• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The doll picnic
 When I grow up
 Bubbles
 The sparrows who would not go to...
 The jumping Jackstones
 The big fish
 "Shut the door"
 The lawn party
 The wigwam
 A rainy day
 Tobogganning
 Kitty and dolly
 Skid, the white rat
 Back Cover






Group Title: Golden reader series
Title: Playtime story book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086667/00001
 Material Information
Title: Playtime story book
Series Title: Golden reader series
Physical Description: 24 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Humphrey, Maud, b. 1905 ( Illustrator )
Hayes Lithographing Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Hayes Lithographing Co.
Place of Publication: Buffalo
Publication Date: [190-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1905   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1905   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated with six colored plates by Maud Humphrey and black and white drawings.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086667
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002815404
oclc - 50225848
notis - ANU3914

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    The doll picnic
        Page 6
    When I grow up
        Page 7
    Bubbles
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The sparrows who would not go to sleep
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The jumping Jackstones
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The big fish
        Page 14
    "Shut the door"
        Page 15
    The lawn party
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The wigwam
        Page 18
    A rainy day
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Tobogganning
        Page 23
    Kitty and dolly
        Page 24
    Skid, the white rat
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text

































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It was Ironing day.


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ILLUSTRATED WITH SIX
COLORED PLATES BY
MAUD HUMPHREY AND
BLACK AND WHITE DRAWINGS


BUFFALO, N. Y.
THE HAYES LITHOGRAPHING CO.






The Doll Picnic
T was ironing day, and Maud and Mabel were
very busy, for their dolls were going to have a
Ji-l picnic that very afternoon, and all their best
clothes must be nicely washed and ironed.
"I suppose dolls like picnics better than any-
thing else," said Maud, seriously; ironing away at Arabella's
dress. "And they never get cross or soil their clothes,"
said Maud.
The girls worked industriously, and were through just as
the lunch bell rang.
After lunch was over, the six dolls were dressed in their
fresh, clean dresses, and they looked as sweet as could be.
When they were carefully tucked in the carriages, and each
little mother pushed her children around the garden till they
came to a nice, grassy, shady spot under the apple tree.
There the tablecloth was laid, and the doll dishes arranged,
and the mud pies and cakes, the girls had baked the day
before, placed in tempting array, and they proceeded to
enjoy themselves.
After the lunch was over, Mabel said, "Maud, dear, I
think our children would like to hear a story."
So Maud commenced: "Once upon a time there was a
beautiful doll called Viola. She lived in a nice house, but
she was not at all happy, for she hadn't any mother. So she
asked the furry pussy cat to be her mother. But she was too
busy with her own kittens. Then she asked mamma Fido,
but she had all the trouble she wanted with her own puppies.
So she asked the furry Teddy Bear, and he said, 'I'll be a
father to you.' So, she never felt lonesome again."
The dolls liked this story very much, but looked as if
they wanted to go home for their afternoon nap, so the girls
put them in their carriages again and soon they were all
home in bed.






When I Grow Up

S A W HEN I grow up my dress shall be
SV All made of. silk and lace,
'l : My hair I'll wear in some fine style
That best will suit my face;
With rings upon my fingers, too,
And bracelets on
my arms,
I'll be the finest lady out,
S With wondrous,
-. mighty charms.
"When I grow up, you understand,
I'll always dine at eight,
And go to dances and 'At homes,'
And sit up very late.
I'll never touch rice-puddings then,
But pastry eat, and cheese,
And always do just what I like
And go just where I please.
"When I grow up I'll have no nurse,
Nor yet a governess;
And lessons will not bother me
When I grow up,
I guess.
I'll pay no heed to
proper nouns,
Nor yet to mood
nor tense"-
Here nurse put in: '
"When you grow up
Let's hope you'll .
have some sense!" a "






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Bubbles
OOK, Mildred," said Evelyn, "how big and
beautiful they are." As she spoke she blew a
bubble larger than any of the rest, and it
rolled along the nursery floor, shining and
sparkling as the sunshine struck it. Mildred
watched it until it burst, and then softly and carefully she
blew a still bigger one herself. It seemed to wink at her as
it sailed through the air, and finally burst as it bumped
against the wall.
"I wonder if anything lives inside of them," said Mildred,
softly, as she blew another. This one, which was a beauty,
burst on the window sill, and the very moment it burst a
big, beautifully colored butterfly fluttered into the nursery.
"Oh! oh!" cried Evelyn, "See the butterfly that came out
of the bubble!"
And it looked very much like it; it had such wonderful
colors, and fluttered so gracefully around the room.
The girls jumped with delight and watched the pretty
creature for quite a while; theh they commenced blowing
more bubbles, when it settled down on the wall.
Then an old black spider came out of his hole near by,
and stood watching the butterfly, and making ready to spring.
The girls saw him and were quite frightened for the butter-
fly, though they were not afraid of spiders themselves.
Then Mildred blew another bubble, and it sailed through
the air right into the spider's web. He was so astonished
and frightened that he couldn't move, till the bubble burst
with a flash and sputter, and he tumbled right off his web
and fell on the floor, where the girls couldn't find him. Soon
the butterfly sailed gracefully into the room, wheeled around
several times, and flashed out of the window and was gone.
Mildred and Evelyn waved good-bys to him.







The Sparrows Who Would Not
Go To Sleep
B j OUR young sparrows grumbled one evening,
because their mother tucked them up in the nest
before the sun had set. "We are not sleepy,"
said they. "We do not want to go to bed."
The father and mother sparrows watched until
their young ones shut their eyes and lay quite still. Then
they flew away to join the gossip-party in the old ivied wall.
As soon as his parents had gone, the first young sparrow
opened his eyes, sprang up, and shook his feathers. Then
the second young sparrow opened his eyes, sprang up, and
shook his feathers too; and the third and fourth young
sparrows did the same.
"We will not go to sleep while it is light," said they. And
they hopped to the edge of the nest and looked around them.
"My feathers are long, and my wings are strong. I am
sure I can fly," said the first young sparrow. And he spread
his wings and flapped and fluttered to the ground. Then
the second young sparrow spread his wings and flapped
and fluttered to
the ground too;
and the third and
,fourth young spar-
rows did the same.
At first it was
delightful to hop
about, to peck at
sticks and stones,
and sometimes
K even to find grubs
for themselves.
But after a time














the sun went down, and the wind became very cold.
"I am sleepy now," said the first young sparrow. "I
shall go home to bed." Then he spread his wings, and
began to flap and flutter again. Then the second young
sparrow spread his wings and began to flap and flutter too;
and the third and fourth young sparrows did the same.
But though their wings had been strong enough to bear
their weight as they came down from the nest, they were not
yet strong enough to carry them up. They flapped and
fluttered for a long time, but could only raise themselves a
short way from the ground.
When the father and mother sparrows came hack from
.the gossip-party, they found their young ones standing in a
row, looking very sleepy and sad. "We want to go to bed,"
chirped they.
"Ah!" said Mother-Sparrow. "If you had done as you
were told, you would have slept in the warm nest until your
wings were stronger. But since you have come down, you
must stay down, and sleep as best you can under the bushes,
until you have learned to fly."
The four foolish young birds felt very miserable when
they heard this, and, when they thought about the cat they
had seen prowling around the bushes the day before, they all
began to cry. So Papa and Mamma Sparrow took each
little bird by each little wing and managed to deposit each
one safely in the nest again.




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A real good game.
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A rea goodgame






The Jumping Jackstones


OUT on the porch where the sun shines warm,
Betty and Milly and Anne,
Watching the golden striped bees that swarm,
And work just as fast as they can.

Soon they are sitting upon the floor,
Playing the nicest game
With little black stars that roll afar,
"Jackstones" is its name.

Milly is tossing them up in the air,
And catching them as they fall;
She does it so well that Betty's afraid
She will not have'a turn at all.

But Milly misses a very hard trick
"Driving the sheep to the pen;"
Over the floor they roll clickety click,
Betty has her turn then.

Was anyone e'er as skillful as she?
Great, indeed, must be their fame;
She plays it so fast and so skillfully,
She's through, and she's won the game.

Milly and Baby Anne both laugh with glee,
When they see that the game is done,
For they're just as glad as can possibly be,
That their dear little sister has won.






The Big Fish
ITTLE Jack and his
a/' d sister Jane
S Knew they mustn't go
fishing again,
F or the last time they went
they got wet through,
SAnd it gave them colds-
'i as wettings will do-
So they thought-we'll fish
.''' from the window,
And some nice fish are
-- sure to go by.

Under the window, the garden bed
Was going to be set with geraniums red.

Thomas, the gardener,
came that way
With the bedding-out
plants ranged on a
tray;
Jack caught his fish-
hook in Thomas's
hat,
It was something like .A
a fish, was that- T -
Thomas was startled "-P
and dropped the ;,
tray,
And what happened g,
after I'd rather not
say.






Little Jack and his sister Jane,
i Will think before they go fish-
/ ing again,
,, And wait till they get to a
: 'quiet stream
Where the daisies nod in the
S warm sunbeam,
When they'll have a real line,
S. rod and hook,
S And catch real fish from a
sparkling brook.

"Shut
S-sS-r----<- i \ )
the Door"
NCE there lived a parrot, with beautiful bright
feathers, red and yellow and blue. Poor Polly!
he had been taken from his happy nursery in a
tropical forest and he did not like the chilly,
damp English climate at all.
After a little while Polly noticed that whenever the door
was left open a puff of cold air came in and made him shiver,
and that when his mistress said "Shut the door!" the draught
left off. So, shrewd Polly learnt to call out "Shut the door!"
in a great hurry, to anyone who came in, if he did not close
it quickly enough to please him.
One day Polly came out of his cage. Somebody had left
the window open. He thought this would be a fine chance
of spreading out those broad, green wings of his, and float-
ing away, a free bird, so he flew into a large garden opposite,
which belonged to a Bishop, and was a charming place. But
by and by a cloud came across the sky, and a keen wind half
froze poor Polly.






Soon Polly's
S mistress, having
missed him, came
over to see whether
her pet had flown
lst into the Bishop's
S garden. It was
not long before she
heard a familiar,
husky voice far
above her head
crying: "Shut the
door!" The par-
rot, -feeling very
cold, made sure
that somebody
must have left a
big door open
somewhere, and
was calling for
him to come and
shut it.
Polly's loving mistress had but to call him, and he quietly
nestled to her, thankful to be taken back.

The Lawn Party
ARY'S father had a beautiful big sloping lawn in
front of his house. The grass was as green as
could be, making a lovely carpet to run about on,
and Mary thought it would be nice to have a
party. So Mary's mamma invited three little
girls, Grace, Irene and Ida to come, on a bright, sunshiny
afternoon, for a real good time.




















































Our game on the lawn


1 .





First, the girls played with their dolls; they gave them a
picnic and a ball, and then put them to sleep. Then Mary's
mamma had a nice lunch of cakes and ice cream, and elegant
candy, which the girls enjoyed very much. Then they all
romped out into the lawn, and mamma said, "Don't you
want to have a game of blindman's buff?"
The girls all said they did, so mamma tied a handkerchief
over Irene's eyes and the fun commenced.
Irene -began running after the other girls and trying to
follow their voices as they chattered and laughed. She
couldn't catch any one till Mary fell down on her hands and
knees and Irene fell over her. It wasn't hard to guess whom
she had caught, for Mary said, "You can't guess who I am?"
and Irene knew her voice. Then Mary was blindfolded, and
the game went on till supper time.
When they were all tired out -Mary's papa drove up in the
carriage and said, "Get your dollies, girls, and I will drive
you all home." So they all tumbled in and they drove off,
saying what a lovely time they had had at Mary's lawn party.


The Wigwam
S/ S AID Jack, "We'll play as Indians,
SThat will be splendid fun,
This tent shall be our wigwam,
And I'll be 'Setting Sun!'
"But first," said he to Dolly,
"An Indian squaw is black,
So I shall have to paint you-"
Oh, naughty Brother Jack!
Black lead, a brush-soon Dolly
Was like an Indian quite,






Although, when it
was finished,
She felt she '-
looked a .
fright.
Then Mother
came and '
caught
them-
No matter
what she said,
But Brother
Jack's next '
wigwam .
That after- -,(v
noon was-

For the face,
don't use ,
black lead. il


A Rainy Day
DON'T want to play with my bricks, Mother,
and I'm tired of my Noah's Ark too! I want
-- to go out," sobbed Ted. "You promised that
you would take me to Auntie's with you. Why
can't we go ?"
"My darling boy," said Mother, "don't you see that it is
raining? I can't possibly take you unless it clears up, and
I am afraid it won't do that. Why don't you go up to the
nursery and play with Gracie and Dot ?"






"Because they're so little," said Ted. "They are down
in the kitchen playing baking day-such a stupid game."
"Come, Ted, don't be cross," said Mother; "it's not like
my bonny boy to be so sulky. Come upstairs with me, and
I'll see if I can't find something to amuse you." Then,
when they were upstairs, she said, "Wouldn't you like to
play soldiers? You may have Father's old uniform."
Ted's face brightened, for nothing was a greater treat to
him than to be allowed to buckle on Father's sword and pre-
tend to be a real grown-up soldier, as he meant to be when
he was a man.
Gracie and Dot were glad to play with him, and to hear
that he was not going out (for they, too, had found it rather
dull that rainy afternoon), that he grew quite ashamed of
having been so disagreeable, and soon the whole party was
playing away at a splendid game of soldiers as merrily as
could be.
Nero, the big Newfoundland, was supposed to be the
enemy, and was made to wear a helmet and cloak. He was
very good about the cloak, but he would not keep the helmet
on for more than two seconds at a time, so at last they gave
up trying, for, as Ted said, real soldiers often lose their
helmets in battle, and so they would pretend Nero had lost
his.
By-and-by Mother peeped in.
"Come and play with us," cried the children. "Do,
there's a dear Mother, and it is such a jolly game."
So Mother laughed, and joined in the game.
She made a much better enemy than Nero, for she
chased them all round the room, up in the corners, and even
,under the table.
Only, when she caught them, she generally gave them a
kiss, and they gave her a good hug, which is a strange thing
perhaps for enemies to do.













































Baking day.


_I


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S 12 1 '


It was such fun that tea-time came all too soon, but
after tea Mother told them all such a nice story.
Then she said she must run away, for Nurse was coming
to put Dot to bed.
"Good night, my darlings," she said. "Have you had a
nice time ?"
"Splendid, mummy -dear," said Ted, giving her a final
hug. "You're the jolliest Mother in the world, and I almost
wish it would rain every day."
And Gracie and Dot said the same. But it didn't rain
every day, and many a fine time did they have playing soldiers
outdoors as well as in. "Soldiers" is a fine game, and
don't forget that girls can play it just about as well as the
boys, for they have just as much courage as most boys have.






Tobogganning

OFNE to be ready, two to be steady,
Three to be off-and away goes
Freddy;
Down' the hill at a splendid pace,
Taking the lead in our famous race.

Away we go, all in the snow,
Feathers a-flying and cheeks aglow:
Six little people, with wild delight,
Tobogganning over a world of white.

We race indeed at a splendid speed,
Faster and swifter than galloping steed,
Flying along down the steep, white hill-
The greater the joy if there comes a spill.

For everyone it's capital fun,
When at last the race is ended and won,
To drag the toboggans with might and main
Right to the top of the hill again.

Oh! who would miss "-
such a treat as this,
To fly along in
a whirl of bliss?
Six little people
are all agreed
Tobogganning is fine
fun indeed. -






Kitty and Dolly

DOLLY is a quiet, child,
And lies quite still in bed,
But Kitty scratches off the clothes
And tumbles on her head,

Dolly always likes to do -
The thing you want to play;
Kitty romps and jumps about
She will .have her own way.

Dolly smiles while getting washed,
Kitty fights if dressed,
But, of the children at our house,
Kitty is loved best.



Skid, the White Rat

T is not known to everybody that white rats are
found wild in many parts of the world, living
together in quife large numbers. This happens
not only on the coast of Guinea, but even in
some parts of England. At one time plenty of
wild white rats were to be seen in Bristol, living in the stables
and warehouses. Most likely these had been brought by a
ship to the port, hidden among bales of goods.
Mr. Moss, of Cheltenham, came across a colony of white
rats, one of which became very friendly, not only with him,
but with his little terrier dog Flora. Now Flora was a great






Kitty and Dolly

DOLLY is a quiet, child,
And lies quite still in bed,
But Kitty scratches off the clothes
And tumbles on her head,

Dolly always likes to do -
The thing you want to play;
Kitty romps and jumps about
She will .have her own way.

Dolly smiles while getting washed,
Kitty fights if dressed,
But, of the children at our house,
Kitty is loved best.



Skid, the White Rat

T is not known to everybody that white rats are
found wild in many parts of the world, living
together in quife large numbers. This happens
not only on the coast of Guinea, but even in
some parts of England. At one time plenty of
wild white rats were to be seen in Bristol, living in the stables
and warehouses. Most likely these had been brought by a
ship to the port, hidden among bales of goods.
Mr. Moss, of Cheltenham, came across a colony of white
rats, one of which became very friendly, not only with him,
but with his little terrier dog Flora. Now Flora was a great











































Kitty and Dolly.






enemy to rats,
and was kept on
purpose to kill
them. Yet as
-_ soon as she saw
her master take
"_'Skid, the white
S rat, into his hand
and stroke his
back, she under-
stood perfectly
that she must
not harm him.
The two soon
grew very fond of
each other, and
Skid would run
to Flora for
protection if
any strange per-
son or strange
__dog came near.
Flora would
growl and show her teeth till she felt sure that no mischief
was intended against her favorite.
The garden of Mr. Moss was shut in by a high wall, and
he often turned the dog and rat out into it to amuse them-
selves, which they did by playing at hide-and-seek among
the flowers. When he whistled to them, they both ran a race
to his feet, each trying to outstrip the other and be first to
pay his respects.
As soon as Mr. Moss seated himself at table, Skid would
run up his leg and, if not carefully watched, would make
free with sugar, cheese, pastry, or other tit-bits.









SERIES7




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