• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Butterfly ballads
 Two little milkmaids
 The way to Fairyland
 The lay of the Lady Florinda
 The magic slate
 The fairy wedding
 The boy that went to sea
 The organ-monkey
 The quest of the cherry pie
 The witch and the truant
 Wings
 His last ride
 A Chinese story
 The lay of the red-hot poker
 Algernon's army
 The dolls' dance
 The edge of the world
 An insect
 Dancing
 The fat little fish
 The wishing vase
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Butterfly ballads and stories in rhyme
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086671/00001
 Material Information
Title: Butterfly ballads and stories in rhyme
Physical Description: 141, 2 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Atteridge, H ( Helen )
Milne, John ( Publisher )
Browne, Gordon, 1858-1932 ( Illustrator )
Wain, Louis, 1860-1939 ( Illustrator )
Morrison and Gibb ( Printer )
Publisher: John Milne
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Morrison and Gibb, Limited
Publication Date: 1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Helen Atteridge ; with illustrations by Gordon Browne, Louis Wain and others.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086671
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221358
notis - ALG1580
oclc - 24685500

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    List of Illustrations
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Butterfly ballads
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Two little milkmaids
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The way to Fairyland
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The lay of the Lady Florinda
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The magic slate
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The fairy wedding
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The boy that went to sea
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The organ-monkey
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The quest of the cherry pie
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The witch and the truant
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Wings
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    His last ride
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    A Chinese story
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    The lay of the red-hot poker
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Algernon's army
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    The dolls' dance
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    The edge of the world
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    An insect
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Dancing
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    The fat little fish
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    The wishing vase
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Back Matter
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Back Cover
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Spine
        Page 147
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CONTENTS



PAGI,
ETHELINDA GRAY 9
Two LITTLE MILKMAIDS 14

THE WAY TO FAIRYLAND 23
THE LAY OF THE LADY FLORINDA 28

THE MAGIC SLATE 35
THE FAIRY WEDDING 40

THE BOY THAT WENT TO SEA 46
THE ORGAN-MONKEY 51

THE QUEST OF THE CHERRY PIE 56
THE WITCH AND THE TRUANT .65

WINGS 71

HIs LAST RIDE .. 76
A CHINESE STORY .. .

THE LAY OF THE RED-HOT POKER 87

ALGERNON'S ARMY 93
THE DOLLS' DANCE I. O

THE EDGE OF THE WORLD 109

AN INSECT 115

DANCING 117
THE FAT LITTLE FISH 121

THE WISHING VASE. 126



















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS




I LOVE YOU, I DECLARE" Gordon Brozone
THE JEALOUS DOG Do.
HE SHOOK HER UP, HE SHOOK HER DOWN Do.
ONE HUNG HIS HEAD AND ONE HIS TAIL DO.
Two LITTLE MILKMAIDS Louis Wain
EACH SAT DOWN ON HER MILKING-STOOL Do.
PATTIE PLAYING WITH IDLE JACK. DO.
THE FARMYARD DOGS .
SIX LITTLE DOGS BEGAN TO FIGHT DO.
IN THE MIDDLE STOOD PEGGY Do.
SLOWLY HOME THEY HAD TO CREEP DO.
OH, WHERE WILL SHE RUN TO, AND WHAT WILL SHE DO? Gordon Browne
SHE SANK ON A DOORSTEP. DO.
EVERY POLICEMAN HAD CAPTURED A CHILD Do.
TIRED OF SUMS Do.
SHE LOOKED BEHIND HER Do.
THE YELLOW HOUSE Do.
CONSOLING NUMBER THREE Do.
MAYSIE WOKE D.
HERE THEY COME, WITH A DRUM-TUM, TUM Do.
THE LITTLE BRIDE. Do.
ON THE WINGS OF A BAT Do.
HARK! THERE'S THE CROW OF A COCK Do.
HE PUT SOME JAM IN HIS HAT Do.
JOCK SAT AND BEGGED o.
THEY KNELT AND ASKED HIM D.
AND JOCK WAS SECOND COOK Do.
THE LITTLE DOG DANCED TOO Do.
IT WAS THE ORGAN-GRINDER DO.
AND CHASED A BIG POLICEMAN Do.
WHILE WEPT THE ORGAN-MAN Do.








LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


THE WITCH ND THE TRUANT
THE WITCH'S CAT .
THE BOYS AND THE MASTER FLED
JOHNNY HODGE AND NEDDY
"I THINK I'LL SELL THE DONKEY"
HE TUMBLED OVER NEDDY'S HEAD
HE FELL-ALACK ALAS .
PEDRO THE ALCHEMIST
"I'LL FIND THE SECRET, AND MAKE GOLD"
THE POKER .
PEDRO THE ALCHEMIST SOARED ON HIGH
ALGERNON'S ARMY
SEATED ON THE DITCH'S BRINK
AND OVER THE EDGE THE ARMY FELL
THE DOLLS' DANCE
THE PRETTIEST DOLLY HE TOOK BY THE HAND.
A DANCE WITH A MUSKET IS AWKWARD TO DO
HE CHARGED ON THE ARMY, AND FLUNG OUT HIS
TOMMY AND SUE
"DON'T YOU GO TOO NEAR"
THE EDGE OF THE WORLD
THE WORLD'S A BALL
THE CHUBBY BOY
HE CAREFULLY SANK .
"IT IS LOST IF I GO BACK"
HIS FEET WENT FLOATING AWAY
THEY TOOK HIM HOME TO BED
THE WISHING VASE
LEFT ALONE .
FLYING UP INTO THE SKY .
BACK TO HIS CITY THROUGH THE MARBLE GATE
LEFT BEHIND .


H. R. Millar
Do.
Do.
SC. Howard
Do.
Do.
Do.
H St. Clair
Do.
Do.
Do.
W. Raincy
Do.
S Do.
Gordon Browne
S Do.
Do.
HEELS Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


Evelyn Harny
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.














BUTTERFLY BALLADS




Ethelinda Gray


0 GENTLE READER, if you choose
This doleful tale to hear,
Begin to shiver in your shoes,
And drop the briny tear.
Prepare your pocket-handkerchief
Some comfortable way,
And you shall weep-but not too loud!-
For Ethelinda Gray.


She was a dream of loveliness,
And sat in a glass case,
And all her golden curls were loose
About her pretty face.
A little maiden took her home,
And dressed her up in white,
And kissed and talked to her all day,
And cuddled her all night.






BUTTERFLY BALLADS


And said, "My Ethelinda Gray,
I love you, I declare;
Your cheeks are pink, your eyes are blue-
As blue as china ware.
I love your little painted shoes-
They're prettier than leather;
I love your little waxen hands,
With fingers stuck together."



i So Ethelinda Gray at meals
Was close to Polly's
side.
S' I wish, my sweet, that you
could eat:
SYou can't-I've tried and
tried."
.- And, all neglected and
alone,
An older friend was by;
His heart was heavy as a stone,
A tear was in his eye.


Poor Bruno! creeping far away,
He sat behind the door,
And sullenly he wagged his tail,
And mopped it on the floor.







ETHELINDA GRAY


And black and blacker grew his heart;
The jealous tail he swung,
And panted for Eth'linda's bran
With wistful eyes and tongue.

Then Polly, in a fairy book,
Read by the fire all day.
"What if the fairies came for you,
My Ethelinda Gray?
They stole the prettiest in the land:
Now what if they stole you ?
It's only fun, you understand-
Those tales are never true."

The little maiden went away, '
And left the beauty there.- i
Make ready now! your
flesh shall creep,
And up will stand your hair!
The jealous dog, the monster, came
And dragged her by the head;
And when she tumbled from his grasp,
He caught her heels instead.

He rolled her down the stony steps,
He trotted round the yard,
He shook her up, he shook her down,
He shook her very hard.







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Escaping by an open door,
Off to the woods he ran:
And all the path was peppered o'er
With one long stream of bran.


He flung her in the wintry grass,
As he would fling a bone;
He left her in the woodland wild:
Left her to die alone.
He met his master down the road,
And frisked with merry paws;
But Polly's brother started back,
For bran was on his jaws!


/ Monster thou hast devoured the
// doll!"

Young Robin shrieked aloud;
But on the road he shrieked
no more,
Lest he might draw a crowd.
But, tracing slow the stream of bran,
He went the woodland way,
Where in the twilight drear he saw
Poor Ethelinda Gray.


And then the wicked dog sat down,
And raised his nose in air,







ETHELINDA GRAY


And howled a very dismal howl-
"I'm jealous I don't care!"
And Robin stooped to pat his head-
Don't cry, my faithful hound;
Let us not tell this gruesome deed,
But hide her in the ground."

So Robin dug a little grave
For Ethelinda's bones,
And heaped the dead leaves over it,
And decked it round with stones.
Then guilty boy and dog went
home,
Nor said a word to Poll:
One hung his head and one
his tail,
When] all day long they heard
her wail-
The fairies stole my doll!"

And often Bruno starts in sleep,
And groans and shakes his paws:
It may be Ethelinda's form
That is the awful cause.
And Robin tumbles through his bed,
Or so at least it seems,
When Ethelinda, shedding bran,
Comes dancing through his dreams.















Two. Little Milkmaids


Two little milkmaids, merry and gay;
Two little dogs running out to play:
Down through the fields they took their way,
In the sparkling grass of the early day.



,, ,,, :. ,





,I : '



Two little milkmaids and two little pails;
Two little dogs wagging two little tails;
Sun-bonnets fluttered like pretty white sails:
They danced over pathways and climbed over rails.

Two little maids, and the cows were but two.
The maids tramped along in the grass and the dew;
14







TWO LITTLE MILKMAIDS


The cows did their best to call out Bulaboo!"
Which perhaps, in their language, is "How do you do?"


Never were milkmaids sweeter than those:
Their gowns were all gathered, the pink of the rose;
Their cheeks were like cherries; they turned out their toes;
And their sashes were tied in most beautiful bows.


Two little milkmaids-plenty to say-
Two little friends with one birthday.
'Work this morning-afterwards play!
The money for milk shall be theirs to-day.


Peggs said to Pattie, and Pattie to Peggs,
"We shall buy a fat chicken, and sell all its eggs.
For eggs at the Castle her Ladyship begs,
And soon we can buy something nice on four legs.


"We could get in the market a very thin sheep,
And gather fresh clover all day for its keep,
And sell it off fat, and go on with a leap,
To buy a young calf-second-hand, you know, cheap.


" The calf would grow into a very big cow,
Profits on profits the milk would allow-
A neat little farm, a man, and a plough-
Our fortune is made, do you see, Pattie, now?"







3 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

"Our fortune is made!"-" Oh yes!" and "Oh yes!"
" Satin and silk shall be every-day dress,
We shall ride upon donkeys like any princess,
And have twenty dozen of dolls-no less!"

They stopped and they laughed in each other's eyes,
Oh, but the village would get a surprise!












Pattie and Peggy felt ever so wise,
"' t Si,-''. -


T[ 4 ',", "
't '"N.. '' ."


Pattie and Peggy felt ever so wise,
And their castles in air ran up to the skies.

They pitied the children that sat in school,
They called the cows from the reedy pool,
And each sat down on her milking-stool,
And milked the cows in the morning cool.

Two little maids sang a milking tune,
"Pattie and Peg will have money soon-







TWO LITTLE MILKMAIDS 17

Ladies in silk with a silver spoon,
Donkeys and dolls and a toy balloon!"


A boy drew near in a smock-frock sack,
A boy with his hands behind his back;
For wasting time he had a knack,
And so his name was Idle Jack.


N-I














Pattie and Jack went frisking about-
Pattie and Jack, with a laugh and a shout.
One little milkmaid alone left out-
Poor little Peggy began to pout.
Pattie, playing with Idle Jack,








Climbed to ride on the old cow's back.
Pattie and Jack went sulking around the hay stack:
Pattie and Jack, with a laugh and alack shout.





2
One little milkmaid alone left out-
Poor little Peggy began to pout.


Pattie, playing with Idle Jack,
Climbed to ride on the old cow's back.

Peggy went sulking around the hay stack:
No one to play with--alas and alack!
2


i, -







18 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

Two little pails unguarded stood,
Milking pails of the whitest wood.
Two little dogs said, We would if we could!"
Their tongues were thirsty, it looked so good.


The farmyard dogs, with bark and scoff,
Said, "Who's afraid?" and "Come, show off!"
The pug said, "I can climb a trough";
And he drank the milk till it made him cough.














And "Mind you don't tumble, my darling pup







'Twas done by the milkmaids' terrier Rover;
Four little milkmaids' pug went rolling over
GreedyOut of the milk and ino sweet a clever.
Growling,- Get out!" and Let mze get a sup!"
And "Mind you don't tumble, my darling pup !"


Pail number one upset--moreover,
'Twas done by the milkmaids' terrier Rover;
And the milkmaids' pug went rolling over
Out of the milk and into the clover.







TWO LITTLE MILKMAIDS

Pail number two stood full and white,
Till six little dogs began to fight.
Splash went the second pail, oh, what a sight!-
Six little dogs in a terrible plight!


ii~h~'. :-


I t


Far away from the dairy
gate,
Two little milkmaids
mourned their fate.
Peggy took care of her
pail too late,
" Toby and Rover sat
down to wait.


SImpudent Rover got into the pail;
On the stool sat the pug with the curly tail;
In the middle stood Peggy, to ee-p
and wail--
Not a penn'orth of milk had the
maids for sale. ,

No milk, no money, no silk,
no sheep, .K ',,, t
No dozen of dolls, no ',
donkey to keep:

Slowly home they had to creep,
Bending their bonnets down to weep.


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20 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

First went Peggy, to point the track;
Dogs came next-white, brown, and black;
Pattie was sobbing along at the back,
With the pails, and the stools, and Idle Jack.


Cheer up! little maidens. Cheer up! say I.
After spilt milk it's no use to cry.
The castles in air fell down from the sky;
But we all shall have honey for tea by and by.



















4~


"Slowly home they had to creep."


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The Way to Fairyland


THEY went together, hand in hand,
Seeking the way to Fairyland.


He was seven, and she was six:
Those two were always up to tricks.


He took the dog, or the dog took him:
Rollo was twice as big as Jim.


Sissy had wrapped her doll in a shawl;
So, you see, they were four in all.


Trampity tramp! Oh, isn't it grand!
All setting off to Fairyland?


The rain came down, and, shelter skelter,
They had to get under a tree for shelter.


They sat and leant against each other:
The girl was sad, the boy said, "Bother!"
23






BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Even the dog began to whine:
They sat so long in a doleful line.


The doll was patient all the while,
And smiled with an unchanging smile.


Till suddenly a rainbow spread
Across the skies-blue, yellow, red!


Quick Where the rainbow meets the ground,
There is the land of the fairies found.


So hurry and hurry, hand in hand,
To the rainbow gates of Fairyland.


Long ago the rainbow faded:
The little pair were tired and jaded.


"Don't lag behind!" cried Jim to Rollo:
"You must take care of us, and follow."


"Don't go to sleep," said sister Sis,
And shook her dolly with a kiss.


They would not stop, they would not play,
They never picked blackberries all the way.







THE WAY TO FAIRYLAND


Sadly at last they came to a stand,
Poor little pilgrims to Fairyland!


They asked a girl; she shook her head,
"I know no place of that name," she said.


They asked a boy; he said, If you please,
Will you give me that dog for a pound of cheese?"


So they went farther, and one and all
Stopped before a policeman tall.


"Policeman, policeman, send us, pray,
To Fairyland the nearest way."


"Where do you come from?" he inquired.
"We don't know where, we are so tired.


"Please tell us-don't you understand?-
The way we should go to Fairyland."


"I think," he said, "that information
Can best be given at the station.


"Come along to our inspector; he,
Perhaps, will look in the Directory."







26 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

The helmet led them down the street-
Four big paws and four little feet-


To a whitewashed room with benches and sand
They asked at the station for Fairyland.


"It takes a very long time to look
For fairy addresses in that big book.


"Wait, little lady; and wait, young sir:
Sit on the bench, and don't you stir.


"Put dolly to sleep against the wall,
And the great big dog shall take care of you all.


Jim sat straight, for he was older,
But Sissy leant against his shoulder.


The dog lay down on the sanded floor,
And they all were asleep for an hour or more,


For they had wandered many a mile;
But the doll kept awake with a pleasant smile.


What was the rattle? The lamps were shining.
Whose was the carriage with velvet lining?







THE WAY TO FAIRYLAND 27

The homeward speed made the carriage shake,
Till the boy and girl were half awake.


And there was the dog on the opposite seat,
And the staring doll: her smile was sweet.


The two little wanderers homeward sped.
Supper, and candles-good-night !-go to bed


For Fairyland's farther than Timbuctoo,
And China's Wall, and the Mountains Blue.


By paths of moonshine pilgrims go;
But they never take dollies and dogs-oh no!


















The Lay of the Lady Florinda


THE lamplighter came, with his pole and his light-
He was lighting the gas, it was very near night;
He was lighting the gas just outside in the square,
And the Lady Florinda sobbed, "Oh, I don't care!"


And all through the city, his muffins to sell,
Went the muffin-man walking, and ringing his bell;
And the nursery table was laid out for tea:
Said Lady Florinda, "Not any for me!"


The dear little sparrows, so cosy and brown,
Were shaking their feathers for couches of down,
And hiding by chimneys-the poor little things!-
And tucking their little heads under their wings.


But the Lady Florinda would not go to bed:
And "I won't take my tea!" and "I don't care!" she said.
She was seven years old, and she stood on a chair
To look out of the window and say, "I don't care!"
28







THE LAY OF THE LADY FLORINDA 29

For-was it not sad ?-ever since she was out
The Lady Florinda had been in a pout:
The nurse would not stop Punch and Judy to see,
So she said, I don't care !" and "I won't have my tea !"


The Lady Florinda has run up the stair,
And thrown off her pinafore down on a chair;
There was no one to speak to, so never she spoke,
But she put on her hat and her little white cloak.


The hat and the cloak were a beautiful white,
Not suited a bit to that hour of the night;
And she never looked down at her poor little toes:
She had only her slippers-red leather, with bows.


Oh! nobody knew, when she stole to the hall;
When she opened the door there was no one to call;
But the clock went on ticking-tick-tack and tick-tack,
And my lady ran out: will she ever come back?


My lady was seven, my lady was sweet,
And she trotted away down the gas-lighted street
In her little white cloak and her little white hat,
With the two little shoes going fast pit-a-pat.


"Oh! where's Punch and Judy? Oh! where can it be?
They were somewhere down here: it was then half-past three.







30 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

Oh! where's Punch and Judy? 'Twas such a fine box,
With a drum and a whistle, and squeaking and knocks.


"Oh! where's Punch and Judy ('twas then half-past three),
With a lovely live Toby worth stopping to see?
He was such a nice Toby: he barked in the show."
Oh! how could she find them? Which way did they go?


The Lady Florinda has turned to the right,
I"e has turned to the left: she has lost
herself quite.
She flies through the crowd, along
''"'i .this street and that:
F i 1 nLeaves one shoe in a puddle, and
/; it ,. loses her hat.


.I ., -- The people look round where the
Shops are all bright,
S As the gay little figure runs crying
with fright.
Oh, where will she run to, and what will she do,
With one foot in ,a stocking and one in a shoe?


The rain began pouring: all wet was her hair;
And she wanted her tea; and she really did care.
She sank on a doorstep-sat weeping aloud;
And round Lady Florinda there gathered a crowd.






THE LAY OF THE LADY FLORINDA 31

They asked for her name, and her voice was so weak,
That she said, "Punch and Judy," and then could not
speak.
They asked for her dwelling, and why she was there;
And she said, "Punch and Judy," and wept in despair.


Meanwhile, in the Countess's house, far away,
They were weeping and wailing at close of the day:
The butler was crying, .
my Lord in a rage, ,
And my Lady distressed I.
by the howls of the '
page. -


For they searched and ,. -.' '-" .'
they called her, but all /, .
was in vain- .
The Lady Florinda comes i L
never again; '
Oh, never again will she scream in a fret!
Oh, never again will her tea-cup upset!


Oh, never again-(or at least so they fear)-
Will the chairs be made sticky with marmalade smear!
And never again, in the dusk unawares,
Will they tread upon dolly and tumble downstairs!







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


She is gone! She is lost! They went searching the square,
And found a policeman, and asked in despair:-
" Oh, gentle policeman! bring back to my Lord
A lost child of seven-There's one pound reward!"


To the home of the Countess, from eight until ten,
Came children of seven with helmeted men;
The children were screaming, the children were wild,
For every policeman had captured a child.


They brought girls and boys: they brought thin ones and fat;
One brought a red shoe, and another a hat;
And a shilling was given to him with the shoe,
And the man with the hat was rewarded with two.


And at last came Florinda-a sovereign down
To the burly policeman that brought her from town.
She was black as a sweep, and as wet as could be,
And my Lord said, How naughty-you cost one pound
three!"


































"For every policeman had captured a c/ild."


7-77-7


I~~I




:-7;2
--
















The Magic Slate


0 LITTLE MAIDS who go to school
And say that six and three are eight,
And slowly plod from rule to rule,
Remember the Enchanted Slate.


For, oh! it may be very fine
A game of fox and goose to play,
And get three crosses in a line;
But there may come a doleful day-


A doleful day, when, tired and slow
You idle on, till comes youi fate,
And down the pencilled path you go,
Like Maysie with the Magic Slate.


The day was hot; the sum was long;
And by the wall she idly sat,
And said, "I think the book is wrong:
It always, always comes to that!"
35







36 .BUTTERFLY BALLADS

So, turning to the other side
Of that old slate with wooden frame,
She wondered at one yellow spot,
And what it was, and why it came.


And round and round the yellow spot
She drew a whirling line of white,
Played puzzles, fox and geese-what not?
With her next neigh-
Sbour on the right.

Then, tired of sums
"A Shand tired of play,
S p She sat and leant
The against the wall,
Sie Drew faces looking
all one way,
d s And curly dogs, and houses
I small.

The flies were buzzing on the
pane;
The day was hot; the room was still.
She walked along a pencil line,
A chalky pathway, all downhill.


A pencil followed with a squeak,
And Maysie shuddered and ran on-







THE MAGIC SLATE


-- -- A pencil's shoes should never
creak:
She looked behind her-it was
gone,


And she was all alone--alone.
R IThe sky was grey, the land
i was black,
m"5,, I No grass-but all a world of
stone,
With just one narrow chalky
track.


I[l i And then the little path of
Nt white
Went all in circles round and round,
And smaller every circle ran,
Until the yellow house was found-


The yellow house with
open door,
Where cake was spread, -
and nuts and pears.
Said Maysie, "This I -
read before:
It is the story of Three -- .
Bears."







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Not bears, but dwarfs! Ah! now I know:
I'm Snow-white with the seven wee men!"
She saw them come, a zig-zag row;
But more than seven: there were ten.

The last was round, the first was straight;
They laughed and pointed in derision:
One slim, one fat, a crooked eight,
And said, She cannot do division ^',A
















She swallows walnuts, shells and all,
And down her throat the pears will roll:
Just watch; I hope the cakes are small,
Because she always eats them whole."

The child gave up the feast, and cried;
Then came consoling Number Three.
"You might do fractions if you tried;
Come now, and dance instead with me."







THE MAGIC SLATE 39

She danced outside. The little house
Shot up and shone, a yellow moon;
They danced aslant a country dance,
And all the pencils squeaked a tune.


A myriad dwarfs came, line by line,
Till in the corner row she stood-
One, Three, herself, and Nought, Six, Nine:
The corner had a wall of wood.


'Twas then the dwarfs began to snore;
The fellow moon fell down and
Li _ike.

,II .I I 1e slate was on

Si "' *- I the schoolroom


.i When Maysie
gave a jump
\ .\'' .. and woke!


r ~ :'












The Fairy Wedding

PRINCE POPPY in red
Is going to wed
Sweet little Princess Fay.

"- ..... .".... .. ..
tir'l .; ,
':' .-f )' ],: ,",L/ r "." : ... i '- : .1
. / ." ',











Here they come,
'40
-: ,~- 4i,









With a drum-tum, turn!
Get out of the way-out of the way.
40







THE FAIRY WEDDING

All the time
There's a wedding chime
Ringing where no one knows.
Merry bells ring
Ding, dong, ding,
In the breeze whenever it blows.


/' /X


Stand aside
For the little bride,
Stand for her train to pass.
There she goes
In the white of a rose,
On the edge 'of the garden grass.







BUTTERFLY BALLADS

Glow-worms bright
Make lantern light
The bushy branches under,
And even the owls,
Those round-eyed fowls,
Look down from the trees in wonder.


The wedding train
Is gone again,
The crickets are chirping loud,
And the moths of the town,
So big and brown,
Run after them, all in a crowd.


Can't we go too?
Come along-do !
Come with a run, run, run.
Though they all are past,
If we run very fast,
We may be in time for the fun.


Shall we get cake
Of the very best make,
Almond and sugar all over?
I am sadly afraid
They have wedding-cake made
Only of honey and clover.







THE FAIRY WEDDING

Have they presents on view?
A dozen or two:-
Acorn cups in a set,
Of toadstools a stock,
And a dandelion clock,
And a ladybird just for a pet.


They will dance to-night,
In circles white,
Where mushroom rings are found:
Elf and fay
Will whirl and play
Merrily round and round.







44 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

The prince and the bride
Will mount and ride
Away for the honeymoon:
Up through the night
Will be their flight,
And I hope they will come back soon.




.- -,






..-4 ,, .





L--- i -


Will they go in a carriage
After the marriage?-
No; on the wings of a bat
They will fly away far
To the moon or a star.
Now what do you think of that?







THE FAIRY WEDDING 45

Then fly, fly away,
Prince Poppy and Fay,
It is three by the farmhouse clock:
The east is pearly,
And dawn comes early,
And hark! there's the crow of a cock.


Uck-uck-uck-koo!
Cock-a-doodle-doo!
Gone; not a stir, not a gleam!'
Have the fairies been here?
Did they all disappear?
Or was it a midsummer dream?
















The Boy that went to Sea


OH very hard was life at school-
His tasks he would not utter;
And very hard was life at home-
No jam-thick bread-and-butter.
And Master Jack was ten years old,
So he said to himself, said he-
I'll run away to sea-I wilL-
. I'll run away to sea!"


He packed his pockets; he stuffed
them tight
/ With provisions, a goodly store-
A nut to crack, and a bun to
bite,
And apples, a dozen or
more.
He buttoned a pancake inside his coat,
And kept it tidy and flat;
And he put some jam in his hat-he did-
He put some jam in his hat.







THE BOY THAT WENT TO SEA 47

And he said, "My old tin whistle I'll take-
The sailors will like a tune
When the ropes are tied, and their shoes they shake
In a hornpipe under the moon.
Then fare ye well, my guinea-pigs!
Good-bye, my rabbits three!
I'm going away to sea-I am-
I'm going away to sea."


But when he said, "My dog, good-bye!"
His tears began to fall;
Jock sat and begged, he knew not why,
Before him in the hall.
" Come, then, my faithful 4 ,,;,
terrier, I '
I'll never part from ,I I I
thee ; ''
We both shall go to sea, :.
my dog- P- I
We both shall go to '.'
sea!" 111



So Jack and Jock ran down the street--
They both went off excited:
The terrier smelt the pancake sweet,
And hoped he yet would bite it.







BUTTERFLY BALLADS

They passed the shops, they found the ships-
The noisy, busy dock;
And there stood Jack and Jock-they
I t r J c .-I J
TT:--ether, Jack and Jock.
.',~l~al5~ ,,!l- ..


.I'

j'-'r P'


~IT-~ bi~iL~d_ i


* i ne captain said they were
too small,
The sailor men admired
them,
S- And knelt and asked him.
one and all,


And so the captain hired them.
And Jack was entered "seaman
bold,"
Their names were in the book;
And Jock was "second cook," he
was,
And Jock was "second cook."


They sailed away, due west by '
east,
They went all round the maps;
And Jack on biscuits loved to feast,
And Jock got fat on scraps.


~- a






THE BOY THAT WENT TO SEA 49

They danced the sailor's hornpipe,
The captain and the crew;
And the little dog danced too-he did-
The little dog danced too.



But oh! they worked, tp:-e -cailr: i'.
gay,
They made the galley
fast, 'W
They ran aloft the live- l -


And slid right down


They washed the decks ', '2i,
with scented soap, .
And reefed aloft the
keel, ,
And round they turned
the wheel-and round
And round they turned the wheel.



But sudden came an earthquake shock:
The sharks were flung about,
The sea went up, the sky went down,
The ship went inside out.








50 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

Oh, take me home!" the sailor cried,
Awaking with a scream:
It only was a dream-that's all-
It only was a dream.


For never was there such a ship,
And never such a crew,
And never such a merry trip,
With such queer things to do.
So Master Jack remained at home,
His terrier dog and he;
And they never went to sea-oh no !-
They never went to sea.


















The Organ-Monkey


IT was the organ-grinder.
The children gathered round,
And the monkey Jo sat tamely,
And heard the dismal sound.
The belted coat of monkey Jo
Was red as a rose in June,
But the organ was an old one,
And always out of tune.


Oh! wistfully the monkey sat
Upon the organ sad,
And sometimes tried to clutch
the hair
Of some unhappy lad.
His ears were pink, his tail was
long,
He crouched and blinked his eyes;
The children hoped he wouldn't jump
And take them by surprise.







52 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

And when the people crowded near,
The master jerked a string;
The monkey ran upon the street,
And begged all round the ring.
And coppers poured into his hat,
And fortune followed soon
For the man that owned the monkey
And the organ out of tune.



The man grew rich and haughty,
And wore a larger hat,
And lived upon lobster salad
Till he was very fat;
And bought a beautiful organ,
With music new and gay,
And out again took monkey Jo,
And began to grind and play.



When Jo, in his scarlet jacket,
Heard the music under him grind
He kicked up such a racket,
He nearly went out of his mind.
He flung his cap at the postman,
And caught a nursemaid's head,
And chased a big policeman
Till the man was nearly dead.







THE ORGAN-MONKEY

And they caught the frantic monkey
Careering round the town,
And brushed him with a hair-brush,
And tried to tame him down.
The man had not a penny;
The shrieking crowd were fled;
So he sold the brand
pOUCL F STATION
new organ,
,And played the old
instead.

Mild as a lamb, the
monkey
Grieved for that organ
gay;
But when he heard the
old one
He fell and swooned
away.
He lay like a rag on the organ,
With his long tail hanging down:
And the news of the dying monkey
Attracted all the town.

The doctors and the dentists
Came running through the streets
The housewives came with jelly,
The children came with sweets;







BUTTERFLY BALLADS

The maidens came with custard,
And poultices of bran,
And plaisters made of mustard-
While wept the organ-man.


And some said, "Take him home to bed!"
And some said, "Bathe his feet!"


And some said, "Stand him on his head,
And give him jam to eat!"
He choked at smelling-bottles:
They fanned him with a fan,
And kept his sweets and custard
Beside him in a can.







THE ORGAN-MONKEY

Then spoke the organ-grinder:
"Alas! you cannot know
How very sympathetic
Was my poor monkey Jo.
The merry organ drove him wild,
The sad one flung him flat,
And our profession's trying,
And so he dies-like that! "


The people gathered round him,
The women sobbed, Poor thing!
He was not fit to rough it
In a jacket and a string."
The men turned out their pockets,
With cheering words like these:
" Here's forty pounds in coppers,
And let him live at ease!"


Then rose the merry monkey,
Like a jack-in-the-box rose he;
And the organ-grinder waved his hat,
And let the monkey free.
And Jo in the scarlet jacket,
And the happy organ-man,
Retired with a fortune of coppers
And the custard in a can.

















The Quest of the Cherry Pie


THREE knights one day- What's that you say-nights in a
day? No; these were knights that were spelt with a K. Well,
they met on the way and stopped to say, What a very fine
morning!" and How do you do?" and lifted their hats-big
tin hats too. One was Sir Bogey de Bullaboo. He had kicked
up a rattle in many a battle, making his enemies yell Oh !"-
and delighting in fighting, and slashing and smiting-and
quick for a quarrel, and glad of a noise, and worse than seventy
thousand boys: so he must have been a terrible fellow.
He rode a black horse, and his armour was black as a tarred
fence, or a chimney-stack, or a beetle, or jet, or perhaps we can
get something blacker than that-black as a blot or a great
sooty pot-black as the blackest black cat. When he was
dressed, he wore his crest,-three bits of black feather,-just to
complete him. So now you'll know him if you meet him; and
you can beat a retreat down the street, or run away round the
nearest corner, like the girl when the bull was going to horn her.
But oh! the next was a beautiful knight. He was shining
like silver; his plumes were all white. Ever since he put down







THE QUEST OF THE CHERRY PIE 57

his breakfast cup, the page and the butler had polished him up.
He had sat in his saddle, with patience sore tried, while they
stood on two step-ladders, one at each side, and smeared him
with powder, and made him look cloudier; but 'twas only the
powder they used for the plate, and they polished it off till he
looked first-rate, being rubbed and scrubbed by both together
with brushes and dusters and chamois leather. Said the butler,
a proud beholder of his own broad grin in his master's shoulder,
"Now I'll just polish the whitening out of the cracks, sir."
And the page kept puffing, Shine yer back, sir!"
So when he rode out and turned about, he shone all over
like a sugar-tongs or a silver cover. All the sunshine danced
to catch him ; and his horse was white, to match him.
The last of the three was a silent man, as dingy as any tin
can. He wore one feather, that once was red, stuck like a
weathercock upon his head : the shabbiest bird that perched on
a rail wouldn't have had such a thing in his tail.
And where are you going with that rag on your head?"
In search of adventures," the shabby knight said.
And you," said Sir Bogey, in tones polite, to that fine old
fogey they called the white knight. I prithee,-Sir Knight, are
you-riding in search of adventures too ? "
"Oh, nothing so grand," said the glittering knight; I'm just
out to get an appetite."
"Why, that will be rather bad for you," said the black S.ir
Bogey de Bullaboo ; "in all the country round, near or far, since
the war, there's hardly a dinner to be found."







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


But I think that a man has a perfect right to get what he
can," said the grand white knight. If I can't get a dinner, or
even a bite, at least I may get an appetite."
Oh, nonsense; that will never do," said the black Sir Bogey
de Bullaboo. If you and I found a cherry pie,-and you know
we might meet it,-you'd be in too great a hurry to eat it, and
I'd be cheated."
Said the white knight, "Why-oh, tell me why-in this
world did you think of a cherry pie? And why do you ride
abroad to-day? and why do you sniff at the skies all the way,
like a sportsman's dog when he smells the grouse, or a cat that
watches a hole for a mouse?"
The black knight answered: Our friend with one feather
rides out for adventures in this hot weather. And you, Sir
Knight, with the plumes of white, are riding in quest of an
appetite. But my quest is the best of all, for I-am riding in
search of cherry pie. I woke and smelt it at break of day, and
saddled my charger and rode away."
The white knight laughed, and his horse went prancing: he
shone like the sun in a looking-glass dancing. Oh, ho! it sets
my heart a-thumping, and it sets my dish-covers all a-jumping,
to hear of a cherry pie. I never shall rest until I die, but join
in search of that cherry pie."
Said the shabby knight: "And so will I."
Sir Bogey de Bullaboo looked round and frowned. Nobody
asked you, sir," said he; "and you both are taking advantage
of me. There can hardly be enough for three. I told you







THE QUEST OF THE CHERRY PIE 59

about it, and I'll be the winner: I shan't be cheated out of my
dinner."
Now that's enough, don't be so gruff," said the shabby
knight. "" My dear Bullaboo, don't fight."
So he asked them to sing a song, and go peaceably along.
Nobody spoke; but they looked for smoke, and kept taking
sniffs and whiffs, to know where the cherry pie was baking.
This was the rhyme they sang all the time-

Well-a-day! the war is done,
All the siege and slaughter:
Nothing left for anyone
But porridge and cold water.

C/orus-Heigh ho! the enemy's beaten,
All the chickens and ducks are eaten.
Stew your boots and toast your candles,
Broil umbrellas with ivory handles!


Well-a-day the war is won,
Hard we fought and harder;
There's glory now for everyone,
And nothing in the larder.

Chorus-Heigh ho! the enemy's beaten,
All the chickens and ducks are eaten.
Stew your boots and toast your candles,
Broil umbrellas with ivory handles!







60 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

By which mournful ditty we perceive-and 'twas a pity-that
in all the castles about, provisions were run out. There was
porridge, as much as they could wish; but three times a day-
they were tired of the dish; it was even believed, by those who
knew, that the porridge was only a sort of bran stew, made of
old dolls, and old pincushions too. This accounts for the anxiety
of these three knights for a little variety; and it made Sir
Bogey's sense so keen, that, as we have seen, he woke at break
of day, and smelt cherry pie ten miles away.
Well, singing that song, they jogged along; but of course
Sir Bogey de Bullaboo said the white knight, and the dingy
one too, were singing the chorus all wrong.
"Hush! never mind," said the bright white knight; "stop
here! Don't you find in the air a spice of something
nice ? "
The dingy knight was seen to be staring with all his might
at a distant castle, where smoke was whirling, out of a chimney,
in great clouds curling.
The black knight pointed from his horse: The cherry pie
is there, of course."
The shabby knight wheeled round so fast, that he was first,
and Sir Bogey last.
Each let his vizor down from his casque.
What in the world is that? you ask.
It means they hid eyes, nose, and all, by letting the fronts of
their helmets fall. Riding in state to a castle gate, they put
down their vizors, to look well dressed and in their best ; for the







THE QUEST OF THE CHERRY PIE 61

same reason that ladies wear veils, or dogs wear collars dotted
like nails, or peacocks raise and spread their tails. The white
knight and Bogey de Bullaboo thought vizors became them-
do you ?
Let's go back," called the knight in black to the other pair.
" Come back and start fair."
The others were so very good as to turn back as fast as they
could, to make a fair start all together-the white knight, the
black knight, and that poor fellow with his armour dingy and
rusty and yellow, and with one ragged feather.
Just for a friendly remark, he spoke: What a good thing
that I saw the smoke "
"I pointed it out first," Sir Bogey replied.
S"But I smelt it first," the white knight cried.
You!" Sir Bogey de Bullaboo roared; "why, I felt it
the moment after I snored."
The two got so angry, they rode without knowing which
way they were going.
Come on said one.
Be off! said the other.
And the dingy man rode in between, saying, Don't make
a scene; now, don't make a bother."
But the black knight was determined to fight: he hoped, if
the other was thrown, he would ride to the castle alone, be
invited to dinner by all who were there, and eat up the other
poor fellow's share.
Now, the moment it came to a fight in earnest downright, Sir







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Bogey saw, to his great delight, that their dingy friend rode off
in a fright.
The white knight fought fiercely, with crashing and clashing:
never before was such slashing and smashing. The noise of
the battle was like tin cans dashing to make no end of a
rattle.
At last the white knight felt giddy and addle, and a poke of
the spear sent him out. of his saddle. He lay on the ground
without thinking of rising-which was not in the least surprising;
for as to those knights in the ages of history, how they ever
stuck on a horse was a mystery, or how the horse kept straight
under such a clatter and weight, and didn't kneel down and roll
his load over his head on the road. So the grand white knight
lay just where he fell, and kicked on his back like a crab in its
shell.
But the victor, Bogey de Bullaboo, put spurs in his horse,
and, galloping, flew-to the castle full speed on his coal-
black steed, and knocked at the door with a double knock
too.
All elated, Sir Bogey waited on the drawbridge across the
moat; his spirits were high, so he thought he'd try to find his
voice and clear his throat, and he sang the Song of the Cherry
Pie. He had reason to know from visits before, that one
sometimes was kept on the step at the door.


"'Little maid, ah! tell me why
Are you like a cherry pie?'







THE QUEST OF THE CHERRY PIE 63

'I am sweet,' the maiden said,
'And my cheeks are cherry red;
And another reason strikes me-
'Tis that everybody likes me.'


"'Little maid, I cannot doubt it;
Yet there's some mistake about it.
Shall I, shall I tell you why
You are like a cherry pie?
'Tis that, always, I'm afraid,
You want more sugar, little maid.'"


Sir Bogey, like the Christmas waits, was singing for glee, at the
castle gates, when the door was suddenly opened wide, and the
castle cook was standing inside, all in linen, with his apron tied;
his hands were folded behind his back; his cap was flat, and his
face was fat, and he was as plump as a sack. The castle cook
was not a man fed on pincushion and broken doll's bran. In
fact, it was clear he lived on good cheer; and the great Sir
Bogey de Bullaboo requested his share of the good cheer too.
"Good sir," said the cook, it's all eaten up ; there's not a
crumb left, nor a drain in a cup."
Said the knight, "Was there cherry pie cooked by you?
Oh, tell me all, and tell me true! For I am Sir Bogey de
Bullaboo; and I fought a knight in the field close by, that I
alone might take for my own the stranger's share of that
cherry pie."







64 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

The castle cook began to jeer. Oh, what a joke! A
stranger was here. He said two more were coming soon, and
begged us to leave them a plate and a spoon; he said they
were down in the big field fighting. But that cherry pie was
so inviting, that we could not let him have his wish; so we
gave him his share, and we scraped out the dish."
The great Sir Bogey de Bullaboo slowly to his home
withdrew, crying, "Woe is me that I was greedy! Woe is
me that I am needy! After quarrels and disputes, home I
come to stew my boots!"
















The Witch and the Truant


THERE was an old woman who lived in a dell;
She was a witch, as my story will tell.


And there was a boy came walking that way,
Playing truant from school one day.


"Good morrow, my laddie!" the old dame said:
She wore a high hat, and her cloak was red.


She wore a red cloak and a steeple-crowned hat,
And under her arm she carried a cat.


" Good morrow, my laddie! What's your name?"
Said this very inquisitive, ancient dame.


" My name is Timothy Tupkins, ma'am,
And mother is making her damson jam."


" Timothy, Timothy, tell me pray,
How are you out for a holiday?
5







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


"Mind how you answer!" the old dame said;
And even the black cat shook his head.


Timothy fell on his knees on the grass:
"Good madam, I pray you, let me pass.


.. ,, If you were a boy,
"' and if I were you,
S .4 Perhaps you might
''play truant too."


S The witch looked
S '' Pup, and the witch
". ; looked down,
And took off her hat,
S -and looked into
"--_ .. the crown,


And said, "Timothy Tupkins, get up out of that;
And would you mind holding my faithful cat?


"I wonder would I a truant be,
If I were you, and if you were me?"


She caught him fast in her scarlet cloak:
"I'll try it, my laddie-just for a joke!"







THE WITCH AND THE TRUANT 67

She whirled, and danced, and spun him round,
Till they fell apart on the grassy ground;


So changed you couldn't tell which was which:
For the witch was the boy, and the boy was the witch.



Timothy Tupkins came home to cram
Seventeen pots of damson jam.


And the witch's cat, in the dead of night,
Woke Timothy's mother up in a fright:


Came down the chimney, with soot and noise;
Sang up the stairs'in a tom-cat voice;


Found the way to Timothy's bed,
And purred all night on top of his head.


And wasn't the witch's tom-cat proud ?-
Nobody slept, for he purred so loud.


Timothy Tupkins went to school,
And took his book, and sat on his stool.


The cat stole in, and, growing bolder,
Jumped, and sat on the scholar's shoulder,







68 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

And "miow'd" at the master, and winked at the boys,
Till lessons were lost in laughter and noise.


Exstingue p!/ssum Hunt it out!"
And the cat and the master went chasing about.


The ink was spilt
---- and the table
turned,
SAnd not a lesson
was said or
learned.


S-And Timothy sat
'1" with a dunce's
cap,
S.- And.the cat was safe
-/ / in the dunce's lap.


"Oh, pussy!" said he, "let us steal away,
And go and eat blackberries all the day."


"Why not?" said the cat. It spoke out loud-
The boys and the master fled in a crowd.


The witch was up in a poplar tree-
A very queer place for a witch to be.







THE WITCH AND THE TRUANT

And-oh, but it was the strangest thing!
This funny old woman had made a swing.


"Good morrow, my laddie; good morrow," said she;
"Go back to your lessons, and leave me free."


"No," said the boy. "It is hardly the rule
For dames of my age to be taught at school."


I tell you, you could not say which was which,
For the witch was the boy, and the boy was the witch.







70 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

The faithful cat, with eyes of fire,
Chased the false witch high and higher.


Till down she fell, as if never to stop,
All the way from the poplar top.


And the truant boy was himself as he fell:
"What an adventure I have to tell!"


And the witch tucked up the cat in her gown,
And sailed off on a broomstick, and never came down.















Wings


" OH, give me wings to fly away !"
So sang Belinda Brown.
She practised singing every day;
Her scales went up and down.
She sang, "Oh, would I were a bird!"
And "Si oiseau j'etais,"
Till something suddenly occurred
In quite a startling way.

Belinda Brown would give a shout
That made the lamps to ring,
And nearly blew the windows out,
Oh, but that girl could sing!
She sat at the piano-forte
And banged it all the day.
"Oh, give me wings to fly-y-y,
To fly-y-y away!"

They set the windows open wide:
Her friends said, "Dear, how sweet!"
Belinda's voice was all their pride:
One heard it down the street.
71







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


"Oh, give me wings to fly away!"
The neighbours understood,
And fervently they wished one day-
They really wished she would.


Belinda ceased her song at last,
Stood up and crossed the floor;
The white French window back was cast
Like any garden door.
Behind her, like a butterfly,
Her gauzy wings projected-
They startled her as she went by,
In window glass reflected.


" Wings wings at last she cried. "What fun! "
And danced with glee and laughter,
Went towards the garden with a run;
But oh! the moment after,
She floated from the steps, and flew,
Ascending like a kite,
And screamed, "Oh, catch me catch me-do "
At such a giddy height.


" They told me I would crack my voice
If I went up too high;
And here I am, against my choice,
Straight making for the sky."








WINGS


She tangled in the telegraph,
And really felt quite vexed
To see the people stand and laugh:
"What will the girls do next? "


Her pretty wings went flutter, flap,
From England off to France.
Belinda said, "How. like the map!"
And knew it at a glance.
She could not quite enjoy the view,
The height was so appalling;
She shook like jelly, as. she flew,
With nervous fear of falling.


Away she floated o'er the Alps,
And tried to catch their tops.
"Farewell," said she," to toast and tea,
To chickens and to chops.
For terra cotta how I long-
No !-terra firima stony.
0 Italy, the land of song!
O dolce macaroni "


But, blown away across the sea,
At last she slowly sinks,
And sees old Egypt's pyramids,
The desert, and the sphinx.







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Then up again, with weary wings,
She drifted, hopeless; gazing
At coral islands round as rings,
And tropic ocean blazing.


She sighed, "My wings, from mile to mile,
Go slower-flip, flap, flop !
The natives of some savage isle
Will eat me when I drop.
In some lone isle where palm trees stand,
There, there will end my folly ;
And parrots, in their native land,
Croak o'er me, "Pretty Polly!"


Ah, sad indeed were such a fate!
But when her wings were failing,
She saw a captain and a mate,
Big steamer-bridge-white railing.
And safe at last she caught the mast:
The captain and the crew
Said, "Shall we shoot that splendid bird,
Or catch it for the Zoo?"


She cried, "Oh, spare Belinda Brown !"
They answered not a word;
But climbed, and caged her, brought her down-
It talks-the Mermaid Bird! "







WINGS 75

She said, I am a hapless maid;
Oh, speak not of the Zoo
I wished for wings to fly away-
Alas! one day I flew!"


The captain opened wide her cage,
The mate took off her wings;
Some wicked elf had tied them on,
And knotted all the strings.
The first-class passengers for days
Discussed Belinda's history;
" The girl," they said, has flighty ways,
But still there is a mystery !"
















His Last Ride


COME, all ye boys, and list to me-
Sit still, or else stand steady-
And you shall hear the history
Of Johnny Hodge and Neddy.
Come, all ye patient asses, too,
And near our circle draw,
And if the story comforts you,
Sing Ho and a high hee-h.aw!"


A heavy boy was
SJohnny Hodge,
A very heavy boy;
i| 5 !' BBut Neddy was a merry
Sass,
S Afour-legg'd thing
of joy:
A waggish donkey
with a will-
S He wagged his
under jaw,







HIS LAST RIDE


He wagged his ears, he wagged his tail,
Singing, "Ho and a high hee-haw!"

They grew together side by side:
Hodge said he loved the beast;
But how to manage him, and ride,
He knew not in the least.
They went at Neddy's own sweet will-
The donkey's will was law ;
When Neddy liked, they both stood still,
With a "Ho and a high hee-haw!"

When -Johnny went to see the fair,
He wore his old smock-frock,
His gaiters were a sorry pair,
His hat showed many a knock.
New finery was there-alas!
He wished for all he saw-
Blue coats with buttons made of brass.
Poor Neddy sighed, "Hee-haw!"

So Johnny went to every stall:
Saw mermaids for a penny;
A penny for the tent of ghosts
(Of course there were not any);
Another penny for a swing-
He swung with fear and awe:
While Neddy cropped some green-leafed thing,
And nobody knew-" Hee-haw!"







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


But vainly, vainly Hodge had turned
His mind to sweets and swings:
For that blue coat his' bosom burned-
Brass buttons are nice things.
All night he laid his heartless schemes,
While on the stable straw
Poor Neddy slept with
happy dreams,
And snored a soft
S0" Hee-haw!"

SNext day the merry sun
arose
For splendid summer
_S" W weather.
Hodge tied a rope to
Neddy's nose,
And off they went
together.
The last day of the village fair-
Hodge mounted thoughtfully:
"I think I'll sell the donkey, there.
Woa, Neddy! Gee up, gee!

"For I must buy that coat of blue,
With buttons all of brass;
The tinker wants a donkey too-
I'll say, 'Look-there's an ass!'






HIS LAST RIDE 79

So good-bye, Ned! Off Neddy goes
The tinker's cart to draw."
Whereat the donkey raised his nose
And whooped a wild "Hee-haw!"


Not to the tinker! No. He danced,
He swung his tail on high,
And gaily down the street he pranced:
"To the tinker! No-not I!"
Away! his master loved him not;
Away 'tis time to go- .
But not to draw the
tinker's cart.
John Hodge cried,
"Stop him Wo!" t


And Neddy stopped-too '
suddenly
And flung his heels on
high,
And Johnny Hodge went
soaring up
With one despairing cry.
He tumbled over Neddy's head:
He fell-alack !-alas!
Just then the tinker passed and said,
"Look, Neddy !- There's an ass !"







BUTTERFLY BALLADS

But now the frisky beast was free
From Hodge the greedy-hearted,
And round the corner galloped he,
And like a shot departed.
S They could not find him in the pound,
Il Nor grasp him by the law;
\ They advertised: he was not found-
Hurrah and a high hee-haw!


.It may be to a sunny clime
That donkey sped away,
And rolled in beds of scented
thyme,
And taught young lambs to bray,
And skipped with little shepherds
-- -there,
And shepherdesses sweet,
And always lived in clover fields,
And got pound-cake to eat.

Let's hope 'twas so for Neddy,
Though I doubt that happy end;
But the moral of his story
Is: Never sell your friend.
And if you go out riding,
Hold fast-stick on like glue;
And don't say, There's a donkey!'
Lest he make an ass of you.

















A Chinese Story


HAVE you heard of the lovely Sing-see?
She lived upon ginger and tea,
She had such little shoes
That she hardly could choose
But go hopping-the lovely Sing-see.


Sing-see was a Mandarin's daughter,
She had gardens and gold-fish in water,
And she walked round the pond
With azaleas beyond:
The Mandarin's beautiful daughter.


'Twas all like the willow-plate ware;
For fanciful bridges were there,
Built up with bamboos-
There were wonderful views
Like you see on the willow-plate ware.
6







82 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

And far away rose the pagoda,
It stood on the hill down the road-a
Mile off or so,
With the rice fields below,
And the birds flew about the pagoda.


Well, all was in peace for a season.
A change came: I'll tell you the reason.
Kwang met with Hang-Foo
And said, How do you do?"
And both muttered sullenly, "Treason!"


For the Mandarin's beautiful daughter
Had many admirers who sought her;
And everything nice,
Made of sugar and spice,
In the daintiest china they brought her.


But the richest of all was Hang-Foo,
And he dressed in a beautiful blue;
His pig-tail was neat,
And hung down to his feet:
The yellow and sallow Hang-Foo.


But there was an ardent young poet,
So famous, his name you must know it:







A CHINESE STORY


Of course I mean Kwang,
Who so tenderly sang,
The soulful and gifted young poet.


He sang serenades with a gong;
In the silence of evening his song
Made the Mandarin jump
With the very first thump
Of the stick on the Chinaman's gong.


In the evening he sat on the wall,
And sang with a sorrowful call:
'Twas a startling effect,
For you would not expect
A gong on the top of the wall.


"Maiden with the pasted hair
Flower-pinned, beyond compare,
Maiden with the gentle stare,
Chinese maiden!
Almond eyes I can't forget,
All aslant and black as jet,
Painted cheeks with roses set,
Chinese maiden!"


Then someone cried, "How do you do?"
And there was his rival Hang-Foo.







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


The poet climbed down,
Backwards, slow, with a frown,
And gruffly said, "How do you do?"


Climbing down, he had felt a slight jerk,
But climbing was difficult work.
Still he.could perceive
Hang-Foo had one sleeve
Stuffed bulky since that little jerk.


They bowed as polite as you please,
Salutations they said in Chinese:
"How old are you, friend?
May your life never end!"
They bowed as polite as you please.


But both of them muttering "Treason!"
They parted in haste, for this reason:
Hang-Foo said, you see,
"They have asked me to tea,"
And politely they bowed, growling "Treason!"


All the little Chinese of Canton
Cried, "Where is your pig-tail? It's gone!"
And the poet knew after,
The cause of their laughter,
As he went through the streets of Canton.







A CHINESE STORY


And he thought of the sleeve of Hang-Foo
(A sleeve is a pocket there too):
His tail was cut short,
In spite or in sport,
When he climbed backwards down to Hang-Foo.


With a large Chinese lantern light,
All crinkled and coloured and bright,
He went, somewhat later,
In search of the traitor,
And carried a lantern light.


Hang-Foo in his beautiful blue,
He straightway began to pursue;
And seizing in flight
The pig-tail, held tight
To the man in the beautiful blue.


The rice fields were flooded with water:
They fought for the Mandarin's daughter:
They went with a dash,
And a slip and a splash,
Through rice fields all flooded with water.


Hang-Foo, with his pig-tail so grand,
Felt it suddenly go in Kwang's hand:







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


It was bought in a shop,
And tied on at the top:
And off came his pig-tail so grand.


One back and one forward they tumbled,
And stood up all dripping, and grumbled,
Let us bow, and not strike,
For we both are alike:
All tail-less and muddy and tumbled."


So, muddy and meek, they went back,
And the way was all wet in their track;
And, looking unsightly,
They bowed most politely:
So weary and wise they went back.


And the maiden said "No" in the garden,
Her soft little heart seemed to harden:
She sent suitors away,
A score every day,
And walked round and round in the garden.


So she lived upon ginger and tea,
They say, to a hundred and three.
She devoted herself
To the jars on the shelf:
And she lived upon ginger and tea.















The Lay of the Red-hot Poker


PART I

HE made mud-pies
'Neath sunny skies,
When he was a boy like other boys;
He made mud-pies, and he made a noise.


The Spanish sun
Would bake a bun,
It blazes hot on flower and bud.
(Wherever did he get the mud?)


And yet I say
He loved to play
At those mud-pies the live-long day:
A wilful boy will have his way.


With studious pride
He also tried
Experiments with squibs and rockets,
For which he emptied out his pockets.
87







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Till neighbours moaned,
And jumped, and groaned.
"Oh, what a noise-it took the breath of us:
That horrid boy will be the death of us!"


Yet Pedro's father
Liked it rather,
And said, "This little lad, you see,
Is only fond of chemistry."


But every morning
SHe gave a warning
SUnto his son: "Look here, my
joker,
S Take care you never heat the

poker.


"My son, beware,
My son, take care:
There may be consequences dire:
Don't leave the poker in the fire."


Then Pedro grew,
As most boys do;
And all his youth he did persist:-
"I mean to be an Alchemist.







THE LAY OF THE RED-HOT POKER 89

"With time enough,
And books and stuff,
All things the druggist ever sold,
I'll find the secret, and make gold."


His father said,
With a shake of the head,
"You might make gold at any
trade,
But not as an Alchemist, I'm
afraid; ;


"At least I doubt it;
I don't know much about .
it.
But, Pedro, whatever you do or do not,
Don't on any account make the poker red-hot!"






PART II


Pedro the Alchemist lived in Spain,
Night and day he laboured in vain:
He was making gold,
The people were told.







90 BUTTERFLY BALLADS

Striving to make it, day and night,
He could not succeed-not yet-not quite.
And what did he make?
Why-a little mistake.


Pedro the Alchemist, learned man,
Had pestle and mortar, and pot and pan:
He talked like a book,
And he worked like a cook.


I His house was like a druggist's
_0 shop,
z The neighbours said he
) ought to stop.
0 But he said, "Not


I must try, try, try!"


He made explosions, horrid messes,
Strange smells, beyond all earthly guesses:
Pounded and brewed,
And steamed and stewed.


And blew off metal heated to vapour,
And gathered up the dross with a scraper.
"Not yet-by and by!
I must try, try, try!"







THE LAY OF THE RED-HOT POKER 91

Pedro the Alchemist, day by day,
Spent forty years, till his hair was grey.
Said the neighbours, "Stop!
Can't you let the thing drop?

"You cannot make gold, not the size of a button,
Or enough to stand a Spanish nut on,
Not the worth of a penny;-
No one ever made any."

Pedro the Alchemist poked the fire.
"Ah! little they know of my life's desire,
And the mixture new,
Which I think will do."

He made the mixture. "Now in a minute
I'll have the secret. I must put in it
Some iron old,
To turn to gold."

But where was the iron? What should he do?
He could not find even a nail or a screw.
The poker? Why wait?
It was stuck in the grate.

Into the mixture, swift as a shot,
He plunged the poker-alas, red-hot!
And like cannon loaded
The bowl exploded.







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Pedro the Alchemist soared on high,
Out through the ceiling, and into the sky.
The terrible noise
Brought crowds of boys.


And women came running, and
said, "I wonder
Was that a gun, or a peal
of thunder?"
"Thunder! No-louder!
He is blownto powder!"


For the Alchemist's house
-"~ /was flat on the ground,
And Pedro the Alchemist
couldn't be found.
But he fell from the sky at Seville,
And perhaps he lives there still.


The moral now:-It is not wise
To spend your boyhood at mud-pies.
But, whatever you do, do not
Make the poker red-hot.

















Algernon's Army


ALGERNON'S army is marching by-
Glory and victory lead the way!
Oh, but they lift their feet up high !-
Squeak the whistle and bang the tray !


Banners red are flaunting brave;
Helmets flash, and weapons
bristle;
Handkerchiefs on sticks they
wave-
Bang the tray and squeak
the whistle!


Algernon's army are soldiers
bold,
Golden youth for the war
to-day:
Every one of them six years old-
Bang the whistle and squeak the tray !







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


Algernon's army may bravely fall,
But never, oh never! shall run away:
Two ranks of three-six men in all-
Merrily bang the bulging tray!

A helmet bright has every man,
Proudly marching along the street-
A jelly mould or an old tin can-
Oh but the tray and the whistle are sweet!

All are armed for brave defence,
Shining sixpenny sword in hand:
Algernon's gun cost eighteen pence-
Whistle and bang for the soldiers' band!

"Right about face!" and Halt! and "Stop!"
Hear the commander hoarsely speak.
The army besieged the confectioner's shop-
Bang the tray and the whistle squeak !

"Left about face! Quick march!" he said.
Down the lane by briar and thistle-
Out of the town his troops he led-
Squeak the tray and bang the whistle!

Marching forward never to yield,
Where is the battlefield they seek?
If they can't find a battle, they can find a field-
Tramp, with the tray and the whistle squeak!







ALGERNON'S ARMY


Hurrah! hurrah for the field is won-
They took the field: it was easy to take-
Hurrah for the eighteen penny gun-
Whistle and bang: what a noise they make!

Down by the river the tents they pitch,
Making a camp, for rest is sweet.
Tents are imagined, you know, by the ditch-
Softly, softly, the tea-tray beat !

Soldiers dream of wars to
come,
Dream of home so far
away.
That ditch is full of frogs
and scum-
Dreamily, dreamily, beat
the tray !

Soldiers rest! Of glory think!
In a row they swing their
feet,
Seated on the ditch's brink-
Lullaby-the tea-tray beat !

Proudly hold the standards high,
After all the battle's riot;
Plant them in the sward close by-
Keep the tray and whistle quiet!







BUTTERFLY BALLADS


See, the army rests in camp,
'Kerchiefs red above them fly;
And the place is rather damp-
Tray and whistle-lullaby !

Sudden came the wild alarm-
Weep and wail, ah! well-a-day!
Fright and panic-hurt and harm-
Fling the whistle at the tray!

Suddenly came a wild surprise-
Algernon's army began to shriek:
"There he is! Here he is! Oh, what a size!"
Bang the tray and the whistle squeak!

The enemy jumped. The captain bold
Clung to Tommy, and Tom to Jack;
Tumbling Jack on Peter rolled-
Bulge the tray and. the whistle crack

Poor little Peter fell upon Jim,
Jim upon Jeremy, last in the line;
Each cried the other was squeezing him-
Sadly now should the whistle whine!

Algernon's army tried to rise,
And over the edge the army fell;
Green stuff covered them up to the eyes--
Drum the tray with a solemn swell!


















2 Y


-~--


" And over the edge the army fell."


:*


~-~----







ALGERNON'S ARMY


Slimy and grimy, and wet to the skin,
Algernon's army went running away.
Each said the other had pulled him in-
Beat a retreat on the whistle and tray !


Who was the enemy, great and grim?
Whence, oh! whence, did the monster come?
A jumping frog at the water's brim-
Hark in the distance the whistle and drum !


Only a frog that danced too near,
Out of the ditch where the polywogs play.
He won the battle-the fact is clear-
Still the whistle and stop the tray!




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