• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Pussy's adventures
 They visit Miss Tabby Purr
 They go to a concert
 They come to a farm
 They go burgling
 They are punished
 The farmer's daughters
 Back Cover






Title: Pussy's adventures
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086663/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pussy's adventures
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wain, Louis, 1860-1939
Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: Raphael Tuck & Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [190-]
 Subjects
Subject: Cats -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1905   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1905
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Louis Wain.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy rebound in library binding; lacking original cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086663
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002653318
oclc - 45290517
notis - ANC0354

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Pussy's adventures
        Page 5
        Page 6
    They visit Miss Tabby Purr
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    They go to a concert
        Page 10
        Page 11
    They come to a farm
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    They go burgling
        Page 16
    They are punished
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The farmer's daughters
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Back Cover
        Page 22
        Page 23
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PUSSY'S ADVENTURES

THERE was a Cat who longed to roam
And travel round the world.
He did not care to live at home
Before the fire curled.

He, talked to other Pussy-Cats
Till two more also thought
They would not catch the mice and rats
Nor-do the things they ought.

So off they set. Upon the road
They saw a tall Cat go
With milk-pails slung, a heavy load,
And shouting, Milk, Yeo-Ho!"


SEEKING
ADVENTURES





PUSSY'S ADVENTURES
But when they offered pence, and said,
We'll buy a pint of it,"
They'found no milk, but saw instead
In each pail was a kit.

'Twas thus he carried them about,
And had no milk to sell,
The thirsty Cats must do without
The drink they loved so well.














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THEY VISIT MISS TABBY PURR
THEY called upon Miss Tabby Purr
Who lived in Catville Town,
She wore a very pretty fur
And such a stylish gown.

They thought she was the loveliest sight
The world could ever see,
And fondly hoped that she'd
S invite
i Them stay for talk and
tea.





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Her house was fine-a cushioned chair
As soft as you could wish,
Saucers of cream-and milk were there,
And plates of fresh fried fish.

But Tabby with a frown declared
She had no friends like those,
For lazy Cats she'd never cared
But Tom the Ratter chose.

And so their visit soon was done,
The rain began to fall,
They'd no umbrella, raincoat none,
Nor any coat at all.

And Tabby Purr went walking by
With Ratter close behind,
No look for them-her head held high-
They thought her most unkind.


go,.~ ..









THEY GO TO
4 A CONCERT

AND so to give their
-- minds relief
S\They went into a Hall
-^ Z Where on the stage-an
Indian chief
-" A song began to bawl.

SWith waving paws and
pointed claws,
And eyes like flam-
ing fire,
1 From out his widely
opened jaws
i" Me-ows rose high-
er and higher

Till all the three were
shivering
With terrible
alarm,
They really felt so
wild a thing
Must surely do
them harm.

But presently that dreadful song
Was ended. All around





THEY GO TO A CONCERT
The audience clapped loud and long
As if they'd loved the sound

And after that a chubby
Tcat THEm TRUMPETER

A blaring trumpet
blew,
With staring eyes, and







cheeks puff-
ed fat,
He played a
tune or two.

And then
the trum-
pet and the II '
voice
Of Indian
were blen-
ded
Till with a
doubly
deaf-
ening
noise
That noisy concert ended.










III ~


THEY COME TO A FARM
THEY fell asleep, three weary'Cats,
All hungry, sad, and damp.
No nice warm milk, no cosy mats,
The hard ground gave them cramp.


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DADDY'S DARLINGS


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THEY COME TO A FARM
But in the morning early, when
Uprose the golden sun,
They felt that their adventures then
Had only just begun.


They raced and chased with early day
Where fields were far and wide,
A pretty, pleasant grassy way,
Through lovely country-side.


And there they heard the Farmer's cock..
Crow welcome to the morn,
And saw the Farmer in his
smock < .~
Bind up the
sheaves of
corn.


The Farmer was
a kindly
soul,
And when he
heard their
tale
He gave them
each a great
big bowl
Of milk from
out a pail. *






THEY GO BURGLING
BUT sad to say, they burgled in
That kindly Farmer's house,
And climbing, stole
from out a tin
Some jam he'd label-
^ led MOUSE."


One Cat upon the other stood
And tiptoed to the shelf.
To do this thing, I really
should
Have been ashamed my-
self.

The Farmer Cat had been
so kind
To give them milk to
drink,
How it could enter in their
mind
To rob him, I can't think.

The tins they emptied, all
the row,
And ate up all they saw,
And now to hide, they crept
below
Some curtains on the floor.

They heard the Farmer
come and cry,
Where are those three
poor Cats ?
S-- We'll call them in
and let them
lie
Upon our soft-
est mats;






THEY GO BURGLING
I'm sure they still must hungry feel,
So bring that nice Mouse Jam,
For them 'twill make a splendid meal,
With fish and cream and ham."

i The Farmer's wife, a handsome Cat,
Ran holding up her paws,
They can't have jam, it's gone, all that I
From out our larder stores.

Quite vanished are the ham and cream,
And every bit of fish,
There's been s6me wicked thief, wouldd seem,
And emptied every dish."


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THEY ARE PUNISHED
THEN sought the Farmer everywhere
And soon the thieves were found,
He thrashed them soundly then and there
And they were strongly bound.






THEY ARE PUNISHED
As punishment they had to stay
Shut up and left alone, WATERING
With teardrops trickling all that day FLo Tw
";- : ^ '^ ^. FLOWERS
Their naughtiness-they own. '""-: -

And so to show their sorrow deep:.-: -.-. ,, i
They said they would remain -,,:. o
To plough and hoe and sow
and reap
Nor ever thieve again.


They gladly planted cabbage
patch
And dug potato field,
'Twas quickly seen no one
could match
The crop they'd make them
.yield. -
--3 Ai. t ... .i ..- I f. II .La .. 77W
They pulled up weed and sowed the seed
Of flowers of every sort,
And fine bouquets were then indeed
To Mrs. Farmer brought.

They worked so well, the Farmer knew
He'd never need to scold,
He gave them for the food they grew
Great sacks of shining gold.





























"'WIN

*( <-=-)


THE
/ TB FAMER's S INGING
DAUGER FARMER'S
DAUGHTERS

S/ TE Farmer had
// H three daughters
fair,
Quite charming,
: sweet and neat,
z. -.j,- They truly were of
,;z S .Complete from head
S- -to feet.

And one could play,
and also sing
A score of songs, or
more,
The. windows she
would open fling
And open throw the
door.

For well the Farmer
liked to hear
The lovely trilling note,
The highest C, which came so clear
From his dear daughter's throat.

The second daughter, very gay,
Danced as you've never seen,
And while she danced she'd gladly play
Tunes on her tambourine.


' *'.'





THE FARMER'S DAUGHTERS
Her tiny toes were seldom still,
Most gracefully she'd go
Right through the Farm and down the hill
She'd dance both to and fro.

The Farmer's third dear darling child
Could run for miles and
miles,
She truly was a trifle wild,
But had the sweetest
smiles.

She'd fetch and carry any- .
thing,
No need to ask her
twice,
And was the first to catch
and bring .
You home the rats and -t
mice.

Three charming daugh-
ters, yes, indeed,"
'Twas very hard to '' "... .
tell '
Of which the j
Farmer had '
most need, f i
He loved them all
so well.

To our three Cats he made so rich,
Besides the sacks of gold,
He gave a child-but which to which
I've never yet been told.






Tnt FAmmBu's RuNmwmo
DAUGHTER


And so were their adventures o'er,
They neyer wandering went,
No happier Cats you ever saw,
Filled full with sweet content.
Grace C. Floyd.




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