Title: Florida clearing house news ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086639/00080
 Material Information
Title: Florida clearing house news ..
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Growers' Clearing House Association
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Winter Haven Fla
Publication Date: January 25, 1932
Frequency: semimonthly (irregular)
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruits -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- Sept. 1928-
General Note: "Official publication of the Florida citrus growers clearing house association."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086639
Volume ID: VID00080
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01306261
lccn - 30006589

Full Text

S. De. Dt. of Agri.. 3-24
-h ansh- D. c. gFL O R I D A
Library Period Div.,
Washington, D. C F I


'CLEARING
jfo


Representing more than 10,000
Growers of Oranges and Grapefruit
Headquarters: WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA


U. S. Postage
lc. hM
Winter Haven, Fla.
Permit No. 1


HOUSE


O icial Publication o tnhe
SFLORIDA CITRUS GROWERS
N E W SIBRARLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION


$2.00 a Year
10 Cents a Copy


Published Semi-monthly by the Florida Cit-
rus Growers Clearing House Association.
DeWitt Taylor Bldg.. Winter Haven, Fla.


X Elerdl-lasV ~oA-class matter August 81,
JANUARY 25, 1932 r-1928, at the postoffice at Winter Haven.
F Ilorida, under the Act of March 3, 1879.


Move Made To ControBuilk Business

Committee of 50 Meets Ready Response
From Clearing House Shipper Members


Unregulated shipment of bulk fruit may be-
come a thing of the past in Florida if present
indications mean anything. Today there is
every reason to believe that the various fac-
tors in the Florida citrus industry are practi-
cally agreed that the shipment of loose fruit
must be controlled if it is not to become a gen-
uine menace to the marketing of the crop.
Realizing that bulk shipments, whether by
rail, truck, or boat, unless a standard con-
tainer of some .sort is used, are fast becoming
a boomerang to the industry instead of a help
in distribution, the Committee of Fifty early
this month called upon the shipper members
of the Clearing House and the Florida Citrus
Exchange to remedy the situation.
SHIPPERS AGREE
The Committee of Fifty's request in brief
was that these two groups refrain from ship-


ping in bulk unless the fruit moves in a stand-
ard container. Shipper members of the Clear-
ing House, at a meeting held in Eustis, Jan-
uary 18, took immediate action in the matter
and unanimously agreed to the Committee of
Fifty's request. The Board of Directors of the
Florida Citrus Exchange, which had met in
Tampa a few days previous, referred the Com-
mittee of Fifty's request to the marketing
committee of the Exchange. According to
Chairman N. H. Vissering, of the Committee
of Fifty, a report from the Exchange commit-
tee is expected very shortly.
Help from another source also was offered
the committee, the State Chamber of Com-
merce advising the committee of its eagerness
to do its part in stabilizing distribution meth-
ods.
In studying the bulk problem, Clearing


Work of Growers and Shippers' League

Helped Industry Cut Freight Expenses
Activities of -the Growers and Shippers done by the League and pointed out with sev-
League of Florida during the past year result- eral illustrations the tremendous service it has
- ed-in a-saving-to the citrus-industry? -of more been- to: the industry. The .president's address
than six million dollars in transportation costs, in part reads as follows:
the annual report of J. Curtis Robinson, secre- INVESTORS AIDED CARRIERS
Star of the League, reveals. The annual meet- "Growers and shippers in the past year have
ing of the League held in Orlando this month, been confronted with transportation problems
was attended by a large gathering of growers that affected their interests to a greater extent
and shippers and others interested in citrus, as than in any year since the organization of the
well as the vegetable business in the state, and League. The railroads all over the United
was the eighth annual session of the organiza- States, including the Florida lines, made an ap-
tion. Officers who served during the past year peal to the Interstate Commerce Commission
and who were re-elected are: President, L. B. for permission to increase all freight and re-
Skinner; first vice-president, E. L. Wirt; second frigeration rates by 15%. This appeal was
vice-president, R. B. Woolfolk; treasurer, S. O. supported by representatives of national in-
Chase, and executive vice-president and secre- surance companies and organizations acting in
tary, J. Curtis Robinson. behalf of savings banks whose urincinals were


HELPED DEFEAT INCREASE
The saving to the citrus industry through
the work of the League was brought about by
reductions in existing rates and the prevention
of the full increase of 15%, which last was the
outstanding case in which the League concern-
ed itself during the past year.
President L. B. Skinner in his formal address
k at the annual meeting, covered briefly the work


heavy investors in railroad bonds. The Florida
shippers were immediately able to concentrate
their opposition against this increase, due to
the fact that they were members of a central
organization having for its sole purpose the
protection of their interests along transporta-
tion lines.
"The penalty that would have been imposed
.(Continued on Page Seven)


House shipper members expressed their unani-
mous approval of the committee's effort. It
was brought out at the meeting in Eustis that
28 percent of all the fruit moved from the
state to date this season has been shipped in
bulk. It is imperative that every frill and un-
necessary expense be eliminated, but shipping
the fruit in a standard container-such as a
crate, bag, or hamper-will standardize the
method of shipments and prove economical in
the long run. This will eliminate the usual
expense of wraps and packing, but permit, at
the same time, the fruit being graded and
sized. The receiver in the market would incur
this expense anyway in placing bulk fruit in
containers for distribution.
Use of a standard container will eliminate
the bruising of the fruit, resulting from ship-
ping in bulk and rough handling at destination.
It is quite a common practice at the other end
to use a scoop shovel to transfer the fruit from
the car to a container in which the fruit may
be distributed to its outlets. A container,
cheaper than ever before made available and
of the regular size of the present orange and
grapefruit box, is being offered.
BETTER TRADE DISLIKES BULK
It is hoped that out of this effort Florida can
-prevent its citrus industry from degenerating
into practices such as have been followed in
other industries where bulk handling of prod-
ucts is practiced. Such methods discourage the
interest of the better type of trade in an or-
ganized control of distribution, grade or-pack-
age.
The action taken by the Clearing House
shippers, in the form of an endorsement of the
Committee of Fifty's request, is as follows:
"The shipper members of the Clearing House
hereby endorse the resolution of the Cornmit-
tee 6f Fifty requesting Clearing House ship-
pers to refrain from shipments of citrus fruit
in bulk by rail, truck, boat or otherwise, other
than in standard containers, provided the Flor-
ida Citrus Exchange and its affiliations will co-
operate and also cease shipments of bulk-fruit,
for the following outstanding reasons:
"Shipments of bulk fruit are demoralizing
the markets on account of lack of standardiza-
tion, unsatisfactory condition of fruit on ar-
rival, and uncontrolled and improper distribu-
(Continued on Page Four)


Volume IV
Number 8


I WJ


---------






Page 2 FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


Committee of Fifty Department


Some of the danger confronting effici-
ent and profitable marketing of our citrus,
which is being felt in the unregulated con-
ditions governing the movement of bulk
fruit, was recently called to the attention
of this committee. A report from a divi-
sion manager in the north, sent to the
Florida Citrus Exchange, outlines clearly
the menace to the industry which this
method of distribution is becoming. Mem-
bers of the Committee of Fifty and grow-
ers generally will be interested in this re-
port, for it not only indicates that the in-
dustry is alive to the possible evil, but it
also indicates how it may be remedied.
The report to the Exchange is given here-
with as follows:

"Ever since my return from our meeting in
Tampa I have been trying to get a slant and
the reaction of the trade on what effect the
bulk shipments from Florida are having and
the possible effect the continuation of these
shipments might have on the future market-
ing of our citrus crop. The general attitude of
most of the legitimate dealers has been quite
antagonistic and a great many have taken the
position of where they do not care whether
they handle Florida fruit or not.
CHAIN STORES TO BLAME
"The effect of the chain stores handling
bulk fruit has, without a doubt, had the most
depressing effect on the market of Florida or-
anges and grapefruit than anything that has
ever happened. It has come to a point where
the independent retailer has no possible chance
to compete with the chain stores on this bulk
fruit for the reason that the chain stores are
buying this bulk fruit not only from us but
from everybody else on the same basis and at
the same price that the legitimate jobber is
paying. On top of this the chain stores ex-
tract a brokerage from the shipper of $25 a
car so that he has his fruit at least 7c a box
cheaper than the legitimate dealer is paying
by the carload to which the jobber must add
his profit so that the chain stores are practi-
cally in the position where they can retail this
fruit at the same price that it cost the inde-
pendent retailer. This means that ultimately
the independent grocer will be forced out of
the Florida citruswudeal-- .
"To illustrate what we mean, we call your
attention to two ads which we are enclosing
herewith, one of them from Charleston, W.
Va., in which Kroger is advertising oranges at
10 pounds for 35c or a retail price of $3.15,
and the other one from the Cincinnati paper
of today where Kroger is advertising 10 pounds
for 31c or on the basis of $2.79 a box delivered.
As we understand it, by mixing 250s and 288s
the consumer is getting from 30 to 32 oranges
for this 31c or on the basis of about 12c a
dozen.
DEALERS' INDIFFERENCE
"In Indianapolis yesterday, Hall was deliv-
ering our own fruit to the Standard Grocery
Company, 250s and 288s, at 8%c a dozen put-
ting them up in bushel baskets of 12 dozen
each which figures on the basis of $1.87 a box.
He is also delivering 64 and 70 size grapefruit
on the basis of 2c each or about $1.35 a box.
Kroger in Dayton is selling 8 pounds of oranges
for 29c, which figures on the basis of $3.19.
What I am trying to bring out is this: with


these kind of prices there is absolutely no
chance for the independent retailer to any way
near compete with the result that he is getting
indifferent. The net result is that instead of
moving more fruit there is actually less con-
sumed because actual statistics have proved
that the chain store covers just about 31%
of the consuming public so that if we elimi-
nate the independent retailers we also are elim-
inating 69 % of the consuming public's buying
power. A situation of this kind is resolving it-
self into a mighty serious problem.
"I realize that this chain store proposition is
here to stay but I also believe that some ways
and means must be found whereby they will be
an asset instead of a liability on the commodity
in which we are engaged and which they are
handling.
"A concrete example of what this chain
store domination has done is the potato field.
It is next to impossible for the independent re-
tailer to compete on potatoes and with their
complete domination, and the slashing of prices
to a point where there is no money in it for
any one they have driven the prices to the pro-
ducer to a point where there is absolutely no
chance for him to exist. Take the potato crop
of this year; it is close to 40,000,000 bushels
under the light crop of last year, yet the prices
are considerably lower than they were a year
ago. The reason for this is that the indepen-
dent retailers, not being able to compete with
the chain stores, are dictating the price that
they are willing to pay regardless of whether
the producer exists or not.
LEARNED BY EXPERIENCE
"The shipment of perishables in bulk is not a
new problem. It is a new problem to Florida
but it is not new to a great many other com-
modities. Going back about ten years, the ap-
ple growers in the eastern section of the coun-
try felt the necessity of getting their apples
on the market much cheaper than by putting
them in packages so that at that time probably
50% of these eastern apples were shipped in
bulk. Within the last few years there have
been practically no bulk apples shipped what-
soever because these growers found out, to
their sorrow, that by cheapening the product
they not only cheapened the bulk fruit but they
also cheapened their package stuff so that their
basic price and net returns were considerably
less than when they were putting them up in
packages.
"There has been considerable talk about Cal-
ifornia always having a fairly good net return
to the grower. The reason advanced has al-
ways been that they were properly organized.
While this is true, and has in a large measure
attributed to their success, but I believe the
biggest part of their success has been in that
they have been free from chain store domina-
tion; they have refrained from shipping any-
thing in bulk thereby cheapening their product
and they have steadfastly stood for real qual-
ity in their package. This, I believe, is the main
reason for their success.
REFUSE TO HANDLE FLORIDA FRUIT
"In talking to practically every office in this
division during the last few days, I have run
across a lot of trade reaction and antagonism


to Florida fruit. In Indianapolis it has come
to this point: the legitimate dealers are abso-
lutely refusing to buy any boxed Florida grape-
fruit, claiming that they are going to handle
Texas for such boxed trade as they would have:
and handle what bulk they can and leave the
rest of the Florida situation to the peddlers
In Evansville some of the legitimate dealers
have taken the position that they are not going
to handle any Florida fruit at all. This has alP
ways been a solid Florida market, but I under-
stand that two of the dealers are now buying
California oranges and letting the peddlersr
handle the Florida in bulk. This seems to be
the general situation all over the division.
"While I realize that we are forced into this
bulk situation against our wishes, yet I frankly
believe that unless something is done in order
to stop it that it will mean complete ruination
to the Florida citrus industry within the next
three to five years. You cannot lower the
standard of any product without ultimately
lowering the basic return to the grower. In,
other words, the minute these chain stores sell
oranges for 10c a dozen it immediately estab-
lishes a price for the independent retailer with
which he must compete and in order to do so-
he must buy as cheap as the chain store, which
he cannot do under existing conditions. The
net result of all of this will be the ultimate
driving down of a price to a point where the
grower cannot exist.
PRIVATE SALES SUFFER
"To substantiate these facts you need only,
go through the distribution sheets of our pri-
vate sales from which you will note that where
ever there is no bulk competition, such as the
eastern territory, sales have been on a fairly
normal basis, but in every district where bulk
has arrived in any quantity our private sales
have been considerably below normal. This
proves conclusively my argument that instead.
of increasing consumption it has actually de-
creased it for the reasons that I have set forth
above.
"We are also met with the argument that
the grower is receiving more for his bulk fruit
than he is for boxes. Some of this may be true
at the moment but the direct cause of this is
the lowering of the standard of your fruit. The
basic price at which the chain stores sell this
bulk fruit has forced the independent retailer
to compete on a per dozen basis with the chain
stores with the result that he has been forced
to buy boxes on a basis where he can compete.
This is the reason the prices are what they were'
so far this season. I frankly believe that if the
shipments of bulk were eliminated entirely'
that within two weeks we would see an advance
in the market of from 25c to 50c per box.

LEGISLATURE MIGHT HELP
"Now I realize that as long,as our competi-
tors ship bulkwe will be forced,to do so also.
This brings the whole matter down to a rem-
edy and I believe there are two courses open
to remedy this situation. First, either by leg-
islative action of the Florida State Legislature
prohibiting the shipment of bulk either by rail
or truck out of the state. The argument may be'
brought up that it cannot be done. For your


January 25, 1932







FLORIDA CLEARING


information, it is being done; the state of
Washington has a law that prohibits the ship-
ment of any bulk apples from that state. The
states of California and Arizona have laws
prohibiting the movement of bulk oranges
from either one of these states. Whether a law
of this kind is constitutional or not, I am un-
able to say, yet I believe it to be so because it
will mean the preservation of the only industry
of the state of Florida of any importance. The
second remedy is the raising of railroad rates
on bulk fruit to about double the boxed rates.
This would put a tariff on bulk shipments which
the traffic could not bear, and I believe could
be worked out much quicker than the legisla-
tive feature because with our closh connection
with Secretary Hyde, the Farm Board, and our
.position with the railroads, I believe enough
pressure could be brought to bear upon them to
"bring this about.
"While I hate to bore you with a lengthy
report of this kind, I believe the subject is of
sufficient importance to all of us and I have
attempted to cover the situation, as I see it,
,as fully as possible. I hate to keep on harping
about bulk shipments, but the attitude of the
trade in the north is far more serious than I
believe you realize it is and it is getting more
serious every day.
CALIFORNIA TAKES LEAD
"For the first time in its history, Cincinnati
today paid more for California oranges at this
time of the year than they did for Florida's on
an equal number of cars and the only reason
that we can account for it is the fact that the
independent retailers have made up their
minds that they are going to sell California or-
anges in preference to Florida's because they
cannot compete with the bulk proposition that
'the chain stores are putting out. Under the
present basis it is absolutely impossible for
these independent retailers to come any way
near competing and they are naturally turn-
ing to something on which they have an equal
chance.
"There is another serious aspect to this bulk
proposition that is getting more serious every
day and this is the fact that our northern sales
force are fast becoming badly discouraged on
account of the Capitol Fruit Company compe-
tition. They are-faced with the fact that the
-Capitol Fruit Company is continually under
quoting them and they are getting to the point
where they do not care whether they push or
whether they don't. I cannot stress the fact
too much that this Capitol competition in the
northern markets is having a very demoralizing
effect upon the morale of our sales force and
they are getting to the point where they are
not in the right mental attitude to put forth
their best efforts.'
COMPETING AGAINST SELVES
"I believe that the solution and what must
be done is the placing of this bulk business
under a separate department and handled
through our offices where we have salaried
representatives' because of the sales force.
There does not seem to be any godd reason why
we should have to compete against ourselves
in the markets and if we do not have capable
enough men in these northern markets to sell
the fruit, I believe that we should get some
'who are.
"Frankly, I believe that something must be


Lime Growing in Florida

Deserving Encouragement

An industry which has flourished and
withered and is now trying to flourish once
more on a more extensive scale is lime grow-
ing. The efforts to bring back the industry
merit the support of all Florida residents to
the extent that they will purchase Florida
limes as far as possible. Limes can very well
Sbe used to substitute for lemons, of which
Florida produces none.
The small lime familiar to most users is
known as the Key lime or Mexican lime. It is

done and pretty quick in order to save the sit-
uation because I do not believe that an organi-
zation can survive under its present disorgan-
ized condition and its competition with its own
fruit.
"I am merely giving you my reaction of the
whole situation as I see it and sincerely hope
that some way can be worked out whereby this
condition can be remedied."
Signed: EDUCATIONAL COMMITTEE,
COMMITTEE OF FIFTY.


CITRUS GROWERS
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grown on the Florida keys, and has been for
years. The fruit is of excellent quality, of the
size desired by soft drink fountains, and is a
well known product. Lime growers on the keys
are rejuvenating their groves, and the produc-
tion is increasing. This production in Florida,
however, will probably be limited, as this lime
is very tender and does not grow outside of
the keys and the extreme southern tip of the
peninsula.
A newer lime in Florida, the Persian or Tahi-
ti lime, is much larger-about the size of a
lemon-and is more hardy, growing success-
fully well into the central part of the state in
sheltered locations. It is slightly more suscep-
tible to cold than either grapefruit or oranges.
The quality of this large lime is excellent. The
principal objection to it by fountain drink dis-
pensers is that it is too large for one lime to
make one drink, and thus cut pieces are left
lying around the fountain. However, the Tahiti
lime is enjoying an increasing popularity, both
in Florida and at'points where Florida citrus
fruits are shipped.
The lime industry has possibilities of bring-
ing still more cash to Florida from citrus fruits,
and should be encouraged.


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Sold by all suppliers of packing house requisites, exchanges or direct from maker.


January 25. 1932


FLORIDA: CLEARING:


HOUSE NEWS


Pare 3





Paae 4


FLORIDA

CLEARING HOUSE

NEWS

CLEARING HOUSE PURPOSES
Co-ordinating members' activities for orderely control
of distribution.
Controlling supplies at key markets.
Disseminating marketing information.
Standardizing grade and pack through impartial in-
spection service.
Increasing consumer demand by advertising and pub-
licity.
Securing best freight rates and transportation
services.
Developing mutual interests of, and better under-
standing among growers and shippers.
Maintaining representation of industry in all matters
of common welfare.


E. C. AURIN ..
J. C. CHASE . .
O. F. GARDNER . .
W. J. HOWEY . .
L. P. KIRKLAND ...
J. H. LETTON" .".
E. C. McLEAN . .
M. O. OVERSTREET
S. J. SLIGH . . .
A. M. TILDEN .
A. R. TRAFFORD . .
E. H. WILLIAMS . .
R. B. WOOLFOLK .


DIRECTORS


.. . Ft. Ogden
. . .. Winter Park
. . .. Lake Placid
. . Howey in the Hills
. . .. Auburndale
. : Valrica
. . .. Palmetto
. . .. Orlando
. . . Orlando
. . .. Winter Haven
... Cocoa
. . .. Crescent City
. . .. Orlando


I.C.C. Turns Attention

To Truck Problem
Recommendations, ranging from fed-
eral regulation of all motor vehicles
operated for hire in interstate com-
merce to modification of anti-trust laws
so as to permit railroads to acquire bus
and truck lines already in operation,
have been made to the Interstate Com-
merce Commission.
According to a recent dispatch in
Produce News, the Commission was
warned by one of its examiners, Leo J.
Flynn, that the stability of rate struc-
tures is being undermined by the tre-
mendous and unregulated expansion of
motor vehicle transportation. Effici-
ency under existing conditions is prac-
tically impossible, it was pointed out.
As a remedy it was proposed' t ex-
tend the Commission's jurisdiction to
include all interstate buses and trucks
except taxicabs, sightseeing and school
buses and trucks used in the businesses
of their immediate owners. Rates, serv-
ices, acquisitions and extensions would
be regulated with all other phases of
operation, which in the case of carriers
already are subject to the Commis-
sion's authority.
MUCH MONEY INVOLVED
The book value investment in rail-
road equipment of steam roads, not in-
cluding switching and terminal roads,
was placed at $26,051,000,223 as of
Dec. 31, 1930, including 249,052 miles
of main line, 60,189 locomotives, 53,-
584 passenger cars in service and 2,-
352,046 freight cars.
"It is variously estimated," said the
report, "that the highway transporta-
tion system and equipment, including
motor vehicles, as well as the roads,


Page 4


LORIDA CLEARING ( HOUSE NEWS

comprise an investment of $26,000,-
000,000 to $28,000,000,000."
The report is expected to form the
basis of recommendations to be sub-
mitted by the Commission to Congress.
SEEK LOWER CARRYING COSTS
One of the most important recom-
mendations affecting the produce trade
is that urging liberalization of present
railroad classifications, particularly
with respect to packing requirements
and rules governing carload commodi-
ty mixtures. Flynn recommends study
of these requirements and rules with a
view to reducing the transportation
costs to shippers whenever that can be
done without increasing loss and dam-
age claims.
Flynn recommended that contract
carriers engaged in interstate com-
merce should be required to register
with the Interstate Commerce -Com-i
mission and should be compelled to
comply with certain requirements of
the Commission for regulation of con-
tract carriers as distinguished from
common carriers. Among these re-
quirements would be the carrying of
liability insurance or filing of indem-
nity bonds to secure the public in cases
of injury or damage. Permits of con-
tract carriers should be for a definite
period, Flynn said.
MUST GET PERMIT
He would prohibit operation of mo-
tor vehicles in interstate commerce on
the public highways by contract car-
riers without a permit from the Com-
mission. Private trucks would not be
affected by the proposed regulations
unless they were operated for hire.
In addition, Flynn recommended the
Commission should be authorized to fix
minimum, but not maximum, rates to
be charged by contract carriers engag-
ed in interstate commerce on a mileage
or other basis sufficient to cover the
cost of the transportation service per-
formed, and rates so fixed should not.
include any compensation for accesso-
rial services that may be rendered in
addition to the transportation service.
The railroads should be permitted to
engage in motor vehicle transporta-
tion, both freight and passenger, Flynn
said, and the Clayton Anti-Trust Act
shouldbe amended to permit them to
purchase competing motor vehicle
lines. Some railroads, of course, are
now engaged in motor vehicle opera-
tions, but under the present law they
may not publish joint rates with the
bus and truck lines, nor may they inter-
change traffic.

CALIFORNIA'S PROPORTION AT
AUCTION
That California is having difficulty in push-
ing her sales in the private sale territory is evi-
dent from the fact that to date 41 percent of
her carlot movement has been sold at auction
as compared with 31 percent same date last
year.


January 25, 1932

Move Made To Control

Bulk Business
(Continued from Page One)
tion, resulting in unprofitable returns to the
industry as a whole."
The letter from the State Chamber of Com-
merce reads in part as follows:
"This is a matter in which both State Cham-
ber Committees with which I am connected are
interested and concerning which we have been
doing considerable work. The two bodies men-
tioned are the Industrial Committee and the
Transportation Ills Committee.
"As we see it there are two grave dangers in
this growing method of transporting our cit-
rus fruit to the markets:
"First, disorganization of existing market-
ing machinery; and
"Second, the possibility of our losing from
the state the packing house payrolls and the
-employment of many of our citizens.
"It is folly for us to point out to you the
elements in the uncontrolled hauling of bulk
fruit by trucks. Your organization was set up
in order to attempt to bring about the control
of shipments which is absolutely necessary to
the success of the industry. If the growth of
this disorganized and uncontrolled movement
continues, your efforts are doomed to failure.
"Again, the movement to ship fruit in bulk
to central markets, there to be selected, wash-
ed and packed, is fraught with even more dan-
ger to the growers of the state. If one hundred
percent successful it will not only eliminate
all of our packing houses, but will also wreck
the growers financially. The people who are
behind this movement are not philanthropists.
Their natural tendency will be to purchase
fruit at the groves and at varying prices but
generally at the lowest to which they can beat
the grower down. The inevitable result of such
a method of marketing will be that the grower
will be compelled to accept whatever price is
offered. The success of this new method of
distributing citrus fruit will wreck marketing
agencies, both co-operative and private. The
grower may actually secure a little more money
net for his fruit at the grove in the beginning
of the movement, but when the old established
- marketing agencies have been put out of busi-
ness, he will be at the mercy of the bulk buyer.
"There is no single danger threatening the
State of Florida today which promises such
dire results as this movement, should it be suc-
cessful and it seems to us, the members of these
two committees, that the citrus growers of
Florida should combine in some manner for the
purpose of co-operating in opposition.
"If any of the machinery of the State Cham-
ber of Commerce can be used toward this end,
we herewith offer it to you and it may be pos-
sible that our services can be used in helping
the growers and shipping agencies to get to-
gether to carry on this fight. If we can serve,
it will give us the greatest pleasure to render
whatever service seems possible. Signed, Wil-
liam L, Wilson, chairman."

A Good Heason
Railroad Agent (dining at a small-town ho-
tel) : "Why does that dog sit there and watch
me all the time?"
Waiter: "You've got the plate he usually eats
from, sir."




January 25, 1932 FLORIDA CLEARING 0 HOUSE NEWS Page 5



CR P S tell the



ATRU //.H

0. AFTER all, you will never completely solve
0L N your fertilizer problem until you face
this fundamental fact: Only your CRO.PS
can tell you which fertilizer you should use.
Give them that chance. Make this test: Use
Nitrophoska, Calcium Nitrate or Calurea for
one-half of your next application; use another
fertilizer for the other half. Then let your
crops decide. Let them tell you the truth
about fertilizers! Send for complete informa-
ed tion today. Just mail the coupon below.
f e er Synthetic Nitrogen Products Corporation,
othe New York, N. Y., and Plant City, Fla.
.- :,," Distributor: JACKSON GRAIN CO., Tampa, Fla.


Eight Grades of Concentrated Complete Fertilizer. NITROPHOSKA (the high-analysis complete ferti-
lizer, made in eight different grades to meet practically every ratio requirement) feeds the crop from start
to finish. It is an even-feeding fertilizer-BOTH quick-acting and long-lasting.


18.2% Ammonia. CALCIUM NITRATE (nitrate nitrogen combined with lime) is quick-acting and sup-
plies the soluble lime so necessary to citrus and other crops-even in soils already rich in lime.



I1% Ammonia. CALUREA (Calcium Nitrate combined with Urea) is a crop booster that supplies both
quick-acting and long-lasting nitrogen in one material.
Mail This Coupon Now
JACKSON GRAIN Co., Tampa, Florida, Dept. E: Please send me your free booklet "Crops Tell the Truth." This does not obligate me in
any way. I grow..........acres of citrus-........acres of truck crops. Name...-- .................-----. P. ........................ ... State..........
-c-----------------------------------------------------------------------------'----I -------







January 25, 1932


Weekly Citrus Summary

(By A. M. Pratt, Manager, Florida Citrus
Growers Clearing House Association)
(Week Ending January 23, 1932)


WEEKLY
CARLOT INDEX ANALYSIS


Week
Ending
Jan.23,'32
Fla. Org's Shpd..... 626
Total..................------ 8440
Fla. Gft. Shpd....... 637
Total.................... 7986
Fla. Tang. Shpd... 213
Total.................... 1994
Fla. Mixed Shpd... 354
Total- ...-..-----. 4946
Texas Gft. Shpd... 251
Total.................... 2639
Cal. Org's Shpd..... 729


Week
Ending
Jan. 16,'32
677
7814
584
7349
174
1781
362
4592
383
2388
890


Week
Ending
Jan.23,'31
984
12444
783
9661
75
2192
641
7727
65
1789
1434


Fla, _)rg's-AQc.....- 449,, 584 509
Average---.............. $2.90 $2.75 $2.80
Fla. Gft. Auc......... 316 318 340
Average.---.....- $2.05 $2.10 $2.50
Fla. Tang. Auc ..... 183 186 162
Average.-.......--. $2.45 $2.30 $2.50
Cal. Org's Auc....... 333 347 289
Average---............- $2.65 $2.45 $3.40

FIRST FIVE DAYS' SHIPMENTS
AND SALES
ORANGES No 1 ORANGES No. 2
Week End. Shpd. Sld. Av. Shpd. Sld. Av.
Jan. 16.... 124 13 $2.39 71 12 $1.92
Jan. 23... 102 14 $2.36 77 21 $1.97
Dif .... -22 +1 -.03 +6 +9 +.05

GFT. No. 1 GFT. No. 2
Week End. Shpd. Sld. Av. Shpd. Sld. Av.
Jan. 16.... 82 20 $1.50 60 17 $1.33
Jan. 23.... 75 20 $1.41 69 12 $1.24
Dif....... -7 +.09 +9 -5 -.09

COMPARATIVE SHIPMENTS


Florida Oranges
Week Last 1929- 1928-
Ending Year 30 29
Jan. 16........ 824 776 1134
Jan. 23 ....- 984 800 1119
Jan. 30 ...-1302 679 1086
California Oranges
Week Last
Ending Year 1930 1929
Jan. 16--.... 911 314 1080
Jan. 23........1434 547 1089
Jan. 30........1459 837 1013

Florida Grapefruit


Week Last
Ending Year
Jan. 16........ 607
Jan. 23....... 783
Jan. 30........ 904


1929-
30
462
497
534


1928-
29
655
662
820


Florida Mixed
Week Last 1929- 1928-
Ending Year 30 29
Jan. 16........ 564 414 357
Jan. 23........ 641 408 395
Jan. 30........ 765 392 386

Florida Tangerines
Week Last
Ending Year
Jan. 16...................... 170
Jan. 23--..................... 75
Jan. 30----.....................- 171


1927-
28
378
510-
624


1926-
27
688
599
1087


1928 1927
710 1089
799 1173
962 1133


927- 1926-
28 27
249 592
456 772
527 635


1927- 1926-
28 27
152 145
192 118
215 207

1929-
30
47
36
35


sity of our raising rather than lowering our
crop estimate as of Dec. 31. In asking for these
reports from the growers, attention was called
to small sizes as well as drop and drought, but,
even in the face of this, what has been picked
and what is estimated left unpicked would war-
rant the conclusion that' our total orange crop
this year was 84 percent of last year's total
and our total grapefruit crop 82 percent of
last year's. If the Clearing House revised its
estimate exclusively from these reports, it
would mean that we would have to increase
our total estimated carlot movement from 28,-
000 oranges to 32,000 and our carlot grape-
fruit movement from 21,000 to 24,000.
SMALL SIZES MAY EXPLAIN
Recently we have been informed of quite a
number of instances where the grower was ex-
pecting to pick far more than he did, having
been fooled in failing to realize how small his
sizes were. When one is accustomed to seeing
small sizes and does not have normal or large
sizes to compare with, one can readily believe
his sizes considerably larger than they are.
Florida operators throughout the season have
been spot picking with the result that mani-
fests on mid-season oranges are tending to run
smaller each week, regardless of such growth
as takes place on the trees. Although this is
particularly true of oranges, the analysis of
our grapefruit sizes indicates no tendency to-
wards elimination of small sizes, with the re-
ports that we have strongly indicating that our
sizes reported are not nearly as small as the
sizes left to pick in grapefruit. From this size
feature alone, therefore, we hesitate in jump-
ing to the conclusion that we must increase our
commercial crop estimate, though certainly we
cannot feel warranted at this time, in the light
of the reports from the growers, in reducing
the crop estimate.
MID-SEASON ORANGES LEFT
Now, let's approach this orange problem
from another angle. From Jan. 24 on last sea-
son 22,189 cars were shipped, of which about
10,500 cars were valencias, leaving 11,689
mid-season oranges that moved from this time
on last season. Counting in proper proportion
of mixed, Florida has shipped to date this sea-
son 11,000 cars of oranges, which on our esti-
mate would leave 17,000 cars, of which we es-
timate 9000 would be valencias. This would
make 8000 cars of mid-season oranges left to
move from now on as compared to 11,000 cars
of mid-season and early oranges already ship-
ped. If we estimated the crop from the grow-
ers' report basis we would have to assume that
11,000 cars of mid-season oranges were left, or
practically as much as last year at this time.
That would mean that there were as many mid-
season oranges left as we have shipped so far.
I believe very few would claim there could
possibly be as many mid-season oranges left as
what we have already shipped.
LACK OF PRESSURE
Another significant thing is this: If there
were as many oranges as this, it would seem
there would be a very much higher pressure to
move the crop than is being shown. If the 8000
mid-season oranges estimated left were moved
on the same average percent per week that the
last eight-year movement shows, it would take
until March 19 to move those cars, as shown in
the following figures:


Week
Ending
Jan. 30........
Feb. 6........
Feb. 13........
Feb. 20-.......
Feb. 27........
Mar. 5........
Mar. 12........
Mar. 19........


8-Year
Avk. %
3.9
4.0
3.8
4.0
3.6
3.4
3.2
3.0


Normal
By Weeks
1931-32
1092
1120
1064
1120
1008
952
896
840

8092


Actual
By Week
1930-81
1707
1689
1541
1566
1530
1227
1246
1312

11,818


In the right hand column is shown as con-
trast the number of cars of oranges shipped
during the same eight weeks last season. It is
rather coincidental that from March 19 on
last season the total movement was 10,371
cars, which is very close to the estimated val-
encia movement last year of 10,500 cars.
LIGHT ORANGE MOVEMENT THIS WEEK
The total orange movement this week will be
about 800 cars, including proper proportion of
mixed, against the normal, based on the past
eight years, of 868. This is a light movement,
especially when it is realized that, based on our
28,000 crop, had we shipped our oranges per
week on the average percentage based on the
past eight seasons, we would have moved to
date 14,112 cars instead of the 11,000 cars
that have gone forward. We are 3000 cars be-
hind a normal movement of our estimated
crop. This again would seem to indicate from
a pressure standpoint that there has been no
great uneasiness in moving this year's crop
and would seem again to indicate our standing
pat and not raising our estimate.
NEXT WEEK'S SHIPMENTS ORANGES
You will note we have estimated next week's
straight carlot orange movement at 825 cars,
mixed at 400. This would make a total orange
movement of about 1025 cars, which again is
slightly less than normal. On the other hand,
it is possible that Florida is over-playing its
hand unless it is willing to work along steadily
at the pace it is going, regardless of an increas-
ing tendency of the fruit to drop that is usual-
ly experienced on mid-seasons held into March.
CALIFORNIA'S ORANGE CROP
California's shipments have been light the
past two weeks and the advice we have for the
coming week is only 700 cars from the state as
compared to 1400 cars a year ago. The sur-
prisingly low prices that California has had to
take at auction, the difficulty experienced with
brown rot decay and the confidence that Cali-
fornia has that this weak fruit is behind her
is back of these small shipments from Califor-
nia. They are giving the trade a chance to
clean up, but advise they will be shipping pret-
ty heavy from the middle of February on, as
California estimates she will have as many
navels to move from this time on as last year.
DRY WEATHER MAY REDUCE CROP
California has had almost continuous cold
as well as unusually wet weather. On Jan. 22
Redlands, Riverside and Pomona showed min-
imums of 31 degrees with Lindsay showing 28
degrees and the maximum being up around 55.
This kind of weather does not dry out frozen
oranges. Normally'warm, dry weather for two
or three weeks might result in the drying pro-
cess taking place in the oranges that have been
frozen to such an extent as to make thorough-
ly practical the use of the gravity water sep-
(Continued on Page Eight)


S GROWERS' CROP ESTIMATE
From over 1500 reports tabulated so far
from Florida growers, we are surprised to see
that these reports would indicate the neces-


Page 6


I


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS





FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


A Glimpse of Florida in Chicago


January 25, 1932


This picture shows a section of Florida Ex-
hibition Hall for the Chicago 1933 World's
Fair. It is an artist's conception from which
elaborations will be made. The size of the hall
is 60 x 100 feet. There will be sixteen alcoves,
each taking care of some phase of Florida's ac-
tivities. The material display will be in front
and a diorama in the background of each will
dramatize the subject matter in natural setting,
color and perspective, many of the dioramas to
be animated.
Above will be sixteen panels, as if a mural
painting, depicting Florida historically and in
proper sequence of events. The dioramas and
panels will be available after the fair for a per-

Growers and Shippers' League
Helped To Cut Freight
(Continued from Page One)
on the Florida citrus and vegetable industry,
if the full fifteen percent increase had been
made effective, would have amounted to be-
tween four and a half and five million dollars.
Growers and shippers rallied and under the
leadership and guidance of counsel employed
by the League, presented their testimony be-
fore the Interstate Commerce Commission in
opposition to the increase. Our own State Rail-
road Commission also presented some very val-
uable testimony in behalf of growers and ship-
pers. The Commission refused to grant the
full fifteen percent advance in freight and re-
frigeration charges. An emergency increase
in freight of one cent per 100 pounds was al-
lowed, but no increase was permitted in refrig-
eration charges. Thus, by this one concen-
trated effort of all our fruit and vegetable in-
terests working together, these industries were
saved something over four million dollars.
"Growers generally do not know that the
railroads attempted to increase our refrigera-
tion rates to eastern destinations by over $3.00
per car, and also made an effort to make a
separate charge for the use of refrigerator cars
on pre-cooled shipments of citrus ranging from


manent exhibit in Florida. The ceiling will be
a Florida sky with day-light and night effects.
Looking through the entrance from the foyer
the visitor will be confronted with a vista of
palms and exotic plants, and at the far end a
heroic figure of "Spirit of Florida" rising from
an electric cascade.
Over the entrance will be a day-light screen
where a continuous 12-minute colored talking.
picture will further tell the story of Florida.
The interior of the building will be finished in
pecky cypress and coquina rock. The picture
as a whole will be highly dramatic and for its
appeal as such, visitors will praise it. There
will not be a drab note in the entire ensemble.

$5.00 to $15.50 per car. These increases were
successfully opposed by the League, and the
Interstate Commerce Commission's decision
during this last year refusing to permit these
increases saved for our Florida growers some-
thing in excess of $150,000.
"Besides affecting these and many other sav-
ings during the year, the League, through con-
ference with traffic officials of Florida lines,
was able to establish contact committees of
shippers to work with similar committees ap-
pointed by the railroads, to jointly work out
standardized packages and methods for loading
vegetables which would insure delivery at des-
tination with a minimum of breakage and with-
out unduly penalizing shippers.
"The cost of transportation by rail still ex-
ceeds what the traffic will reasonably bear.
Last year the shippers, through the League, re-
quested the railroads to publish emergency
rates on citrus in order to insure the movement
of the entire crop and a fair return to the
growers. Our request was not granted, and
literally thousands of cars of fruit were not
picked at all, because growers realized that
after assuming the cost of picking, hauling and
packing, when added to the prevailing trans-
portation charges, they would be fortunate if
they would not have to pay transportation
costs out of their net returns and leave the
grower nothing but red ink."


in the Hands of


The Dealer




An Indian River Packer whose brand
is a favorite in the New York and Boston
auctions says that "the important ele-
ment in the use of Brogdex is that it
provides protection to the dealer."
This packer considers dealer satisfac-
tion as the paramount issue and disre-
gards all other benefits that accrue, his
only concern being that the dealer will
get fruit that has better appearance and
longer keeping time.
The favorable market attitude toward
Brogdex has come about because dealers
have found that Brogdexed fruit will stay
sound, plump, fresh and live looking long
enough to permit of sale before any evi-
dence of decay or shrinkage shows up.
The average price paid for Brogdexed
fruit in the various auctions reflects deal-
er preference and well justifies the small
service charge for the treatment.
Pack your fruit the Brogdex way and
identify it with the familiar Brogdex
trade mark-it is the recognized sign of
a better product.




Florida Brogdex
Distributors, Inc.
B. C. SKINNER, Pres.
Dunedin, Florida.


Page 7

Clearing House Formed

By Agencies in Texas
A clearing house for market information has
been set up in Texas by the marketing agencies
in that state, ninety percent of the industry be-
ing represented, according to press dispatches.
The members of the clearing house have agreed
to ship on order as much as possible, this agree-
ment being arrived at as something of an emer-
gency move because of unsatisfactory market
conditions.
Members and non-members alike call the
clearing house headquarters every morning
and receive complete data on the previous day's
movement, current f.o.b. prices, auction sales
and other marketing condition phases.






I .i 4 I.





FLORIDA CLEARING ) HOUSE NEWS


Exports To United Kingdom, 192 9-3 I


January 25. 1932


EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK
Grapefruit
1931 1930 1929
16,206 41,229 (*)
34,582 53,170 52,848
50,016 24,952 37,979
60,119 24,089 38,265
51,984 43,591 18,973
70,172 21,235 6,238
54,787 15,920 9,281
42,353 17,974 16,877
116,102 82,490 19,099
27,198 17,183 57,725
34,953 21,684 17,531
10,027 19,965 17,434
568,499 383,482 292,250
EXPORTS FROM JACKSONVILLE


Months:
January
February
March
April .
May
June
July
August
September
October -
November
December
Total .


Months:
January
February
March
April .
May
June
October
November
December
Total .


Months:
January
February
March
April .
May
June
October
November
December
Total .


1931
49,163
24,115
30,413
19,539
26,831
19,116
37,276
29,049
235,502


Grapefruit
1930

8,618
17,597
5,576
4,008
15,268
6,919
18,075
76,061


EXPORTS FROM


1931



S 935
2,160
S 3,084

6,179


Grapefruit
1930






15,616

15,616


1929
(*)
15,810
30,357
29,853
20,128
3,503
2,872


102,523
TAMPA

1929
(*)
9,310
6,350
13,820
14,743




44,223


1931
11,416
85
357
3,842
7,719
361


970
1,494

26,244


1931
3,071
782
2,234
1,696
4,690




12,473


1931


1,984





1,984


(*) Above service inaugurated first week in February, 1929, with New York, Jacksonville and Tampa.


Weekly Citrus Summary
(Continued from Page Six)
arator and reduce California's crop more than
they at present estimate.
FORTUNATE SIZE SITUATION
It is fortunate for California as well as for
us that these California navels are running
much larger sizes than our mid-season oranges.
These navels are averaging only 15 percent
250s and smaller and 15 percent 216s, where-
as, our oranges are running 50 percent 250s
and smaller with 20 percent 216s. California
is following a picking policy wherein they plan
on moving their smaller size navels from the
1st or 15th of March on. This fits in very
nicely with us and our sizes with hers, and it
would seem that the price level on small sizes
Sought to continue to even up a little closer to
the medium sizes.
GRAPEFRUIT SITUATION
Most growers and operators seem to be
reaching the point on the grapefruit situation
where it is felt regardless of past precedence
Sor anything else the industry should find some
vigorous means at once of working together
and concentrating on some constructive plan
Son grapefruit. A special advertising fund is
Being considered, also the elimination entirely
Sof any bulk grapefruit by carlot or to trucks,
.;in :the hope that at the same time something


could be done to standardize cannery prices,
thereby eliminating competition of under-
priced canned goods against our fresh product.
The situation is so serious that many of us are
in hopes we will be forced to get together
where we will actually do something instead of
just talking about it. It seems to be generally
felt it would take not only a concentrated ad-
vertising campaign but also vigorous action in
controlling shipments to materially bring about
better net results to the growers. It is esti-
mated that there are about 2500 cars of grape-
fruit left in Texas and it is realized in any move
of this kind that it is always impossible to get
100 percent. It is, however, time for open-
minded and decisive action along practical
lines.

Between the devil and the deep blue sea-
we need rain, but we're afraid of what it
will do!


Citrus Grove
Accountants and Income
Tax Specialists
Certified Public Accountant

A. Gilbert Lester & Co.
Taylor Building
WINTER HAVEN, FLA.


Oranges
1930
110
125
140
91
60




1,648
18,820
20,994

Oranges
1930


9,375



3,320
12,695

Oranges
1930
---------





89

89


Page 8


1929
(*)
14,469
73,153
1,509
2,807
1,642
543
169
542
677

95,511


1929
(*)
250
1,497
5,478
2,029



9,254


1929
(*)
770

1,848



2,618


THE
SIDE IS
TURNING TO

TEMPLES


This wonderful orange is rap-

idly gaining a deserved popu-
larity in the northern markets
and is selling at a premium over
all other varieties.

One Orange County grower
(name on request) sold his
fancy Temples this season for
$6.00 per box and the balance
of them for $2.75 per box on
the tree.

TEMPLE trees, under our ex-
clusive copyright, can be sold
legally only by this Nursery. So

great has been the demand for
trees this winter, we are now
practically sold out.

Next winter, however, we will
have an ample supply of splen-
did trees. We suggest that you
place your order long before-
hand, so as to avoid disappoint-
ment.




^-



9j)1en Caint (ilary


nurseries Co.

Write for a copy of our Special
Citrus Catalog.

WINTER HAVEN
American National Bank Bldg., in charge of
Mr. H. E. Cornell and Mr. A. G. Scott.
ORLANDO
Room 701, Orlando Bank & Trust Bldg.,
in c!large, of Mr. E. J. Parker.
TAMPA
Room 812, First National Bank Bldg.,
in charge of Mr. L. L. Collins.
A




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