Title: Florida clearing house news ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086639/00079
 Material Information
Title: Florida clearing house news ..
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Growers' Clearing House Association
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Winter Haven Fla
Publication Date: January 10, 1932
Frequency: semimonthly (irregular)
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruits -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- Sept. 1928-
General Note: "Official publication of the Florida citrus growers clearing house association."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086639
Volume ID: VID00079
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01306261
lccn - 30006589

Full Text
U. S. Dept. of Agri.,
Library Period Div.,
Washington, D. C.


V- ? 7 "1 -_ -.


FLORIDA


CLEARING


Representing more than 10,000
Growers of Oranges and GrapeFruit
Headquarters: WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA


NEWS


U. S. Postage
Ie. Pail
Winter Haven, Fla.
Permit No. 1


HOUSE


R D)ffrJiil^ bIublication of the
J OiR I D CITRUS GROWERS
CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION


$2.00 a Year Published Semi-monthly by the Florida Cit- Ene a- atteiAugust 31, Volume IV
n a C y rus Growers Clearing House Association, JANUARY 10, 1932 19~ tde'postoffice at Winter Haven.
1 cents a Cpy DeWitt Taylor Bldg., Winter Haven, Fla. Florida, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Number 7


Freight Rate To Southeast Is Cut


Half a loaf is better than no loaf at all.
This might be said to be the case in the re-
duction infreight rates on citrus shipped to
certain southeastern destinations. The reduc-
tion will amount to 25 percent. The disap-
pointing feature of the Interstate Commerce
Commission's action was the refusal of that
body to permit the railroads to reduce their
rates to northeastern points as had been con-
templated and as the railroads had asked per-
mission to do.
NEW MINIMUM LOAD
The reduction of 25 percent to the southeast-
ern markets calls for a minimum carload of
384 boxes as against the present minimum load
of 360 boxes.
According to officials of the Clearing House,
the industry will press its demand for a reduc-
tion in the rates to the northeastern points, as
the Flbrida and associated railroads concerned
are willing and eager to make the reduction
more comprehensive than the present ruling
permits. Although official advice had not yet
been received by the Clearing House when the
News went to press it is thought the new rates
will become effective fifteen days after the an-
nouncement of the Interstate Commerce Com-
mission, or on Jan. 23. It is understood too
that a new application for the reduction to
eastern points will be filed by the railroads.
In denying the rate reduction to the eastern
points the commission stated that it did not be-
lieve a reduction should be allowed on less
than thirty days' notice, the reason being that
ample time for objections should be given.
SAVING ABOUT 15c
The saving in freight to the southeastern
points will range from about 10c per box to
20c, in Georgia the average being about 12c,
and in North Carolina about 17c. The accom-
panying map shows the area in which the re-
duced rate applies.
The action of the railroads in obtaining the
Reduction, as well as their proposed efforts to
obtain further reductions is expected to have
far-reaching results on the Florida citrus in-
Sdustry. This move by the railroads is admit-
tedly an effort to meet competition which
trucks are giving the railroads. The truck, as
a carrier of citrus, became an important factor
in the picture a year ago and has had consid-
Serable influence this season to date, If the


Where Fruit Moves at


The.shaded portion in the above map shows
the area effected by the freight rate reduction
to southeastern points, which has just been
granted by the LC.C. It will be noted that the
reduction-which is of 25 %-applies to all of
two states, Georgia and South Carolina, and
parts only of North Carolina, Tennessee and
Alabama. The rates to Mississippi, Virginia
or Kentucky are not reduced.
The following gives the boundary of the area
in which the lower rates apply: Starting at


truck movement is curtailed or eliminated by
any action the railroads may take, the result
on the citrus industry unquestionably will be
felt. The industry appears uncertain now
whether the truck movement is good or bad
for it. Its good feature is that the truck is
introducing Florida citrus fruit in small towns
where it has not reached before. The difficulty
of keeping daily account of the volume and
destination of truck shipments provides the
bothersome feature. This season to date, for
instance, trucks have handled the equivalent
of more than two thousand cars, or about


Lower Freight Rates


Washington, N. C., the line made by the A. C.
L. through Rocky Mount to Wilson, thence on
and south of the Norfolk Southern to Raleigh,
thence on and south of the Southern through
Durham, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, States-
ville and Asheville to Morristown, Tenn., Knox-
ville to Harriman, thence on and south along
the Tennessee Central to Nashville, thence on
and east along the Louisville & Nashville from
Nashville through Columbia and Birmingham
and from there to Montgomery and then to
Mobile.


eleven or twelve percent of what the railroads
have handled.
The following table shows the old and new
rate per box from Winter Haven to a number
of representative points in the area in which
the reduction will be effective. The rates shown
below include the surcharge of 1 cent per box
which was granted the railroads by the Inter-
state Commerce Commission when the carriers'
petition for a 15% increase last summer was
refused. The saving per box to the various
points shown, also is indicated.
(Continued on Page Two)


bI






FLORIDA CLEARING %| HOUSE NEWS


Committee of Fifty Department


"Say It With Tangerines"

We Did
"What are you going to do with your tange-
rines?" is a common question these days
among growers who note with concern the low
market prices and look with perplexity on trees
laden to the breaking point with red, ripe,
juicy fruit that ought to be finding a ready
market at profitable prices.
Florida produces no finer citrus fruit than
the tangerine (when fully ripened); beautiful
in color (when fully ripened); sweet, yet
springhtly in flavor (when fully ripened); peels
easily and divides readily (when fully ripen-
ed); a fruit for a king (when fully ripened).
Then why is there difficulty in selling it profit-
ably when we have a monopoly on tangerines?
There are three major reasons why the tange-
rine market is in its present condition, and in
order of importance they are:
THREE REASONS
1. Early shipment of immature fruit.
2. Uncontrolled distribution.
3. No advertising.
The first of these is the most important and
until we cease the shipment of unripe tange-
rines early in the season, control of distribu-
tion and advertising are worthless.
The 7 to 1 standard of maturity for tange-
rines is too low and should be raised without
protest at the next session of the legislature.
The advocates of the present low maturity
standard for tangerines claimed that because
the tangerine season was naturally short we
must start shipment as early in the season as
possible and so the 7 to 1.
So this season we shipped at 7 to 1. Was the
fruit fit to eat? Certainly not. If you doubt
this the best answer is the fact that packing
house employees did not eat them then.
EXPENSIVE ECONOMY
The testing period for tangerines ends Nov.
15; it should continue until Dec. 15. Advo-
cates of the Nov. 15 ending lament the added
cost of inspection if it is continued another
month and shed tears over the 2 c per box it
would cost the poor grower. Is it not worth
2 %c per box to protect the reputation of our
tangerines, especially when an expenditure of
2%c would mean higher market returns?
November 15 this year everyone realized
that the testing period was ending too soon;
our tangerines were later than usual and so a
gentleman's agreement was made to destroy all
that failed to meet the 7 to 1 requirements
after the law went out of effect Nov. 15. There
are some in the industry who are gentlemen
and some who are not. The writer personally
knows of tangerines packed and shipped that
tested 5.02. If 7 be dangerously low, how did
the consumer enjoy the tangerines at 5.02
that he bought and paid good money for?
In view of these facts is there any wonder
that the tangerine demand collapsed and prices
flopped below actual costs?
Raise the standard and extend the testing
period.
a--.._


Then control distribution so that the various
cities of the country may have their prorata
share of the delicious (when fully ripened)
fruit.
PLENTY OF MARKETS
The survey made this summer showing a con-
sumption of tangerines per thousand of popu-
lation varying from one-tenth of a box in Sara-
nac Lake, N. Y. to 86 boxes in Buffalo, N. Y.
clearly proved that with proper distribution
and sales promotion a large volume of tange-
rines (fully ripened) could be profitably sold.
Then and not until then-advertising.
We note that the Clearing House has justly
or unjustly been publicly blamed for not ad-
vertising tangerines. We leave it to you to de-
cide whether advertising is wise now. Every
box of tangerines that leaves the state this sea-
son is paying from fifty cents to a dollar for
advertising. We "said it with (immature) tan-
gerines."
Harmful advertising shipped by the carload;
fruit that set the teeth on edge and convinced
the purchaser that he had been gyped and for
self protection should buy no more; carloads of
damaging advertising costly and effectively
destructive to demand and prices; advertising
that no eleventh hour expenditure of growers'
needed dimes in printers' ink will ever over-
come.
We must first have a product fit to sell-sec-
ond effectively controlled distribution, then
advertising and dealer service, and tangerines
will again be a joy to both consumer and pro-
ducer.
Signed-EDUCATIONAL COMMITTEE,
COMMITTEE OF FIFTY.



Freight Rate To Southeast

Is Cut
(Continued from Page One)

The old and new rates and the saving, are as
follows:


From
Winter Haven
To:
GEORGIA
Albany ................
Atlanta................
Valdosta...............
Brunswick............
Savannah..............
Augusta................
S. CAROLINA
Florence...............
Charleston............
N. CAROLINA
Fayetteville..........
W ilson..................
Rocky Mount........
Raleigh...............
Durham...........
Greensboro...........
Winston-Salem.....
Asheville-----............
TENNESSEE
Knoxville.............
Chattanooga.........
ALABAMA
Birmingham.........
Montgomery.........
M obile...................


Present
Rate
Per Box

$.532
.622
.46
.487
.514
.595
.64
.586
.685
.73
.73
.712
.712
.712
.712
.694
.73
.694
.676
.622
.676


New Rate
Per Box

$.406
.469
.352
.37
.388
.451

.487
.442
.514
.55
.55
.541
.541
.541
.541
.523
.55
.523
.514
.469
.514


Saving
Per Box

$.126
.153
.108
.117
.126
.144

.153
.144
.171
.18
.18
.171
.171
.171
.171
.171

.18
.171
.162
.153
.162


Watch Closely For Aphids

And Avoid Big Spray Bill
By J. R. WATSON, Entomologist,
State Experiment Station
(Broadcast Over WRUF)
The green citrus aphid is estimated to have
done $4,000,000 worth of damage in the spring
of 1924, and it was nearly as destructive in the
spring of 1925. Since then it has not been so
troublesome. This comparative scarcity of
aphids is due entirely to the climatic conditions
combined with wise precautions on the part of
the growers. Should we have another winter
like the winters of 1923-24 and 1924-25, there
is every probability that the aphids would again
become destructive, unless growers take intel-
ligent means to combat them. These aphids are
very scarce at the present time, but there are a
few about, and should conditions be favorable
for their development during the winter they
are entirely capable of building up a destruc-
tive infestation before blooming time.
To realize the potentialities of this aphid, it
is only necessary to know that when the
weather is warm and there is plenty of food,
that each aphid produces an average of six
young a day and that they begin to breed when
only six days old. If you will use your pencil
you will find that a single aphid could have
186,000,000 descendants by the middle of
February.
CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE
In many ways conditions are becoming fav-
orable for a heavy infestation of aphids this
Coming winter. The long fall drought has made
the trees very dormant. In many sections of
the citrus belt this drought has been broken,
and if the weather should continue warm, it
is liable to produce more or less tender growth
on citrus and the aphids must have tender
growth for development. It is because the win-
ter of 1923-24 was warm and moist that aphids
were able to multiply in large numbers.
January apparently is the critical month for
determining whether or not we will have a
heavy infestation of aphids in the spring. If
the month of January is warm, with an aver-
age temperature of 60 degrees or above, and
enough moisture in the ground to start the
growth on citrus, we are apt to have an infes-
tation of aphids in the spring, particularly if
there is an absence of heavy dashing rains dur-
ing the winter. Such rains are always very
destructive of aphids. There has been very lit-
(Continued on Page Four)




IRRIGATION

COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
Large Stocks Pumps, Pipe and Other
Materials for immediate delivery.

The Cameron & Barkley Co.
TAMPA, FLA.


Pave


Page 2


January 10, 1932




FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


THE GOOD OLD DOLLAR.

q odh a dola again


)Ae )endi f/The )Ume,

IS TO THRIFT OF COURSE,

3utjiln tiame.to peaimen /


ACUT in production cost .is always desir-
able---and especially now, since most
everyone has a readjusted regard for the value
of a dollar. However, in cutting citrus produc-
tion cost to a minimum, care should be taken
not to injure your present and future crops by
practicing economy that is too rigid.
The present practice in Florida of applying
three liberal applications of well-balanced fer-
tilizer in groves each year is not the result of
a hasty decision. It is the result of years of
untiring effort. The practice has brought growers
regular crops of quality fruit and at the same
time has paved the way to future productivity.
With all the desire for short cuts there is
no substitute for a definitely proportioned, well-
balanced application of Fertilizer made at the


We own and operate
BRANCH OFFICES and
WAREHOUSES
at
MIAMI
ORLANDO
WINTER GARDEN
SANFORD
WINTER HAVEN
FORT MYERS
BRADENTON
SARASOTA
LAKE WALES


and Distributing
Warehouses through-
out the State


time of the spring growth to increase vigor and
to set the bloom. This, likewise, applies to the
early summer application to promote Further
growth for Future bearing surface and to stimu-
late quality fruit. The third application being
made in the fall to strengthen the tree for win-
ter and provide a reserve supply of spring food.


8


o


Your citrus trees, like all plants,
r r livinn *tinne Th*r rail*


Your citrus grove is a permanent investment plenty of good nourishing food,
and year in and year out your trees require just like humans. And similarly,
e wd alictios of p they thrive best on "balanced
these well-balanced applications of plant-food diet." That's why so many grow-
The trend of the times is to thrift, of course, ers use the following Ideal Brands
for the spring application:
but the changing economic condition does not
change the ratio of plant-food required by your W. & T.'s Special Mixture No. 1
trees. Today, you cannot afford to experiment, Original Ideal Fertilizer
tres. odI, deal High Grade Fruiter
The good old dollar must do a dollar's worth Ideal Tree Grower
of work if it is to produce the quality of fruit Our complete list of Ideal Brands
that will command steady profits. That's why consists of many well-balanced
fs n i e e A ertilizers made especially to meet
so many growers in Florida have used IDEAL the needs of citrus and vegetable
FERTILIZERS for the last 39 years and will growers under different con-
editions. The list will be mailed
continue to do so. Consult our representative, promptly upon request.



I DEAL >^ffh
WILSON & TOOMER FERTILIZER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA


January 10, 1932


Page 3






Pere it


FL

CLEAR



CLEARII
Co-ordinating mem
of distribution.
Controlling supplies
Disseminating mar
Standardizing grad
section service.
Increasing consum
licity.
Securing best f
services.
Developing mutual
standing among grow
Maintaining repres
of common welfare.

E. C. AURIN .
J. C. CHASE
O. F. GARDNER
W. J. HOWEY
L. P. KIRKLAND
J. H. LETTON
E. C. McLEAN
M. 0. OVERSTREET
S. J. SLIGH .
A. M. TILDEN
A. R. TRAFFORD .
E. H. WILLIAMS
R. B. WOOLFOLK


ORIDA

ING HOUSE
.I I r\ Il f


FLORIDA CLEARINGi HOUSE NEWS

and the tendency to regard it as a lux-
ury-must be overcome before our

E grapefruit is as profitable a crop as it
should be.


L W 0 At first thought, establishing the
grapefruit as a common article of food
NG HOUSE PURPOSES appears to be an insuperable task. But
bers' activities for orderely control
is it? Let us look at our markets and
es at key markets.
keting information, examine their possibilities. Leaving the
de and pack through impartial in-
er demand by advertising and pub- territory west of the Mississippi river
eight rates and transportation to OUr competitors, Texas, California
I interests of, and better under- and Arizona, we find we have a popu-
vers and shippers.
entaton of industry in al matters lation in the cities east of the big river
in excess of 63,000,000 persons. All of
DIRECTORS the Florida grapefruit shipped east of
. . ... Ft. Ogden the river last season could have been
. . . Winter Park
. . . Lake Placid consumed by these 63,000,000 persons
. . Howey in the Hills at a per capital consumption of only
. . . . Auburndale
. . . Valrico ten fruits during the seven months of
Paletto shipping.


r an
S. Orlando
SWinter Haven
. Cocoa
Crescent City
Orlando


:t


Finding the Grapefrui

Consumer


A certain Florida citrus grower re-
cently remarked more or less jokingly
that "it's too bad California doesn't
produce more grapefruit; if she did,
the advertising that would be done
would be a big help to Florida grape-
fruit growers."
Despite the humorous intent behind
the remark, there may be some truth
in it. It is freely admitted that the
millions of dollars which California
has spent in advertising oranges have
been of tremendous help to Florida in
maintaining a fair-to-good market on
her oranges. Fortunately for Florida,
our oranges rival and exceed in flavor
and juice the product from California.
With the consumer demand for or-
anges increased through the advertis-
ing done by the Pacific Coast growers,
it has been comparatively easy for
Florida to "cash in" with her own or-
anges. And so it may be said with ac-
curacy, that California's orange adver-
tising has helped sell Florida oranges.
But the grapefruit is another story.
There has been very little money spent
in advertising grapefruit by any of the
grapefruit-producing sections of the
country. The fruit, generally speaking,
is unknown to the great buying public
and, many of those who do know of it,
it is regarded as something of a luxury.
These two phases-its unfamiliarity


Take another approach: There are
estimated to be 18,400 leading restau-
rants east of the Mississippi. Accord-
ing to statistics, one out of every four
persons living in towns or cities, eats
at least one meal a day in a restaurant.
One-fourth of our 63,000,000 then, or
15,000,000 persons, could consume our
grapefruit crop if they ordered only
five grapefruits per month, or, let us
say, half a grapefruit every third day!

Again, according to statistics that
seem to be reliable, there are 1,700,885
persons east of the Mississippi reputed
to be worth $5,000 or more. (To be able
to liquidate for $5,000, one's income
probably would have to be close to the
same figure). The families alone of
these 1,700,885 persons of varying de-
grees of wealth, could consume our
grapefruit crop if 48 fruits, or about
one box, was purchased every month
for the seven months for the family.
And indeed, isn't it this particular class
of people to. whom we have been look-
ing to consume our grapefruit? As a
substitute for adequate advertising we
have come to depend upon the wealth-
ier individuals to provide us with a
grapefruit market.

Since we know that our fruit HAS
been consumed, there is but one prob-
lem remaining. This is to so stimulate
the demand that the price for the fruit
will be increased to the fair profit
point. That is Florida's objective, and
until it is reached we cannot expect
better than we are receiving.
Advertising our grapefruit so as to
stimulate consumer-demand appears
to be the only solution!


January 10, 1932


Watch Closely For Aphids

And Avoid Big Spray Bill
(Continued from Page Two)
tie growth on the trees during the winter; the
trees have been dormant, and the aphids have
been starved out.
It is nearly always the young trees which
carry aphids through the winter; these and oc-
casionally water sprouts on an old tree, which
should be cut off. As you go among your young
trees this winter watch carefully for aphids.
Wherever you see a colony treat it as you
would a rattlesnake. Keep your grove free of
aphids during the next six or eight weeks and
you will not have to go to the heavy expense
of combatting them when the big flush of
growth starts in late February or March.
PINCH OFF BRANCHES
At this time of the year probably all that is
necessary to prevent an outbreak will be to
pinch off any infested branch that may be
found on the young trees. Although the aphids-
themselves are small and rather inconspicuous,
the effects on the tree are rather easily seen,
i. e., the curled leaves. Whenever the grower
first sees the young leaves commence to curl,
he should look for aphids. Another indication
of the presence of aphids in a tree is the pres-
ence of large numbers of much excited ants.
Ants are fond of honey dew which aphids give
off and will quickly find a colony on a tree.
These excited ants running up and down a
tree are often more conspicuous than the
aphids. If later in the season aphids become
too abundant on the young trees for this pinch-
ing process, go through the grove with a bucket
containing a little insecticide such as a strong
nicotine solution or a pyrethrum compound,
and dip every infected branch into this insec-
ticide. At this time of the year practically all
new growth will be out on the end of the
branches, which can be easily bent over into a
bucket. Swish them around in this bucket for
a second and you can be sure that the aphids
will all be killed.


Citrus Experts To Judge

Orange Festival Exhibits
Distinguished agricultural instructors and
leaders of Florida will comprise the two com-
mittees named thus far to judge exhibits at the
Florida Orange Festival, to be held in Winter
Haven January 26 to 30, inclusive. Manager
J. B. Guthrie has announced that the judges
of the citrus exhibits include Prof. H. Harold
Hume, assistant director of research of the
Agricultural Experiment Station, Gainesville;
Dr. A. F. Camp, horticulturist at the State Ex-
periment Station, and Dr. H. S. Wolfe, assist-
ant horticulturist, in charge of the sub-tropical
division of the State Experiment Station, all of
Gainesville.
TO PICTURE CITRUS INDUSTRY
The festival, while having commercial ex-
hibits, entertainment features and various
other attractions, is primarily a citrus exposi-
tion, its sole purpose being to emphasize the
importance of the citrus industry to Florida
and to educate its thousands of visitors in the
growing, shipping and marketing of oranges,
grapefruit and tangerines.
(Continued on Page Six)


P-e 4


E





FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


Weekly Citrus Summary

(By A. M. Pratt, Manager, Florida Citrus
Growers Clearing House Association)
(Week Ending January 9, 1932)


WEEKLY
CARLOT INDEX ANALYSIS


Week
Ending
Jan. 9,'32
Fla. Org's Shpd..... 1050
Total.................... 7152
Fla. Gft. Shpd....... 600
Total...............----..... 6755
Fla. Tang. Shpd... 225
Total-----------.................... 1603
Fla. Mixed Shpd... 450
Total ......----.... 4220
Texas Gft. Shpd... 175
Total.................... 1989
Cal. Org's Shpd..... 950


Week
Ending
Jan. 2,'32
519
6102
465
6155
317
1378
324
3770
104
1814
457


Week
Ending
Jan.9,'31
750
10720
624
8290
237
1949
543
6024
155
1458
556


Fla. Org's Auc....... 439 252 579
Average-----................ $3.25 $3.05 $2.70
,Fla: Gft. Auc........- 337 203' 378-
Average.--.--..... $2.25 $2.30 $2.55
Fla. Tang. Auc..... 278 109 264
Average................ $2.80 $3.60 $3.00
Cal. Org's Auc....... 385 294 297
Average----................ $2.75 $2.95 $3.00

FIRST FIVE DAYS' SHIPMENTS
AND SALES
ORANGES No 1 ORANGES No. 2
Week End. Shpd. Sld. Av. Shpd. Sld. Av.
Jan. 2...... 44 9 $2.33 31 6 $1.95
Jan. 9...... 199 32 $2.29 123 31 $2.09
Dif.......+155 +23 -.04 +92 +25 +.14

GFT. No. 1 GFT. No. 2
Week End. Shpd. Sid. Av. Shpd. Sld. Av.
Jan. 2...... 66 17 $1.40 31 6 $1.28
Jan. 9...... 90 13 $1.40 60 15 $1.30
Dif......... +24 -4 -+29 +9 +.02

COMPARATIVE SHIPMENTS


Week
Ending
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

Week
Ending
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.


Florida Oranges
Last 1929- 1928-
Year 30 29
2........1056 923 1312 1
9........ 750 898 1133 ]
16........ 824 776 1134
California Oranges
Last
S Year 1930 1929
2........ 732 722 1261
9........ 556 635 1657
16 ...--. 911 314 1080

Florida Grapefruit


Week Last 1929- 1928-
Ending Year 30 29
Jan. 2........ 708 400 693
Jan. 9........ 624 522 588
Jan. 16........ 607 462 655
Florida Mixed
Week Last 1929- 1928- 1
Ending Year 30 29
Jan. 2........ 630 358 358
Jan. 9........ 543 502 399
Jan. 16........ 564 414 357
Florida Tangerines
Week Last
Ending Year
Jan. 2...................... 306
Jan. 9...................... 237
Jan. 16...................... 170


1927-
28
L029
L054
378


1926-
27
1222
998
688


1928 1927
501 1012
990 883
710 1089


1927-
28
602
446
249


1927-
28
272
297
152


1926-
27
572
431
592


1926-
27
227
194
145


1929-
30
103
67
47


ORANGE SHIPMENTS TOO HEAVY
Including proper proportion of mixed, this
'week's totals will show about 1280 oranges,
700 grapefruit and 340 tangerines. This is
about 200 cars over the normal movement,


based on our estimated crop of oranges, as
well as 200 cars over shipments'of last year.
The estimated movement from our shippers
for next week (ending Jan. 16) indicates prac-
tically the same number of cars of oranges
and an increase in grapefruit with a slight
increase in tangerines. Too few oranges are
selling f. o. b. Too many cars will be forced
into auction next week. A year ago next week
Florida oranges averaged $2.65 delivered, the
lowest week in the entire season's records. Cal-
ifornia's larger sizes are bound to create bet-
ter demand for our smaller sizes later. Cali-
fornia's general estimate on navels has been
increased on account of the larger sizes now in-
dicated. Central California sizes have been
running much smaller so the trade has not be-
gun to feel the effect of Southern California's
larger sizes. Our smaller sizes a few weeks
hence should, therefore, be coming into their
own and not selling at the discount they are
today. We urge that this phase of the relative
size question be considered carefully before
rushing your picking of oranges next week.

NEXT WEEK'S COMPARISON
On account of the heavy estimates turned in
by our shippers and reports we are getting
elsewhere of tendencies next week, we don't
feel warranted in estimating next week's
straight movement at less than 950 cars oranges,
compared with 1050 this week. You will notice
this estimate is 125 cars more than was ship-
ped a year ago. It will mean a total orange
movement, including proper proportion of the
mixed, of about 1200 cars, against a normal
of 868 cars or 50% heavier than it should be.
With the dropping of oranges having ceased,
we cannot see any sense in our shippers moving
as heavily as they are planning on this coming
week, disappointing their growers severely
over what they are anticipating and taking far
less money than will be possible later. Why
not keep out of this congestion and show proper
foresight?
GRAPEFRUIT
The way the grapefruit situation is being
handled would seem to indicate that it is down
to the salvage basis. In a salvaging effort, most
certainly every precaution should be used to
avoid picking and shipping that will add to the
loss of the grower instead of helping reduce
that loss. Low grade grapefruit and small
sizes have been in the red ink class for some
time. It may be true, as some say, that the
only thing to do is to ship what we can that
has every chance of getting something back to
the growers over cost of picking, packing and
marketing in the hopes that the marsh seedless
grapefruit will have a market more to itself
and get better prices. Surely every one realizes
the necessity of doing everything possible to
make f. o. b. sales and to decrease the amount
of grapefruit at auction.

TANGERINES
The average on tangerines has shown a
steady decline this week, the five days' auctions
showing respectively as follows: $3.05, $2.90,
$2.65, $2.45 and $2.40, ending Friday. This
indicates tangerines are more on the salvaging
basis than grapefruit, with plenty of red ink
coming on this so-called salvaging effort. In-
cluding proper proportion of mixed, 2130 cars
of tangerines have been shipped to the week


ending Jan. 2. Adding in this week's shipments
of 340 cars makes 2470 cars. One thousand
two hundred sixty-seven cars of tangerines
have been sold this year at the various auc-
tions, the season's average being $3.16 deliv-
ered. Through this same week a year ago Flor-
ida had sold 1606 cars of tangerines at auc-
tion at a general average of $3.29 delivered.
59 % of our tangerines this year to date
have been auctioned as compared with 57 % %
to the same date last year. If our estimate of
4000 cars of tangerines is correct for this sea-
son, Florida has left about 1500 cars of tange-
rines to move as compared with 2000 cars un-
shipped at this time last year.

CALIFORNIA'S LOW AUCTION PRICES

California's low average of $2.75 at auc-
tion in contrast with our average of $3.25 is
quite unusual. An analysis of the California
brands sold at auction indicates that Tulare
County brands have been selling for much less
than Southern California brands. With Tulare
County being through shipping navels (or prac-
tically so), the relative position of California
to Florida will doubtless become more normal,
especially with Southern California sizes being
much more desirable than Central. Central
California has recently been salvaging oranges
that went through mighty cold weather. Some
brands are showing up in Southern California
that are not regular and that cover "doubtful"
fruit. The fact that California is planning on
shipping this coming week 900 cars would seem
to indicate that they have confidence that they
have eliminated to a great extent the decay
and other off conditions which have pulled
down their averages this week.

OUR WIRED WARNING

So that our shippers Saturday afternoon
could be warned in time of the heavy shipments
indicated in oranges for the coming week, we
wired you all as follows:
"Our shippers estimate moving next week
as many oranges as this week which indi-
cates 1200 cars from state, including mixed
properly proportioned. 1200 oranges again
next week would be fifty percent over nor-
mal, 200 more than last year. You are fore-
warned and responsibility is yours."
This week's high auction averages as usual
are tempting growers and shippers to move
heavier than is wise. It will be too late to move
so freely next week; and much of this week's
shipments will probably be selling next week
at auction averages considerably below this
week, as this week's movement has been heavy.
Remember we reaped the benefit at auction
this week of last week's light movement of only
688 cars oranges, including classified mixed.
We can't double that amount for two weeks in
succession and expect anything like the same
prices.



Citrus Grove
Accountants and Income
Tax Specialists
Certified Public Accountant

A. Gilbert Lester & Co.
Taylor Building
WINTER HAVEN, FLA.


January 10, 1932


Page 5





FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


Another Estimate Of Crop

Is Requested From Growers


Convinced that everything possible should be
done to determine accurately the amount of
fruit remaining in the state, the Clearing House
has just undertaken to obtain estimates from
some ten thousand growers. A letter calling
the attention of the growers to the necessity
for an accurate re-estimate were mailed out by
the Clearing House this week. Enclosed with.
the letter is a blank form on which the grower
is asked to show by varieties the amount of
fruit he shipped last season, the amount picked
so far this season, and an estimate as to what
remains unpicked.
RETURN ESTIMATE AT ONCE
Every grower receiving this letter and form
is urged to immediately fill in the blank and re-
turn it to the Clearing House. The estimate
is being asked from all growers regardless of
their marketing affiliation and regardless of
whether or not they are members of the Clear-
ing House. The drought and resulting loss by
droppage, as well as the failure of the fruit to
size normally, has made it unusually difficult
this season to arrive at a dependable estimate.
The figures as sent in by the individual grow-
ers will, of course, be kept confidential, al-


Florida Citrus Growers Clearing House Ass'n.,
Winter Haven, Florida.


though the total figures from all growers will
be made public as quick as they can be com-
piled. The estimates as turned in will be ap-
plied by counties to the figures for the counties
covering last season's shipments. This will in-
dicate the percentage of decrease (or increase
if there be such) for this season. The Clearing
House plans to consult with all marketing
agencies in the state and check as accurately
as possible the actual crop conditions in order
that every cent possible may be realized by all
growers at this time.
"DON'T DEPEND ON GEORGE"
In case you lose the blank form mailed to
you, the form printed herewith may be filled
out and mailed in to the Clearing House at
Winter Haven. Every grower in the state by
sending in this estimate will be helping himself
as well as every other citrus grower. Do not
depend on the other fellow to send in his esti-
mate, but do it yourself. The more estimates
that are received the more accurate will be the
figures that will be made available to the state
and the more available the figures are the more
efficiently the crop can be handled so as to
realize a maximum profit.

January....................................1932


I am glad to co-operate with other Florida growers in passing to you in confidence the fol-
lowing figures on my citrus crops of last season and this.
In the left hand column I am showing the number of boxes picked, by varieties, from
my property during the previous season 1930-31. In the middle column I am showing what I
have picked so far this season. In the right hand column I am giving you my estimate of what
I have left unpicked. These figures cover only those groves that I had last season as well as
this.


Picked Last Season
(No. of Boxes)


Picked This Season
(No. of Boxes)


Estimated Unpicked
(No. of Boxes)


Mid-Season Oranges ..........................-----
Valencia Oranges ........................ .---
Regular Grapefruit .. ........................
Marsh Seedless Grapefruit --.........-- ........... ----
Tangerines . ........

Signed..................------ ......................--------------- -- -------........ . Grower
Grove Location
Vicinity of.--- ----....................... .................................-.... -Town

...........................---------------------....-- -------------------........County


Citrus Experts To Judge

Orange Festival Exhibits
(Continued from Page Four)
In the 1932 festival the two main exhibition
halls, 250 feet in length, will be devoted to cit-
rus exhibits in which various organizations
will be represented by extensive booth space.
There also will be exhibits of citrus by-products
and the whole is designed to present a display
of citrus that will serve as a big advertisement
for the industry. There will be approximately
100 citrus booths.
There will be three classifications of citrus
booths to compete for prizes and three prizes
will be awarded in each class. The classes are
arranged according to the volume of shipments
of the competing houses, those having an av-


erage of over 200,000 boxes a year for three
years being in class one, those having an aver-
age between 100,000 and 200,000 boxes an-
nually for three years in class two, and those
under 100,000 boxes in class three. First prize
winners in each class will be judged again for
the grand prize. Fruit from the grade prize
booth again will be sent the President at Wash-
ington during the festival. A packing contest
also will be held, as has been the custom for
some years, and three prizes will be awarded
both men and women.
GROWERS TO HOLD MEETING
Of chief interest to citrus growers will be
the Growers' Day program on Friday, January
29, when the fifth annual meeting of growers
will be held in the Williamson Theatre, morn-
ing and afternoon, with outstanding leaders of
the industry as speakers. The Clearing House


will be represented at this meeting for it was
at the Orange Festival in 1928 that a similar
program started the movement which led to
the organization that year of the Clearing
House.
Judges for the county agents citrus exhibits
will be H. G. Clayton, of the State Extension
Service, and Harold Mowry, assistant horticul-
turist, both of Gainesville, and Alfred War-
ren, of Fort Pierce. Mr. Warren was for some
years county agent of St. Lucie County and
has the distinction of having prepared more
citrus exhibits than any other man in the state.
The first committee named will judge not
only the packing house and shipping organiza-
tion exhibits but also the by-products exhibits.
The former will be in three classifications, ar-
ranged according to the volume of fruit ship-
ped from the houses over a three-year period.
I. -i


in the Hands of



The Dealer





An Indian River Packer whose brand
is a favorite in the New York and Boston
auctions says that "the important ele-
ment in the use of Brogdex is that it
provides protection to the dealer."
This packer considers dealer satisfac-
tion as the paramount issue and disre-
gards all other benefits that accrue, his
only concern being that the dealer will
get fruit that has better appearance and
longer keeping time.
The favorable market attitude toward
Brogdex has come about because dealers
have found that Brogdexed fruit will stay
sound, plump, fresh and live looking long
enough to permit of sale before any evi-
dence of decay or shrinkage shows up.
The average price paid for Brogdexed
fruit in the various auctions reflects deal-
er preference and well justifies the small
service charge for the treatment.
Pack your fruit the Brogdex way and
identify it with the familiar Brogdex
trade mark-it is the recognized sign of
a better product.




Florida Brogdex

Distributors, Inc.
B. C. SKINNER, Pres.
Dunedin, Florida.


Page 6


January 10, 1932





January 10, 1932

Florida Orange Continues


FL


To Lead California Prices
Florida continues to beat California on or-
anges, prices received in the auction markets
show. During last week the differences in the
auction prices ranged from 35c to 50c a box
in favor of Florida. When it is considered that
production costs for California greatly exceed
those in Florida the differential in favor of the
Florida orange grower becomes even greater.
Florida's premium becomes even more out-
standing in view of the differential on orange
sizes; Florida's oranges are running more heav-
ily to the small off sizes than is the case with
California, yet our fruit continues to bring
more than that paid the California grower.
The following table shows a regular standard
462-box load of California reduced to a 360-
box load making their sizes comparable with
ours. It will be noted that the.average Florida
car contains 167 boxes of 250s and smaller,
whereas the Southern California navels aver-
aged only 59 boxes of 250s and smaller. In
short, the average California car had nearly


ORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS
108 boxes less of the small off sizes to the car
than was the case for Florida. Also note that
California has only 113 of the 216s and smaller
compared to 242 of the 216s and smaller for
Florida, or less than half as many small sizes
that are at present selling at a discount at auc-
tion.
NUMBER BOXES AVERAGE QAR


SIZES CENT. CAL. SOU. CAL.
80s 1 3
100s 9 15
126s 30 43
150s 50 66
176s 57 70
200s 54 50
216s 67 54
252s 43 30
288s 32 21
344s 16 7
392s 1 1


FLORIDA

9
22
42
45
75
83
58
26

360


Decay apparently is entering as a factor into
the California price situation. Reports from
some of the markets indicate that California is
having more or less trouble with decay al-
though some of the factors pulling down their
price level are off-flavor and occasionally more
concrete evidence of frost damage.


Page 7




"Rainy Day"


Foresight



SAVING during a"rainy day"
is as important as saving for a
rainy day. This is particularly
true in regard to our citrus
plantings.


TAKING advantage of exist-
ing conditions is true foresight.
If you have been tempted to
postpone planting new acre-
age, it will pay you to consider
these facts:

Grove labor expense
is a third lower. Raw
citrus land is a fourth
of what it was. The
cost of trees has been
cut practically in half.


THIS combination of circum-
stances may never be repeated.
With the return of normal times
these expenses will regain their
former level, and your present
opportunity will be gone.


THE high quality and low cost
of GLEN GROWN TREES will
enable you to benefit by exist-
ing conditions. Plant now and
you plant economically!







0aint Wavy

WY/urwries O0.

WINTER HAVEN
TAMPA ORLANDO


The Florida Orange Festival

to be held in Winter Haven on January
26-27-28-29-30, 1932, will again offer
a wonderful exhibition of Oranges and
Grapefruit and the many allied indus-
tries .... a beautiful display of color,
lights and golden fruit, arranged with
full expression to the various educa-
tional and commercial features.

January 26
SCHOOL DAY-devoted to the entertainment and education of
students who will be admitted free.

January 27
G OVERNOR'S DAY-reception to the Honorable Doyle E. Carl-
ton, Governor of Florida, and the official inspection of exhibits.

January 28
ALL-STATES AND TOURIST DAY-third annual gathering of
Tourist and Tourist Club members throughout the state. Ohio-
Virginia wedding at 8 p. m.

January 29
GROWERS' DAY-fifth annual gathering of Florida Citrus Grow-
ers; special meetings morning and afternoon.

January 30
AMERICAN LEGION DAY-special concert by American Legion
Auxiliary Fife and Drum Corps.




Page 8



CRC


tell


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS



)PS


ATR


January 10, 193M


E VERY time you buy fertilizer do you
wonder whether you have bought
wisely-for your crops? Why not let
your crops tell you? Do this: Use Nitro-
phoska, Calcium Nitrate or Calurea for
one-half of your next application; use
another fertilizer for the other half.
Then your crops will show you which
fertilizers you should use. Crops tell the
Truth! Send now for complete informa-
tion. Just mail the coupon below. Syn-
thetic Nitrogen Products Corp., New
York, N. Y., and Plant City, Florida.
JACKSON GRAIN Co., TAMPA, FLORIDA


Eight Grades of Concentrated Complete Fertilizer. NITROPHOSKA (the.high-analysis complete fertilizer, made in eight different
grades to meet practically every ratio requirement) feeds the crop from start to finish. It is an even-fecding fertilizer-BOTH quicl-
acting and long-lasting.


18.2% Ammonia. CALCIUM NITRATE (nitrate nitrogen combined with lime) is quick-acting and supplies the soluble lime so
necessary to citrus and other crops-even in soils already rich in lime.


41% Ammonia. CALUREA (Calcium Nitrate combined with Urea) is a crop booster that supplies both quick-acting and long-last-
ing nitrogen in one material.
Mail This Coupon Now
--------------------------------------------------------------
JACKSON GRAIN Co., Tampa, Florida, Dept. E: Please send me your free booklet "Crops Tell the Truth." This does not obligate me in
any way. I grow.-........acres of citrus..........acres of truck crops. Name..................................... ......... P. ......................----- State..




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