Group Title: Citrus grower (Orlando, Fla.)
Title: The citrus grower
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086640/00001
 Material Information
Title: The citrus grower
Uniform Title: Citrus grower (Orlando, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30-44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Orlando Fla
Publication Date: November 15, 1938
Frequency: weekly (semimonthly july-sept.)[<1939>]
semimonthly[ former 1938-]
weekly
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Fruit-culture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Citrus fruits -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Citrus fruit industry -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 15, 1938)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1942?
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 4, no. 9 (May 15, 1942).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086640
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 03227648
lccn - sn 96027371

Full Text
\ii


TNH


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~P~j


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE
IFLORIDA CITRUS GROWERS INC.


Marketing Apreement Executive Committeemen F. T. Henderson, H. E. Porcher and
J. J. Banks, Jr., receive President L. H. Kramer's congratulations on their Washington
achievements. Story in this issue.


L Ar

bMAR 3- 1939








The


President


Speaks


N THIS FIRST issue of its official organ, as
president of Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., may
I state some of the objectives and hopes of
the organization:
For the first time, the original producers of Florida
citrus fruits are banded together in an organization to
protect and promote their interests. We believe the
interests of these growers are identical with the inter-
ests of all other wholesome and straightforward ele-
ments in the entire industry. With us is the collective
strength of the growers. It is our purpose to use this
organized power in solving, insofar as it is humanly
possible to do so all the serious problems that have
beset the citrus industry for many years.
!, *
GROWERS OFFER COOPERATION
To the other branches of the industry and to all in-
terested constructive organizations and forces working
for the solution of these problems, we offer hearty and
sincere cooperation.
Through careful and patient discussion between
members of our organization and jointly with other
organizations, we hope to be able to make all ques-
tions, issues, and objectives clear, thus insuring greater
possibility of a substantial and workable agreement
within our organization, and, through it, with other
organizations. Such agreement, we feel, is the first
requirement for complete cooperation and the longest
step toward removing those conditions which have been
disastrous to the grower.

IT IS NO EASY TASK
It might be well for us to emphasize that Florida
Citrus Growers,-Inc., is not undertaking an easy task
nor one that we can hope to complete in one season,
two seasons, or more. We are not concentrating on
any single industry problem, except as each problem
presents itself in point of urgency and timeliness of


U


U U


solution. At the moment we regard the outstanding
problem as that of securing an effective marketing pro-
gram. We are not forgetting for a moment, how-
ever, nor shall we forget, the interests of better laws
and better enforcement of law for the prevention of
shipping green fruit or frozen fruit,' nor the matter of
the constant pressure exerted by carriers to raise rates,
nor the matter of other items of cost intervening be-
tween the grower and his final customer, nor the pre-
senting of our product to our final consumers in the
best condition and most appealing attractive form.
We mean to say that our organization is attacking the
growers' problems on a broad front.
*

GREAT, INTRICATE TASKS
As great and as intricate al are the tasks before us,
we enter upon them with the greatest hope of finding
a satisfactory solution. We are even enthusiastic in
this effort and we have the soundest reasons for ex-
pecting success to crown our efforts. These reasons
are the unselfish devotion of each member to the col-
lective benefit of all members and to the benefit of
growers outside our organization.
Springing from this devotion is a spirit of coopera-
tion, tolerance for the views and even pet prejudices of
others, patience in discussions to arrive at just and
proper conclusions, willingness to go along with the
majority in order that the full force of our organiza-
tion may be applied at a given point, at a given time.
To direct this devotion, outstanding leaders have
arisen in our midst. We are a democratic organiza-
tion, discovering its powers, and rapidly growing in
numbers and strength.
We bring to our members and to the Citrus in-
dustry the machinery to bring order out of chaos. It
is our sincere hope that we will justify confidence and
receive the cooperation not only of the remainder of the
Citrus Industry, but by all interests over the State of
Florida, who will be favorably affected by the results
of our efforts to give the Citrus Industry a construc-
tive program.





President,
Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.









i '/114 t


The Citrus Grower

Official Publication of Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.

VOLUME ONE NOVEMBER 15, 1938 NUMBER ONE


FIRST ISSUE....
THIS FIRST ISSUE OF Florida Citrus Grower goes to press
in the midst of epoch-making events following each other
with breath-taking rapidity. In order to give proper recognition
to these developments, our magazine must needs be somewhat un-
orthodox. The marketing agreement is the most urgent question
before the industry at this moment, consequently we have given
in full the report of the grower's committee to which the industry
committee (composed of representatives of various shippers' or-
ganizations and the citrus growers) delegated the task of prepar-
ing a complete marketing program. Then. just to be certain
you'd have all the basic facts about this timely question, we have
included a complete copy of the proposed marketing agreement
for your future reference.
In this first issue of THE CITRUS GROWER we felt it was ad-
visable to include a complete list of your grower-officers, both
state and county; these are so arranged that you may tear them
out and keep them for your permanent record.
Naturally a number of very fine articles of especial interest to
growers suffered this issue because we wanted to give you these
permanent records: but they won't suffer long, we promise you.
You will note, too, that your first issue does not carry a line
of paid advertising. Members of the Publication Committee, and
the editors, felt that it was wise to follow this policy of eliminating
advertisers from the first issue for two reasons: first, because use
of afore-mentioned marketing agreement in detail, and of the state
and county officers, was vital to your interests: second, because we
feel it is only fair that prospective advertisers in your magazine
should have a sample of the magazine before they are asked to
purchase space in its pages.


NEXT ISSUE ....
MATERIAL IS ALREADY piling up for your December 1st
issue. Mr. Charles D. Kime has written the first of a fine
series on the work of the Florida Soil Testing Association .
Mr. H. L. Pringle has contributed a vivid analysis of the work of
the Traffic Committee.
Of especial interest to you will be THE CITRUS GROWER'S
OWN market analysis and chart of conditions affecting the mar-
keting of citrus, which we hope to have ready for you in the
next issue . . There will be forecasts of weather and soil con-
ditions, feature articles dealing with the methods used by successful
Florida Growers . . And, vital to all of you, will be the reports
of activities of county units. Our correspondents have promised
to submit them in ample time for the next issue .
Don't forget that we want to hear from all of you. Your con-
tributions, as members of the Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., will
be most gratefully received.


CONTENTS


The President Speaks........... inside Cover Page

The Growers Present
THE MARKETING AGREEMENT...Page Four

FORT PIERCE MEETING DRAWS
GROWERS ........................Page Seven

Directory of Growers' State and
County Officers. ................... Page Eleven

Growers' Future Not So Bleak.......Page Sixteen

With the Editor ................. Page Seventeen

Marketing Agreement Text .............Page Ten




AN APPRECIATION ....
N PROPOSITIONS TO SOLVE the many prob-
lems of agriculture, it has been the policy of the
United States Government to give first consideration
to the needs of the original producer. He is the basis
of the industry. In citrus he is the grower.
This governmental policy may have had something
to do with the energetic and active help that has come
in forming this first far flung organization of growers,
from the men in state and federal agencies.
We prefer to believe, however, that their generous
and valuable assistance has sprung from a personal de-
sire to give aid to a movement that will undoubtedly
greatly benefit everyone in the entire citrus belt.
To these men and to its many other loyal friends
within and without the industry, Florida Citrus Grow-
ers, Inc., express highest appreciation for their coopera-
tion and support.


Virgil H. Conner --- .. Editor
Norman B. Lefler .Associate Editor
J. E. Robinson .__Business Manager
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE-W. E.
Kemp, Chairman; Carl D. Brorein, R.
J. Kepler, E. G. Thatcher, W. L. Burton.
Printed by The Chief Press, Apopka


Published the First and Fifteenth of each
month by The Florida Citrus Growers,
Inc., Orlando, Florida.
Application for entry as second-class
matter is pending.
The entire contents of this magazine are
protected by copyright and must not be
reprinted without the publishers' permis-
sion. Manuscripts submitted to this maga-
zine should be accompanied by sufficient


postage for their return if found unavail-
able. The publishers can accept no re-
sponsibility for return of unsolicited manu-
scriptE.
Subscription Rates
In United States, one year $1.00 to non-
members of Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.,
Membership subscriptions, one year 50c.
Advertising Rates on Request







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


The Growers Present:


The Marketing Agreement


Your
to


Committee Offers Its Findings
The Citrus Industry After Con-


ferences.


HE MARKETING AGREEMENT Commit-
tee of Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., under-
stood from the beginning the direction toward
which it should work. The market for citrus fruits
is a buyers' market. The growers wish to put forces
into play that will change this to a scl'ers' market.
The members of the committee have always been
aware that this most desirable change could not be
brought about over night. That realization, however,
did not fully prepare them for the staggering mass of
details that must be considered, the many hours
of discussion that have been necessary thus far, in or-
der to get an agreement worked out for submission to
the industry.
The draft of this agreement will be made public
about the time this issue of THE CITRUS GROWER
goes to press. It
will contain pro-
visions for grade
and size prorates
and volume con-
trol. The grow-
e rs' committee
has held firmly
to its stand that
a n y agreement
Must contain
some kind of
volume control.
T h e editors
had first request-
ed J. J. Banks,
." Jr., chairman of
th e marketing
agreement com-
mittee to prepare
an article on this
most important
subject. Ho w -
ever, after the
rousing meeting
at Lake Wales
James J. Banks, Jr.-Headed Growers Thursday, and
at Washington.
upon due con-


sideration by the publication committee, it was decided
the subject could not be presented to the reader in any
better form than verbatim quotation from the text of
the report which the growers' committee will make
(Monday, Nov. 14) to the entire industry committee,
composed of representatives from the various shipper
organizations and the citrus growers. Some weeks ago
the industry committee delegated to the growers' or-
ganization the task of preparing a complete marketing
program.
Consequently we are quoting the draft of commit-
tee's report verbatim.- (Editor's note.)
Mr. A. S. Her'ong, Chairman,
Dzar Mr. Herlong:
Attached herewith please find a copy of the mar-
keting agreement which your committee requested the
growers' organization to draft.
REQUEST MADE LAST SEPTEMBER
This request was made on September 9, last, at a
meeting of a general industry committee by the mo-
tion of Mr. C. C. Commander of the Florida Citrus
Producers Trade Association and seconded by Mr.
Chester C. Fosgate of the United Growers and Ship-
pers Association. The motion was as follows:
"That the Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., draft
a marketing agreement which embodies a com-
plete program. That it request the assistance of
the Federal Government agricultural authorities
and that it submit its recommendation to the var-
ious group; of the industry."
This request was made only after a series of meetings
had been held and a full and frank discussion of the
respective attitudes of the different groups. It was
predicated upon an oft-repeated statement which in sub-
stance was that, as the growers of the state necessarily
formed the base of the industry, their welfare must
necessarily be of prime consideration. Before accept-
ing this responsibility, the Growers' group asked for,
and received, promises of cooperation from all present
in working out this program. This help has been gen-
erously given us and, while there may remain some
differences of opinion, we feel that this cooperative at-
titude has gone a long way in adjusting differences and
making this program constructive and, we hope, of
worth-while benefit to all concerned.

ACCEPTED MAJOR CHANGE
In analyzing the problem placed before it, the grow-


Page Four







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15. 1938


ers' committee was forced to accept the conclusion that
a major change has come about in the citrus industry as
a whole. This change is the result of increased pro-
duction in all producing areas out of proportion to the
ability of the industry to stimulate consumptive de-
mand upon a sufficiently increased scale to prevent a
surplus. In our study of this particular phase of the
problem, we had to recognize the inescapable facts that,
barring a major catastrophe, a citrus surplus would be
the rule rather than the exception until such time as
consumptive demand could be increased to the point
where that surplus would be absorbed in the normal
channels of trade.

PROGRAM DIVIDED
In order to deal correctly with the problem from
the standpoint both of immediate need and future
stabilization, we have divided the program into two
major parts: (1) the consideration of those agencies
which might be available to temporarily aid the pro-
ducer and cushion him against too severe an economic
jolt; (2) to consider the drafting of a marketing agree-
ment applicable to Florida conditions.
We believe that a government aid program will best
accomplish the first objective, and a marketing agree-
ment will furnish the essential machinery needed to
help overcome the demoralizing effects of the existence
of present surplus conditions.

OTHER AREAS CONSCIOUS
In requesting assistance from the Federal govern-
ment, we found that other producing areas, as well 13
the department of agriculture, were acutely conscious
of the seriousness of the problem. This re:u'ted in a
conference in Washington, beginning October 17th,
between representatives of the three major producing
areas and representatives of the department of agricul-
ture. After prolonged discussions the conference
adopted a program of government assistance to be u-ed
in those areas where cooperation of the handlers and
growers could be secured.
URGE ACCEPTANCE
While the practical results of this assistance must
necessarily depend very largely upon the nature of the
details which are now in the process of development,
we earnestly urge that the program be accepted in the
spirit in which it was proposed and that all possible
cooperation be given to make it a success. Its benefits
will be in direct proportion to the extent to which it
is carried out. The successful application of this as-
fistance will inevitably relieve the market of this year's
surplus problems and bring about much better returns
to the grower than can possibly be realized without it.
We recommend that further study be made of its ap-


plication to the citrus industry, looking toward the
possibility of its future use as a permanent stablizing
influence. We recommend, however, that it not be
used in such a way as to create artificial and unjusti-
fiable markets, nor to encourage additional tree-plant-
ing until such time as consumptive demand can be built
up to the point where it can absorb surplus production
in normal and economically sound markets.

FOUR FACTORS
In preparation of a marketing agreement, which we
consider the most effective way of reaching the second
objective, we took into consideration: (1) the law un-
der which such agreements could be drawn and entered
into: (2) the extent to which the terms could be made
applicable to the Florida industry; (3) an analysis of
the Florida problems with respect to the application of
such terms; (4) the discretion which should be used
in applying the specific terms and provisions in order
to create and maintain a healthy and economical.'
sound marketing program.
The discussions which took place at the various
meetings clearly indicated to us the specific details upon
which there was unanimous agreement and those de-
tails upon which there was some division of opinion.
As there was comparatively no division of opinion as
to the type of administrative control to be provided
for, we have drafted this agreement so as to provide
a Growers' Administrative Committee, to be assisted
and aided by a Shippers' Advisory Committee. The
Growers' Committee is to handle all administrative
problems and details.

BY SECRETARY
It is to be appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture
upon recommendation of the growers, as expressed by
them in a referendum. The Shippers' Committee is to
make recommendations as to the invocation and con-
tinuation of controls, whether it be grade, size, or vol-
ume, after taking into consideration those factors which
make intelligent application of control equitable
and necessary. This committee is to be appointed by
the secretary upon recommendation of the shippers
through the medium of a shippers' referendum.
It was unanimously agreed by all members of your
committee that a provision should be incorporated in
the marketing agreement to give authority to regulate
citrus fruit by grade and size, or both, at any time the
secretary in his discretion, and acting through the ad-
vice of his committee, should deem such control neces-
sary to cOTectuate the declared policy of the act under
which marketing agreements are authorized.
This provision has been incorporated in this pro-
posed agreement. The provisions used are those which
experience in other areas have led us to believe to be


Page Five








'1 his is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


L. H. Kramer-Growers' President
went to session.
the fairest and most applicable to
our problem. The recommendations
for the invocation of grade and size
restrictions are left to the discretion
of the committees and are to be used
only when production and market
conditions make it advisable that
they do be used.
All other provisions of the agree-
ment, except that pertaining to vol-
ume control, are more or less required
by the law itself or are now of stand-
ard practice. We have endeavored
to eliminate any new and untried
provisions which might work to
confusion and hardship on either the
grower or handler.
Only those provisions have been
incorporated which, in the opinion
of the technical advisers of the de-
partment of agriculture, and our-
selves, seem necessary to the success-
ful handling of a marketing pro-
gram under the regulation of the
marketing agreement. Where there
was an indicated necessity to app'y
regulatory measures and where it
was doubtful as to the specific re-


quirements needed, we have vested
authority in the committee to use
discretionary powers. The growers
and handlers alike are protected
against abuse of power by virtue of
the fact that they are a part and par-
cel of all those whom they represent,
and therefore have, of necessity, a
common and sympathetic interest in
the welfare of the industry.
After the agreement is put into ef-
fect, the various problems will mani-
fest themselves more clearly and,
through future amendments of the
agreement, anything out of line with
the best interest of the industry can
be brought into proper adjustment.

ONLY MAJOR DISPUTE

The only major provision of the
agreement upon which there was dif-
ference of opinion was tha: pertain-
ing to volume control. In trying
to arrive at the best solution to this
problem, we have carefully analyzed
the opinions expressed by the various
branches of the industry.
There seems to have been no dif-
ference of opinion with respect to
the value of volume control to the
producer; the only difference of
opinion seemed to be in adopting it
under such terms and conditions as
not, in the opinion of some, to af-
fect adversely a portion of the han-
dlers. This was brought out by the
fact that, at the first meeting in
Haines City, all handlers agreed on
volume control provided that the
allotments could be made to han-
dlers upon their past performance.

NO SERIOUS HARDSHIPS

It was further brought out that
cooperative handlers would not find
any serious hardships in operating
under any of the known methods
of allocations of allotment basis. At
the same meeting the Growers' com-
mittee emphasized the vital necessity
of incorporating volume control in
an agreement upon any terms which
afforded the producers proper and
necessary protection. This then fo-
cused the attention of the Growers'


Complete Text of
Agreement Given
In order that the subject of the
proposed marketing Agreement
may be most fully covered this,
the first issue of THE CITRUS
GROWER, has eliminated much
of the planned material for the
publication and included the com-
plete text of the agreement.
When you have completed this
timely article on The Marketing
agreement, turn to the text for
reference.
^ --~------------------- *^

committee upon the fact that it was
not the use of volume control which
caused a diffence of opinion, but
only the methods by which allot-
m-nt basis could be allocated.
Our problem was simplified when,
at subsequent meetings, it was made
clear that the use of an exclusive past
performance base was prohibited by
law, and, in the opinion of all grow-
er and handler members of the in-
dustry committee, a dual base of con-
trol would complicate the problem
and make administrative details very
difficult to handle. It was agreed to
by all those expressing an opinion
that, if volume control were to be
Please Turn to Page Fourteen


W. L. Burton-Growers' Secretary,
sat in on momentous meetings.


Page Six







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15. 1938


Enthusiasm High As

Fort Pierce Meeting Draws Growers

By Virgil H. Conner


Two Hundred Growers Gather at Fort Pierce Meeting.


HE SIXTH DIRECTORS' meeting of Florida
Citrus Growers, Inc., was called to order at
Fort Pierce, at 10 a. m. November 3. There
were present all the evidences of a healthy and vigorous
organization, glowing with energy, and putting the
mighty force of collective effort behind the drive to
solve the economic problems of its grower members.

SHARP, POINTED DEBATE
There was enough pointed, even sharp, debate on
controversial issues to show that all such issues will
be given the full light of day, that they are not too big
for this organization to attack. Still, as President L.
H. Kramer said there must be, there was final complete
harmony and agreement. There could be no other
outcome of a discussion between this large group of
people, who have come so clearly to realize that the
interests of all of them face exactly the same obstacles.
Showing the interest of the rank and file grower in
the activities of the state organization, it is notable


that the meeting of the state directors was by no means
a small group seated around a table. It is a large
group anyway, as will be readily seen from the list
of directors published elsewhere in this issue.
REPRESENTATIVE GROWER MEMBERS
They are representative grower members from ev-
ery county organization. But, added to those direc-
tors at the meeting, were large numbers of growers who
were not directors, but had traveled many miles to
look on at the proceedings. The directors' meeting is
most democratically conducted. Every reasonable
courtesy is extended to interested non-director grow-
ers in permitting them to be heard.
One question, that of locating the next regular meet-
ing of the state directors, was thrown open by presid-
ing officer Kramer for a vote by everyone present. (The
next meeting will be held in Lake County, the city to
be designated later.)
The meeting was held at the beautifully located


Page Seven


~C







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


New Fort Pierce Hotel, opened early
this season. Fine weather and in-
imitable Indian River scenery were
contributing factors to a good meet-
ing, but the long to be remembered
extra-parliamentary feature was the
hospitality of St. Lucie County
Growers, Inc., and the people of
Ft. Pierce. Beyond all that could
reasonably be expected, a delightful
luncheon was served to the growers
and their friends at the noon recess.
Business was preceded by an in-
vocation by Reverend Taylor. An
address of welcome was made by
Mayor Holtsberg, of Ft. Pierce, with
response by President Kramer.
GO OUTSIDE
Under business of a general na-
ture, President Kramer indicated the
necessity of going outside of the state
directorate in the appointment of
qualified men as chairmen of state
committees. This authority was
granted to the president by the di-
rectors.
The president further advised that


Host G. B. Van Sickler greets chief
guest, President Kramer.


the broadening activities of the or-
ganization necessitated the forming
of the following committees:
1. Advertising for following
through on advertising programs
within the state.
2. Canners' Committee for
studying the relationship between
the canning industry and the grow-
ers.
3. Phosphate Industry Commit-
tee-to cooperate with the govern-
ment committee investigating the
distribution of phosphate.
4. Packers' Committee-for in-
vestigating of handling and packing
house charges.
The president was duly author-
ized to appoint these committees.
The president again asked that all
committees submit reports to the di-
rectors' meeting in writing; and
that the office of the state organiza-
tion's secretary be advised of all
committee and county meetings.
MAY MAKE CHANGE
Chairman E. G. Todd announced


that the Legislative Committee, was
having difficulty in obtaining the
name "Florida Citrus Growers,
Inc." for the the state grower organ-
ization. This name was used some
years ago by another corporation.
It was indicated some slight change
in the name of the state organization
might have to be made.
The name matter was referred to
the Legislative Committee for fur-
ther investigation and for appro-
priate action.

WAGE AND HOUR
Of particular interest to the meet-
ing was the report of W. J. Steed,
chairman of the committee investi-
gating the effect of the Wage and
Hour Bill. Mr. Steed's report in-
dicated the committee had done much
constructive work, had, with rep-
resentatives of other branches of the
citrus industry, interviewed Wage-
Hour Administrator Andrews in
Washington, had interested Senator
Claude Pepper in the matter. Mr.
Steed's report indicated the grower,


Page Eight


State Directors Gesticulate in Busy Session.







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


E. G. Todd, Growers' Treasurer.

as such, would be practically unaf-
fected by the law. Attached to his
report was much information about
the law as it applies to the citrus in-
dustry.
TRAFFIC
Activities of the Traffic Commit-
tee have been intense and effective.
On the front page of the directors'
meeting program was a press report
dated Tallahassee, October 14, in
which the state Railroad Commis-
sion had refused to grant increases
to the railroads on fertilizer mater-
ials. Under the story was a com-
ment:
"Largely through the efforts and
large attendance of members of the
Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., the
above was accomplished. This saves
the growers of the state 50c per ton
on their fertilizer purchases."
Of course it would be impossible
accurately to estimate the weight of
the testimony of the grower organi-
zation in this important case. It is
certain it had some weight.
Chairman D. C. Williams of the
membership committee reported fur-
ther work in organizing Dade Coun-


ty and the completion of units in
Pasco, Marion, Hernando, Citrus
and Putnam counties.
He advised of preliminary work
in Lee County and indicated his be-
lief that a meeting to be held at Ft.
Myers on that day would result in
that county completing its organiza-
tion.
President Kramer said he was
voicing the sentiment of the entire
organization when he complimented
Chairman Williams for the fine work
he has been doing.
Senator A. W. Young, chairman
of the Uniform Contract Commit-
tee reported that his committee had
done considerable work on a Uni-
form Contract, but no release of
their work had been made, nor
would it be made until such time
as his committee could have a joint
session with the Marketing Agree-
ment Committee. It was Senator
Young's opinion that the work of
his committee would have to fit into
the Marketing Agreement picture,
which is not yet clear.
Chairman Clifford Hiatt of the
Citrus Culture Committee was
known to have been active in the
past weeks, but it was impossible
for him to attend the meeting.
Chairman J. N. Mowery of the Sell-
ing by Weight Committee also was
not present.
Chairman George I. Fullerton of
the Crop Insurance Committee re-
ported his committee had investigat-
ed insurance plans on wheat, pecans,
and prunes, but had not yet ar-
rived at an arrangement they regard-
ed as fitting the situation of the
orange grower.
PUBLICATION
The report of chairman W. E.
Kemp of the Publication Committee
was made in his absence, by sub-
Chairman W. L. Burton. This pub-
lication is largely a reflection of the
work of that committee. The com-
mittee has numerous plans to im-
prove the magazine-improvements
that could not be incorporated in


this first issue.
The report of the Marketing
Agreement Committee was given by
Chairman J. J. Banks, Jr. The
lead article in this issue gives that
report to the growers. One of the
bright spots of the meeting was an
analysis of the grapefruit situation
by Fred T. Henderson, another
member of the marketing agreement
committee, and of the Washington
delegation. Mr. Henderson's anal-
ysis is also given in full in this is-
sue.
Arthur Porcher also of the mar-
ket agreement committee and the
Washington conferences paid tribute
to the splendid work of the bal-
ance of his committee and also to
the constructive work which had
been done in Washington by Chair-
man Steed of the Wage-Hour Bill
committee.
Marvin Walker, of the Florida
Citrus Producers Trade Association,
who was in Washington in the in-
terest of his organization, also
praised the constructive work of the
growers' marketing agreement com-
mittee and their untiring fight for
the interests of their grower mem-
bers.
A resolution was passed com-
mending Agriculture Commissioner
Nathan Mayo for the position he is
taking in enforcing the arsenic law,
and the organization pledged him
moral support in this connection.
A resolution was passed com-
mending U. S. Secretary of Agricul-
ture Henry A. Wallace for his ef-
forts to get freight rates reduced on
citrus fruits this season. Another
resolution asked the Interstate Com-
merce Commission to approve re-
duced freight rates on citrus fruits
this season in order that a larger
volume may be shipped and that the
grower losses may be reduced.
Chairman Kramer indicated a
called meeting would likely have to
be had before the next regular di-
rectors' meeting. This meeting was
voted to be held in Lake Wales.


Page Nine









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


Came Longest Distance


John M. Criley, who came 1,000 miles
to Fort Pierce meeting.


Cleveland Not Too Far
Away for L. F. Criley
to Come.

Longest distance-more than 1,-
000 miles-came John M. Criley to
attend the meeting of the Florida
Citrus Growers, Inc., at Fort Pierce
November 3.
Visiting in Cleveland, Mr. Criley
learned of the meeting, entrained at
once for Fort Pierce to attend.
A resident of Terra Ceia Island,
Mr. Criley has been interested in
growers' endeavors since first those
endeavors began; he was a member
of the original Committee of Eleven,
from which was born Florida Cit-
rus Growers, Inc.
He is a member of the Manatee
county unit.
Interested for many years in
growers' problems, Mr. Criley is a
grove owner himself and evinced
considerable interest in all of the
happenings and discussions at the
Fort Pierce meeting.


Marketing Agreement Text


NOTE: The following draft of a pro-
posed marketing agreement for Florida
citrus fruit has been developed by the
Marketing Agreement Committee, Florida
Citrus Growers, Inc., for the consideration
of the industry. Although technical as-
sistance and advice of the Department of
Agriculture has been secured during the
course of developing the terms and provis-
ions incorporated, the Department of Agri-
culture has in no way given its approval
thereto. Such approval cannot be given in
advance of a public hearing, at which all
facts bearing on the justification and
workability of that proposal must be
developed.
-Jas. J. Banks, Jr., Chairman,
Marketing Agreement Committee
Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.
PROPOSED MARKETING AGREEMENT
AND PROPOSED ORDER REGULAT-
ING THE HANDLING IN INTER-
STATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE.
AND SUCH HANDLING AS DIRECT-
IY BURDENS, OBSTRUCTS, OR
AFFECTS INTERSTATE OR FOREIGN
COMMERCE. OF ORANGES, GRAPE-
FRUIT AND TANGERINES GROWN
IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA.
ARTICLE I-DEFINITIONS
Section 1. As used herein the following
terms have the following meanings:


1. "Secretary" means the Secretary of
Agriculture of the United States of
America.
2. "Act" means Public Act. No. 10, 73d
Congress, as amended and as reenacted
and amended by the Agricultural Market-
ing Agreement Act of 1937.
3. "Person" means individual, partner-
ship, corporation, association, and any
other business unit.
4. "Fruit" means the following citrus
fruit, and their several respective varie-
ties grown in the State of Florida: (a)
Citrus Sinensis, Osbeck, commonly called
"oranges"; (b) Citrus Grandis, Osbeck,
commonly called "grapefruit"; (c) Cit-
rus Nobilis Deliciosa, commonly called
"tangerines"; and (d) temple oranges.
5. "Variety" or "varieties" means any
one or all of the following classifications
or groupings of citrus fruit: (a) early and
midseason oranges, including temple or-
anges, Navel types and other varieties
commonly called "round oranges." except
Valencias, Leu Gim Gongs, and similar
late-maturing oranges of the Valencia
type; (b) Valencias, or late Valencias,
Leu Gim Gongs. or other oranges of the
Valencia type; (c) Marsh and other seed-
less varieties of grapefruit, including
pinks; (d) Duncan and other seeded varie-
ties of grapefruit, including pinks; and (e)
tangerines.


6. "Producer" means any person en-
gaged in the production of fruit.
7. "Handler" means any person who
ships fruit, or causes fruit to be shipped.
8. "Ship" means to convey fruit in fresh
form or cause such fruit to be conveyed,
(but not as a common carrier for another
person in the current of interstate or for-
eign commerce, or so as directly to bur-
den, obstruct, or affect interstate or for-
eign commerce, by rail, truck, boat, or
any other means whatsoever (except by
express or parcel post), whether as owner,
agent, or otherwise. Shipment shall be
deemed to commence not later than (a)
on the date when the bill of lading, relat-
ing to fruit shipped, is issued by the com-
mon carrier or its duly-authorized agent,
or (b) in the case cf fruit shipped by mo-
tor truck, when such fruit is loaded into
a motor truck.
9. "Interstate commerce" means trans-
actions involving the sale or transporta-
tion for sale of fruit from Florida to any
point outside of Florida in continental
United States.
10. "Foreign commerce" means trans-
actions involving the sale or transporta-
tion for sale of fruit from Florida to
Canada.
11. "Standard packed box" means a
unit of measure equivalent to one and
three-fifths (1-3/5) United States bushels
of fruit, whether in bulk or in any con-
tainer.
12. "Fiscal period" means the period of
time from August 1 of any year to July
31 of the following year.
13. "District" means any of the fol-
lowing areas in the State of Florida:
(a) "Citrus District One" shall include
the Counties of Hillsborough, Pinellas and
Manatee.
(b) "Citrus District Two" shall include
the Counties of Citrus, Sumter, Lake, Her-
nando and Pasco.
(c) "Citrus District Three" shall in-
clude the Counties of Alachua, Putnam,
St. Johns, Flagler, Marion, Levy and Sem-
inole and County Commissioner's District
Numbers One, Two and Three of Volusia
County.
(d) "Citrus District Four" shall include
the Counties of Orange and Osceola.
(e) "Citrus District Five" shall include
the Counties of Brevard, Indian River.
St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach, Broward,
Dade and County Commissioner's Districts
Numbers Four and Five of Vol usia
County.
(f) "Citrus District Six" shall include
the Counties of Sarasota, Hardee, High-
lands, Okeechobee, Glades, DeSoto, Char-
lotte, Lee, Hendry, Collier and Monroe.
(g) "Citrus District Seven" shall in-
clude the County of Polk.
ARTICLE II-ADMINISTRATIVE
BODIES
Section 1. Designation of Committees.-
1. A Growers Administrative Committee
and a Shippers Advisory Committee are
hereby established and the membership
shall be selected in accordance with the
provisions of this article.
Sec. 2. Growers Administrative Commit-
t-e Membership and Term of Office.-The
Growers Administrative Committee shall
consist of eight (8) members, each of
whom shall have an alternate, all of whom
shall be producers who shall not be con-
nected with any packing, shipping or mar-
keting agency or association either as paid
officers or as paid employees. Not less
than three (3) such members and their
alternates shall be affiliated with growers'
cooperative marketing organizations. The
initial members and alternate members
shall hold office for a term beginning on
the date designated by the Secretary and
ending on the last day of July. 1939, and
until their successors are selected and
have qualified. After the last day of July,
1939. the term of office of members and
alternate members shall be one year be-
Please Turn to Page Eighteen


Page Ten









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


Directory: Your State and County Officers.


STATE OFFICERS

L. H. KRAMER, PRESIDENT. LAKE WALES


J. J. Banks. Jr., First Vice-Presi-
dent, Orlando.

W. L. Burton, Secretary, Orlando.


G. B. Vansickler, Second Vice-Presi-
dent, Fort Pierce.

E. G. Todd, Treasurer. Avon Park.


Brevard County
Senior-D. C. Williams, Rt. 2, Merritt
Island.
Junior-Ben I. Garvey, Melbourne.
Alternate-Thos. D. A. Peta, Titusville.
Citrus-Hernando Counties
Senior-A. B. Endsley, Brooksville.
Junior-W. L. Spivey, Floral City.
Alternate-James M. Weeks, Brooks-
ville.
DeSoto County
Senior-T. M. Johns.
Junior-Roy Buchan.
Alternate-Joe Burtschee.
Hardee County
Senior-Wilbur C. King, Zolfo Springs.
Junior-A. Z. Olliff, Wauchula.
Alternate-S. L. Frierson, Rt. 1, Ona.
Highlands County
Senior-E. G. Todd, Avon Park.
Junior-G. A. Devane, Lake Placid.
Alternate-A. K. Hallett, DeSoto City.
Hillsborough County
Senior-R. M. Clewis, Sr., Tampa.
Junior-Ralph H. Sampson.
Alternate-R. DeHaven, Lutz.
Indian River County
Senior-A. W. Young, Vero Beach.
Junior-S. B. Taylor, Vero Beach.
Alternate-M. T. Baird.


STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

L. H. Kramer, Chairman, Lake Wales.
A. W. Young, Vero Beach.
R. M. Clewis, Tampa.
T. M. Johns, Arcadia.
H. L. Pringle, Leesburg.


STATE DIRECTORS
Lake County
Senior-H. L. Pringle, Leesburg.
Junior-C. R. Hiatt, Tavares.
Alternate-C. E. Lester, Tavares.
Manatee County
Senior-John M. Geiley, Terra Ceia.
Junior-Francis H. Corrigan, Braden-
ton.
Alternates-H. J. Edsell, Sarasota,
H. Gocio.

Marion County
Senior-J. M. Douglas, Weirsdale.
Junior-L. E. Futch, Ocala.
Alternate-W. A. Boyer, Weirsdale.

Orange County
Senior-J. J. Banks.
Junior-T. C. Hawthorne.
Alternate-W. L'E. Barnett.

Osceola County
Senior-W. J. Steed, Kissimmee.
Junior-R. E. Thomas, Narcoossee.
Alternate-Steve Sharpe, St. Cloud.

Pasco County
Senior-J. A. Barthle, San Antonio.
Junior-N. M. Swartzel, Elfers.
Alternate-B. E. Smith.


STATE RESOLUTION COMMITTEE

W. J. Steed, Chairman, Kissimmee.
Fred Forward, Maitland.
C. Roy Buchan, Arcadia.
S. A. Whitesell, Largo.
James L. Hardin, Lakeland.


Pinellas County
Senior-S. A. Whitesell, Anona.
Junior-A. J. Grant, Dunedin.
Alternate-Stephen Chase, Dunedin.

Polk County
Senior-L. H. Kramer, Lake Wales.
Junior-Fred T. Henderson, Winter
Haven.
Alternate-J. I. Hardin, Lakeland.

Putnam County
Senior-W. F. Glynn, Crescent City.
Junior-Ralph Crosby, San Mateo.
Alternate-Rufus West, Crescent City.

St. Lucie County
Senior-C. B. Van Sickler, Ft. Pierce.
Junior-Jas. A. Martell, Ft. Pierce.
Alternate-Margaret Quesse, Ft. Pierce.

Seminole County
Senior-Fred Forward, Maitland.
Junior-W. H. Pope, Maitland.
Alternate-W. B. Richards, Maitland.

Volusia County
Senior-Geo. I. Fullerton, Oak Hill.
Junior-M. S. McGregor, DeLand.
Alternate-R. J. Kepler, DeLand.


STATE FINANCE COMMITTEE

E. G. Todd, Chairman, Avon Park.
R. M. Clewis, 'lampa.
J. A. Martell, Fort Pierce.
F. H. Corrigan, Bradenton.
T. C. Hawthorne, Ocoee.


CANNERS INVESTIGATION COM.

E. L. Wirt, Babson Park, Chairman
F. H. Corrigan, Bradenton
J. A. Martel, Fort Pierce
Fred Forward, Maitland
Stephen Chase, Dunedin


STATE PUBLICATION COMMITTEE

W. E. Kemp, Chairman, Pine Castle.
Carl D. Brorein, Tampa.
R. J. Kepler, DeLand
E. G. Thatcher, Vero Beach.
W. L. Burton, Orlando.


STATE COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN


Marketing Agreement
James J. Banks, Jr., Orlando.
Citrus Culture
Cliff Hiatt, Tavares.
Credentials
Wilbur G. King, Zolfo Springs.
Crop Insurance
George I. Fullerton, Oak Hill.


Legislative
E. G. Todd, Avon Park.
Membership
D. G. Williams, Cocoa.
Research
W. L. Barnett, Tangerine.
Selling by Weight
J. N. Mowery, Eustis.


Traffic
H. L. Pringle, Leesburg.
Uniform Contract
A. W. Young, Vero Beach.
Packing House Charges
A. V. Saurman, Box 686, Clearwater.
Advertising
Karl Lehmann, Tavares.


Page Eleven









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938



COUNTY UNITS AND OFFICERS


BREVARD
Officers
President, D. C. Williams, Rt. 2, Cocoa,
Merritt Island.
Vice-President, B. I. Garvey, Melbourne.
Secretary, Thos. L. Cain, Cocoa.
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. O'Hara, Cocoa.
Directors
G. A. Draa, Mims.
Ben I. Garvey, Melbourne.
Elton Hall, Melbourne.
Mrs. A. B. O'Hara, Cocoa.
Thos. D. A. Peta, Titusville.
A. G. Porcher, Cocoa.
D. C. Williams, Rt. 2, Box 23, Cocoa,
Merritt Island.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-Thos. D. A. Peta, Titus-
ville.
Credentials-L. P. Allen, Cocoa.
Crop Insurance-C. B. Kingman, Titus-
ville.
Legislative-G. A. Draa, Mims.
Marketing Agreement-A. G. Porcher,
Cocoa.
Membership-D. C. Williams, Rt. 2, Cocoa.
Research-Norman L. Wolf, Cocoa.
Selling by Weight-Mrs. A. B. O'Hara,
Cocoa.
Traffic-Chas. W. Skelly, Cocoa.
Uniform Contract-Ben I. Garvey, Mel-
bourne.
State Directors
Senior-D. C. Williams, Rt. 2, Merritt
Island.
Junior-Ben I. Garvey, Melbourne.
Alternate-Thos. D. A. Peta, Titusville.
Press Agent. T. L. Cain, Cocoa.

CITRUS-HERNANDO
Officers
President A. B. Endsley, RFD 1, Brooks-
ville.
Vice-President W. L. Spivey, Floral City.
Secretary W. C. O'Hara, Brooksville.
Treasurer, W. C. O'Hara, Brooksville.
Directors
A. B. Endsley, Brooksville.
W. L. Spivey, Floral City.
James Mountain, Brooksville.
J. T. Daniels, Brooksville.
James M. Weeks, Brooksville.
R. T. Hancock, Brooksville.
W. P. Murphy, Brooksville.
Herbert VanNess, Inverness.
T. E. Edenfeld, Inverness.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-J. T. Daniels, Brooksville.
Credentials-J. P. Kimbrough, Brooksville.
Crop Insurance-James M. Weeks, Brooks-
ville.
Legislative-A. A. McKethan. Brooksville.
Marketing Agreement-R. T. Hancock,
Brooksville.
Membership-W. C. O'Hara, Brooksville.
Research-W. P. Murphy, Brooksville.
Selling by Weight James Mountain
Brooksville.
Traffic-W. L. Spivey. Floral City.
Uniform Contract-Judge E. S. McKinsey,
Brooksville.
State Directors
Senior-A. B. Endsley, Brooksville.
Junior-W. L. Spivey, Floral City.
Alternate-James M. Weeks, Brooksville.

DESOTO

Officers
President, T. M. Johns, Arcadia.
Vice-President, B. F. Stewart.


Directors
T. M. Johns.
W. M. Nolan.
Roy Buchan.
Joe Burtschee.
C. D. Turner.
Captain M. H. Harrison.
D. W. Brown.
Hugh Jones.
State Directors
Senior-T. M. Johns.
Junior-Roy Buchan.
Alternate-Joe Burtschee.

HARDEE
Officers
President, Wilbur C. King, Zolfo Springs.
First Vice-President, A. Z. Olliff, Wau-
chula.
Second Vice-President, W. W. Whitehurst,
Wauchula.
Secretary, H. L. Miller, Wauchula.
Treasurer, H. L. Miller, Wauchula.
Directors
Wilbur C. King, Zolfo Springs.
A. Z. Olliff, Wauchula.
W. W. Whitehurst, Wauchula.
R. S. Farwell, Gardner.
S. L. Frierson, Rt. 1, Ona.
L. M. Shackelford, Rt. 2, Wauchula.
A. H. Carlton, Wauchula.
Walter Altman, Wauchula.
R. M. Coile, Bowling Green.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-Walter Altman, Wauchula.
Credentials, R. M. Coile, Bowling Green.
Crop Insurance-L. M. Shackelford, Rt. 2,
Wauchula.
Legislative-Wilbur C. King, Zolfo Springs.
Marketing Agreement-S. L. Frierson.
Rt. 1, Ona.
Membership-George Gillette, Wauchula.
Research-C. E. Baggott, Wauchula.
Selling by Weight-R. S. Farwell, Gardner.
Traffic-A. Z. Olliff, Wauchula.
Uniform Contract-W. W. Whitehurst.
Wauchula.
State Directors
Senior-Wilbur C. King, Zolfo Springs.
Junior-A. Z. Olliff, Wauchula.
Alternate, S. L. Frierson, Rt. 1, Ona.

HIGHLANDS

Officers
President, E. G. Todd, Avon Park.
First Vice-President, G. A. DeVane, Lake
Placid.
Second Vice-President, Guignard Maxcy.
Sebring.
Secretary and Treasurer, A. K. Hallett.
DeSoto City.
Directors
Parke Anderson, Avon Park.
Chas. L. Crawford, Sebring.
E. W. Hartt, Avon Park.
G. A. DeVane, Lake Placid.
E. G. Todd, Avon Park.
C. H. Shackelford, Hicoria.
Guignard Maxcy, Sebring.
L. H. Alsmeyer, (Ex-Officio), Sebring.
V. G. Watters, Sebring.
A. M. Wolfe, Sebring.
Philip Correll, DeSoto City.
A. K. Hallett, DeSoto City.
C. F. Rust, DeSoto City.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-G. A. DeVane, Lake
Placid.
Credentials-Guignard Maxcy, Sebring.
Crop Insurance-C. F. Rust, DeSoto City.
Legislative-E. W. Hartt. Avon Park.
Marketing Agreement-C. L. Crawford
Sebring.


Membership-V. G. Watters, Sebring.
Research-C. P. Turner, Avon Park.
Selling by Weight Guignard Maxcy
Sebring.
Traffic-A. M. Wolfe, Sebring.
Uniform Contract Guignard Maxcy.
Sebring.
State Directors
Senior-E. G. Todd, Avon Park.
Junior-G. A. DeVane, Lake Placid.
Alternate-A. K. Hallett, DeSoto City.

HILLSBOROUGH
Officers
President, R. M. Clewis, Sr., 405 Madison
St., Tampa.
First Vice-President, R. V. Wayne,
Tampa.
Second Vice-President-A. B. Carlton,
Knights.
Secretary, Mrs. C. O. Brown, Odessa.
Treasurer, R. V. Wayne, Tampa.
Directors
Roscoe DeHaven, Lutz.
A. B. Carlton, 2829 Morgan St., Tampa.
Milton H. Mabry, 509 Twiggs St., Tampa.
L. G. Taylor, Rt. 1, Box 995, Tampa.
Dr. T. W. Raymond, Thonotasassa.
H. F. Lewis, Rt. 2, Box 316K, Tampa.
H. M. Pancoast, Seffner.
J. H. Letton, Valrico.
H. C. Carltcn, Knights.
C. C. Wiggins, Plant City.
R. G. Wood, Lithia.
S. D. Sweat, Balen.
R. M. Clewis, Sr., 405 Madison St., Tampa.
Doyle E. Carlton, 1st Natl. Bank Bldg.
Tampa.
Mrs. C. O. Bowron, Odessa.
R. V. Wayne, Ins. Bldg., Tampa.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-A. Mendenhall, Waters
Ave., Tampa.
Crop Insurance-A. B. McMullen, 1st Natl.
Bank Bldg., Tampa.
Legislative-Doyle E. Carlton, 1st Natl.
Bank Bldg., Tampa.
Marketing Agreement-Doyle E. Carlton,
1st Natl. Bank Bldg., Tampa.
Membership-C. W. Cailliouelto, Box 402,
Thonotosassa.
Research-R. P. Thornton, 1145 E. Cass
St. Tampa.
Selling by Weight-C. G. Suary, 5303 Cen-
tral, Tampa.
Traffic-Ray B. Cralle, 401 Washington
St., Tampa.
Uniform Contract-Geo. P. Raney, Box
1097, Tampa.
State Directors
Senior-R. M. Clewis, Sr., Tampa.
Junior-Ralph H. Sampson.
Alternate-RI. DeHaven, Lutz.
INDIAN RIVER
Officers
President A. W. Young, Vero Beach.
Vice President, R. L. Kinney, Fellsmere.
Secretary, E. G. Thatcher, Vero Beach.
Treasurer, A. O. Helseth, Vero Beach.
Directors
A. W. Young, Vero Beach.
R. L. Kinney, Fellsmere.
W. R. Duncan, Vero Beach.
S. B. Taylor, Vero Beach.
R. D. Carter, Vero Beach.
F. R. Jewett, Vero Beach.
M. T. Baird, Vero Beach.
A. O. Helseth, Vero Beach.
Committee Chairmen
Cirtus Culture-A. M. Hill, Jr. Vero Beach.
Credentials-M. T. Baird, Vero Beach.
Crop Insurance-Alfred Warren, Vero
Beach.


Page Twelve









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


Legislative-R. D. Carter, Vero Beach.
Marketing Agreement-A. M. Hill, Vero
Beach.
Membership-M. T. Baird, Vero Beach.
Research-R. L. Kinney, Vero Beach.
Seling by Weight-J. J. Schumann, Vero
Beach.
Traffic-W T. Zeuch, Vero Beach.
Uniform Contract, W. C. Graves, Jr., Vero
Beach.
State Directcrs
Senior-A. W. Young, Vero Beach.
Junior-S. B. Taylor, Vero Beach.
Alternate-M. T. Baird.

LAKE
Officers
President, C. R. Hiatt, Tavares.
Vice-President, C. E. Lester, Tavares.
Secretary and Treasurer, Z. D. Giles,
Eustis.
Directors
W. A. Skinner, Umatilla.
C. R. Hiatt, Tavares.
C. E. Lester, Tavares.
T. J. Smart, Clermont.
Karl Lehmann, Montverde.
E. S. Choate, Eustis.
Z. D. Giles, Eustis.
H. W. Palmer, Fruitland Park.
H. L. Pringle, Leesburg.
W. L. Barnett, Mount Dora.
A. S. Clark, Eustis.
Frank Laird, Groveland.
C. R. Short, Clermont.
H. C. Brown, Clermont.
H. H. Meincke, Howey.
Ralph Mulholland, Eustis.
H. H. Hethcox, Umatilla.
R. E. Norris, Tavares.
Wilmer Bassett, Tavares.
H. C. Henricksen, Eustis.
J. S. Quimby, Eustis.
A. A. Kurfiss, Groveland.
J. P. Lynch, Groveland.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-C. R. Hiatt, Tavares.
Credentials-H. H. Meincke, Howey .
Crop Insurance-H. H. Hethcox, Umatilla.
Legislative-H. C. Brown, Clermont.
Marketing Agreement Frank Laird,
Groveland.
Membership-A. S. Clark, Eustis.
Research-Dr. M. N. Walker, Leesburg.
Selling by Weight-H. W. Palmer, Fruit-
land Park.
Traffic-H. L. Pringle, Leesburg.
Uniform Contract-Zera Giles, Eustis.
State Directors
Senior-H. L. Pringle, Leesburg.
Junior-C. R. Hiatt, Tavares.
Alternate-C. E. Lester, Tavares.

MANATEE
Officers
President, R. H. Prine.
Vice-President, Harry Gocio.
Secretary and Treasurer, H. J. Edsall.
Directors
W. M. Burnett.
W. F. Burrows.
F. H. Carrigan.
V. M. Criley.
H. J. Edsell.
H. Gocio.
R. H. Higgins.
W. R. Pollard.
R. H. Prine.
State Directors
Senior-John M. Geiley, Terro Ceio.
Junior-Francis H. Corrigan, Bradenton.
Alternates-H. J. Edsell, Sarasota,
H. Gocio.
MARION
Officers
President, W. A. Boyer, Weirsdale.
Vice-President, L. E. Futch, Ocala.


Secretary, A. B. Lewis, Highlands Hotel,
Ocala.
Treasurer, L. Grieneisen. Jr., Weirsdale.
Directors
A. B. Lewis, Ocala.
G. H. Morthland, Weirsdale.
L. Grieneisen, Jr., Weirsdale.
J. M. Douglas, Weirsdale.
W. W. Lewis, Ocala.
L. E. Futch, Ocala.
F. G. Douglass, Citra.
M. J. Timmons, Box 542, Ocala.
H. G. Billings, Lowell.
Geo. W. Brant, Sr., Rt. 1, Oklawaha.
W. E. Christian, McIntosh.
F. W. Cawthon, Weirsdale.
J. F. Cocowitch, Dunnellon.
Podell Crosby, Citra.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-H. G. Billings, Lowell.
Credentials-L. Grieneisen, Jr., Weirsdale.
Crop Insurance-F. W. Cawthon, Weirs-
dale.
Legislative-L. E. Futch, Ocala.
Marketing Agreement-W. A. Boyer,
Weirsdale.
Membership-Geo. W. Brant, Sr., Rt. 1,
Oklawaha.
Research-G. H. Morthland, Weirsdale.
Selling by Weight-F. G. Douglas, Citra.
Traffic-A. B. Lewis, Highlands Hotel,
Ocala.
Uniform Contract-J. F. Cocowitch, Dun-
nellon.
Program Committee-W. W. Lewis, Ocala.
State Directors
Senior-J. M. Douglas, Weirsdale.
Junior-L. E. Futch, Ocala.
Alternate-W. A. Boyer, Weirsdale.

ORANGE
Officers
President, Jas. J. Banks, Jr., 1015 Wilkin-
son Ave., Orlando.
1st Vice-President, J. C. Haley, Box 1955,
Orlando.
2nd Vice-President, Carl J. Jackson,
Apopka.
Secretary, W. L. Burton, Windermere.
Treasurer, W. E. Kemp, Pinecastle Rd.,
Orlando.
Directors
W. L'E. Barnett, Tangerine.
T. C. Hawthorne, Ocoee.
John Jaquith, Windermere.
K. N. McPherson, Maitland.
E. J. Parker, Box 826, Orlando.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-E. J. Parker.
Crop Insurance-K. N. McPherson.
Program-W. L'E. Barnett.
Publicity-John Jaquith.
Membership-T. C. Hawthorne.
Marketing-J. C. Haley.
Legislative-Carl Jackson.
Traffic-W. E. Kemp.
State Directors
Senior-J. J. Banks.
Junior-T. C. Hawthorne.
Alternate-W. L'E. Barnett.
OSCEOLA
Officers
President, Ira O. Young, St. Cloud.
Vice-President, E. L. Spence, Rt. 1, Kis-
simmee.
Vice-President, Cecil Whaley, Kissimmee
Park.
Secretary, J. R. Gunn, Kissimmee.
Treasurer, Peter W. Straub, Kissimmee.
Directors
E. L. Spence, Kissimmee.
P. W. Straub, Kissimmee.
L. E. Partin, Kissimmee.
W. A. Hughey, Kissimmee.
Cecil Whaley, Kissimmee Park.
R. E. Thomas, Narcoossee.
W. J. Steed, Kissimmee.


S. E. Sharpe, St. Cloud.
Ira O. Young.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-S. E. Sharpe, St. Cloud.
Crop Insurance-J. J. Johnston, St. Cloud.
Legislative-W. J. Steed, Kissimmee.
Marketing Agreement-Ira O. Young,
St. Cloud.
Membership-R. E. Thomas-Narcoossee.
Research-E. L. Spence, Kissimmee.
Selling by Weight-W. I. Barber, Kissim-
mee.
Traffic-B. L. Steen, St. Cloud, Fla.
Uniform Contract-H. M. Johnston, Kis-
simmee, Fla.
State Directors
Senior-W. J. Steed, Kissimmee.
Junior-R. E. Thomas, Narcoossee.
Alternate-Steve Sharpe, St. Cloud.

PASCO
Officers
President, E. C. Blum, New Port Richey.
Vice President, Dr. F. C. Wirt, Dade City.
Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Nita Fos-
kett, New Port Richey.
Directors
F. C. Wirt, Dade City.
Sam O. Slough, Dade City.
E. C. Futch.
J. W. Sanders, Lutz.
J. R. A. Williams.
B. E. Smith.
0. W. Lipsey.
N. W. Swartzel, Elfers.
J. A. McClellan, Dade City.
State Directors
Senior-J. A. Barthle, San Antonio.
Junior-N. M. Swartzel, Elfers.
Alternate-B. E. Smith.

PINELLAS
Officers
President, A. J. Grant, Dunedin.
Vice-President, A. V. Saurman, 309 Hilltop
Ave., Clearwater.
Secretary and Treasurer, C. E. Jackson,
Jr., Palm Harbor.
Directors
A. J. Grant, Dunedin.
A. V. Saurman, Clearwater.
J. A. Boyd, Palm Harbor.
Stephen Chase, Dunedin.
E. L. Pearce, Clearwater.
S. A. Whitesell, Anona.
J. C. Nelson, Clearwater.
B. L. McMullen, Bay View.
Ge. W. Clinger, 4321 10th Ave. N. St.
Petersburg.
F. L. Campbell, R. 1, Largo.
C. E. Jackson, Jr., Palm Harbor.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-Stephen Chase, Dunedin.
Credentials-J. C. Nelson, Clearwater.
Legislative-A. V. Saurman, Clearwater.
Marketing Agreement-S. A. Whitesell,
Anona.
Membership, E. L. Pearce, Clearwater.
Selling by Weight-F. L. Campbell-Largo.
Traffic-B. L. McMullen, Bay View.
Uniform Contract-J. A. Boyd, Palm
Harbor.
State Directors
Senior-S. A. Whitesell, Anona.
Junior-A. J. Grant, Dunedin.
Alternate-Stephen Chase, Dunedin.

POLK
Officers
President, L. H. Kramer, Lake Wales.
Vice-President, J. V. Hodnett, Auburn-
dale.
Secretary and Treasurer, Paul Hayman,
Bartow, Fla.
Directors
L. H. Kramer, Lake Wales.


Page Thirteen









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


J. V. Hodnett, Auburndale.
J. L. Hardin, Lakeland.
J. G. Stenger Bartow.
J. E. Palmer, Davenport.
C. C. Spencer, Haines City.
W. L. Pederson, Winter Haven.
M. M. Loadholtes, Ft. Meade.
Fred T. Henderson, Winter Haven.
C. E. Davis, Lake Hamilton.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-J. E. Palmer, Davenport.
Credentials-J. G. Stenger, Bartow.
Crop Insurance-G. H. Holden, Ft. Meade.
Legislative-J. L. Hardin, Lakeland.
Marketing Agreement-F. T. Henderson,
Winter Haven.
Membership-J. V. Hodnett, Auburndale.
Selling by Weight-C. C. Spencer, Haines
City.
Traffic-W. L. Pederson. Winter Haven.
Uniform Contract-J. V. Hodnett, Auburn-
dale.
State Directors
Senior-L. H. Kramer, Lake Wales.
Junior-Fred T. Henderson, Winter Haven.
Alternate-J. L. Hardin, Lakeland.

PUTNAM
Officers
President, T. S. Carpenter, Jr., Crescent
City.
Vice-President, Ralph Crosby, San Mateo.
Secretary and Treasurer, E. M. Pickens,
Crescent City.
Directors
T. S. Carpenter Jr., Crescent City.
Ralph Crosby, San Mateo.
E. M. Pickens, Crescent City.
E. H. Williams, Crescent City.
W. F. Glynn, Crescent City.
W. C. Cartledge, Crescent City.
Rufus West, Crescent City.
A. E. Kopler East Palatka.
Ralph Atkinson, Federal Point RFD 1.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-J. L. Padgett, Crescent
City.
Credentials-Ralph Atkinson, Federal
Point.
Crop Insurance-E. H. Williams, Crescent
City. 1 1 i
Legislative-W. F. Glynn, Crescent City.
Marketing Agreement-E. H. Williams,
Crescent City.
Membership-Rufus West, Crescent City.
Research-Ralph Crosby, San Mateo.
Selling by Weight-E. M. Pickens, Cres-
cent City.
Traffic-Rutus West, Crescent City.
Uniform Contract-A. E. Kopler, East
Palatka.
State Directors
Senior-W. F. Glynn, Crescent City.
Junior-Ralph Crosby, San Mateo.
Alternate-Rufus West, Crescent City.
ST. LUCIE
Officers
President, C. B. Van Sickler, Fort Pierce.
Vice-President, Jas. A. Martell, Fort
Pierce.
Secretary, C. Van Der Lugt, care Chamber
of Commerce, Fort Pierce.
Treasurer Geo. Russos, Fort Pierce.
Directors
J. T. Archambault, Ft. Pierce.
Anton Beerhalter, Ft. Pierce.
G. E. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
Jas. A. Martell Ft. Pierce.
E. R. Enns, Ft. Pierce.
T. W. Olson, Ft. Pierce.
Margaret Quesse, Ft. Pierce.
Geo. M. Russos, Ft. Pierce.
C. B. Van Sickler, Ft. Pierce.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-G. E. Hoofnagle.
Credentials-Margaret Quesse.


Crop Insurance-D. A. Walsh.
Legislative-Walter M. Rogers.
Marketing Agreement-Ed. Colean.
Membership-C. Van Der Lugt.
Research-Norman G. Platts.
Traffic-Al. C. Gordy.
Uniform Contract-Jas. A. Martell.
State Directars
Senior-C. B. Van Sickler, Ft. Pierce.
Junior-Jas. A. Martell, Ft. Pierce.
Alternate-Margaret Quesse, Ft. Pierce.

SEMINOLE
Officers
President, Fred Forward, Maitland.
Vice-President, W. H. Pope, Maitland.
Secretary, O. R. Estridge, Sanford.
Treasurer, W. B. Richards, Maitland.
Directors
Fred Forward, Maitland.
W. H. Pope, Maitland.
W. B. Richards, Maitland.
C. R. Dawson, Sanford.
J. F. McClelland, Sanford.
J. G. Leonardy, Sanford.
H. H. Pattishall, Geneva.
O. R. Mathieu, Geneva.
Endor Curlett, Geneva.
R. F. King, Ovieda.
Dr. J. W. Martin, Oviedo.
P. D. Anderson, Lake Mary.
W. J. Wells, Longwood.
F. J. Scholfield, Longwood.
R. L. Crooms, Maitland.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-W. B. Richards, Maitland
Credentials-Emma Abbot Lyman, Alta-
monte Springs.
Crop Insurance-W. J. Wells, Longwood.
Legislative-J. G. Leonardy, Sanford.
Marketing Agreement Endor Curlett,
Geneva.
Membership-O. R. Mathieus, Geneva.
Research-C. R. Dawson, Sanford.
Selling by Weight-J. D. Davison, Sanford.
Traffic-W. H. Pope, Maitland.
Uniform Contract-P. D. Anderson, Lake
Mary.
State Directors
Senior-Fred Forward, Maitland.
Junior-W. H. Pope. Maitland.
Alternate-W. B. Richards, Maitland.

VOLUSIA
Officers
President, R. J. Kepler, DeLand, RFD 2.
Vice-President, J. W. Perkins, DeLand.
Secretary and Treasurer, James V. Doyle,
DeLand.
Directors
R. J. Kepler, DeLand.
J. W. Perkins, DeLand.
E. R. Conrad, DeLand.
Geo. I. Fullerton, Oak Hill.
Rudolph D. Peterson. Pierson.
J. H. Graham, Seville.
B. J. Nordman, DeLand.
M. S. McGregor, DeLand.
Committee Chairmen
Citrus Culture-F. N. Baetzman, DeLand.
Credentials-M. S. McGregor, DeLand.
Crop Insurance-R. D. Peterson, Pierson.
Legislative-Geo. I. Fullerton, Oak Hill.
Marketing Agreement-R. J. Kepler, De-
Land.
Membership-J. W. Perkins, DeLand.
Selling by Weight-E. R. Conrad, DeLand.
Traffic-J. H. Graham, Seville.
Uniform Contract-B. J. Nordman, De-
Land.
State Directors
Senior-Geo. I. Fullerton, Oak Hill.
Junior-M. S. McGregor, DeLand.
Alternate-R. J. Kepler, DeLand.


Marketing Agreement

Continued from Page Six

used, the only available method for
its operation was that of current
control of allotment bases. We felt
further reassured by the additional
fact that all shipper members of the
industry committee expressing them-
selves upon this specific question
were of the opinion that, by reason-
able adjustments in their own busi-
ness practices, they individually
could continue to operate and serve
the industry in the future as in the
past.

WOULD DISCONTINUE

We were mindful, however, of
the fact that some handlers were still
of the opinion that the practice of
cash buying would largely discon-
tinue under the application of cur-
rent control. Therefore, in fram-
ing the provisions for that section
of the agreement dealing with vol-
ume control, we have tried to incor-
porate as far as possible only those
provisions which would permit the
continuation of the acceptable and
generally used practices of the Flor-
ida trade under which both the co-
operative and cash buyer handlers
are serving the producer.
We wish to call attention to, and
emphasize, the fact, while adopting
the current control feature, we have
made provisions for the recognition
by the administrative committee of
all legal contracts which may be en-
tered into between producer and
handler. By not attempting to
bridge the rights of private contract
we feel that reasonable and normal
adjustments can be made by both
producer and handler with the least
possible interference with present ex-
isting essential trade practices.
When we all stop to realize that
the producer assumes all the direct
restrictions a n d losses u n d e r
grade and size control and some of
the adjustments made necessary by
volume control, it is not unreason-
able to expect the handlers of their


Page Fourteen








This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


fruit to likewise make the necessary
adjustments in order that the pro-
ducer may not be denied the bene-
fits of volume proration.
Upon our examination of the
facts we find that cash buying is
necessarily and to a large extent ser-
iously restricted by the chaotic con-
ditions which a surplus condition
always brings about and emphasizes.
Present conditions are simply a re-
flection of this condition. The pro-
ducers' position and both the assign-
ment and cash handlers' position is
materially improved wherever fac-
tors are applied which tend to con-
trol or eliminate the surplus prob-
lem and stabilize a market. This
involves the shipping to fresh fruit
markets during any season only that
portion and those grades and sizes
of the crop which the markets can
absorb at a fair net return to the
producer and the understanding that
shipments must be made in an or-
derly manner so that periodic mar-
ket gluts will not destroy seasonal
price objectives.
We are all aware of the fact that
a buyers' market is produced, and in
the case of perishable commodities is
accentuated, when a surplus problem
is left so uncontrolled as to permit
promiscuous movement into a mar-
ket in excess of that which it can
normally absorb.
We are also thoroughly aware of
the fact that a buyers' market
always tends to lower the market
price of a commodity. In the case
of a serious surplus and uncontrol-
led movement that market price fre-
quently drops below cost of produc-
tion. All too often with handling
and shipping charges paid, the pro-
ducer realizes anything from a mea-
ger and unsatisfactory return to ac-
tually paying for the privilege of
donating his product to the con-
sumer. The fact is so thoroughly
understood as to become axiomatic
that, by supplying a market with
only a sufficient quantity of fruit,
a sellers' market is maintained which
will result in anything from the


realization of cost of production to
a fair and reasonable return upon
the producers investments.
When we stop to realize that we
must choose between either main-
taining a sellers' market, in which
we may at times actually find bona-
fide orders without the right to fill
them, or a buyers' market in which
we shall experience throughout most
of the season a surplus of quality
fruit without orders at satisfactory
price levels to justify shipping, we
realize the importance of adopting
that method of control: namely,
volume proration, which is the only
practical and satisfactory way of es-
tablishing a sellers' market. In our
wide-spread contact with the grow-
ers we are firmly of the opinion that
this problem is understood and that,
while it will require adjustments
upon the part of the individual
grower, a vast majority are ready to
make those adjustments, not only
in the interest of self-protection, but
in the interest of all other producers
and the community as a whole.
We feel, therefore, that it is
only reasonable that we, as pro-
ducers, should ask the minority
group of handlers, who heretofore
have objected to current control of
volume proration, to make such
normal and reasonable adjustments
so that the benefits of a marketing
agreement may be more quickly se-
cured. For certainly under condi-
tions we are now facing no cash
buyer can operate upon sane, legiti-
mate business principles and no as-
signment handler can render proper
service to the producer whom he
serves.
The citrus industry of Florida is
a basic industry of this state. Its
stabilization and welfare is essen-
tial, not only to those who have in-
vestments in groves and packing
houses, but is vital to the welfare and
prosperity of the state as a whole.
Many people outside of the indus-
try itself are dependent upon its
prosperity for a livelihood. A great


deal of time and thought and energy
have been used in working out this
program. Those of us who have had
a part in it are conscious of the fact
that it is not a perfect program.
Necessarily all programs of this na-
ture must be reached through ad-
justments of individual opinions to
the requirements of all people in-
volved. We believe that it is the
best that can be proposed at this
time; we believe that its quick adop-
tion is necessary to bring about
changes which must be brought
about if small producers are to be
kept in possession of their properties
and large producers are to be pre-
vented from taking serious, if not
disastrous, losses.
We hope, therefore, that individ-
ual opinions with respect to any de-
tails of the agreement will at this
time be subordinated so that,
through cooperation of the industry
as a whole, further negotiations will
not be made necessary and that all
concerned will join hands in giving
this program a fair and impartial
trial.
We pledge ourselves to continue
to work with open minds to the
further development of a better pro-
gram which working conditions and
actual experiences might justify.
In conclusion, may we express
again our heartfelt appreciation to
all who have worked with us and
to the department of agriculture,
who have given so generously of
their time in trying to solve our
complex problems.
Marketing Agreement Committee
of Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.,
J. J. Banks, Chairman.


A. C. LUNDSTEN
Opens House
A. C. Lundsten, Winter Park,
announced acquisition early this sea-
son of the packing house former'v
owned by the Pennoflora Packing
Company, at Apopka. Brand names
are unchanged.


Page Fifteen







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


Report Shows:

The Future For The Grower May


LEAK THOUGH the hori-
zon may appear to Florida
Citrus Growers, there are
rays of sunshine seeping through, as
Fred T. Henderson, of Winter Ha-
ven, told members of the Florida
Citrus Growers, Inc., at their Fort
Pierce meeting.
Mr. Henderson, a member of the
citrus marketing agreement execu-
tive committee, presented statistics
to prove his case-a case growers
will be glad to believe since it points
the way to better times.
He used facts relating to Florida's
grapefruit problem, and based upon
the acceptance of the proposed mar-
keting agreement by Florida Grow-
ers and Shippers, saying:
"We are particularly fortunate in
this state in having both the early
and late bloom fruit. Now, let's
get down to figures and see what
that means.
"The total estimated crop of
Florida grapefruit is 21,000,000
boxes. Of that amount, at least 25
percent is late bloom. Disregarding
that for the present, we have 15,-
750,000 boxes of early bloom. Your
industry committee estimated 20 per-
cent of that to be third grade and
recommended the elimination of that
grade, leaving 12,000,600 boxes for
both cannery and fresh fruit mar-
kets. In my opinion, the canners
will use at least 5,000,000 boxes of
this early bloom crop. That would
leave 7,000,600 boxes for fresh use.
During the 1936-37 season we mar-
keted fresh, 9,900,000 boxes, with
very little late bloom included.
"That was under the last mar-
keting agreement and things then
looked very black early in that sea-
son.


ot Be As Bleak

SHOULD EXTEND PERIOD
"I have separated the two blooms
because it seems logical to suppose
that the Florida industry will mar-
ket most of the late bloom crop after
Texas is out of the way and since
the bloom is very late it should ex-
tend the marketing period as well
as the area of distribution.
"Now let's go back to that 5,-
250,000 boxes of late bloom, which
of course includes also both the reg-
ular and seedless grapefruit. The
industry committee estimates about
60 percent of it to be first and sec-
ond grade. That leaves about 3,-
150,000 boxes available for fresh
and canned usage. My belief is that
at least 1,000,000 boxes of it will
be used by canners, leaving 2,150,-
000 boxes for the fresh fruit mar-
kets.
"This amount added to the nor-
mal season movement of the early
bloom fresh fruit figure of 7,600,-
000 makes a total fresh movement
for Florida of 9,750,000 boxes.
Express shipments and other utili-
zation are estimated at 1,250,000
boxes, leaving eight million and a
half for interstate shipment. That
is almost a million and a half less
than we shipped fresh in the 1936-
37 season.
"So much for the early and late
bloom advantages.
"Now I want to touch upon
other related factors that have been
studied by your committee.
"First and greatest importance I
think is the apple shortage. The
principal competition for deciduous
fruits comes from apples, the only
fruit carried over into winter stor-
age. The shortage as estimated by
the U. S. D. A. amounts to over


As It Appears

78,000,000 bushels. Reduced to
boxes the size of ours it amounts to
more than 49,000,000 less than last
year. That is more by 8,000,000
than the total grapefruit crops of all
producing areas.
"In conclusion I want to urge
all growers to fully realize that the
15 and 20 cent minimum figures
emenating from these conferences
are on the tree minimums and should
not be considered the established tree
prices. Let's get behind this agree-
ment with a will to make it work.
It must have your full cooperation
and active support to be of greatest
value to you. It is the only means
of keeping low grade fruit out of
the markets."


PUTNAM GROWERS
Organize

Mr. H. L. Pringle of Leesburg,
and Mr. R. J. Kepler, of DeLand,
went to Crescent City to assist
growers of Putnam County in their
organization October 4. They
found a large attendance, 55 mem-
bers already signed up with dues
paid.
Mr. H. L. Pringle spoke on the
needs of a grower organization and
Mr. Kepler explained the method of
organizing; members proceeded to
elect directors as follows:
Rufus West, R. W. Atkinson,
T. S. Carpenter, Jr., W. F. Glynn,
Ralph Crosby, W. C. Cartledge, A.
E. Kepler, Ed Williams, E. M.
Pickins.
T. S. Carpenter was chosen presi-
dent; Ralph Crosby, vice-president;
E. M. Pickins, secretary and treas-
urer; W. F. Glynn, senior director;
Ralph Crosby, junior director; T.
S. Carpenter, alternate.


Page Sixteen







This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938



With The Editor


TO OUR GROWER FRIENDS
LORIDA CITRUS GROWERS, INC., takes
the position that the growers have no enemies.
We do not believe there are any villains in the
industry deliberately seeking to do the growers' in-
terests harm. Our organization is not "out to fight
anybody."

OTHER INTERESTS PRESENT IN INDUSTRY
The grower, however, has become acutely conscious
there are other interests in the industry. He has finally
realized the citrus job is not finished when a high qual-
ity product is grown and ready for market. He now
sees that many others handle the fruit before it reaches
the final consumer. Among these interests we men-
tion the shipper, the railroad, the speculator in Florida
and in the Northern markets, the handler at the con-
sumer terminals, the retailer, and many others. All
of them actively seek a share in the consumer's dollar.

CONFLICTS HAVE RISEN IN MARKETING
In the scramble for this share, conflicts have come
up. In such conflicts, all the tree-to-market people
have been on the job striving to take care of them-
selves.
The grower has never been represented in these
councils where the consumer's dollar has been divided.
And, we wish to repeat, there is no hint that the
handler interests are unduly greedy. They have mere-
ly followed the first law of nature and have first
taken care of themselves. They do not think of it as
their fault that the consumer's dollar is really not
large enough.
In this matter of taking care of themselves, also,
these handler interests have yielded to temptation even
to lessen, the consumer's dollar for the entire industry.
They have shipped green fruit, frozen fruit, off-grade
fruit, have shipped it without plan or order, in quan-
tities not suited to demand, with terminal marketing
facilities not always the best.

GROWER NOT HEARD IN COUNCILS
In none of these things has the grower, in the past,
sat in at the councils, or made himself heard in any
effective way.
Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., has come into
being from the urgent need of united grower
representation and action.
It is now upon its feet and functioning. In such
important instances as freight rate hearings, marketing
agreement, government purchase of fruit, it has already


justified its existence. It has been of material benefit
to the grower and to the entire industry.
One not closely in touch with the organization's ac-
tivities could hardly imagine the amount of brain and
nerve power that it puts into motion. Bankers, law-
yers, industrialists and all other kinds of men, them-
selves growers, and who have been successful in other
lines of endeavor, are traveling hundreds of miles,
spending days and weeks of time, earnestly seeking to
better the condition of the grower.

COOPERATION OF ALL GROWERS NEEDED
But the organization needs the cooperation and as-
sistance of every grower. Its work will lag badly, it
cannot hope to do the good it might, unless a large
majority of all Florida growers join its county units.
The grower is the final burden carrier in all the
problems of the citrus industry. He needs representa-
tion, he needs an advocate-he needs our organization,
and our organization needs you-the grower.

WE'RE NOT DISSATISFIED
UBLICATION OF AN "official organ" by The
Florida Citrus Growers, Inc., does not infer that
the Growers' organization is dissatisfied with the
amount, or kind, of publicity it is receiving.
On the contrary: The Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.,
feel deeply indebted to newspapers throughout the
state, to other periodicals voicing news and views of
the industry, to radio stations and the various pub-
licity organs of the industry's earlier-formed govern-
ing bodies for the generous authentic treatment they
have given the Growers' new organization.
Without this publicity, much difficulty might have
attended organizing a body of so great scope as The
Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.; much public misunder-
standing might have attended its birth; many erroneous
impressions of its sincere purpose of serving both the
industry and the grower in that industry might have
arisen.
And so, for these kind favors, thanks. May the
growers continue to enjoy the courtesy and esteem of
press and radio alike, working in harmony for the
ultimate benefit of the citrus industry in Florida.

This issue of THE CITRUS GROWER does not
carry time schedules of daily radio broadcasts of lowest
predicted temperatures from the U. S. Weather Bu-
reau's special frost service. It was the fault of the edi-
tors that Mr. Eckley S. Ellison, meteorologist in charge,
was not notified in time.


Page Seventeen









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15,


ginning on the first day of August. The
members, their alternates and their re-
spective successors shall be nominated by
producers and selected by the Secretary
as hereinafter provided.
Sec. 3. Nomination of Members for
Growers Administrative Committee. 1.
The Secretary shall give public notice of
a meeting of producers in each district to
be held within twelve (12) days after the
l'fective date he.eor and .n ensuing years
not later than July 10, for the purpose of
making nominations for members and al-
ternate members of the Growers Adminis-
trative Committee. Each such meeting
shall select its chairman and secretary.
The chairman of each meeting shall pub-
licly announce at such meeting the names
of the persons s-locted as nominees and
the total number of votes cast for each,
and the chairman and the secretary shall
transmit to the Secretary their certificate
as to the number of votes so cast, the
names of the nominees selected, and such
ether information as the Secretary may re-
quest.
2. Producers in each of Districts One,
Two, Three, Four, Five and Six shall nom-
inate at least four (4) producers (at least
.... of whom shall be affiliated with a
growers' cooperative marketing organiza-
tion) for a member and an alternate mem-
Ler of the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee. Producers in District Seven shall
nominate at least eight (8) producers (at
least .... of whom shall be affiliated with
a growers' cooperative marketing organi-
zation) for two members and two alternate
members of the said committee. All nom-
inees shall be producers in the district
Irom which they are nominated. In vot-
ing for nominees, each producer shall be
entitled to cast one (1) vote in each of the
districts in which he is a producer.
3. For the fiscal period ending July 31,
1939, all nominations shall be submitted
to the Secretary not later than fifteen (151
uays after tne effective da.e hereof, and
for ensuing years, beginning with the first
day in August 1939, all nominations shall
be submitted to the Secretary on or befo-e
the 20th day of July.
Sec. 4. Selection of Members of Growers
Administrative Committee.-In selecting
the members and alternate members of the
Growers Administrative Committee, the
Secretary shall select one member and one
alternate member from the nominees of
Districts Number One, Two, Three, Four,
iive and Six and two members and two
alternate members from Dist. Seven. Not
less than three such members and their
alternates shall be affiliated with growers'
cooperative marketing organizations.
Sec. 5. Shippers Advisory Committee
Membership and Term of Office.-The
Shippers Advisory Committee shall consist
of eight (8) members, each of whom shall
have an alternate, all of whom shall be
handlers. Not less than three (3) such
members and their respective alternates
shall be duly authorized representatives of
handlers which are cooperative marketing
o-ganizations and two (2) each of the re-
maining members and alternate members
shall be handlers who produced not less
than fifty (50) per cent of the total volume
of fruit shipped by each such handler dur-
ing the fiscal period used for computing
the weighted vote cast in nominating such
members and alternate members. The in-
itial members and their alternates shall
hold office for a term beginning on the
date designated by the Secretary and end-
ing on the last day of July, 1939, and until
their successors are selected and have
qualified. After the last day of July, 1939,
the term of office of members of the Ship-
pers Advisory Committee and their alter-
nates shall be one year. beginning on the
first day of August. The members, al-
tcrnate members and their respective suc-
cessors shall be nominated by handlers
end shall be selected by the Secretary as


hereinafter provided.
Sec. 6. Nomination of Members for
Shippers Advisory Committee.-The Secre-
tary shall give public notice of a meet-
ing to be held within twelve (12) days
after the effective date hereof, and in en-
suing years not later than July 10th, for
the purpose of making nominations for
members and alternate members of the
Shippers Advisory Committee. Each such
meeting shall select its chairman and sec-
retary. The said chairman shall publicly
announce the results of the voting and the
names of the nominees selected. In the
case of nominees made by handlers other
than cooperative mark-ting organizations,
such announcement shall include the vol-
ume of fruit produced and shipped, during
the applicable fiscal period by each such
nominee. The said chairman and secre-
tary shall transmit to the Secretary their
certificates showing the information so an-
nounced and such other information as the
Secretary may request.
2. Nominations of at least nine (9) per-
sons for three (3) members and alternate
members shall be made by handlers which
are cooperative marketing organizations.
Nominations of at least fifteen (15) persons
for five (5) members and alternate mem-
bers shall be made by handlers other than
cooperative marketing organizations. In
voting for nominees each handler shall be
entitled to cast but one (1) vote, which
shall be weighted by the volume of fruit
shipped by such handler during the then
current fiscal period: Provided, however,
That vote of each handler for nominees
made first after the effective date hereof
shall be weighted by the volume of fruit
shipped by such handler during the pre-
ceding fiscal period.
3. For the fiscal period ending July 31,
1939, all nominations shall be submitted
to the Secretary not later than fifteen (15)
days after the effective date hereof, and
for ensuing years. beginning with the first
day in August, 1939, all nominations shall
be submitted to the Secretary cn or before
the 20th day of July.
Sec. 7. Selection of Members of Ship
pers Advisory Committee.-In selecting th3
members and their alternate members of
the Shippers Advisory Committee, the Ser-
retary shall select (a) at least three (3)
members and their alternates from the
nominees made by handlers which are co-
rperative marketing organizations, and (b)
the remaining number of members and
their alternates from the nominees made
by handlers other than cooperative mar-
keting organizations, of which two (2)
members and their alternates shall be
l',ndlers who produced not less than fifty
(50) percent of the total volume of fruit
shipped by them during the fiscal period
used for computing the weighted vote
cast for such nominees.
Sec. 8. Failure to Nominate.-In the
event nominations for a member or alter-
nate member of either committee are not
made pursuant to the provisions of this
article, the Secretary may select such
member or alternate member without re-
gard to nominations.
Sec. 9. Acceptance of Membership.-
Any person selected by the Secretary as a
member or alternate member of the Grow-
ers Administrative Committee or the Ship-
pers Advisory Committee shall qualify
by filing a written acceptance with the
Secretary within ten (10) days after being
notified of such selection by the Secre-
tary.
Sec. 10. Inability of Members to Serve.
An alternate for a member of the Growers
Administrative Committee or the Shipoers
Advisory Committee shall act in the place
end stead of such member (1) in his ab-
sence or (2) in the event of his removal,
resignation, disqualification or death, un-
til a successor for his unexpired term has
been selected.
2. In the event of the death, removal,
resignation or disqualification of any per-


son selected by the Secretary as a mem-
ber or an alternate member of either com-
mittee, a successor for the unexpired term
of such person shall be selected by the
Secretary. Such selection may be made
without regard to the provisions hereof as
to nominations.
Sec. 11. Powers of Growers Administra-
tive Committee.-The Growers Administra-
tive Committee shall, in addition to the
power to administer the terms and pro-
visions hereof, as herein specifically pro-
vided, have power (a) to make, only to the
extent specifically permitted by the pro-
visions hereinafter contained, administra-
tive rules and regulations; (b) to receive,
investigate and report to the Secretary
complaints of violations hereof and (c) to
recommend to the Secretary amendments
hereto.
Sec. 12 Duties of Growers Administra-
tive Conmittee.-Ic snail be the duty of
the Growers Administrative t'omnmittee
(a) to select a chairman from its mem-
bership ana to select such other olhicers,
and adopt such rules and regulations for
the conduct of its business as it may deem
advisable;
(D) to keep minutes, books, and records
which will clearly reflect all of its acts
ana transactions, unich minuLes, books,
ana records snail at all times be subject
to the examination of the Secretary;
(c) to act as intermediary between the
Secretary and the producers and handlers.
(d) to furnish the Secretary Xvich such
available information as he may request;
(e) to appoint such employees as it may
deem necessary and to actermme the sa:-
lanes and detme the duties of such em-
ployees;
(tk to cause its books to be audited by
cne or more certified public accountants at
least once for each lscal period, and at
.uch other times as it deems necessary or
as the Secretary may request, and to file
N ith the Secretary copies of all audit re-
ports;
(g) to provide an adequate system for
determining the total crop of each variety
of fruit and to make such determinations,
including determinations by grade and
size, as it may deem necessary, or as may
be prescribed by the Secretary. In connec-
tion with the administration of articles
IV and V;
(h) to perform such duties in connection
with the administration of Section 32 of
the Act to Amend the Agricultural Adjust-
ment Act and for other purposes. Public,
No. 320, approved by the President on
August 24, 1935 as amended, as may from
time to time be assigned to it by the Sec-
retary; and
(i) to notify the Shippers Advisory Com-
mittee of its intention to meet to consider
recommendations required of such commit-
tee pursuant to articles IV and V;
(j) to maintain books and records which
shall accurately reflect all transactions be-
tween handlers made pursuant to article
V;
Sec. 13. D u t i e s of Shippers Advisory
Committee.-It shall be the duty of the
Shippers Advisory Committee:
(a.) to select a chairman from its mem-
bership and to select such other officers,
and adopt such rules and regulations for
the conduct of its business as it may deem
advisable:
(b) to keep minutes, books, and records
which will clearly reflect all of its acts,
which minutes, books, and records shall
at all times be subject to the examina-
tion of the Secretary; and
(c) to notify the Growers Administrative
Committee of the time at which it will
meet to make the recommendations re-
quired by articles IV and V.
Sec. 14. Compensation and Expenses of
Committee Members.- The members of
each committee, and alternate members
when acting as members, shall serve with-
out compensation but may be reimbursed


Page Eighteen


1938









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


for expenses necessarily incurred by them
in the performance of their duties here-
under: Provided, That such members and
alternate members, when acting as mem-
bers of a subcommittee selected by either
committee and performing duties approved
by the Growers Administrative Committee,
may be compensated at a rate not in ex-
cess of five dollars ($5) per day and may
be reimbursed for actual transportation
expenses and (at such proportionate rate
of five dollars per day as tne Growers Ad-
ministrative Committee may determine)
for subsistence in connection with per-
formance of such duties.
Sec. 15. Procedure of Committees.-].
For any decision or recommendation of
either committee to be valid five (5) con-
curring votes shall be necessary, and the
votes of each member cast for or against
any recommendations made pursuant here-
to shall be duly recorded. Each member
must vote in person.
2. Five (5) members of a committee shall
be necessary to constitute a quorum of
such committee.
3. The Growers Administrative Commit-
tee shall give to the Secretary the same
notice of meetings of the Committees as is
given to the members thereof.
Sec. 16. Right of the Secretary.-The
members of the committees (including suc-
cessors and alternates), and any agent
or employee appointed or employed by the
committees, shall be subject to removal
or suspension by the Secretary at any
time. Each and every order, regulation,
decision, determination or other act of
both committees shall be subject to the
continuing right of the Secretary to dis-
approve of the same at any time and upon
his disapproval shall be deemed null and
void, except as to acts done in reliance
thereon or in compliance therewith.
Sec. 17. Funds.- All funds received by
the Growers Administrative Committee
pursuant to any Drovisicn hereof shall be
used solely for the purposes herein spe-
cified and shall be accounted for in the
following manner:
(1) The Secretary may, at any time, re-
ouire the Growers Administrative Commit-
tee and its members to account for all
receipts and disbursements.
(2) Upon the removal or expiration of
the term of office of any member of the
Growers Administrative Committee, such
member shall account for all receipts and
disbursements and deliver all property and
funds, together with all books and records,
in his possession, to his successor in office.
and shall execute such assignments an-
other instruments as may be necessary or
a.nropriate to vest in such successor full
title to all the property, funds and claims
1'sted in such member pursuant hereto

ARTICLE III EXPENSES AND AS
SESSMENTS
Sec. 1. Expenses.-The Growers Admin-
istrative Committee is authorized to incur
such expenses as the Secretary finds may
be necessary to carry out the functions of
both committees hereunder during each
fiscal period. The funds to cover such ex-
penses shall be acquired by levying of
assessments upon handlers as hereinafter
provided.
Sec. 2. Assessments.-1. Each handler
shall pay to the Growers Administrative
Committee. upon demand, such handler's
pro rata share of the expenses which the
Secretary finds will be necessarily incurred
by the Growers Administrative Committee
for the maintenance and functioning dur-
ing each fiscal period of the committees
established hereunder. E a c h handler's
share of such expenses shall be that pro-
portion thereof which the total quantity
of fruit shipped by such handler during
said fiscal period is of the total quantity
of fruit shipped by all handlers during the
fiscal period. The Secretary shall fix the
rate of assessment per standard packed
box of fruit.


2. At any time during o- aftar the fiscal
period, the Secretary shall have the power
to increase the rate of assessment so that
the sum of money collected pursuant to
the provisions of this article shall be ade-
quate to cover the expenses. Such increase
shall be applicable to all fruit shipped dur-
ing the given fiscal period. In order to pro-
vide funds to carry out the functions of
the committees established hereunder,
handlers may make advance payment of
assessments.
Sec. 3. Handlers Accounts.-1. If at the
end of the fiscal period it shall appear that
assessments collected are in excess of ex-
penses incurred, each handler entitled to
a proportionate refund shall be credited
with such refund against the operations of
the following fiscal period unless he de-
mands payment of the sum due him, in
which case such sum shall be paid to him.
2. The Growers Administrative Commit-
tee may, with the approval of the Secre-
tary, maintain in its own name or in the
name of its members a suit against any
handler subject hereto for the collection of
such handler's pro rata share of expenses

ARTICLE IV REGULATION BY
GRADES AND SIZES
Section 1. Marketing Policy.-1. Each
season, before making any recommenda-
tions pursuant to this article for any vari-
ety of fruit, the Growers Administrative
Committee and the Shippers Advisory
Committee shall, -,ith respect to the regu-
lations permitted by this article, submit to
the Secretary a detailed report setting
forth an advisable marketing policy for
such variety for the then current shipping
season. Such report shall set forth the
proportion of the total crop of such variety
of fruit (determined by the Growers Ad-
ministrative Committee to be available for
shipment during the entire shipping season
of such variety) deemed advisable by the
Shippers Advisory Committee and the
Growers Administrative Committee to be
hippedd during such season.
2. In determining each such advisable
proportion, the committees shall give due
consideration to the following factors re-
lating to citrus fruit produced in Florida
and in other States: (1) the prospective
total crop of each variety of citrus fruit
in Florida, and in other States, including
the grades and sizes thereof, which grades
and sizes of fruit in Florida shall be deter-
mined by the Growers Administrative
Committee pursuant to paragraph (g), sec-
tion 11 of article II; (2) the probable sea-
son total shipments of citrus fruit from
other States; (3) the probable level or
trend in consumer income; (4) the prospec-
tive supplies of competitive commodities;
and (5) other pertinent factors bearing on
the marketing of fruit.
3. In addition to the foregoing, the corre-
mittees shall set forth a schedule of pro-
posed regulations for each week of the
shipping season for each variety of fruit
for which recommendations to the Secre-
tary pursuant to this article are contem-
plated. Such schedules shall recognize the
practical operations of harvesting an d
preparation for market of each variety
and the change in grades and sizes there-
of as the respective seasons advance. In
the event it is deemed advisable to alter
such marketing policy as the shipping sea-
son progresses, in view of changed de-
mand and supply conditions with respect
to fruit, the said committees shall submit
to the Secretary a report thereon.
4. The Growers Administrative Commit-
tee shall notify producers and handlers of
the conten's of such report by publishing
a summary thereof in a newspaper of
general circulation in Florida, selected by
said committee.
Sec. 2. Reosmmendaticn for Regulations.
-1. Whenever the Shippers Advisory Com-
mittee deems it advisable to regulate any
V-rietv pursuant to this article, the said


committee shall determine and recommend
the particular grades and sizes thereof
deemed by it advisable to be shipped. In
making such determination, the said com-
mittee shall give due consideration to the
following factors relating to the citrus
fruit produced in Florida and in other
States: (1) market prices, including the
market prices, by grades and sizes, of the
fruit for which regulation is recommended;
(2) amount on hand at the principal mar-
kets, as evidenced by supplies on track;
(3) maturity, condition and available sup-
ply, including the grade and size thereof
in the producing areas; (4) other pertinent
market information; and k5) trend in con-
sumer income. The Shippers Advisory
Committee shall promptly report the deter-
mination and recommendations so made,
with supporting information, to the Grow
ers Administrative Committee, which com-
mittee shall, in turn, submit the same to
the Secretary together with its own recom-
mendations and supporting information re-
specting the factors hereinbefore enum-
erated.
2. The failure of the Shippers Advisory
Committee to make a recommendation
after having received notice of the inten-
tion of the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee to meet for the purpose of receiv-
ing such recommendations with respect to
regulations authorized by this article shall
not preclude the Growers Administrative
Committee from submitting recommenda-
tions and supporting information to the
Secretary.
3. The Growers Administrative Commit-
tee shall give at least twenty-four (24)
hours notice of any meeting to consider
the recommendation of regulations pur-
suant to this article, by publication in a
newspaper of general circulation in Florida
selected by said committee. The said com-
mittee shall also give notice of any such
recommendations, at least twenty-four (24)
hours before the time that it is recom-
mended that such regulation become ef-
fective, by issuing a press release or by
such other means as the committee may
determine in order to give handlers notice
thereof.
Sec. 3. Regulation by the Secretary.-1.
Whenever the Secretary shall find from
the recommendations and reports of the
Shippers Advisory Committee an d the
Growers Administrative Committee, or
from other available information, that to
limit the shipment of any variety to par-
ticular grades or sizes would tend to ef-
fectuate the declared policy of the act, he
shall so limit the shipment of such variety
during a specified period or periods. Prior
to the beginning of any such regulation
the Secretary shall notify the Growers Ad-
ministrative Committee of the regulation
issued by him, which committee shall
notify all handlers desiring to ship such
variety, by publication in a newspaper of
general circulation in Florida, selected by
the said committee.
Sec. 4. Grading and Certification. When-
ever the Secretary issues a regulation pur-
suant to this article, no handler shall, dur-
ing the effective time thereof, ship fruit
which has not been inspected by an au-
thorized inspector of the Federal-Stale
Inspection Service. Each handler who
ships fruit during such period, shall 1
promptly submit to the Growers Adminis-
trative Committee a copy of the Federal-
State Inspection certificate issued by such
inspector.
Sec. 5. Exemptions.-1. In the event any
variety is regulated pursuant to this ar-
ticle. any producer who furnishes ade-
ouate evidence to the Growers Administra-
tive Committee that he will be prevented
from having as large a proportion of such
variety of his fruit shipped during the en-
tire shipping season for the variety, as
the proportion announced by the said com-
mittee pursuant to section 1 of this article,
the committee shall issue one or more ex-
emption certificates to such producer. Such


Page Nineteen









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


exemption certificates shall permit such
producer to have a quantity of the regu-
lated grades and sizes of the particular
variety of fruit shipped as will permit
such producer to have the said proportion
of such variety of his fruit shipped during
the entire shipping season thereof. The
Growers Administrative Committee shall
adopt and announce the procedural rules
by which such exemption certificates will
be issued to producers.
2. Before issuing an exemption certifi-
cate to any producer for any variety of
fruit, the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee shall have made a determination
as to (1) the producer's total crop of the
variety, (2) the grades and sizes thereof,
(3) the total quantity of such variety the
producer has had shipped during the sea-
son, and (4) the grades and sizes of the
quantity of the variety the producer has
remaining for shipment. The said deter-
minations shall be given due considera-
tion by the committee in appraising the
evidence submitted by the producer apply-
ing for an exemption certificate.
3. V a e nc i a oranges permitted to be
shipped pursuant to this section shall be
shipped in compliance with the provisions
of article V.
4. The Secretary shall have the power
to modify, change or alter (a) any such
procedural rules and (b) any exemption
granted under subsection 1 of this section.
ARTICLE V REGULATION BY
PRORATION
Section 1. Requirements for Recommend-
ing Proration-1. Before any recommenda-
tion is submitted to the Secretary pur-
suant to this article, the Growers Admin-
istrative Committee shall submit to him a
detailed report showing: (a) that an ade-
quate system for determining the total
crop of Valencia or late Valencias, Leu
Gim Gongs, or other oranges of the Valen-
cia type (hereinafter in this article re-
ferred to as "Valencia oranges") has
been established and that qualified person-
nel has been employed to make such de-
termination; (b) that a determination of
the total crop of Valencia oranges for the
then current season has been made in ac-
cordance with the system established as re-
quired in (a) above; (c) that the said com-
mittee has made determinations of the
volume of Valencia oranges controlled for
the then current season by each handler
who has submitted the data required in
section 4 of this article; and (d) that hand-
lers having submitted such data have
under control a sufficient portion of the
total crop of Valencia oranges as to in-
sure an equitable allotment of the total
volume of such oranges to be shipped dur-
ing the then current season.
2. The Growers Administrative Commit-
tee and the Shippers Advisory Committee
shall, before making any recommendations
pursuant to this article, submit to the
Secretary a detailed report setting forth
an advisable marketing policy for the then
current shipping season with respect to
the regulations permitted by this article,
Such marketing policy shall set forth the
total quantity of Valencia oranges deemed
advisable by the committees to be shipped
during the entire current shipping season
for such oranges. In determining suc pro-
posed advisable cuantitv, the committees
shall give due consideration to the follo.w-
ing factors relating to oranges produced
in Florida and in other States: (1) the
prospective total crop of Valencia oranges
in Florida and in other States; (2) the sup-
plies of other varieties of oranges in Flor-
ida and in other States remaining for ship-
ment during the shipping season for Valen-
cia oranges; (3) the probable level or
trend in consumer income: (4) the pro-
psective supplies of competitive commodi-
ties during the Valencia orange shipping
season; and (5) other pertinent factors
bearing on the marketing of Valencia or-
anges from Florida. In addition, the com-
mittees shall set f o r t h a preliminary


schedule of weekly shipments of such to-
tal advisable quantity of Valencia oranges.
The Growers Administrative Committee
shall notify producers and handlers of the
contents of such report by publishing a
summary thereof in a newspaper of gene-
ral circulation in Florica, selected by said
committee. In the event it is deemed ad-
visable to alter such marketing policy as
the season progresses, in view of changed
demand and supply conditions with re-
spect to fruit, the said committees shall
submit to the Secretary a report thereon,
and the Growers Administrative Commit-
tee shall, in turn, notify producers and
handlers thereof in the same manner as
required for notification in the foregoing
sentence.
3. A recommendation with respect to reg-
ulation of the volume of Valencia oranges
that may be shipped during the then cur-
rent season, shall be submitted to the Sec-
retary not later than the beginning of
such season.
Sec. 2. Recommendation of Advisable
Quantity.-1. If the Secretary finds, from
tne reports submitted in accordance with
section 1 of this article, or oLner available
information, that each week throughout
the season the regulation of the volume of
Valencia oranges that may be shipped will
tend to effectuate the declared policy of
the act, he shall notify the Growers Ad-
ministrative Committee, which committee
shall, in turn, notify the Shippers Advisory
Committee. thereafterr, and tor each week
during the shipping season, the Shippers
Advisory Committee shall determine the
quantity of Valencia oranges deemed by
it advisable to be shipped during each sucn
week. Such determination shall be made
by the said committee during the week
immediately preceding the weeK for which
the advisable quantity is to be fixed by
the Secretary. In making such determina-
tion the committee shall give due consider-
ation to the following factors relating to
citrus fruit produced in Florida and in
other States: (a) market prices; (b) sup-
plies, as evidenced by the amount on
track at the principal markets; (c) matur-
ity, condition, and available supply in the
production areas; (d) other pertinent mar-
ket information; and (e) level or trend in
consumer income. Promptly after making
each such determination and recommenda-
tion, the Shippers Advisory Committee
shall submit a report thereon to the Grow-
ers Administrative Committee, which com-
mittee shall, in turn, submit a copy of the
same to the Secretary, together with its
own recommendations in connection there-
with and supporting information with re-
spect to the factors enumerated in this
paragraph.
2. The failure of the Shippers Advisory
Committee to make a recommendation
after having received notice of the inten-
tion of the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee to meet for the purpose of receiv-
ing such recommendations with respect to
regulations authorized by this article shall
not preclude the Growers Administrative
Committee from submitting recommenda-
tions and supporting information to the
Secretary.
3. The Growers Administrative Com-
mittee shall give at least twenty-four (24)
hcurs notice of any meeting to consider
the recommendation of regulations pur-
suant to this article, by publication in a
r wspaper of general circulation in Flor-
io.i selected by said committee. The said
coizia:nittee shall also give notice of any
sue!. recommendations, at least twenty-
four (24) hours before the time that it is
recommended that such regulations be-
come effcc'.ve by issuing a press release or
by such c:ir.er means as the committee may
determine in order to give handlers notice
thereof.
Sec. 3. Fixing Quantity to be Shipped.
-1 If the Secretary finds, from the re-
ports and reco--rmendations of the Shippers
Advisory Committee and the Growers Ad-


ministrative Committee, or other available
information, that to fix the total quantity
of Valencia oranges that may be shipped
by all handlers during any week will tend
to effectuate the declared policy of the
act, he shall fix such quantity of Valencia
oranges and shall notify the Growers. Ad-
ministrative Committee of the amount so
fixed, which the committee shall notify
all handlers, by publication in a newspaper
of general circulation in Florida, selected
by said committee.
Sec. 4. Valencia Oranges Controlled by
Handlers.-1. Prior to the beginning of
each shipping season for Valencia oranges,
each handler who desires to ship such or-
anges during such period shall submit to
the Growers Administrative Committee a
written report with respect to the volume
of such oranges which, for the entire of
said season. he controls the marketing of
by (a) a bona fide written contract giving
him authority to ship, or (b) having legal
title or possession thereof, or (c) having
purchased or agreed to purchase said or-
anges, as evidenced by a bona fide bill of
sale or written agreement. When a hand-
ler controls such oranges pursuant to (a)
or (c), he shall submit a copy of each type
of such contract, bill of sale, or agreement,
and shall maintain a file of the originals
thereof which shall be subject to examina-
tion by the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee, or its duly authorized representa-
tives. Such report shall be submitted at
such time as may be designated by the
said committee, and upon forms prepared
by it, and shall include (1) the name and
address of the owner and duly authorized
agent, if any, of each grove; (2) an ac-
curate description of the location of each
such grove, including the number of acres,
number of trees, and their age distribu-
tion; and (3) an estimate, which shall be
based upon the quantity of such oranges
eligible for shipment during the current
shipping season, of such oranges on each
such grove in terms of standard packed
boxes.
2. Ir the event that the information
contained in the initial report submitted
by a handler as aroresaid, or in subse-
quent reports, as required herein to be
submitted by such handler, is subject to
change due to (a) loss of control of quant-
ities of Valencia oranges on groves pre-
viously reported to the Growers Aaminis-
trative Committee, or (b) acquisition of
control of additional quantities of such
oranges on groves not previously reported,
or (c) an increase or a decrease in the de-
termination of the total quantity of such
oranges on a particular grove reported,
the said handler shall submit full details
thereon to the committee, upon forms pre-
pared by it, at such times and verified in
such manner as the committee shall de-
termine.
Sec. 5. Verification and Revision of
Handlers Reports-1. It shall be the duty
of the Growers Administrative Committee
to determine the accuracy of the reports
submitted by handlers pursuant to section
4 of this article and to correct any errors
or omissions in connection t h e r e w it h.
Whenever the committee finds that there
is an error or omission in a handler's re-
port, it shall so notify such handler and
shall give him a reasonable opportunity
to be heard thereon before adopting a de-
termination of the total quantity of Valen-
cia oranges controlled by such handler for
the entire marketing season.
2. Verification of reports by the corn
mittee shall be made as to all handlers ac-
cording to a uniform method, and shall
be made as to all handlers from time to
time throughout the season, in order to
assure accuracy with respect to the com-
mittee's determinations of the total quant-
ity of Valencia oranges controlled by each
handler for the entire shipping season.
Sec. 6. Adjustment of Handler's Total
COntrnl.-1. The Growers Administrative
Committee shall find and determine, from


Page Twenty









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


time to time, whether the total quantity
of Valencia oranges controlled by any or
all handlers as adopted by said committee
pursuant to section 5 hereof should be ad-
justed in order to establish or maintain
equitable apportionment of such oranges
permitted to be shipped pursuant to this
article among handlers by eliminating the
effect of any changes reported by handlers
pursuant to paragraph 2 of section 4 and
verified as prescribed in section 5, upon
the total shipments allotted any or all
handlers for the entire current shipping
season of such oranges. If the committee
determines that such adjustments are nec-
essary, it shall make all such adjustments
in accordance with a uniform method es-
tablished by the committees.
2. Acquisition of control by a handler of
Valencia oranges not previously u n d e r
control by any handler subsequent to the
beginning of the shipping season, shall be
credited to the handler acquiring control
in an amount determined by the proportion
of the total crop of Valencia oranges re-
maining to be shipped during the current
shipping season. Acquisition of control by
a handler of such oranges previously con-
trolled by another handler, subsequent to
the beginning of the shipping season, shall
be credited to the handler acquiring con-
trol on the basis of
and the handler losing control on the basis
of
(To be developed later)
3. If, from time to time, the Growers Ad-
ministrative Committee determine that the
total quantity of Valencia oranges con-
trolled by any or all handlers shall be ad-
justed in order to establish or maintain
equitable apportionment of such oranges
permitted to be shipped pursuant to this
article among handlers as a result of vari-
ations in the tree-storage qualities of such
oranges controlled, said committee may
make such adjustments in accordance with
uniform standards and a uniform method
applicable to all handlers.
Sec. 7. Recommendation of Prorate
Bases.-1. In order that the total quantity
of Valencia oranges which may be shipped
during the entire shipping season and dur-
ing each week thereof, may be equitably
apportioned among all handlers of such
oranges, the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee shall recommend to the Secretary a
prorate base for each such week. The
total quantity of Valencia oranges deter-
mined to be under the control of each
handler pursuant to section 5 hereof, as
the same may have been adjusted pur-
suant to section 6 hereof, shall consti-
tute the recommendation to the Secretary
of the Growers Administrative Committee
for a prorate base of each such handler.
The committee shall, in accordance with
the method herein prescribed, recommend
a prorete base for each handler who sup-
plied the committee with the required
data. Such recommendation to the Sec-
retary shall be made the week prior to the
week to which the prorate bases are to be
applicable.
2. Each week the Growers Administ'-a-
tive Committee shall make written re-
ports to the Secretary of its recommenda-
tions pursuant to this section, and any
chances or adjustments of the total auant-
ity of Valencia oranges controlled by each
hondler.
S2c. 8. Fixing Prorate Bases by Secre-
tary.-1. Upon receipt from the Growers
Administrative Committee of the recom-
mendations respecting prorate bases and
reports thereon, the Secretary shall, from
such recommendations and r e p o r t s or
from other available info-mation fix a
prorate base for each handler. The Secre-
tary shall notify the Growers Administra-
tive Committee of the fixing of such bases
and the committee, in turn, shall notify
ech hendlcr. in the manner he'einafter
prescribed, of the prorate base fixed fcr
him.
Sec. 9. Hand!er's Allotment.-1 When-


ever the Secretary has fixed the total
quantity of Valencia oranges which may
be shipped each \.eek, as provided in sec-
tion 3 of this article, and the prorate bases
of each handler for each such week, as
provided in section 8 of this article, the
Growers Administrative Committee shall
calculate the quantity of such oranges
which may be shipped by each handler
during such week, which quantity shall be
the allotment of each such handler, and
shall be in an amount determined by the
product of the ratio which the handler's
prorate base bears to the total of all pro-
rate bases and the total quantity which
may be shipped by all handlers during
such week.
2. 'The Growers Administrative Commit-
tee shall calculate the allotment of each
handler in terms of standard packed boxes.
A certificate shall then be issued by the
said committee to each handler which
shall show the prorate base and the allot-
ment of such handler for such weekly per-
iod and shall set forth that such allotment
is subject to adjustment with respect to
(1) overshipments, as provided by section
10 of this article, (2) undershipments, as
provided by section 11 of this article, (3)
duly-recorded allotment loan transactions,
as provided in section 12 of this article,
and (4) transfers of allotments, as pro-
vided by section 13 of this article; and
shall state that such allotment as adjusted
represents the net quantity of Valencia
oranges which may be shipped by such
handler during the specified week. Such
certificate shall be mailed or otherwise
sent to the handler, and the delivery of
such certificate to such handler or the de-
positing thereof in the United States mail
shall constitute notice to such handler of
his prorate base and his allotment.
Sec. 10. Overshipments.-1. During any
week in which the Secretary has fixed the
quantity of Valencia oranges which may
be shipped, any handler (when not re-
quired to reduce the quantity of such or-
anges which he may ship as provided
herein) may, in addition to his allotment,
ship a quantity of such oranges not in ey-
cess of five (5) percent of his allotment
2. If a handler's allotment for any week
is less than one hundred (100) standard
packed boxes, such handler may ship a
quantity of Valencia oranges equivalent
to the difference between one hundred
(100) standard packed boxes and such al-
lotment.
3. The quantity of Valencia oranges
shipped in excess of a handler's allotment
(but not exceeding the quantity permitted
to be shipped as provided in paragraph I
hereof) shall be deducted from such hand-
ler's allotment for the next week. If such
allotment is in an amount less than the ex-
cess quantity of Valencia oranges per-
mitted to be shipped by a handler, such
oranges shipped by him in excess of his
allotment shall be deducted from his suc-
ceeding weekly allotments until such ex-
cess has been entirely offset.
Sec. 11. Undershipments.-If a handler
during any week. ships a quantity of Va-
lencia oranges, which is less than his allot-
ment, such handler may, in addition to his
allotment for the next week, ship during
such week only a quantity of such oranges
equivalent to such undershipment: Pro-
vided, That such additional quantity shall
not exceed twenty (20) percent of the total
allotment of such handler for the week
during which th- undershipment occurred.
No handler shall loan any part of such
additional quantity.
Sec. 12 Allotment Loan Transactions.-
1. Handlers for whom an Pllotment base
has been fixed by the Secretary may bor-
row allotments from one another: Pro-
vided, That (a) a handler borrowing an
allotment agrees with the lender in writ-
ing, on forms prepared by the Growers
PAdmni-trative Committee, to return to
the lender pn allotment of the same nuant-
ity of Valencia oranges and specifies in


such agreement the week in which said
allotment is to be returned, which week
shall not be later than the third week after
the week in which the allotment was loan-
ed; (b) handlers party to such an agree-
ment shall notify the said committee of
such loan by supplying said committee
with a copy of said written agreement
within ti.o days after the execution there-
of; and (c) the loan of an allotment is
made during the week for which the al-
lotment is issued.
2. The filing of a written loan agreement
with the Growers Administrative Commit-
tee shall serve as an automatic return of
the borrowed allotment during the week
stated in said agreement for the return
of such allotment and the Growers Admin-
istrative Committee shall accordingly debit
and credit the allotment of the lending
handler and borrowing handler respective-
ly. The allotment may be returned prior
to the date specified: Provided, That the
parties to the loan agreement notify the
Growers Administrative Committee of such
prior return within two days thereafter,
upon forms prepared by said committee.
3. A handler borrowing an allotment may
ship the ouantitv of Valencia oranges
represented by such an allotment only dur-
ing the week for which such allotment is
issued, and shall not loan any part thereof
to another handler. A handler who returns
an allotment borrowed from another hand-
ler shall deduct the quantity of Valencia
oranges represented by the allotment re-
turned from such handler's allotment for
the week during which the borrowed allot-
ment is returned. A handler receiving the
return of an allotment loaned may ship a
quantity of Valencia oranges equal to
such returned allotment or may loan such
allotment only during the week the re-
turn of such an allotment is received.
4. No handler shall loan an allotment
when such handler does not need the re-
turn thereof to complete his shipping sea-
son for Valencia oranges.
5. During any week in which a handler
has (1) an additional quantity from the
previous week as permitted by section 11
of this article, (2) receives the return of
an allotment loaned pursuant to section 12
of this article, (3) borrows an allotment
from another handler nursuant to section
12 of this article, or (4) obtains an allot-
ment pursuant to section 13 of this article,
and ships less than the total of his
allotment (or such portion thereof that
has not been disposed of pursuant to sec-
tion 12 and 13 of this article) plus the
quantities enumerated in (1). (2), (3) and
(4) above, such shipment shall first be ap-
plied to his current weekly allotment or
to such portion thereof as has not been
disposed of (pursuant to sections 11, 12 and
13 of this article), and the remainder of
such shipments shall be applied to the
quantities enumerated in (1), (2), (3) and
(4) above.
Sec. 13. Transfer of Allotments.-1. Any
person who, during any week. acquires
from a handler control of Valencia or-
anges (within the meaning of paragraph
one of section 4 of this article), in an
amount not exceeding the quantity of such
oranges for which the handler has received
an allotment to ship during such week,
may secure from such handler a sufficient
portion of the handler's allotment as will
permit the transferee to ship such oranges
during that week only.
2. Any handler who makes such a trans-
fer of Valencia oranges shall, upon request
of the transferee, also transfer to such
person, upon forms prepared by the Grow-
ers Administrative Committee, a sufficient
portion of his allotment to permit the
transferee to ship such oranges, and the
transferee and the transferer shall, within
twenty-four (24) hours thereafter, notify
the Growers Administrative Committee of
the transfer and of the amount thereof.
Sec. 14. Allotments to Central Marketing
Organizaticns.-Upon application by any


Page Twenty-One









This is THE CITRUS GROWER for November 15, 1938


marketing organization with which any
handler subject hereto is affiliated, and
such handler agrees thereto, the Growers
Administrative Committee, in accordance
with the provisions of section 9 of this
article, shall issue to such marketing or-
ganization the aggregate of the respective
allotments of each of such handlers. For
the entire shipping season such marketing
organization shall ship for each such han-
dler an equitable share of the aggregate
allotment received by such marketing or-
ganization.
Sec. 15. Obligation of Handlers to Grow-
ers.-Each handler shall, insofar as practi-
cal operations permit, e-luitably divide his
allotments received pursuant hereto among
the growers whose Valencia oranges he
controls, during the whole or part of the
shipping season, as set forth in subsection
1 of section 4 of this article.

ARTICLE VI HANDLERS REPORTS
Section 1. Weekly Report.--. On or be-
fore such day of each week as may be
designated by the Growers Administrative
Committee, each handler shall, with re-
spect to each variety of fruit, report to
the committee, on forms prepared by it
the following information for the immedi-
ately preceding calendar week: (a) quant-
ity shipped in interstate commerce and to
Canada, (b) quantity shipped by express
and parcel post, (c) quantity shipped for
distribution to persons on relief, including
donations for charitable purposes, (d)
quantity exported to countries other than
Canada, (e) quantity sold or transported
for intrastate consumption in fresh form.
(f) quantity sold or otherwise disposed of
for canning or for manufacture into by-
products, (g) quantity eliminated, and (h)
quantity harvested and shipped from each
grove, including the name and address of
the owner, or his authorized agent, and an
accurate description of the location of each
grove.
2. Upon reamest of the Growers Adminis-
trative Committee, made with the approval
of the Secretary, every handler shall furn-
ish srch committee, in such manner and
at such times as it prescribes, such other
information as will enable it to perform
its duties hereunder.
Sec. 2. Mqnifest Renort.-The Growers
Administrative Committee may request in-
formation from each handler rewarding the
variety, grade and size of each standard
packed box of fruit shipped by him and
may require such information to be de-
livered to the said committee or its dulv-
Puthorized representatives, in a manner or
by such method as the said committee may
prescribe, union such forms as may be pre-
pared by said commit*'e fnr such purpose.
within twenty-four (24) hours after such
shipment is made.
ARTICLE VII FRUIT FOR BY-PROD-
UCT USE, EXPORT, AND CHARITABLE
PURPOSES
Nothing contained herein shall be con-
rtrued to authorize any limitation of the
right to ship fruit for (1) consumption by
charitable institutions or distribution by
relief agencies, or (2) conversion into by-
products, or (3) export to foreign countries
other than Canada, nor shall any assess-
ment be levied on fruit so shipped. The
Growers Administrative Committee may
prescribe adequate safeguards to prevent
fruit shipped for such purpose from enter-
ing commercial fresh fruit channels of
trade contrary to the provisions hereof.
The term "by-product," as used herein.
includes all processed and manufactured
products of fruit, including canned or
bottled fruits and fruit juices; except
that fruit shipped for conversion into fruit
juices without further processing or treat-
ment to render the same bona fide manu-
factured or processed products, as above
described, shall be deemed fresh fruit and
shall be subject to all regulations herein
contained.


ARTICLE VIII COMPLIANCE
Except as provided herein, no handler
shall ship fruit the shipment of which has
been prohibited by the Secretary in ac-
cordance with the provisions hereof.
ARTICLE IX EFFECTIVE TIME ANI
TERMINATION
Section 1. Effective Time-The provi-
sions hereof shall become effective at such
time as the Secretary may declare above
his signature attached hereto, and shall
continue in force until terminated in one
of the ways hereinafter specified.
Sec. 2. Termination.-1. The Secretary
may at any time terminate the provisions
hereof by giving at least one (1) day's
notice by means of a press release or in
any other manner which he may deter-
mine.
2. The Secretary shall terminate the pro-
visions hereof at the end of any fiscal per-
iod whenever he finds that such termina-
tion is favored by a majority of producers
who, during the current fiscal period, have
been engaged in the production for market
of fruit: Provided, That such majority
have, during such period, produced for
market more than fifiy (50) percent of the
volume of such fruit produced for market,
but such termination shall be effective
only if announced on or before July 31.
3. The provisions hereof shall, in any
event, terminate whenever the provisions
of the act authorizing it cease to be in ef-
fect.
Sec. 3. Proceedings after Termination.-
1. Upon the termination of the provisions
hereof, the then functioning members of
the Growers Administrative Committee
shall continue as joint trustees, for the
purpose of liquidating the affairs of the
said committee, of all the funds and prop-
erty then in the possession of or under
control of such administrative committee,
including claims for any funds unpaid or
property not delivered at the time of such
termination.
2. The said trustees (a) shall continue in
such capacity until discharged by the Sec-
retary, (b) shall, from time to time, ac-
count for all receipts and disbursements
or deliver all property on hand, together
with all books and records of the Growers
Administrative Committee and of the
joint trustees, to such person as the Secre-
tary may direct: and (c) shall, upon the
request of the Secretary, execute such ap-
signments or other instruments necessary
or appropriate to vest in such person full
title and right to all of the funds, prop-
erty and claims vested in the Growers Ad-
ministrative Committee, or the joint trus-
tees pursuant hereto.
3. Any funds collected pursuant to ar-
ticle III, over and above the amounts nec.
essary to meet outstanding obligations and
expenses necessarily incurred during the
operation hereof and during the liquidation
period, shall be returned to handlers as
soon as practicable after the termination
hereof. The refund to each handler shall
be represented by the excess of the a-ncunt
paid by him over and above his pro rata
share of the expenses.
4. Any person to whom funds, proDertv
or claims have been transferred or deliv-
ered by the Growers Administrative Com-
mittee or its members, pursuant to t;rs
section, shall be subject to the same obl'-
gations and duties with respect to the said
funds, property or claims as are herein-
above imposed upon the members of said
committee and upon the soid joint trustees
ARTICLE X DURATION OF
IMMUNITIES
The benefits, privileges, and immunities
conferred upon any person by virtue here-
of shall cease upon its termination. exc-Dt
with respect to acts done under and during
the existence hereof.
ARTICLE XI AGENTS
The Secretary may, by designation in
writing, name any person, including any


officer or employee of the Government, or
name any bureau or division in the United
States Department of Agriculture, to act
as his agent or representative in connec-
tion with any of the provisions hereof.
ARTICLE XII DEROGATION
Nothing contained herein is, or shall be
construed to be in derogation or in modi-
fication of the rights of the Secretary or
of the United States (1) to exercise any
powers granted by the act or otherwise,
or (2) in accordance with such powers, to
act in the premises whenever such action
is deemed advisable.
ARTICLE XIII PERSONAL
LIABILITY
No member or alternate of the commit-
tees, nor any employee or agent thereof,
shall be held personally responsible, either
individually or jointly with others, in any
way whatsoever, to any handler or to any
other person for errors in judgment, mis-
takes, or other acts, either of commission
or omission, as such member, alternate or
employee, except for acts of dishonesty.
ARTICLE XIV SEPARABILITY
If any provision hereof is declared in-
valid, or the applicability thereof to any
person, circumstances or thing is held in-
valid, the validity of the remainder hereof
or the applicability thereof to any other
person, circumstance or thing shall not be
affected thereby.
(NOTE: THE FOREGOING PROVI-
SIONS APPLY TO BOTH THE PRO-
POSED MARKETING AGREEMENT
AND THE PROPOSED ORDER. THE
FOLLOWING PROVISIONS, W H I C H
ARE NOT PERTINENT TO AN ORDER,
ARE A PART OF THE PROPOSED MAR
KETING AGREEMENT.)
ARTICLE XV-AMENDMENTS
Section 1. Proposal.-Amendment of this
agreement may, from time to time be pro-
posed by any party signatory hereto or by
the Growers Industry Committee.
Sec. 2. Hearing and Approval.-After due
notice and hearing, and upon the execu-
tion of the proposed amendment by hand-
lers who, during the preceding fiscal per-
iod, shipped not less than fifty (50) per-
cent of the fruit shipped during such per-
iod, the Secretary may approve such
amendment and it shall become effective
at such time as the Secretary may desig-
nate.
ARTICLE XVI COUNTERPARTS
This agreement may be executed in mul-
tiple counterparts and when one counter-
part is signed by the Secretary, all such
counterparts shall constitute, when taken
together, one and the same instrument as
if all signatures were contained in one
original.
ARTICLE XVII ADDITIONAL
PARTIES
After the effective date hereof, any
handler may become a party if a counter-
part thereof is executed by him and deliv-
ered to the Secretary. This agreement
shall take effect as to such new contract-
ing party at the time such counterpart is
delivered to the Secretary, and the bene-
fits, privileges, and immunities conferred
by this agreement shall then be effective
as to such new contracting party.
ARTICLE XVIII ORDER WITH MAR-
KETING AGREEMENT
Each signatory handler hereby requests
the Secretary to issue, pursuant to the act,
an order providing for the regulating of
the handling of fruit in the same manner
as is provided for in this agreement.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the contract-
ing parties, acting under the provisions of
the act. for the purposes and subject to
the limitations therein contained, and not
otherwise, have hereunto set their respec-
tive signatures and seals.


Page Twenty-Two






_________________________-- -------------____ ___ ------------------ -- ----- --- ----I--- ----------


Growers! This is YOUR Organization!

. Join It Now .

Membership Application Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.
OBJECTIVES OF THE FLORIDA CITRUS GROWERS, INC.
1. To give the CITRUS GROWERS OF FLORIDA identity in the Citrus Industry.
2. To bring about a better understanding of all phases of the Citrus Industry, and to create con-
fidence and good will between those responsible for the various activities throughout the Industry, to
the end that better cultural methods may be employed to improve the quality of citrus fruits, and that
marketing methods may be improved, markets stabilized and new markets developed.
3. Tq represent the CITRUS GROWERS in legislative matters; to cooperate collectively with
Federal and State Agencies in the improvement of the Citrus Industry and to assist such agencies in car-
rying out the mandates of laws and regulations affecting the Citrus Industry.
4. To foster, encourage and promote research beneficial to the Growers and to cooperate with all
existing research agencies.
5. To compile and analyze data relative to Citrus Culture and Citrus Markets and to furnish from
time to time such information to the Grower so that he may be kept better informed as to actual ex-
isting conditions in the Industry.
6. To foster and encourage the formation of local and county units of Citrus Growers for the pur-
pose of affording the Growers opportunities to meet, discuss and collectively act upon their problems.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP
Membership in the _______------------ County Citrus Growers is limited to bona-fide growers
who do not buy or sell citrus fruit of others as a business for profit, and who do not derive a salary or
commission from any marketing organization, and who have no interest in any non-cooperative mar-
keting agency.
Under the above qualifications I make application for membership in the ----------------
County Citrus Growers.

Signature.
Date ....--------------------------- ------ 193-_
Membership Committeeman
Name ----------------------- --.-----------------------
Mail Address ------ --------------- --- Phone.
Grove Location ----------------------- ---------- -----------------------------------------
County, near -------------------------- -------- ------------- -
Section-------- Township -------- Range___-------
Total Acreage (all groves) _.-------------- ----------- ----- ---------------------------------------.--- --
Marketing Method: Independent ------ ------------------------
Cooperative --------- ------------------------------
PRODUCTION
1937-38 1938-39
Boxes No. Groves Acres Boxes No. Groves Acres
Oranges----- ----- .
Grapefruit ---------- ------- ----- ------ ----- -------
Tangerines------ ------
Mail your Application to the President of your County's Unit, or to the Florida Citrus
Growers, Inc., Orlando, Florida.
--------------- =------ -------------- --------------- ----










FLORIDA CITRUS GROWERS, INC.
"CITRUS GROWERS COOPERATING TOGETHER"
PUBLISHERS
"THE CITRUS GROWER"

ORLANDO, FLORIDA
L. H. KRAMER. PRESIDENT PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
LAKE WALES. FLA.
J. J. BANKS, IST V. PRES. W. E. KEMP. ORLANDO, CHM.
ORLANDO, FLA. W. L. BURTOx. ORLANDO
C. B. VANSICKLER, 2ND V. PREs. R. J. KEPLER, DELAND
FORT PIERCE, FLA. E. G. THATCHER, VERO BEACH
E. G. TODD. TREASURER CARL BR TAMPA
AVON PARK, FLA.
W. L. BURTON, SECRETARY
ORLANDO, FLA.


Mr. Advertiser ...


HE PUBLICATION Committee unreservedly recommends THE CITRUS GROWER as an adver-
tising medium. Its enthusiasm arises from sound reasons. Here are some of them:


THE CITRUS GROWER goes almost solely into the hands of prospective customers of those who ad-
vertise in its pages.
It is read by a group whose members and friends have a single interest. In this respect of concen-
trating its circulation upon a single point of buyer probability, few mediums exist able to equal it.

The subscription rolls of this magazine constitute a mailing list of selected quality. No advertiser
could reasonably afford the expense of compiling a list so select in its appeal; nor could he afford to
keep it up to date. We have that list because of the nature and activities of our organization. Many
advertisers, too, attempting to circularize this group by mail, realize of course that a very large per-
centage of their mailed messages are never read.
This brings us to the second strong advertising appeal of THE CITRUS GROWER. Its subscribers are
those who, under ordinary circumstances, would be most anxious to keep themselves informed about
the progress and development of the citrus industry. At this particular time this reader interest is multi-
plied many times, for upon the grower is falling the entire crushing weight of the distressing problems
of that industry.

The grower's sincere search for the solution of his problems will bring him first, and continuously,
to the pages of the mouthpiece of his own organization-a mouthpiece made vocal to apply combined
S grower strength to the task of settling these difficulties.
It is on the basis of this concentration of circulation and height of reader interest that the Com-
mittee offers the pages of THE CITRUS GROWER to its advertisers. We do not believe its advertis-
ing value in its field can be equalled; certainly it cannot be surpassed.
Furthermore, it is only upon the basis of an outstanding value that space is offered for sale.
We are confident our salesmen will have no reason to appeal to advertisers on any other basis and
they have been specifically instructed to this effect.

The committee feels the number of those advertisers who will find the "pulling" power of the THE
CITRUS GROWER thoroughly satisfactory, will be large; it looks forward to pleasant business relations
with its advertisers; it recommends that readers of the magazine give careful consideration to the
products of those who advertise in its pages.

Sincerely yours,

Publication Committee

Florida Citrus Growers, Inc.




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