, Longfellow, 48
Mercury, Baker, .. 48

A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.
Story of the Moon-Story of the Man in the Moon-Story of the Woman
in the Moon-Story of the Toad in the Moon-Scenery on the Moon-
Hindoo Legend, 49-67
The New Moon, s. Follen, .. 65
Lady Moon, Lord Houghton, 66
A Legend, .Taken from the New York Tribune, 67

THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.
Story of Planet Mars-Story of the Baby Planets, .. 68-79





CONTENTS.


PAGE
STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.
Story of Jupiter-Jupiter as Seen through a Telescope-The Moons of
Jupiter-Eclipse of Jupiter's Moons, 80-93
Jupiter, Moore,. 92
A Lesson in Astronomy, Youth's Companion, 92
THE GIANT PLANETS.
The Planet Saturn-The Planet Uranus-Difference between a Planet
and a Star-Discovery of Planet Neptune, 94-108
Is It True? Morgan Growth, from Child-Study
Monthly, 102
COMETS AND METEORS.
Story of Comets-Story of Meteors-Story of a Shooting Star, 104-114
Starlight at Sea, Amelia B. Welby, 11
STORIES OF THE SUMMER STARS.
Legends of the Great Bear-Stories of the Great Dipper-Story of the
Dragon-Stories of the Northern Crown-Story of the Lion-The
Milky Way-A Swedish Legend-Legend of the Swan-Meeting of
the Star-Lovers, 116-146
The Stars and the Violets, 145
The Nights, Adelaide Proctor, .. 146
The Calling of the Stars, 146
STORY OF THE WINTER STARS.
Story of the Royal Family-Story of the Fishes-Story of the Pleiades-
Story of the Seven Little Indian Boys-Why the Stars Twinkle-
Flowers of Heaven-Number of the Stars-Distance of the Stars-
What Are the Stars Made of?-Our Island Universe, 147-179
Wynken, Blynken, and Nod, Eugene field, 177
Seven Little Indian Stars, Mrs. S. M. B. Piatt, from St.
Nicholas, 178
Why the Stars Twinkle, Oliver Wendell Holmes, 179
"GOD BLES THE STAR I"
"God Bless the Star!" 181-186
Ye Golden Lamps of Heaven, Doddridge, 185









































'HARRY."










STORIES OF STARLAND.

LIGHT.
Night has a thousand eyes,
And the day but one;
Yet the light of the bright world dies
With the dying sun.
The mind has a thousand eyes,
And the heart but one;
Yet the light of the whole life dies
When love is done.
-F. W. BOURDILLON.

THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.

"SISTER, come here and talk to me. I am
so tired of being alone."
His sister Mary at once closed her book, and
took a chair beside Harry's couch. Poor little
Harry was not like other boys. He could not
play and run about as they did, for he was a
cripple. All the long weary days he had to lie
on a couch which was placed under the shady
trees during the warm summer season. He had




STORIES OF STARLAND.


learned to love the flowers and trees, and the
bright blue sky overhead, and his sister often told
him pretty stories about them. She was just
thinking of telling him one now, when he said
gently:

ANCIENT STORIES OF THE SUN.

Sister, you have told me so many stories of
the flowers. I wish you would tell me something
about the sky. I have been looking at it for
such a long time, watching the little white clouds
floating across it like boats with silver sails; and
then I tried to look at the bright yellow sun, but
it dazzles my eyes. Won't you tell me about it,
and where it goes in the evening when we cannot
see it any more? Is it always ready in the
morning to give us light ? Is it ever late, do you
think ? What would we do if it forgot to come
round the edge of the earth and give us light ? "
he continued anxiously.
There is no fear of that," said his sister Mary,
laughing at the idea. "But a long time ago
people asked the very same question. In those





THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


days they thought the earth was flat, and sur-
rounded by an ocean without end. The Hindoos
supposed that the earth rested upon four ele-
phants, and the four elephants stood on the back
of an immense tortoise, which itself floated on the










EARTH SUPPOSED TO BE FLAT.

surface of an endless ocean. It was thought that
the sun plunged into the ocean when it disappeared
in the evening, and some people said they heard
a hissing noise when the red-hot body went under
the waves.
But if the sun dropped into the water each
evening, how did it happen that next morning
it was seen again, as hot and bright as ever?
The people could not tell why, so they said





STORIES OF STARLAND.


that during the night the gods made a new
sun to be used the next day."
"That must have kept them busy," said Harry,
laughing.
The good people made up another story
about the sun, so that the same one could be




/ __ _. -._ .








ANCIENT IDEA OF THE EARTH.

saved each night. Just as it was dropping into
the ocean, a god named Vulcan, who had a great
boat ready, caught it, and all night long he
paddled with the blazing sun. Next morning
he was ready at sunrise to send the sun
up into the sky in the east. He threw it with






THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


so much force that it would go very high, and
when it came down on the other side in the
west, he stood ready to catch it again."
"But where does the sun really go to at
night ? asked Harry curiously. I should like
to know."

HEAT OF THE SUN.

We live on a big round globe called Earth,"
replied his sister, and we travel round the sun,
which gives the earth light and heat. The sun is









ILLUSTRATING DAY AND NIGHT.

like a great lamp in the sky, and when you face
the lamp you see the light, but if you turn away
from it you are in darkness. As the earth goes
around the sun, it whirls around like a huge top;




STORIES OF STARLAND.


first one side and then the other is turned to the
sun and gets sunlight, and so we have day and
night. If the sun, or the lamp in the sky, went
out and stopped shining, all the light would go
out on the earth, and we would
miss its heat as well.
"It is so hot that if it kept
coming nearer and nearer until it
was as far from the earth as the
pretty bright moon, the earth would
get warmer and warmer and melt like a ball of
wax."
"Just like Nellie's doll, then," said Harry,
" when she left it on the grass the other day.
The sun was so hot that day that when Nellie
picked up her doll, she found that its wax face
had melted and the eyes had fallen in. So the
sun did that," continued Harry, laughing heartily.
" Poor Nellie! I must tell her that the next time
I see her."
I can show you something else to prove how
hot the sun is," said Mary, as she picked up a leaf
from the ground. "Just wait a moment while




THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


I go into the house and get a magnifying-
glass."
In a few minutes she returned, holding the
glass in one hand and the leaf in the other. She
held it so that the sun shone directly upon the
glass and passed through it onto the leaf. In
a few seconds the leaf began to smoke, and then
burn, until a little hole could be seen.
Harry was so surprised that he had to try it
for himself, and he looked forward with much
delight to a visit from his cousin Nellie.
Won't I have a lot to tell her?" he said to
his sister: "all about the sun's melting her dollie,
and how to make the sun burn a hole through
a leaf. But the sun cannot be very far away, can
it ?" he asked.

DISTANCE OF THE SUN.

"Yes, it is very far away," replied Mary. "If
a railroad could be made from the earth to the
sun, and a train started going at the rate of
a mile a minute, it would' take days and weeks
and years to get there.




STORIES OF STARLAND.


"Let me see," said Mary, making a little note
in her note-book. There are sixty minutes in
an hour, and twenty-four hours in a day, and
three hundred and sixty-five days in a year.
Why, Harry, do you know it would take that
train nearly one hundred and seventy-five years
to get there ?"
It must be very far away, then," said Harry,
" more than a hundred miles."
It is more than a million miles," said Mary.
"It is nearly ninety-three millions of miles away.
Now let us suppose you want to go to the sun.
You would call at the railroad office and ask for
a ticket to Sunland. The officer in charge would
appear a little surprised, because that is quite
a long trip. Then he would look up the cost of
the journey in his book, and hand you a mileage
book, saying: Sir, if you want to save money on
this trip, you had better take a mileage book with
you, costing two cents for every mile. Even
then your fare will be nearly two million
dollars.'"
"Then I would say: Dear sir, I cannot go, as




THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


I know my sister could not spare all that money.
I think I would rather walk to the sun.' How
long would it take me to walk there, supposing
I could walk ? asked Harry thoughtfully.
Dear, you would have to keep walking a very
long time before you would ever get there. Sup-
posing you walked four miles an hour, and ten
hours a day, and kept this up for hundreds of
years, you would be more than six thousand years
on the way. When you reached the sun you
would be footsore and weary, and as old as the
hills."
Harry laughed heartily at the idea, and thought
again of poor Nellie's doll and the melting wax
running like tears down its cheeks.
But suppose," he asked, his eyes bright with
excitement, someone fired a big cannon at the
sun. Would the cannon-ball ever get there ?"
Again Mary brought out her little note-book,
and, with rather a look of surprise, she said:
" Supposing the cannon-ball went as fast as it
could go, it would take nine years to reach the
sun, and the sound of the explosion would reach




STORIES OF STARLAND.


there in fourteen years. The cannon-ball would
come along first, and five years afterward, if you
were living on the sun, you would hear the sound
made when the cannon was fired off.
"It takes time for me to walk from the garden
to the house, so it takes time for sound to travel
from the earth to the sky; and sound travels only
one-fifth of a mile in a second. Do you remem-
ber the thunderstorm the other day, Harry, that
frightened you so ?"
I shall never forget it," said Harry, tremb-
ling at the thought. You said, 'Count slowly';
and I counted one, two, three, four, five, up to
fifteen."
Then I said: Don't be afraid, brother; the
storm is three miles away.' "
"Yes, I remember," said Harry; "and I
thought you were very clever, and wondered
how you knew."
"It was not so wonderful, after all, was it?"
said Mary, laughing.
"Now tell me, sister," said Harry. Sup-
posing I had a very long arm, and stretched it




THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


out toward the sun, and touched it with the tip of
my little finger. What would happen ?"
You would never know that you had burned
it, for the pain of burning would be one hundred
and fifty years going along your little finger, and
down your giant arm nearly ninety-three millions
of miles long, before it at last reached your brain.
Then it would let you know that one hundred
and fifty years before you had burned your little
finger."
Harry stretched out his little arm in the direc-
tion of -the sun, and, looking at it critically,
laughed at the idea of a giant arm millions of
miles long.
"It is too short by several inches," said his
sister, reading his thoughts, and joining in the
laugh. It would take hundreds and hundreds
of little arms as long as yours, would it not ?
Now what else do you want to know about the
sun ? "




STORIES OF STARLAND.


SIZE OF THE SUN.

If you are not very tired, sister," said Harry
coaxingly, "I should like to know how large it is.
Is it as large as the earth ?"
Ever so much larger," replied Mary. It is


so large that if it were cut up into a million parts,
each part would be larger than the earth. If we
could weigh the sun in a pair of giant scales, it
would take over three hundred thousand globes




THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


as heavy as the earth to make the scales even.
If the sun were hollowed out, and the earth placed
in the center, there would be room for the moon
as well. Now the moon is thousands of miles
from the earth, and yet the edge of the sun would
be thousands of miles from the moon, as you will
see in the picture. If a tunnel could be made
through the center of the sun, and a train started
going at the rate of a mile a minute, it would
take six hundred days for the train to reach the
other side of the tunnel. If this same train went
around the edge of the sun it would take five
years. A train going around the earth would
take seventeen days to complete the journey."
But suppose we went around the sun in a big
steamer, like the one Uncle Robert came over
in; how long would that take?" asked Harry
curiously.
Only fifteen years," said his sister, laughing.
" If you had started when you were a little baby
you would still have five more years to travel
before you would get back again to the starting-
point."





STORIES OF STARLAND.


Then the sun must be very large," said Harry
thoughtfully. "Let us call it GIANT SUN.
Has it always been as large as it is now ?"

THE SUN IN THE DAYS OF ITS YOUTH.

Ever so much larger," replied Mary.
Once upon a time it was a ball of glowing
gas reaching as far as the path of the last planet.












THE SUN AND PLANETS FORMING OUT OF STAR-MIST.

The ball whirled around rapidly and the outer
edge cooled. A ring formed and separated from
the ball and whirled around on its own account,
until it broke up into fragments. One of the
fragments drew all the others toward it, and




THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


another ball was formed, but quite a small ball
this time, called a planet. Just like the central
ball, the planet kept whirling around, threw off
a ring, the ring broke up into little pieces, and
the pieces, coming together, made a little moon.
The planet is Neptune, and it still has only one
moon. Meanwhile the ball in the center kept
whirling around, other rings formed other planets
with their attendant moons, completing the family
of Giant Sun.
"The Sun is in the center and his planets circle
around him. Next to him is playful little
Mercury, then beautiful Venus, then our own
planet Earth. Beyond it, we find ruddy Mars,
the four hundred and fifty baby planets, giant
planet Jupiter, the ringed planet Saturn, and
the last two planets, Uranus and Neptune. All
these planets are under the control of the sun,
and cannot get away from him."
What is the sun made of?" asked Harry.
Of iron and copper and silver, and many
other things we can find on earth; but the sun is
so hot that they are melted together into a mass




STORIES OF STARLAND.


like glue. This is the center of the sun. Out-
side is a shell of bright clouds, from which rosy
flames leap to a height of thousands of miles
above the surface of the sun. All around the
edge of the sun, and reaching millions of miles
beyond it, is the pearly light of the corona like
a crown.,of glory. The pearly corona fades away
into a soft beam of light."
How beautiful the sun must'be!" said Harry,
as he listened attentively to his sister. But is it
all alone in the sky, and does it not have any
little stars to play with ? "
It is not at all lonely," said Mary, laughing
at the idea of the stars as playthings for Giant
Sun, and is kept quite busy looking after its
large family of planets. I will tell you about
them to-morrow, or nurse will scold me for tiring
you. And now, good-by, my dear. Don't forget
all I have told you about Giant Sun."
Forget! how could I, sister? It is better
than any fairy tale I have ever heard. Giant
Sun! Why you have told me enough to keep me
thinking all day and all night. Here comes Nellie.




THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


Hello! Nellie, come here and let me tell you all
about GIANT SUN, and how he melted your
dollie for you the other day."
Melted my dollie!" said a pretty little
golden-haired girl, as she tripped like a little fairy
up the garden-path. So he melted my dollie,
did he ? I should like to see him do it again! "
Tears came into her eyes at the thought of her
sad experience. Since then, however, a china
head had replaced the melted wax, and Nellie's
fickle little heart had been comforted. So the
tears soon vanished in a smile as she showed her
new treasure to Harry.

ON THE SETTING SUN.
Those evening clouds, that setting ray,
And beauteous tint, serve to display
Their great Creator's praise;
Then let the short-lived thing called man,
Whose life's comprised within a span,
To Him his homage raise.
We often praise the evening clouds,
And tints so gay and bold,
But seldom think upon our God,
Who tinged these clouds with gold.
-SIR WALTER SCOTT.





























SUN.


GIANT SUN AND LITTLE EARTH.





THE STORY OF GIANT SUN.


THE FOUR SUNBEAMS.

BY M. K. B.

Four little sunbeams came earthward one day,
Shining and dancing along on their way,
Resolved that their course should be blest.
"Let us try," they all whispered, some kindness to do,
Not seek our own pleasuring all the day through,
Then meet in the eve at the west."

One sunbeam ran in at a low cottage door,
And played hide-and-seek with a child on the floor,
Till baby laughed loud in his glee,
And chased with delight his strange playmate so bright,
The little hands grasping in vain for the light
That ever before them would flee.

One crept to the couch where an invalid lay,
And brought him a dream of the sweet summer day,
Its bird-song and beauty and bloom;
Till pain was forgotten and weary unrest,
And in fancy he roamed through the scenes he loved best,
Far away from the dim, darkened room.

One stole to the heart of a flower that was sad,
And loved and caressed her until she was glad,
And lifted her white face again;
For love brings content to the lowliest lot,
And finds something sweet in the dreariest spot,
And lightens all labor and pain.





STORIES OF STARLAND.


And one, where a little blind girl sat alone,
Not sharing the mirth of her playfellows, shone
On hands that were folded and pale,
And kissed the poor eyes that had never known sight,
That never would gaze on the beautiful light
Till angels had lifted the veil.

At last, when the shadows of evening were falling,
And the sun, their great father, his children was calling,
Four sunbeams sped into the west.
All said: We have found that in seeking the pleasure
Of others, we fill to the full our own measure,"
Then softly they sank to their rest.
-St. Nicholas, December, 1879.


THE SUN.

Somewhere it is always light;
For when 'tis morning here,
In some far distant land 'tis night,
And the bright moon shines there.

When you've retired and gone to sleep,
They are just rising there;
And morning o'er the hill doth creep
When it is evening here.

And other distant lands there be
Where it is always night;
For weeks the sun they never see,
The stars alone give light.





THE STORY OF GIANT SUN. 33

But though 'tis dark both night or day
It is as wondrous quite
That when the night has passed away,
The sun for weeks gives light.

Yes, while you sleep the sun shines bright,
The sky is blue and clear;
For weeks and weeks there is no night
But always daylight there.










THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


THE next morning, when Mary came out in the
garden to sit with Harry, she was surprised to
see an audience of three instead of one: Harry,
whose face beamed with delight when he saw her;
Nellie, who was seated in a tiny rocking chair
beside him, and Nellie's doll.
You see, dollie wants to know all about Giant
Sun, too," Nellie gravely informed Mary. "I
never could remember all, and she might remember
what I forget. Besides, she must learn some day.
That is what mamma said about me. I heard
her," Nellie continued wisely, as she looked up at
Mary. Do you mind telling me about the sky-
people too ?"
Mind ? Why you little bit of a doll baby,"
laughed Mary, as she picked her up, doll and all,
and hugged her, "if you and dollie promise not
to go to sleep, you can stay here as long as you





THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


want to. But does Aunt Agnes know you are
here, Nellie; or have you run away from home ?"
"No, I have not run away," said Nellie earn-


GIANT SUN AND HIS FAMILY.


estly, "but my dollie has. Nurse brought me
over here, but she did not know my dollie was
here. I forgot all about her yesterday, while
Harry was telling me about Giant Sun, and I left




STORIES OF STARLAND.


her out on the grass. But she didn't melt a bit.
I knew you wouldn't, dear little dollie, would you?
Now, dollie, sit up straight, and listen to Cousin
Mary talk. My, how she can talk, too! Can't
you? "
I'll try," said Mary, laughing. So you want
to hear about Giant Sun and his family. He has
such a large family, and he has to give them all
plenty of light and heat. If he put out his big
lamp in the sky, it would be always dark here, and
we would shiver with cold and die. When I
come to your room at night, Harry, to say good-
night, I always carry a lamp in my hand so that
I can see you; but supposing a puff of wind blew
it out, then I could not see you at all.
Now this light is not only for us, but for the
rest of the sun's family as well. First, there is
little Mercury, who was named after the god of
thieves; and he deserves this name, because he
steals more light and heat from the sun than any
of the other planets."





THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


WHAT IS A PLANET ?

What is a planet?" asked Harry.
"A planet is just like this earth we are living
on, and only shines with the light it borrows from
the sun. If we lived on planet Mercury, and could
look at our earth, we would see it shining like a
bright star in the sky; but all the light comes
from the sun."
"Do we live on a star, then?" asked Nellie,
her little eyes wide open with amazement.
No; we live on a planet. We could not live on
a star, as a star is blazing hot. That is the differ-
ence between a star and a planet. A star is hot
and bright and shining and gives light to the
planets, if it has any. Planets are little globes
like the earth that circle around the sun."
"Then the sun must be a star," said Harry,
as you told me yesterday that it is very hot."
That is right," said Mary; and every star in
the sky is a sun."
And has lots of weensy-teensy planets going
all around it ? asked Nellie excitedly.




STORIES OF STARLAND.


STORY OF PLANET MERCURY.

Some of them have, I am sure," said Mary.
" But now we are running along too fast, and
I must tell you about our own sun first, and its
nearest planet Mercury. Well, Mercury is a very
warm little world, and it gets so near the sun that
sometimes it is about nine times as warm as here,
and at other times it is only four times as warm.
You see, Mercury does not go round the sun in a
perfect circle, so at times it is farther away than
at others. Now, the sun is like a great fire in the
sky, and the nearer we go to it the warmer we are.
How would you like to live on a little world where
it is nine times warmer than it is here ? "
I should not like it at all, would you, dollie "
said Nellie; we would roast if we went to world
Mercury."
"But we don't know whether there are any
people there," continued Mary, and if there are,
they might not mind the heat at all. You can get
used to the heat, just as Uncle Robert did when
he went to India. Don't you remember how he





THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


felt the change when he came home, and how he
shivered? He missed the heat just as we would


COMPARATIVE SIZE OF SUN AS SEEN FROM THE PLANETS.

suffer from it if we went to India for the first
time."
Then Uncle Robert would not mind going to
Mercury," said Harry, laughing, if he is getting





STORIES OF STARLAND.


to like the heat in India. But I do not want
him to go yet, as he might never come back
again; and what would we do without him?"
"What would we ? said Nellie mournfully,
her eyes filling with tears at the very thought.
"Is a planet made of earth and stones and
trees and flowers, just like planet Earth ?" asked
Harry.
Yes, dear," replied his sister; only some
planets, like Jupiter and Saturn, are still wrapped
up in a blanket of clouds and steam, and we
cannot see them yet. They are very hot indeed,
and all the water that will make the oceans
and seas and bays is now steam and clouds
hiding the true planet from view. Water could
no more rest on the surface of the planets Jupiter
and Saturn than it could rest on red-hot iron.
Don't you remember, the other day, when nurse
upset a cup of water on the hot stove, how the
water sizzled and turned into steam in a moment ?
"Now planet earth, a long time ago, when
it was a very young world, was very hot like
Jupiter. All the lakes and seas and oceans





























JUPITER


IEPTUNE


URANUS
I. A


COMPARATIVE SIZE OF THE PLANETS.




STORIES OF STARLAND.


were turned into steam and blankets of cloud.
It would have been a very uncomfortable world
to live on then. But it became cooler and
cooler, and the clouds changed into the oceans
and seas and lakes that make our earth so
beautiful.
"And all around this little world formed a
blanket of air to protect us from the scorching
heat of the sun. Otherwise we should not be
able to live on this planet; for when the sun rises
in the morning it would suddenly appear in the
eastern sky without any warning, and by mid-day,
when it was overhead, everything would have
been burned by its glare. Instead of that, the air
sends first one little ray and then another to
announce the approach of the sun, and finally
thousands of rays usher it in until we become
accustomed to its light and heat and are ready to
make it welcome."
"And what happens in the evening," asked
Harry, when the sun goes away?"
"The sun does not go away," replied Mary;
"but as our planet turns 'round, first one side of




THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


it then the other is turned toward the sun, and
that is how we have Day and Night. When
the shades of Night begin to close around the
darkened side of our planet, the flowers droop
their heads and birds nestle to repose. The air I
have been telling you about is the air we breathe
and that which keeps us alive. We could no more
live on a planet without air than a fish can live
without water."
Or else that fish Uncle Robert caught would
have lived," said Nellie. But please tell us
a story about Mercury, Cousin Mary, and the
other little planets."
Well, Mercury is a very little planet, and
instead of taking a year of three hundred and
sixty-five days, it goes around the sun in eighty-
eight days. That is, it goes round the sun four
times while we go round 'it only once. Some
think Mercury always keeps the same side turned
to the sun, so that it is always day on one side
and night on the other, but we are not quite sure
about this yet."
I should like to live on Mercury, wouldn't




STORIES OF STARLAND.


you, Harry?" said Nellie, clapping her hands
with glee. Just think of day all the time, and
never having to go to sleep!"
But you would get very tired of that," said
Mary, and long for the night to come. And,
besides, would you not miss seeing the moon and
the beautiful stars?"
I would live on the edge of Mercury," said
Harry thoughtfully, "so that when I was tired
of day I might slip around it and have night. It
must be very cold on the other side, where the
sun does not shine, if Mercury gets all its heat
from the sun."
"I suspect it is," said Mary, "and I don't
believe we should like to live on Mercury, after
all; so let us try the next planet, which is called
Venus."

STORY OF PLANET VENUS.

"What a pretty name," said Nellie; and is
Venus very warm, like Mercury?"
It is not so near to the sun," replied Mary,
"but it is about twice as warm and bright as our




THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


planet. Venus is nearly as large as the earth,
and sometimes she is called her twin sister.
Like Mercury, she may probably always turn
the same face to the sun, and get baked on one
side and frozen on the other. She looks like
a beautiful silver globe in the sky. Sometimes
we see her early in the morning as a morning
star, or just about twilight as an evening star.
Like Mercury and the earth, she borrows all her
light from the sun. We only see her because the
sun is shining on her. Next to Venus is our own
planet, earth, and around it circles the moon,
but I must tell you about that another time."
































































EARTH IN SPACE.


8


'' "



'...-


I-


`d

Q~iF;i I 1 I~

I:rr





THE FAMILY OF GIANT SUN.


ESTELLE'S ASTRONOMY.

BY DELIA HART STONE.

Our little Estelle
Was perplexed when she found
That this wonderful world
That we live on is round.

How 'tis held in its place
In its orbit so true
Was a puzzle to her,
With no answer in view.

"It must be," said Estelle,
Like a ball in the air
That is hung by a string;
But the string isn't there!"
-St. Nicholas, March, 1896.



VENUS.

Fairest of stars, last in the train of night,
If better thou belong not to the dawn,
Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn
With thy bright circlet.
-MILTON.





STORIES OF STARLAND.


THE EVENING STAR.

Lo! in the painted oriel of the West,
Whose panes the sunken sun incarnadines,
Like a fair lady at her casement, shines
The evening star, the star of love and rest!
And then anon she doth herself divest
Of all her radiant garments, and reclines
Behind the somber screen of yonder pines,
With slumber and soft dreams of love oppressed.

O my beloved, my sweet Hesperus !
My morning and my evening star of love !
My best and gentlest lady even thus,
As that fair planet in the sky above,
Dost thou retire unto thy rest at night,
And from thy darkened window fades the light.
-LONGFELLOW.


MERCURY.

First, Mercury, amid full tides of light,
Rolls next the sun, through his small circle bright;
Our earth would blaze beneath so fierce a ray,
And all its marble mountains melt away.
Fair Venus next fulfills her larger round,
With softer beams and milder glory crowned;
Friend to mankind, she glitters from afar,
Now the bright evening, now the morning star.
-BAKER.










A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


THE moon was shining brightly and flooding
Harry's room with its rays. He was suffering so
very much, and had tried in vain to sleep. Pres-
ently he asked his nurse if she would not let
Mary come and talk to him. "It will not tire
me," he begged earnestly; and it does tire me
to lie here hour after hour with no one to talk to."
His nurse understood him so well, and her
heart ached for the lonely child who had so little
to amuse him in life. She never refused a request
if it were at all possible to grant it. So she
called his sister Mary, who hastened at once to
his room, and brother and sister were soon far
away on a ramble in starland.
We shall go to the moon this evening," she
began, "and find out what a queer old world
it is."
"Old?" asked Harry; "why do you call it





STORIES OF STARLAND.


old, when it looks so bright and new? See,
sister, how it seems to be looking right into the
window and watching us. I wonder if it knows


THE MOON.
what we are saying about it. Now what would
it think if it heard you calling it old?"
But it is," said Mary, laughing; and very
old indeed. Its face is wrinkled and scarred, and
is just like that of the old dried-up apple we
found in the orchard the other day."




A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


"What makes it so bright, then, if it is so
old ?" asked Harry, as he looked curiously at the
moon.
It borrows its light from the sun," replied his
sister; if the sun were to stop shining you would
not be able to see the moon at all. It would be
as dark as night and twice as gloomy."
Do you think there are people on the moon ? "
asked Harry excitedly.
No, dear, not even the Man in the Moon,'
though I am going to tell you some stories about
him presently. Besides, no one could live on the
moon, as there is not any air to breathe, and you
cannot live without air. There is not any water
to drink; in fact, there is not a drop of water on
the moon."
"Then it must be very old," said Harry
thoughtfully, "because you know you told me,
sister, some time ago, that if a planet grows very
old all the oceans and bays disappear."
Yes, the moon is very old; it is a deadworld.
If you could go there, you would find it a very
gloomy spot. There are no trees or flowers; and





STORIES OF STARLAND.


there is not even a blade of glass. The sky is
always black and the stars shine night and day.
The shadows are so black on the moon that it
would be a fine place to play hide-and-seek. The


SCENERY ON THE MOON.


moment you stepped into a shadow you would
become invisible."
"Just like the prince in the fairy tale who put
on a little cap and no one could see him," said
Harry.
Yes; that prince would not need the cap on
the moon. If he did not want anyone to know





A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


he was there, all he would have to do would be to
keep in the shadow. No one would hear his foot-
steps, as not a sound can be heard on the moon.
It would be useless to speak, as there is no air to
carry the sound of a voice."
I should not like to go to the moon, then," said
Harry seriously, because you could not tell me
any stories, sister, could you ? What would I do
then ? "
"I really cannot imagine," said Mary, laugh-
ing; "but perhaps you might come across the
Man in the Moon and talk to him in sign-
language."
"Like the deaf-and-dumb people ?" asked
Harry.
"If he could understand it," said Mary; "but
then, we know there is really not any Man in the
Moon."
But there is a story about him," said Harry
coaxingly, and I do wish you would tell it to
me, just now while the moon is looking at us
from the sky."





STORIES OF STARLAND.


THE MAN IN THE MOON.

"Well, once upon a time," began Mary, in true
fairy-story fashion, there was a man who went
out into the woods and picked up sticks on a
Sunday. That was very wicked of him, you know,
because Sunday is a day of rest, and picking up
sticks is work. He tied the sticks together into a
bundle, and, putting them on his shoulder, started
to walk home with them. On the way he met a
handsome stranger, who said to him:
What are you picking up sticks for on Sun-
day ?'
It does not matter to me whether it is Sun-
day or Monday,' replied the man roughly. I
pick up sticks when I want to.'
"' Very well, then,' replied the handsome
stranger sternly, since you will not observe Sun-
day as a day of rest on earth, you shall have
an everlasting moon-day in heaven.' Next
moment he went whirling away to the sky, and
landed on the moon, where you can still see him
with his load of sticks on his back at full moon."





A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


Can I see him now, sister? asked Harry.
"Not to-night," she replied, "because there is
only a quarter moon. But perhaps you can see
the face of the woman in the moon, if you look
very carefully. See her sharp chin and pointed
nose and shaggy eyebrows."
Why, is there a woman in the moon, too ?"
asked Harry, as he looked intently at the moon,
trying to see all his sister had pointed out, but
having to rely largely upon his imagination.


THE WOMAN IN THE MOON.

"I have heard a story of an old woman who
was sent to the moon."
"Why, what had she done?" asked Harry.
"She was very unhappy while on earth, because
she could not tell when the world would come to
an end; that is, when it would get old and dead
like the moon, so that no one could live on it any
longer. For this she was sent to the moon. She
has been weaving a forehead strap ever since.
Once a month she stirs a kettle of boiling hominy,





STORIES OF STARLAND.


and her cat sits beside her unraveling her net. So
she keeps on weaving and weaving, and the cat
unravels her work as soon as it is done. This
must continue to the end of time, for never till
then will her work be finished."
Poor old woman! said Harry; Iwonder she
does not hide her work from the cat, or send the
cat away. But then, that is only a story. Can
you tell me another?"
Do you never tire of stories ? asked Mary,
smiling.
"Never, when you tell them tome, sister. And
you seem to know such a lot of them."
But these stories are only fairy-tales," said
Mary, laughing; these moon-stories, I mean."
"I don't mind," said Harry roguishly; we
must have a little make-up story now and then,
or I would get tired. Do you make them all up
yourself, sister ?"
No, indeed," said Mary. "I find them here
and there and everywhere; sometimes right in
the middle of a big book on astronomy, or in the
corner of an old newspaper, or hidden away in





A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


a book covered with dust on the top shelf in the
library."
Where did you find that story about the old
woman and the cat?"
In a book of Indian legends, and the story is
told by the Iroquois Indians. Here is another
one I found. Would you like to hear it ?"
You know I would, dear," said Harry,
nestling closer to his sister, as she clasped his
hand in hers.


THE TOAD IN THE MOON.

Once upon a time a little wolf fell very much
in love with a toad, and went a-wooing one night.
Just like the frog, he would a-wooing go.' You
remember, Harry, don't you ? "
Whether his mother would let him or no,' "
continued Harry; of course I remember all
about him. So the wolf went after the toad
and "
"He prayed that the moon would light him on
his way," continued Mary; and his prayer was




STORIES OF STARLAND.


heard. By the clear light of the full moon he
ran after the toad, and he nearly caught her,
when, what do you think happened?"
Oh, go on, sister; tell me quickly!" said
Harry excitedly.
Why, the toad jumped right onto the face of
the moon, and, turning round to the wolf, said:
'How's that, Mr. Wolf?' And she is laughing at
the wolf to this day."
"That was a clever little toad," said Harry,
laughing; and how vexed Mr. Wolf must have
been! Are there any more people on the moon-
I mean story people?"
Yes, there is one we read about in the legend
of Hiawatha. Don't you remember how Nokomis
tells about a warrior

:". Who very angry
Seized his grandmother, and threw her
Up into the sky at midnight,
Right against the moon he threw her:
'Tis her body that you see there.' "

"Do you think he meant the black marks you
can see all over the moon, sister ? "






























































BARTH AS SEEN FROM THE MOON.




STORIES OF STARLAND.


SCENERY ON THE MOON.

Very likely," replied Mary; "and perhaps you
would like me to tell you what those black marks
are. They are enormous plains and gloomy
caverns on the moon. A long time ago, perhaps,
these plains were bays and seas. At least, a great
astronomer named Galileo thought they were, and
he gave them such pretty names-the Sea of
Serenity, the Bay of Dreams, the Ocean of Storms.
But he lived in the days before it was known that
there is not any water on the surface of the moon.
Then the caverns on the moon may once have
been volcanoes pouring forth hot lava and ashes,
just as the active volcanoes on the earth. But the
volcanoes in the moon have gone out. They are
now like huge dark caverns, some of them more
than fifty miles across. One is three miles deep,
and it is named Tycho, after a great astronomer of
olden times.
Then there are mountains on the moon just
like the mountains on earth, and quite as high.
In walking over the moon you would find it very





A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


rough and uneven, but you would not mind this
very much, as you would weigh so much less.
Just think, Harry, you would weigh only one-sixth
as much as you do here."
And what would Uncle Robert weigh ? asked
Harry, with a gleam of mischief in his eye.
"He would only weighforty pounds," said Mary,







PLANET EARTH AND THE MOON.

laughing; and if he played football on the moon,
a good kick would send the ball six times as far
away as here. Supposing we were on the moon
now, you could throw a stone at Uncle Robert's
house on the other side of the grounds, six hundred
yards away, and hit one of the windows."
I expect Uncle Robert may be glad then we
are not on the moon," said Harry, laughing;
"because I am afraid I should be throwing stones





STORIES OF STARLAND.


at the windows all the time. I can see the win-
dows plainly from here. There is a light in the
library."
"Then it must be very late," said Mary, looking
over at the house; "because uncle said he would
not be home till nine o'clock. So I can only tell
you one more little story about the moon, and
then I must let you go to sleep. This story is
told by the Hindoo people, and gives the reason
why the moon shines with such a soft, silvery
light."

THE HINDOO LEGEND.

"The Sun, the Moon, and the Wind had been
invited to dinner one day by their uncle and aunt,
Thunder and Lightning. Their mother (one of
the most distant stars you see far up in the sky)
waited patiently at home for the return of her
children. Sad to relate, the Sun and Wind were
both greedy and selfish, and, while enjoying the
good feast, forgot all about their poor hungry
mother at home.
"But the gentle Moon did not forget, and when-




A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


ever a dainty dish was placed before her she
would put part of it aside for the Star who waited
so patiently at home. When the Sun, Moon, and
Wind returned home, the Star, who had kept her
bright little eye open all night long, said:
"' Dear children, have you brought anything
home for me?'
Then the Sun, who was the oldest, said: 'I
have brought nothing home for you. I went out
to enjoy myself with my friends, not to get a
dinner for my mother.'
"And the Wind said: 'Neither have I brought
home anything for you, mother. You could
scarcely expect me to think of you when I merely
went out for my own pleasure.'
"But the gentle Moon said: 'Mother, see all
the good things I saved for you,' and she placed
a choice dinner before her mother.
"Then the Star turned to the Sun, and said:
'Because you went out to amuse yourself with
your friends, without any thought of your poor,
lonely mother at home, you shall be cursed.
Henceforth your rays shall be ever hot and





STORIES OF STARLAND.


scorching. They shall burn all they touch, and
men shall hate you and cover their heads when
you appear.' That is why the sun is so hot to
this day.
Then she turned to the Wind and said: 'You
also, who forgot your mother while you were en-
joying yourself, shall be punished. You shall
always blow during the hot, dry weather, and
shall parch and shrivel all living things. Men
shall detest and avoid you from this time till the
end of the world.' That is why the wind is so
disagreeable during the hot weather.
But to the gentle Moon she said: 'Daughter,
because you remembered your hungry mother at
home, you shall be cool, calm, and bright. No
dazzling glare will accompany your pure rays,
and men will call you blessed."' That is why
the moon's light is so soothing and beautiful."
"Is that all?" asked Harry, as his sister
finished the story.
That is all," said Mary; "but here is a little
good-night lullaby by Eugene Field, and then
you must go to sleep:





A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


"'In through the window a moonbeam comes,
Little gold moonbeam with misty wings,
All silently creeping, he asks, Are you sleeping,
Sleeping and dreaming, while the pretty stars sing? '"

THE NEW MOON.

BY MRS. POLLEN.

Dear mother, how pretty
The moon looks to-night !
She was never so cunning before;
Her two little horns
Are so sharp and bright,
I hope she'll not grow any more.

If I were up there,
With you and my friends,
I'd rock in it nicely, you'd see;
I'd sit in the middle
And hold by both ends;
Oh, what a bright cradle wouldd be I

I would call to the stars
To keep out of the way
Lest we should rock over their toes;
And then I would rock
Till the dawn of the day,
And see where the pretty moon goes.

And there we would stay
In the beautiful skies,
And through the bright clouds we would roam;





STORIES OF STARLAND.


We would see the sun set,
And see the sun rise,
And on the next rainbow come home.
-Taken from Child-Life, edited by Whittier.


LADY MOON.


BY LORD HOUGHTON.

Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you roving ?
Over the sea.
Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you loving
All that love me.

Are you not tired with rolling, and never
Resting to sleep ?
Why look so pale and so sad, as forever
Wishing to weep ?

Ask me not this, little child, if you love me;
You are too bold;
I must obey my dear Father above me,
And do as I'm told.





A RAMBLE ON THE MOON.


Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you roving ?
Over the sea.
Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you loving ?
All that love me.
-Takenfrom Child-Life, edited by Whittier.


A LEGEND.

A moonbeam once fell on the bell of a flower,
Way down by a silvery rill;
'Twas cradled to sleep in a rapturous hour,
When all the green forest was still.

That flower, when golden and glad was the morning,
Was shriveled and wilted and thin;
But on the next night, all its chalice adorning,
The moonbeam still lingered within.

Since then has the flower been tender and creamy,
Wherever its petals have blown,
All fragile and pearly and dainty and dreamy
Is the night-blooming cereus known.
-Taken from the New York Tribune.








THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY
PLANETS.
NEXT morning Harry and his little cousin Nel-
lie, with her doll, awaited Mary. Harry had told
Nellie about his delightful ramble on the moon
the evening before, and she was delighted with
the stories of the man, the woman, and the toad
in the moon.
"I wonder what cousin Mary will tell us about
this morning," she said.
"I am going to tell you about a pretty little
planet named Mars," said Mary, as she came into
the room and overheard Nellie's remark. Picking
up Nellie, and placing her on her knee, she began
the story of Mars as follows:

STORY OF PLANET MARS.
"Next door to our own planet earth is a beau-
tiful little world tinted with red. It has snow-
white caps at the north and south poles just like
68





THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.


our earth, and trees and flowers perhaps far pret-
tier, for all we know. But there is not much
water on Mars, because Mars is an old planet."
How do you know it is old?" asked Harry.













THE PLANET MARS.

I know it is old," replied his sister, "because
the older a planet is, the smaller are the seas and
lakes and the amount of water on its surface. As
the planet gets older and older, the water dis-
appears, until not a drop is left.
There is a curious net-work of lines all over
Mars, and these lines have been named canals,
only we are not at all sure whether they are





STORIES OF STARLAND.


canals or not. They have a peculiar way of
doubling at a day's notice, and at the places where
the canals meet little round spots have been seen."
"Perhaps the spots are landing-places where
the captains take passengers aboard," said Harry
earnestly.
"If there are any people on Mars," said Mary;
"but we are no more certain of that than we
are that the markings that have been seen are
canals. From all we can see and guess about
the planet, it must be a beautiful little world like
our own."
"It is not quite as bright on Mars as it is here,
since it is farther away from the sun and only gets
one-half as much light and heat. The year is also
nearly twice as long and lasts six hundred and
eighty-seven days, instead of only three hundred
and sixty-five. Therefore, the summer season is
nearly twice as long, but not nearly as warm as
here."
Then the winter must be twice as long and
much colder than here," Harry said. I do not
think I should like that. But perhaps the canals





THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.


freeze over in the winter time, and there may be
fine skating up there?"
"No, the canals disappear altogether during the
winter time," replied Mary; "or, rather, we cannot
see them until they reappear again as faint dark











CANALS OF MAEs (LOWELL).

lines in the spring-time. They get wider and
wider until the summer season, then they get nar-
row again and disappear. Some of them are
double, but the double lines we see may mean
only grass and ferns on each side of a large canal
fifty miles wide. When the canals double, the
little round spots at the junctions of the canals
darken. Perhaps these spots are like little islands




STORIES OF STARLAND.


in a desert, and they are covered with grass during
the summer time."
"I should like to live on one of those little
islands," said Harry. Wouldn't you, Nellie ? "
"If I could take my dollie with me," she replied,
as she gazed at it tenderly. "And we might go
for little boat-rides all around the islands. Do you
think there are any little girls on Mars who have
beautiful dollies like mine ? "
"I really do not know," replied Mary; "but if
there are any people living on Mars, I do know
they are not like us. We could not live there, as
there is not enough air for us to breathe. We
would gasp just as that poor fish did the other day,
when Uncle Robert hauled it up out of the lake
and threw it into the boat. We must have air,
and plenty of it, if we want to live."
So we could not live on Mars, could we, sis-
ter? said Harry.
It would not be comfortable," replied Mary;
"besides, it is not nearly as warm as here. Poor
Uncle Robert would nearly freeze during the long
winter. He would also find another surprise




THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.


awaiting him if he went to Mars. Mars is a
smaller world than the earth, so everything weighs
less."
Ah! I see," said Harry, clapping his hands
with glee. Uncle would not be so heavy on
Mars. How glad he would be to go there! Poor
Uncle Robert! He is so heavy he just shakes the
house when he walks across the floor. Next time
I see him I shall say: Go to Mars, Uncle Rob-
ert, and see what will happen to you there.' How
much would he weigh on Mars? "
He weighs two hundred and forty pounds
here, and would weigh only ninety pounds there,
and you would weigh only thirty pounds. So I
could pick you up, couch and all, and carry you
as easily as Nellie carries her doll in its doll-
carriage."
Then dollie would weigh nothing at all," said
Nellie, looking at her doll curiously.
Harry looked puzzled, and after thinking a mo-
ment, he said to his sister:
I cannot see why I would weigh less if I went
to Mars."





STORIES OF STARLAND.


"Because the planet being smaller than the
earth, it has less power to attract you and to hold
you down to its surface. The earth is like a great
magnet, and if there were not something drawing
us to it and keeping us there, we would be greatly
puzzled. Tables and chairs would not stand firm,








MARS AND THE EARTH.
and we would stagger about for want of weight,
just as when a diver tries to walk in deep water.
He has to have heavy weights fastened to him so
as to keep him in place. A stone that would be
quite heavy on earth would weigh only a few
ounces on Mars. Nellie could carry this large
rocking-chair I am sitting in and eight or ten
dollies as well. Do you remember seeing the men
at the circus jumping over bars five feet high ?
Well, on Mars they could jump fifteen feet, while




THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.


the clumsy old elephant we saw there would
probably be as graceful and nimble as a deer."
"How would football be on Mars?" asked
Harry.
Very unlike football here, dear. A good kick
would send the ball much farther than here."
"Is Mars very far away ? asked Nellie. If
we could go there in a train, would it take us ever
so long going ?"
"About sixty years," said Mary, -laughing, if
the train went a mile a minute. If you tried to
walk it, going four miles an hour and ten hours a
day, it would take you more than two thousand
years to get there. So, I don't think we can take
that trip, little girl, can we? But let us call on
the next-door neighbor or neighbors to Mars, for
there are about four hundred and fifty of them."


STORY OF THE BABY PLANETS.

Four hundred and fifty little worlds? asked
Harry.
Where can there be room for them all, and




STORIES OF STARLAND.


don't they knock against each other in the
sky ? "
"No, there is plenty of room for them up there.
Besides, they are so small, some of them being
only ten miles wide," said Mary.
Why, Uncle Robert walked ten miles the other
day," said Harry; he could walk all around those
little worlds. And if they are so little, I suppose
he would weigh scarcely anything at all if he lived
on one of them. I should think he would be al-
most like the giant with the seven-league boots.
Don't you remember, Nellie, you were reading
about him the other day. Poor little Jack the
Giant Killer would not have much chance there,
but perhaps he could fly if he weighed so little.
And how would football be on these little
worlds ? "
You might give the ball such a kick that it
would leave the planet altogether and circle around
the sun as a planet on its own account."
How Harry and Nellie laughed at the idea of a
football circling around the sun as a planet!
And is this really true?" inquired Harry.




THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.


" Why, this is better than any fairy story I ever
heard. Now, tell me some more. Don't you
think we might be able to fly on these tiny
worlds?"
If you could get someone to make you a pair
of wings up there, it would be quite easy to fly.
Our bodies would only weigh a few pounds,
so we ought to be able to flap a pair of wings
strong enough to keep us flying. That is, if
the air around these little worlds is as dense
as ours."
Don't I wish I lived there, then," said Harry
regretfully, because it would not matter about
my being lame. And I could put on my wings
whenever I wanted to see you, Nellie, and fly
across the park, and way, way up into the sky,
and-"
Oh, don't! Harry," said Nellie, throwing her
doll on the ground and catching hold of her cousin
in dismay; if you go you must take me with you
too. And poor little dollie," she continued, sud-
denly remembering her precious charge, and
Cousin Mary and Uncle Robert and Aunt Agnes




STORIES OF STARLAND.


and everybody in the world. What would we do
if you flew away from us ?"
"But I can't," said Harry, laughing at her dis-
may; "and it's just like a little girl to think I
would go and leave her all alone. No, we'll all
go some day, won't we ? he continued, turning to
his sister Mary; and we'll be with the angels-
and have wings. You and Nellie and I-why, we
will all fly, and I shall forget I ever was lame on
planet earth then."
And will father have wings, too ?" asked Nellie
curiously. He will want a very big pair, some-
thing like the big eagle's down at the aquarium."
Will he, you little rogue?" exclaimed the loud,
good-natured voice of her father, as he appeared
on the scene. So this is where you are, and I
have been looking for you all over the house and
grounds."
I told nurse I would be back in a minute,"
she replied.
A minute!" said her father, laughing heartily;
"why, you have been here nearly an hour. So
you want your father to have wings, do you, you





THE PLANET MARS AND THE BABY PLANETS.


little rogue Wait till I show you how you would
fly if you had wings." The next moment he put
her up on his shoulder, dollie and all, and ran
with her across the meadow at full speed, while
she laughed merrily and clapped her hands with
delight.
So the party is broken up," said Harry's nurse,
who came to look after her charge.
"Yes; one of the audience has flown," said
Harry, laughing.
And I must fly, too," said Mary, as she kissed
Harry lovingly. "And I shall tell you about the
rest of Giant Sun's family to-morrow. Good-by."










STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.

IT was several days before Mary could see Harry
again and tell him sky-stories," as he called
them, for he had been suffering much pain. Even
her gentle voice irritated him, and perfect quiet
was ordered by the doctor until the little sufferer
was better. At last he was able to enjoy the sun-
light and the flowers and the song of the birds
again, and one bright morning he was all ready,
as he told his sister, to take another trip to Star-
land. As Mary arranged the pillows on the couch
for him, and a large sunshade, so that the glare of
sunlight would not hurt his eyes, he caught hold
of her hand and, pressing it lovingly, he said::
Darling, what should I do without you? You
are so good to me."
"How can I help it, little sweetheart!" said
Mary, as she turned her head aside to keep him
from seeing the tears that would come to her eyes;




STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


"how can I help it, when I love you so dearly.
Besides, you are my own dear little brother, and
you don't know how I missed you all last week."
Did you really, sister ? And I was dreaming
away all day long about the wonderful stories you
have been telling me. I played football on Mars,
and had beautiful wings when I lived on the baby
planets, and flew from one to another, and now I
want to know something about the giant planets.
You said they lived next door to the little tiny
planets."

STORY OF JUPITER.

"Yes, next door to the baby planets we come
to the largest of all, the giant planet Jupiter. If
a tunnel were made through the center of Jupiter,
eleven globes as large as the earth, placed side
by side, would reach from one side to the other.
You could make thirteen hundred globes out of
planet Jupiter as large as the earth. If the earth
were a large snowball, and a giant could roll thir-
teen hundred such snowballs into one, he would
have a ball to play with as large as planet Jupiter.





STORIES OF STARLAND.


If it were made of the same material as the earth,
it would be more than three hundred times as
heavy."
It would take a very big giant to play with
that snowball, wouldn't it?" said Harry, smiling












GIANT JUPITER AND THE EARTH.

at the thought. There would not be much room
in the sky for him to play in, would there ?"
Plenty of room," replied his sister, laughing;
" room for millions and millions of balls as large
as Jupiter, and much, much larger."
What a wonderful place the sky must be!"
said Harry, in awe. Now, tell me some more




STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


about Jupiter. Didn't you tell me last week that
he is hidden away among blankets, and very, very
hot? "
"That is right, Harry, but some day he will
cool down, and the blankets will change into
beautiful oceans and seas and lakes. Then it
will be a world like ours, with trees and flowers,
and perhaps people will live there."
The sun is so much further away from Jupiter
than from the earth that it gives it only one
twenty-seventh as much light and heat. If you
can imagine the sun as a bright lamp in the sky,
and someone turning down the wick of the lamp
till its light is only one twenty-seventh as bright
as it is now, you can imagine how dim the light
and small the amount of heat must be on Jupiter."
"How long does Jupiter take in going round
the sun ?" asked Harry.
"About twelve years," replied Mary; and the
day is only about ten hours long, instead of
twenty-four as here."
What a short day! said Harry, in surprise
" Then you could work only five hours and sleep




STORIES OF STARLAND.


five hours. I believe I would sleep all day, and
all night, too. I must tell Nellie about that next
time I see her."
"Why did not she come this morning, I won-
der? said Mary. Perhaps she has gone for a
walk with her nurse."
I'll tell her about my trip," said Harry gen-
erously, when she comes over here again. And
now what else is there about Jupiter ? "


JUPITER AS SEEN THROUGH A TELESCOPE.

If you look at it through a large telescope you
will see that it is beautifully colored, as if Uncle
Robert had taken his paint-box, and dipped his
brush into browns and reds, and tinted the cloud-
belts around Jupiter here and there with touches
of yellow and orange, olive-green and purple.
Only an artist could get such beautiful effects. If
we could journey to one of the little moons of
Jupiter- "
Has Jupiter moons also ? asked Harry, de-
lighted at the thought.




STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


"Five of them," said Mary; "and I shall tell
you about them later. Supposing we could jour-
ney to one of these little moons, what a glorious
sight Jupiter would be! From the nearest
moon it would look thousands of times larger
than our moon. The colors we see only faintly
through our telescopes would present a mag-
nificent sight when seen at close range, while
constant changes would be taking place, as
varied as the changes in the clouds flitting across
a summer sky. Great cloud-masses drift hither
and thither with enormous speed, driven by winds
of hurricane force. By watching the changes that
take place in the clouds, we know there must be
winds blowing at the rate of nearly two hundred
miles per hour. Do you remember the cyclone
Uncle Robert told us about, when several houses
were blown down and trees uprooted ? "
"Yes, indeed, I do," replied Harry, and his
poor little dog Fido was nearly killed by a falling
chimney."
Poor little Fido would not have much chance
on Jupiter. The storms there are ever so much




STORIES OF STARLAND.


worse than here. The strongest buildings would
be blown down in a few moments; sturdy oaks
would be uprooted and blown about by the wind
like straws."
"Do the storms last very long? asked Harry.
They last six and seven weeks at a time," re-
plied Mary, "so that Jupiter would scarcely be a
comfortable world to live on yet. Besides, it is
still in the fiery stage."
"Won't you tell me some more about the little
moons of Jupiter ?" asked Harry.


THE MOONS OF JUPITER.

"They are not so little, after all, brother, except
the first one, which is only one hundred miles wide.
It is such a shy little moon that it keeps hiding
behind Jupiter, or gets so close to him that it is
lost in the glare of light from the giant planet.
We had no idea it was there at all until an Ameri-
can astronomer, Professor Barnard, caught sight
of it one evening. It was playing hide-and-seek
as usual, but Professor Barnard, with his keen





STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


eyes, spied the little speck of light. It is now
known as the fifth moon of Jupiter. It was only
discovered in 1892, and just think, that for the
hundreds and hundreds of years it has been there,
yet no one had seen it. The French people were







JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.

so delighted because Professor Barnard caught
sight of the little truant that they gave him a
beautiful gold medal."
"Won't you show the little moon to me some-
time?" said Harry. "I should like to see it so
much."
"You can only see it through a very large
telescope; but I can show you the other four
moons if Uncle Robert will lend us his telescope."
"Here he comes," said Harry, in great glee, as
he saw Uncle Robert crossing the meadow.




STORIES OF STARLAND.


" Won't you bring over your telescope this even-
ing ? said Harry pleadingly, as he told him what
Mary had just said.
Certainly, my little man," his uncle replied;
"but we can only see three of the moons this
evening as one of them is eclipsed."
What's that ? said Harry, in surprise at the
strange word.
Eclipsed means hidden," said Mary, laughing.
"If Uncle Robert stands right in front of you, as
he is doing just now, he hides me from you, so I
am eclipsed."
Very true," said Uncle Robert, laughing
heartily at the hint. Planet Mary is eclipsed by
Uncle Robert, and poor little Planet Harry cannot
see her till Uncle Robert gets out of the way."
This he immediately proceeded to do, and next
moment he was pursuing Fido, who was having
a not over-friendly encounter with a strange cat
in a neighbor's garden.
"Oh, dear," said Harry, in distress; "where
were we? We were up in the sky among the
planets, and now Uncle Robert has brought us




STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


back again to earth. Do listen to poor Fido."
He certainly seemed to be getting the worse of the
encounter with Pussy; but when Uncle Robert
came to the rescue the enemy vanished, and Fido,
nothing daunted, went in search of other prey.
When peace and quiet were once more restored,
Mary resumed her story.


ECLIPSE OF JUPITER'S MOONS.

"Do you know, the appearance and disappear-
ance of the little moons of Jupiter once gave a
great deal of trouble to astronomers. They had
a way of appearing a little too soon or a little too
late. They were very seldom on time. This was
very provoking, as astronomers were rather proud
of being able to tell exactly when these little
moons could be seen. At last they found out
what was the matter, and that they were to blame
and not the moons. We see the little moons on
account of their light, and light takes time to
travel. Don't you remember, I told you sound
travels a mile in five seconds. Light travels even





STORIES OF STARLAND.


more quickly, for it only takes a little over a sec-
ond in coming to us from the moon. It takes
about eight minutes in coming to us from the sun;
but Jupiter is about five times as far away from
us as the sun, so that light takes about half an
hour in coming to us from Jupiter. We do not
see it as it is, but as it was more than half an hour
ago, when its rays of light started out to Planet
Earth.
"Now, Jupiter, in going around the sun, is
sometimes on the same side of the sun as we are.
Then the light from the moons reaches us in about
thirty-two minutes. But when Jupiter is on the
opposite side of the sun, and as far away from us
as it can be, then light takes as much as forty-
eight minutes in coming here-over a quarter of
an hour longer. So a clever astronomer decided
that when Jupiter and his moons are nearest to us,
it does not take as long for their light to reach us
as when they are farther away, and this is because
light, like sound, must have time to travel.
"Even though light can go round the earth seven
times in a second, traveling at the rate of about





STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


186,000 miles a second, yet, as Jupiter is millions
of miles away, it takes light about half an hour,
and some times forty-eight minutes, for it to cross
that great distance. It is just the same as if
Uncle Robert were in India. It would take him a
much longer time to come and see you than if he
were at his home just a few hundred yards away.
It takes time for him to travel here, just as it
takes time for light to travel from the little
moons of Jupiter."
"I wish we had five moons shining on our
earth," said Harry; "how pretty it would be!
Does it take the moons as long as our moon to
get around Jupiter ? "
They are much livelier than our moon," re-
plied Mary; and the second moon flies right
around Jupiter in a little more than a day and a
half, and even the outside moon only takes about
two weeks; so there must always be a moon shin-
ing in the sky for Jupiter. These moons, except
the moon discovered by Professor Barnard, are
all larger than our moon, and the fourth one is
nearly as large as Mars. But I hear the bell for




STORIES OF STARLAND.


lunch, Harry, and I must run away now. I will
tell you about the other planets later."
How many are there?" said Harry, as his
sister kissed him good-by.
Only three," replied Mary; "and I shall tell
you about them to-morrow, if you are not too
tired."
"Too tired said Harry. "I am never too
tired to listen to you."


JUPITER.
Oh that it were my doom to be
The spirit of yon beauteous star,
Dwelling up there in purity,
Alone, as all such bright things are;
My sole employ to pray and shine,
To light my censer at the sun !
-Moore : Loves of the Angels.


A LESSON IN ASTRONOMY.

The solar system puzzled us,
Miss Mary said she thought it would,
And so she gave us each a name,
And made it all into a game,
And then we understood.




STORY OF JUPITER AND HIS MOONS.


Theresa, with her golden hair
All loose and shining, was the sun,
And 'round her Mercury and Mars,
Venus, and all the other stars
Stood waiting, every one.

I was the earth, with little Nell
Beside me for the moon so round,
And Saturn had two hoops for rings,
And Mercury a pair of wings,
And Jupiter was crowned.

Then when Miss Mary waved her hand,
Each slow and stately in our place,
We circled round the sun until
A comet, that was little Will,
Came rushing on through space.

He darted straight into our midst,
He whirled among us like a flash,
The stars went flying, and the sun,
And laughing, breathless, wild with fun,
The system" went to smash.
-Youth's Companion.











THE GIANT PLANETS.


THE PLANET SATURN.

HARRY had spent a most delightful evening
looking through Uncle Robert's telescope at the
little moons of Jupiter, and he also had seen the


THE RINGED PLANET SATURN.


planet Saturn, with its rings and moons. Next
evening when his sister came to talk with him he
had many questions to ask her. First of all he
wanted to know what the rings were made of.




THE GIANT PLANETS.


"Millions of little moons," replied his sister.
"I wish you could see Saturn and its rings through
the great telescope at the Lick Observatory. It
makes such a pretty picture? Like Jupiter, the
planet Saturn is surrounded by clouds; but they
are tinted with blue at the poles, yellow elsewhere,
and dotted here and there with brown, purple, and
red spots. Around the center is a creamy white
belt. Then, there are eight moons that accompany
Saturn in its journey around the sun; but they
give very little light to the planet, since if they
could all be full together they would give but a
sixteenth part of the light we receive from the
moon."
"Why is that? asked Harry.

THE PLANET URANUS.
"Because Saturn is so far away from the Sun,"
replied Mary. "Next to Saturn we find Uranus.
This planet was first seen by William Herschel,
who afterwards became one of the greatest as-
tronomers the world has ever known. When
Herschel was a little boy his home was in Han-




STORIES OF STARLAND.


over. He had great talent for music, and when
he was fourteen years old he joined the band of
the Hanoverian Guards. What a proud boy he
was when he dressed in his new uniform How-
ever, pride must have a fall, and it was not very
long before he wished he had never entered the
army. Just about this time war broke out be-
tween France and England, and as Hanover
belonged to the English it was attacked by the
French. The Hanoverian Guards were badly de-
feated. Herschel spent the night after the battle
hiding away in a ditch, and next day, assisted by
his friends, he ran away to England. There he
continued his musical studies, and some years later
he became a fine organist."
Did he have to play a big organ like the one
in our church ? asked Harry.
"Something like that, I suppose," said Mary;
"and he played very well indeed. He learned
more and more about music, and in the evenings
when going and coming from the church he used
to notice the beautiful stars overhead, and he
wished to learn something about them."




THE GIANT PLANETS.


"Just the way I feel," said Harry. "I get
nurse to pull up the window curtain at night so
that I can see the stars from my bed, and they
seem to laugh and wink their little eyes at me as
if they knew I was watching them. Did Herschel
have a telescope like the one Uncle Robert
has?"
He was not so fortunate, but he wanted one
very much indeed. So he borrowed a telescope
from a friend, and every night after practicing in
the church he would amuse himself looking at
the stars. He longed to have a telescope of his
own; but he found that they cost more than he
could afford to pay, so he decided to make one.
He bought all that was necessary, and turned his
home for the time into a workshop. He had a
dear, good-natured sister named Caroline, and she
did all she could to help her brother. Sometimes
he was too busy to eat and she used to feed him.
When he was tired she would read to him from
the 'Arabian Nights.' "
"The same book I have?" asked Harry, in
surprise.




STORIES OF STARLAND-


"The very same; and this helped to pass away
the time while Herschel polished away on the
great mirror of his telescope. When the tele-
scope was finished people came from far and near
to see it. One evening when Herschel was gaz-
ing at the stars with this magic glass he spied a
star not marked down on his charts. Something
wrong here,' thought Herschel; this must be a
comet.' But after noticing it for a while he found
that it was not a comet, but a planet or wanderer
among the stars."


DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PLANET AND A STAR.

"How could he tell the difference ?" asked
Harry. "When I looked at Planet Jupiter last
night it looked like the stars, only rounder and
bigger."
The planets are so much nearer to us than the
stars that we can follow them as they slowly creep
between us and the stars in their journey around
the sun. The stars are so far away that we would
have to watch them for thousands. of years before




THE GIANT PLANETS.


they would seem to move at all, yet we know they
are moving."
Are the stars moving ? said Harry, in sur-
prise.
Yes, they are moving, just as distant steamers
seen at sea are moving; but they are so far away
that they seem motionless. Don't you remember
how we used to watch them from the seashore.
Still they were going as fast as steam could take
them. We might compare the steamers to the
stars, and the little boats nearer shore were more
like the planets. We could easily follow the boats
with our eyes as they danced over the waves, and
in the same way we can easily follow the planets
as they creep across the sky, because they are so
much nearer to us than the stars."
The new planet was called Uranus, although
at first the friends of Herschel wanted to name
it after him. Next to Uranus comes the planet
Neptune, which was discovered before it was ever
seen."




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