Title: Florida clearing house news ..
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086639/00038
 Material Information
Title: Florida clearing house news ..
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Growers' Clearing House Association
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Winter Haven Fla
Publication Date: April 25, 1930
Frequency: semimonthly (irregular)
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruits -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- Sept. 1928-
General Note: "Official publication of the Florida citrus growers clearing house association."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086639
Volume ID: VID00038
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01306261
lccn - 30006589

Full Text
U. S. Dept. of
Washingtoa, D.
* r .. . . .


Ai .;l
Arig.,
C.


FLORIDA


Sec. 435%, P. L. & R.
U. S. Postage
Ic. Paid
Winter Haven, Fla.
Permit No. 11


Representing more than 10,000
Growers of Oranges and GrapeFruit
oHeadquarters: WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA


HOUSE

"l\ fcicial Publication of the
FL RIDA CITRUS GROWERS
CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION


10 Cents a Copy lin s Volume 11
$2.00 a Year APRIL 25, 19360 "- -- Number 14



Committee of 50 Stands Behind Clearing House Fundamentals


Crop of 14,000,000

Boxes Is Florida's

Total of Past Year

Members' Handling of Stor-
age Problem Brings Praise
From State

To date government records show
16,462 cars of oranges, 13,772 cars
grapefruit, 8,068 cars mixed and
817 cars tangerines, making a total
of 39,126 cars. To these figures
would have to be added about 206
cars still in the state in cold storage,
,making 39,332 cars.
Our carlot shipments are just
about an even 10,000 cars short of
last year's shipments-in oranges at
this time and 4,000 cars short of
last year's shipments in grapefruit,
with our mixed being about 400 cars
more.
In round figures our crop in boxes
could be stated as follows:
6,000,000 oranges
5,000,000 grapefruit
3,000,000 mixed
Now assuming that the mixed are
two-thilrds Loranges and. one-third
grapefruit that would make:
8,000,000 oranges
6,000,000 grapefruit
as our crop which was shipped in
carlot quantities this season, includ-
ing those shipments which went by
boat.
The government carlot figures ex-
tended by 360 boxes gives us the
following:
SCars Boxes
anges ....-----.. 16,462 5,926,320
Grapefruit ....-- 13,779 4,960,440
Mixed ------- 8,068 2,904,480
Tangerines --.... 817 294,120
Total .------- 39,126 14,085,360
Very Close to Marks Estimate
H. A. Marks' estimate of Decem-
ber 19, 1929, was for 8,500,000
boxes of oranges, 5,500,000 grape-
fruit or total of 14,000,000 boxes.
This estimate is almost exactly what
the crop turned out. Mr. Marks said
(Continued on Page Two)


Asks That Operating Retain Be

Fixed And That Present Manager

Be Continued For Coming Season

Emphatic and enthusiastic endorsement of the operating
fundamentals of the Clearing House was expressed by the
Committee of Fifty at its monthly meeting held in DeLand
April 17. The endorsement included the recommendation
that the Association's program establishing uniform grade
and pack of Florida citrus be maintained as it has in the past
and that the retain to meet general Clearing House expenses
for the coming season be fixed immediately by the Board of
Directors. The question of advertising, the Committee's res-
olution requested, should be left to a joint committee of the
Board, Committee of Fifty and
Operating Committee. The resolu- vertising plans and retain so as to
tion was drawn up at the morning be acted on by the Board not
meeting of the Executive Commit- later than July 15."
tee and was passed unanimously.
The resolution reads as follows: Laud Progress Made


"RESOLVED, that due to some
differences in opinion as to what
the Clearing House retain should
be the coming year, it is our re-
commendation to the Board that
they immediately fix as the gen-
eral Clearing House retain for the
coming season a per box charge
adequate to meet the general
operating expenses, reserving the
right of the Board to levy such
other and further retain for ad-
vertising as later on seems neces-
sary.
"It is believed that such action
on the part of the Board will be
agreeable to all Clearing House
members, and 'settle differences
which at present are disturbing to
our progress as an organization.
"Wi, however, urge that there
be continued as heretofore, in-
spection having to do with the
maintenance of a standard and
uniform grade and pack.
"We further recommend that
the general question of advertis-
ing be left to a joint committee
consisting of three members of
the Operating Committee and
three members of the Committee
of Fifty to work in conjunction
with the Board of Directors, this
committee to bring in its findings
and recommendations as to ad-


Expressing their approval of the
progress made by the Clearing
House during the season just ended
and commendation for its successful
work in transforming what earlier
(due to quarantine restrictions) ap-
peared as a somewhat dismal mar-
keting outlook into a highly satis-
factory season, the committee also
went on record as-recommending to
the Board of Directors and the
Operating Committee that the pres-
ent management be retained next
year. The resolution reads as fol-
lows:
"Be it resolved that we, the
Committee of Fifty, having in
mind the splendid accomplish-
ments of the Clearing House dur-
ing this season, recommend that
the Board of Directors and Oper-
ating Committee retain the pres-
ent manager in office during the
coming year."
Following discussion of the fruit
fly quarantine situation, partici-
pated in by growers attending the
meeting, a resolution was passed
recommending that the United
States Congress make the necessary
appropriation to carry on inspection
and eradication work so that exist-
ing quarantine regulations may be
lifted before the next shipping sea-
(Continued on Page Two)


Per Cent of No. I's

For All Varieties

Has Shown Decline
Last'Year's Crop Ran 45% to
Top Grade While Average
Fell to 40% This Season.
By A. M. PRATT,
General Manager Florida Citrus Growers
Clearing House Association
Many growers have probably been
seriously disappointed this season in
their having such a small propor-
tion of first grade oranges, grape-
fruit or tangerines. The Clearing
House has analyzed its proportion
of grades this year as compared
with last and finds that our shipper-
members have this season packed
only 38% No. 1 oranges as com-
pared with 42% last season, a drop
of 4%. In grapefruit a similar drop
occurred, the grapefruit this season
showing 41% as compared with
45% last season. Tangerines show
the biggest drop of all, being only
59% No. Is this year as compared
with 68% a year ago or 9% drop.
More Mixed Cars
Though our crop this year was
only 61.5% of last year's crop, our
mixed cars show a greater number
of cars shipped than was shipped 'to
this time last season. That is, those
cars that went out with oranges and
grapefruit mixed in the same car,
including occasionally some tange-
rines, were grouped by the govern-
ment as "mixed citrus." Of this
mixed citrus the figures from our
shipper-members show that 40% of
such mixed cars was No. 1 grade as
compared with 49% a year ago.
Taking all of our varieties together
our records show that 40% graded
U.S. No. 1 as compared with 45%
last season.
You will remember that last sea-
son a lot of our fruit went by bulk.
For instance, 11% of our total or-
ange movement last season was
shipped in bulk. These bulk cars
were usually composed of all grades
of the 250s and smaller with quite
frequently the second grade of some
larger sizes as well as smaller, and
(Cont4tued on Page Three)


CLEARING


NEW





Page 2


COMMITTEE OF FIFTY
STANDS BEHIND CLEARING
HOUSE FUNDAMENTALS
(Continued from Page One)
son opens. The resolution, present-
ed by H. G. Murphy, reads as fol-
lows:
"In view of the fact that the
time of discovery, the last finding
together with the progress of
eradication of the Mediterranean
fruit fly is in fact now and has
been plainly before every branch
of the Department of Agriculture,
the State Plant Board, and the
forces in the eradication work;
and, that if it exists at all, its
spread is slow and not danger-
ous; and, since the rigid quaran-
tine regulations which have cost
the main industry of the state
many millions in money and have
given the citrus industry much
adverse publicity, and need for
which no longer exists, we, the
Committee of Fifty representing
ten thousaniid citr-us growers of
Florida pray and petition-
"FIRST That the United
States Congress make the neces-
sary appropriation to carry on in-
spection and eradication work to
the extent that quarantine regu-
lations as they now exist may be
entirely removed before our 1930-
1931 shipping season.
"SECOND-Should it appear
that certain quarantines should
exist, we pray and petition that
all citrus Florida be re-districted,
making zones one and two as
small as practicable thereby giv-
ing the widest possible access to
all markets of North America and
foreign countries without steri-
lization or processing.
"THIRD-We pray and peti-
tion and believe that Zone Three,
where the fly has never been
found, never existed, and is as
free from the fly or even a sus-
picion of it as any state in the
Union, should be allowed the free
use of all and any markets with-
out sterilization or processing.
"With thanks to the Department
of Agriculture, the Plant Board,
and any and all who have so ably
assisted us; and, firmly believing
that the above resolution will en-
danger no state, territory or coun-
try; and, that the success if not
the existence of the citrus indus-
try depends on these or similar
quarantine modifications, we of-
fer this resolution and ask that
copies be mailed under register-
ed regulations to Secretary Hyde,
Chairman O'Kane and the State
Plant Board."
Study Canning Industry
The Clearing House Board next
was requested to make a study of
the grapefruit canning industry
with the view to helping stabilize
this aspect of citrus marketing, the
request being made in a resolution
presented by John D. Clark as fol-
lows:
"RESOLVED, That this com-
mittee recognizes the importance
of the canning industry to the
state and of the obligation which


PaL-e


FLORIDA CLEARING

we as producers have to them in
furnishing them supplies of grape-
fruit under conditions and regula-
tions which will safeguard their
interests and future as well as our
own.
"To this end steps should be
taken immediately to stabilize
prices to canners for the future
not only to protect ourselves but
to protect those who have pio-
neered and are now engaged in
the canning business.
"We, therefore, urge the Board
to suggest and direct the Operat-
ing Committee to give immediate
thought to this important item,
and together with the Board es-
tablish and enforce a standard
and uniform code of rules and
prices for grapefruit in which de-
liberations the canners will be re-
quested to participate to the end
that a standard and stabilized raw
product be vouchsafed the can-
ners and a fair and uniform price
be guaranteed the producers the
coming year."
Seek Uniform Reports
A brief discussion relative to the
lack of uniformity in sales and
packing-out reports as sent to the
growers by the shipping agencies
generally resulted in the motion to
have the chair appoint a committee
to study this matter and report its
recommendations at the next meet-
ing.
Following the meeting various
members of the Committee of Fifty
expressed their appreciation of the
support which has been given the
Clearing House by the press of the
state, declaring that their body real-
izes it owes a duty to the business
interests of Florida and likewise
that it still has a duty to perform in
carrying out the promise made to
the growers to solve the problems
confronting the citrus industry.
Those present were: J. C. Morton,
Chairman, Auburndale; John D.
Clark, Waverly; E. Winton Hall,
Lakeland; J. G. Grossenbacher, Ply-
mouth; Henry G. Murphy, Zolfo; D.
S. Boreland, Fort Myers; W. M.
Reck, Avon Park; H. V. Lee, East
Lake; J. C. Merrill, Leesburg; C. A.
Garrett, Kissimmee; J. B. Prevatt,
Tavares; A. R. Trafford, Cocoa; F.
I. Harding, Babson Park; Dr. James
Harris, Lakeland; W. D. Yonally,
Grand Island; R. R. Gladwin, Fort
Pierce; B. J. Nordmann, DeLand;
F. J. Alexander, DeLand; James
Thompson, Winter Haven; Theron
Thompson, Lake Hamilton; Charles
Demko, Umatilla; G. M. Moses, Nar-
coossee, committee member-elect;
Alfred Skinner, Cocoa, committee
member-elect; Director F. G. Moor-
head, DeLand, and T. G. Hallinan,
Winter Haven, Acting Secretary.


WHY CONDUCTORS DIE YOUNG
, Lady: "Conductor, where do I
transfer?"
Conductor: "Where are you go-
ing, please?"
Lady: "None of your business
where I'm going"


Gft.
Cars
44
50


Mxd. Totl
Cars Cars
17 91
16 66


18 20 49


Total..---. 41 112 53 206
From the advice received from
our own members it seems, there-
fore, that our members have 37 cars
out of the 41 cars of oranges in
storage; 83 cars out of the 112 cars
of grapefruit; 2 cars out of the 53
cars miscellaneous citrus or a total
of 122 cars on the part of our mem-
bership, leaving 84 cars out of our
membership.
Florida's Own Requirements
With prices so temptingly good we
may be overlooking our own con-
suming market in our own state.
We must remember that this is only
the middle of April and it is a long
time between drinks. Florida could
well use every one of the cars in
cold storage in Florida at this time.
We should anticipate the likelihood
of not keeping anything like enough


HOUSE NEWS

CROP OF 14,000,000
BOXES IS FLORIDA'S
TOTAL OF PAST YEAR
(Continued from Page One)
that this estimate included fruit to
move by rail, boat and express. It
looks as if his estimate missed only
the fruit that went by express.
Based on 360 boxes to the car his
estimate would be 22,972 cars of
oranges. Our figures show 21,841
cars including two-thirds of the
mixed classified as oranges. His
figures would indicate 14,864 cars
of grapefruit. The crop figures show
16,468 cars of grapefruit classify-
ing one-third of the mixed as grape-
fruit. Assuming our figures are cor-
rect he under-estimated the grape-
fruit crop 1,604 cars and over-esti-
mated the orange crop 1,131 cars.
We will be determining later on-
from our own records-the actual
proportoin of grapefruit shipments
to oranges and it is possible that
Marks' figures may prove more cor-
rect than our present figures. At
any rate we must recognize that
Marks' figures, the middle of De-
cember, practically hit the nail on
the head.
Associated Press Passings Short
The Associated Press reports of
passing, as shown up in the daily
paper, show 19,126 cars of oranges
compared with our 21,841. 16,606
cars of grapefruit compared with
our 16,468. 1,201 cars tangerines
compared with our 817 or a total of
36,933 cars compared with our 39,-
126 or 2,193 cars short in Associ-
ated Press passing as compared
with government figures.
Citrus Storage in Florida
Through the courtesy of Mr. Chas.
M. Hunt the following figures are
made available as being the most
complete summary possible of the
amount of citrus in storage in Flor-
ida. These figures, of course, in-
clude those cars that our own mem-
bers have in storage as well as those
outside our membership.
Citrus In Storage In Florida


quantity of citrus here in Florida
for our own requirements.
Storage Policy Highly Commended
From all sides we are hearing, not
only from growers but from citi-
zens, the pride they are feeling in''
Florida's ability to handle its grape-
fruit problem, particularly, as they
are doing right now, by storing the
grapefruit and continuing satisfac-
tory prices, as well as extending the
marketing season. Our members
are to be congratulated on the ex-,
cellent work they are doing and do-
ing voluntarily in meeting their
common problem together in this
cold storage distribution.
Porto Rico's Competition
Porto Rico is giving us a run for
our money by continuing to drop
into New York City about 35,000
boxes weekly of grapefruit, most of
which would have normally gone to
the canneries but which is attracted
to New York City because of the
satisfactory prices available, partic-
ularly for the smaller sizes Porto
Rico has. Our members are fully,
informed of Porto Rican policy and'
have their grapefruit problem well
in hand where there is no necessity
of releasing over 200 or 300 cars
per week.
Crews' Observations
In acordance with instructions
from the management Harold'
Crews, in charge of the Clearing
House Inspection Department, has
taken a hurried trip to some of the
nearby markets for the purpose of
checking up his grade ideas against
the practical viewpoints of the buy-
ing trade in important markets, also
for the purpose of checking relative
weights between Florida and Cali-
fornia; relative merits in packing;
problems connected with cold pro-
cessing in Norfolk or elsewhere;
condition of fruit in cold storage,
etc. He states that he has seen
only one lot of storage fruit show-
ing any pitting; all the lots so far
showing good keeping conditions;
that naturally some of the oldest
fruit now moving out shows some
indications of weakness at stem end.
He urges the necessity of all ship-
pers making arrangements to have
their storage fruit frequently in-
spected so as to release in plenty of
time any fruit that is showing ten-
dency towards weakness.
Texas Feeling Cocky
Mr. A. R. Sandlin and Mr. Shary
were recently here from Mission,
Texas, where they are connected
with the Texas Citrus Exchange.
Mr. Sandlin stated there was no
doubt in his mind but that there
would be at least as many cars,
probably more, of grapefruit ship-
ped this coming year than a year
ago. Two California growers, who
recently came through Texas, esti-
mated that Texas would ship 7,000
cars grapefruit this coming year.
This estimate was made after spend-
ing four days in Texas and after
having been in the citrus growing
business for forty years. Mr. Sand-
lin, formerly a resident of Leesburg,
was one of the original members of
our own Committee of Fifty.


April 25, 1930


Or.
Cars
Polk County__ 30
Jacksonville -_ 0
Elsewhere in
State ------.. 11





April 25, 1930


Keen Interest Manifested

Outside and Within State

In Year's Accomplishments


SThe following letters are samples
of a great many received by the
Clearing House following publica-
rtion of the market analysis in the
April 10 issue of the News showing
the remarkable increase in net re-
turns for the season's crop. The
letters reproduced as follows indi-
cate the genuine interest in the
0 Clearing House which exists outside
as well as within the state:
American Cranberry Exchange
New York,
April 11th, 1930.
PMr. A. M. Pratt, Gen. Mgr.,
Florida Citrus Growers
Clearing House Assn.,
Winter Haven, Fla.
I have read with a great deal of
interest your Comparative Analysis,
dated April 1st, of the Sales of Flor-
,ida Citrus Fruits. It certainly seems
to me that all Florida citrus grow-
iers are to be congratulated on the
results, especially considering re-
strictions under which the distribu-
tion had to be made. The physiolog-
ical influence of a short crop of cit-
rus fruits was, of course, quite help-
iful in begetting confidence in the
prices established, but surely regu-'
;lation of distribution of the ship-
ments must have been of great
,value in sustaining the prices and
trade confidence therein.
The closer the co-operation and
the greater control of distribution,
the better are the net returns. Stabi-
lized prices begets trade confidence
'and the more confidence dealers
have in the market values the more
interest they will take in increasing
the sale.
" I thank you for sending me a
copy of your report.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) A. H. CHANEY.

E. C. Fitz & Company, Inc.
Commission Merchants
Boston, Mass.,
April 12th, 1930.
Florida Citrus Growers
)Clearing House Assn.,
Winter Haven, Fla.
Dear Sir:
We thank you very much indeed
,for your letter of April 8th and also
for the Analysis of the season
which you so kindly sent us. We
have enjoyed reading it. It shows
what organized and united effort
can accomplish and you and your
Association are certainly to be con-
gratulated.
r ,As chairman of the Boston Citrus
Committee we have enjoyed co-
operating with you and feel that a
number of times good has been ac-
complished when otherwise a decid-
edly lower market might have been
faced.
The co-operation on the part of
tthe members has been good and it


has been a pleasure to work with
them. Our work has been light.
There have been very few times
when we have had to take a decided
stand. The work, of course, would
be very greatly increased if the re-
ceipts were heavy.
Again assuring you that we have
enjoyed working with you, we are,
Very truly yours,
E. C. FITZ & CO., INC.,
Per E. C. Fitz, Pres. (Signed)
Eustace C. Fitz.

The First National Bank of
St. Petersburg
St. Petersburg, Fla.,
April 12th, 1930.
Mr. A. M. Pratt, Gen. Mgr.,
Florida Citrus Growers
Clearing House Assn.,
Winter Haven, Fla.
Your favor of the 10th instant re-
ceived with analysis pertaining to
general marketing and profits of cit-
rus fruits, and this report will no
doubt be effective in re-establishing
a justified self-reliance to all grow-
ers.
From all indications the crop just
ahead will be an outstanding one,
and your Association is to be con-
gratulated on the manner in which
it is assisting growers and distribu-
tors.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) R. J. McCUTCHEON, JR.,
President.

California Feels Effects
Redlands, California,
April 17, 1930.
Thanks for the copy of the analy-
sis which your Association has put
out. It is indeed interesting and I
am glad to have it. We, out here,
feel the effects of your organization
and certainly Florida is now putting
its fruit out in more orderly fashion
than ever before and credit is given
your Clearing House for this effect.
This has been a peculiar year
with navels running about 60%
of normal and to very large sizes.
The winter months did not develop
a price commensurate with the
shortage of the crop but the past
month has developed a price far
greater than would be expected con-
sidering the volume of shipments.
On the whole, it has been a very
successful season out here, uneven-
ly of course, on account of some few
shy crops but from a profit stand-
point, probably about normal. The
valencias are going to run in a very
even spread of sizes from 150s to
288s peaking somewhat on 216s but
on the whole with quantity well dis-
tributed on different sizes and
should bring very high money.
It pleases us all to see that you
apparently have gotten the Mediter-
ranean fly licked. I sincerely hope
from now on it can be kept well


FLORIDA CLEARING


HOUSE NEWS

under control.
Yours very truly,
ELEPHANT ORCHARDS,
(Signed) F. W. Moore, president.

"You've Done Good Work"
Redlands, California,
April 16, 1930.
Florida Citrus Growers
Clearing House Assn.,
Winter Haven, Fla.
Dear Sir:
Your report is very comprehen-
sive and interesting. It certainly
shows that the Clearing House did
some good work.
We agree with you that we have
a wonderful opportunity with val-
encias this year. There are not more
than 1,200 cars remaining for ship-
ment in Tulare County and the es-
timate is for about 23,000 cars for
shipment from Southern California.
The movement is just now starting
in the South but will be very -light
until after the 1st of May.
It will require another couple of
weeks to clean up the navels but
with shipments well regulated at
around 1,200 to 1,400 cars per week
for all varieties, prospects are for
continued strong market which
should enable Florida also to clean
up the balance of the fruit in stor-
age.
We would be interested to know
just how much fruit there is in stor-
age in Florida and in the terminal
sales markets, valencias and grape-
fruit separately. We have been ad-
vising our shippers to hold back
on valencias as much as possible,
giving Florida a chance to get out
of the way.
With kindest personal regards.
Very truly yours,
Mutual Orange Distributors,
(Signed) J. A. Stewart, Sales Mgr.

PERCENT OF NO. I's
FOR ALL VARIETIES
HAS SHOWN DECLINE
(Continued from Page One)
in some cases third grade. No bulk
shipments were allowed this season.
A grower in considering these
average grades for the season must
recognize that many groves will
show less than the average while
some will show more than the aver-
age mentioned as going into No. Is.
I understand there have been some
groves that went entirely into
No. 2s.
It has been a hard season for
grades to be maintained. It is per-
fectly natural that pressure should
be put on house managers, grading
foremen and others to try to give a
grower a higher percentage of No.
Is than the real merit of the fruit
warranted. The Clearing House, as
a disinterested body, has had from
thirty to forty men in continual con-
tact with the grade and packing
operation. By maintaining a uni-
form grade and holding this grade
firmly to U.S. requirements it has
resulted not only in commanding
confidence from the trade, that
would not have otherwise existed,
but it has also resulted in confidence
on the part of the sales-managers
themselves in their own product, as
well as confidence of those sales


Paie 3


managers in their competitors. They
realize that no longer will a com-
petitor be permitted to continually
offer for sale so-called U.S. No. Is
at a cut price because that com-
petitor knows it may be a combina-
tion grade or practically all No. 2s.
"Square Deal" Grading
More than this, the disinterested
but firm policy followed by the
Clearing House has insured the in-
dividual grower a square deal in
grading policy. It has given back-
bone to the grading foreman or
house manager when pressure has
been put on that man to give some
large or influential grower, or some
grower that is a kicker, a better
grade than he is entitled to. This
disinterested service has also in-
sured the accuracy and fairness of
returns where they are made on a
pool basis. The objections that some
growers have had to pools are elim-
inated where every "pbol-member
knows a uniform grade has been
maintained through that pool period.
Aside from these considerations
there is a final one that no matter
how conscientious nor what long
experience a man has, any one con-
fined to his own district only and to
his own particular line of fruit loses
his perspective. A grade is purely
comparative. The mind and eye are
influenced by those things it is im-
mediately sensing with the result
that where one has become accus-
tomed to poor fruit some of the bet-
ter U.S. No. 2 oranges or grapefruit
can easily look like U.S. No. 1 in
comparison and vice versa. It, there-
fore, takes an outsider's viewpoint
with a more general perspective to
keep before all operators the same
thought as to what constitutes U.S.
No. 1, U.S. No. 2, etc.
This season's analysis of grades
shows a much better performance
record for our shippers than a year
ago regardless of the fact that it
was much more difficult to live up to
grade requirements.
The following table shows how
the varieties compared in percent-
age of No. Is this past season and
the season of 1928-1929:
This Year Last Year
Oranges --- 38% 42%
Grapefruit ... 41% 45%
Tangerines -.. 59% 68%
Mixed ....---- 40% 49%

All ----_ 0 40% 45%
Low grades this year resulted
from so many growers a year ago
failing to dust, spray and prune as
they should. Many of them thought
that quarantine restrictions would
be so severe that their fruit in Zone
One could never be shipped. Others
had received such low returns as to
be unable to care for their groves
as they wanted to and they could
not get the needed loans to do their
job rightly.
Our financial structure a year ago
was deplorable. Growers this year
for the coming crop have none of
these unavoidable problems to meet,
although the continued spring rains
have offered difficulties with mel-
anose and scab that are unusually
severe in some sections.


Palre 3





FLORIDA CLEARING'Iw HOUSE NEWS


Committee of Fifty

Membership

The following are the members of
the new Committee of Fifty who
will serve during the coming season:
DISTRICT No. ONE
J. C. Morton-.-----........_ Auburndale
C. D. Gunn -_ Haines City
Theron Thompson __.Lake Hamilton
James Thompson --- Winter Haven
F. E. Brigham-_---- Winter Haven
Frank I. Harding.----- Babson Park
John D. Clark _---__------. Waverly
F. M. O'Byrne -- ---. Lake Wales
C. F. Lathers -------- Winter Haven
Dr. James Harris ...------Lakeland
E. Winton Hall .---- -- --_--.Lakeland
A. F. Pickard_ ----_-.Lakeland
Dr. J. A. Garrard ---------.- Bartow
Harry Askew -_....------ Lake Garfield
DISTRICT No. TWO
C. C. Wiggins --....-_-_-- Hopewell
C. W. Lyons _----------- .. Tampa
S. A. Whitesell -----------Clearwater
T. C. Bottom ------Valrico
I. W. Watts _____ Valrico
S. F. Wooten __-----------Tampa
DISTRICT No. THREE
W. J. Ellsworth ---_---- Dade City
J. B. Prevatt____ .__ ----Tavares
J. C. Merrill.___-__..-... Leesburg
Charles Demko --__----_- Altoona
H. C. Brown___.__..---- Clermont
DISTRICT No. FOUR
Howard V. Lee _- --East Lake
F. J. Alexander ____....-- DeLand
B. J. Nordmann -__----------DeLand
T. S. Carpenter, Jr--- Crescent City
M. J. Timmons_ __- --- -...-- Ocala
W. F. Glynn ...__ _- Crescent City
J. J. Peterson __------Pierson
DISTRICT No. FIVE
J. G. Grossenbacher_ __--- Plymouth
C. A. Garrett ..._-------- Kissimmee
M. O. Overstreet __ -- .Orlando
Bert H. Roper__...... Winter Garden
F. M. McDonald -- ____.Plymouth
G. M. Moses-_ __ ___Narcoosee
DISTRICT No. SIX
W. M. Reck.___-__--...... Avon Park
R. R. Gladwin .. _---- --. Fort Pierce
M. T. Baird ..-.._---_ Vero Beach
Alfred Skinner --........--_.. ---_ Cocoa
DISTRICT No. SEVEN
R. K. Thompson--....-.----- Sarasota
R. H. Prine _----....-----Terra Ceia
R. S. Windham__.... ..Punta Gorda
D. S. Boreland ___----....Fort Myers
Rupert Smith -------- Arcadia
Henry G. Murphy_..__ Zolfo Springs


E Pluribus Unum

Many of us forget what the old
United States motto stands for.
When it is read or heard it is easy
to connect it with spread-eagle ora-
tory and rather artificial patriotism.
The fact remains, however, that the
United States is the result of chang-
ing "from many to one." Without
any spread-eagle oratory Florida
can rightly rejoice in the fact that
it is learning the same lesson of the


Now Is Time To Advertise,

Authority Advises Nation

In Reply To "Scare" Talk


The low ebb in business fortune
or the period approaching such a
situation, is particularly the time to
.dvertise in the opinion of Earnest
Elmo Calkins, prominent advertis-
ng authority writing in the March
issuee of Review of Reviews. Mr.
Calkins fails to see anything funda-
mentally wrong with the country at
this time, but advises strongly that
advertising should be done now sim-
ply because of the mental state of
some of us. An excerpt from his
article is reproduced as follows:
The prosperity which these United
States have enjoyed might be de-
scribed by a very simple formula.
In a certain office the bookkeeper
owed the stenographer two cents. The
stenographer owed the office boy
two cents. And the office boy owed
rhe bookkeeper two cents. One day
the bookkeeper finding a penny in
his pocket passed it to the stenogra-
pher discharging half his indebted-
ness. The stenographer passed it on
to the office boy who paid it to the
bookkeeper, who sent it around the
circle again. Thus each of the three
became solvent and the bookkeeper
had his original capital.
Exchange for Money
That's it, money in active circula-
tion, the small money of small peo-
ple, but lots of them. Static wealth
means nothing. Factories and goods,
stocks and bonds, are not prosper-
ity. Business is exchange of com-
modities for money, and then spend-
ing that money for other commodi-
ties. You pass up a shine and Tony
does not get your ten cents. Others
do the same and Tony cannot buy
the radio he has set his heart on.
The electrical dealer finds radio
sales falling off and does not buy
the car he had planned. The motor
car distributor sells fewer cars and
cuts down his expense, little and big.
His grocer, butcher, haberdasher
feel the difference. This includes
whatever you sell. And you skip
more shines and so it goes round to
Tony again and begins all over.
Too much emphasis is placed upon
big business-lumbering, railroads,
steel, banking. These do not make
prosperity. They merely reflect it.
They prosper when the country pros-


advantages gained by changing
"from many to one."
Right To Be Proud
The strikingly good results of this
season, particularly in those mar-
kets where as much or more fruit
had to go than a year ago and yet
realizing seventy cents to a dollar
per box more money is something
that every grower and shipper mem-
ber of the Clearing House has a
right to be proud of, for each one
contributed his full part. No other
explanation is possible of this gain
(Continued on Page Bits)


pers. And the country prospers by
the daily round of small expendi-
tures of millions of families. As long
as that keeps up, everything is nor-
mal. But let the housewives begin
to pare their budgets, substitute a
boiling piece for the weekly roast,
make over little Mary's frock in-
stead of buying a new one, and busi-
ness falls off, The daily purchases
of millions of people are conditioned
by advertising. Cut advertising
sharply off and we would have a
slump beside which the stock ex-
change debacle would be a mere in-
cident.
A business slump such as we are
in danger of is all a matter of belief.
This statement has come in for some
sharp criticism recently from disil-
lusioned critics of our industrial civ-
ilization. We are accused of "kid-
ding ourselves," we are reminded
that optimism will not change facts.
Nothing Actually Wrong
But what are the facts? There is
actually nothing wrong with the ma-
chine that makes, advertises, and
sells goods; nothing subtracted from
the incomes and wages of the masses
of people. Nothing has happened
but the squeezing of inflated paper
values from a lot of stocks. Such
adverse circumstances as there are
existed before the slump. Those
that have arisen since are due en-
tirely to loss of confidence and hesi-
tation.
SIt is that disposition which con-
cerns us. That is what makes it pre-
eminently an advertising situation.
Our difficulty this year is not that
people have less to spend but that
they hesitate to spend it. It will be
a fine test of advertising. It is far
more logical to advertise when
sales are hard than when they are
easy. Yet many otherwise logical
manufacturers curtail advertising at
the first sign of a businses cloud.
They may see the importance to
prosperity of our advertising as a
whole. But each may think "My ad-
vertising is but a small part of the
whole. I'll play safe, cut down this
year, and see how things go." A
multiplication of such doubting
Thomases can cause the only thing
which is to be feared at this mo-
ment-a psychological business de-
pression.
Few business men, even-those who
employ advertising, understand that
it must be continuous and consistent
to produce its best results. Con-
tinuance is more necessary than any
other factor. Many businesses are
under-advertised. There is no half-
way house. The advertising must
equal the opportunity. Too little is
no better than none at all. If the
persimmons hang ten feet high a
nine-foot pole. is no better than a
two-foot pole to get them.


Advertising Is Building
If you seek proof of the building
power of advertising, look about
you. There is no greater asset than
good will. That is what the bankers
buy when merging industries into
chains and groups products with
good will created by continuous ad-
vertising, industries built up from
small beginnings by the gentle pro-
cess of offering them enticingly,
convincingly, persistently, a growth
as slow and sure as the growth of a
tree.
The Welch Grape Juice Company
has just been sold to a group of
capitalists for a good round sum. I
can remember when it was a small
family business making communion
wine. At a time when practically
no beverages were advertised ex-
cept the beer that made Milwaukee
famous and regretted, the Welch
family decided to advertise grape
juice as a palatable, refreshing
drink. It was not a grape juice that
the capitalists recently bought. For
a fraction of the purchase price the'
purchasers could have assembled a
grape juicery as good or better than
the Welch's, but it would have lack-
ed the essential ingredients, a name
favorably known wherever thirsts
are quenched.
Cyrus Curtis is one who prospers
in bad times as well as good. During
the worst week of the post-war de-
itaflon period when the Saturday
Evening Post carried only eight
pages of advertising, he put $50,-
000 into the newspapers to reiterate
his belief in advertising. The news-
papers too were empty. He got max-
imum attention and maximum re-
sults when the tide turned, as busi-
ness men do who have the courage
to cast their advertising bread upon
business waters.

But It Paid Well
Congoleum has also profited by-
the courage to advertise when timid..
business was curtailing. In the lean
years after the war when the busi-
ness was in the red, A. W. Erickson
persuaded his fellow directors to
sign an iron clad agreement to
spend $1,000,000 and keep on ad-
vertising, come what would. Con-
goleum continued in the red, and to -
that loss was added $100,000 month-
ly outgo for advertising. The direc-
tors got cold feet and begged to be
let off. But Erickson was adamant.
He knew the pull would be a long
one. As business picked up Con-
goleum forged ahead long before its
competitors had recovered. It had/
enjoyed the advantage of large
space in magazines empty of rivals.
And that is how Mr. Erickson got
the money to build and maintain at
Tucson, Arizona, the finest helio-
therapy institution in the world.
The time has come to use adver-,,
tising as it was intended to be used,
to stimulate business. Never has
there been a time for a cleaner test.
There are no adverse factors except
the mental hazard of last year's
stock slump in men's minds. The
obstacle is psychological, not physi- '
cal.


Page 4


' F A HApril 25, 198_3






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CAROLYN
EYSELL.
Granddaugh-
ter of Mr. and
Mrs. J. W.
Clarke, of
Northumber-
land Avenue.
Breckon photo)


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If you can't come to

this winter. . let


:orida

'orida


come to you


FLORIDA is a paradise of growing chin blooming
.and ripening under the friendliest c( editions, of
nature. Florida oranges and grapefruit e the finest
products of this fair land! Here tropi sunshine,
rainbow showers and rich soil produce e sweetest
and juiciest oranges and grapefruit that row. They
are heavy with tree-ripened goodness, eight from
golden groves to yoti. Florida oranges by repeated
tests, have one-fourth more juice- lus flavor,
sweetness and thin peel. And Flori.P grapefruit
hold a quality and size advantage, all their
own. In oranges and grapefruit, "Florida" means
superiority! Ask for them by the state name.
Florida Citrus Growers Clearing House.Association,
Winter Haven, Florida.


",Olt h ^


Falls, Waterton Lakes, National Park, in the the Canadian "-.
Rockies, this angler is about to hook a big one,


Supplement to Florida ClearinHousNews,
Supplement to Florida Clearing Hou$se, News,



I


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For Health Drink Orange
and Grapefruit Juice .



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FLO Rfi5A;-;CLEnARING'


1929-1930 ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN


Black and White Advertisements
Total Space No. of No. of Times


Publication
Boston Globe (M)----------
Boston Blobe (E )------..
Boston Post ---------___. -
New. York Sun ----
New York World---
New York Journal-----
Philadelphia Bulletin -------
Pittsburgh Press ...___------
Baltimore News ------..
Washington (D. C.) Star --
St. Louis Post-Dispatch___ -
Providence Bulletin_--......--
Hartford Times --------
New Haven Register --......
Albany (N. Y.) News ----
Buffalo News--____.........-----
Rochester Times-Union --
Syracuse Journal ----
Newark News ..--_.....-_.....
Harrisburg Telegraph ......
Scranton Times ______--
Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch ....-
Rtichmond News-Leader--.....
Columbus (0.) Dispatch ---
Grand Rapids Press ---------
Toledo Blade -----------
Indianapolis News.___ ...-----
Milwaukee Journal--____-
Minneapolis Journal ___----
Springfield Union (M)-......--
Springfield Union (E) ........
Springfield Republican ---___
Springfield News ---
Worcester Telegram_ ..---..-
Worcester Gazette ------
Louisville Courier-Journal ..
Louiusville Times _--_..... .
St. Paul Dispath ---
St. Paul Pioneer Press ---
Kansas City Times.----
Kansas City Star---
Dayton (0.) News ---------
Cleveland Press ---_
Detroit News ....----....... -
Cincinnati Times-Star -------
Chicago American--- -
Chicago News
Atlanta Journal ---
Nashville Banner -.....-----
Memphis Com. Appeal (M) -
Memphis Com. Appeal (E)_
Chicago Times ----
Birmingham News --
Birmingham Age-Herald --
Macon Telegraph -----
Greenville (S. C.) News .--.
Greenville Piedmont ---......-
Montgomery Advertiser-.....-
Augusta Herald -------------
Savannah News -------._____....
Charlotte Observer--...-.... -
. Greensboro News -.. -------
Columbia (S. C.) State ----
Chattanooga News -------
Chattanooga Times-.............-
Knoxville News-Sentinel -....


Circulation
140,576
158,387
384,698
302,214
289,834
634,483
551,541
185,778
151,777
102,068
241,050
79,772
59,429
55,761
44,948
167,661
78,076
67,139
146,058
52,000
46,267
45,945
71,189
125,513
35,870
134,672
134,056
171,793
118,088
35,255
35,060
22,983
41,375
44,847
60,779
104,742
100,267
89,976
75,193
277,331
279,096
58,385
211,870
333,959
160,159
540,243
430,003
82,081
68,366
113,098
76,412
145,893
83,012
40,542
31,500
30,347
12,276
27,510
15,895
23,243
48,804
36,446
24,980
37,245
37,797
37,920


Black and White Tptals.- 8,651,533
GRAND TOTAL ...------1.12,641,859


Talk Of Large Crop

May Change To That

Of a Reduced Yield


The very thing that made such
continued talk of such a big crop
for the coming season is now the
thing that is causing people to talk
that the crop is not going to be
nearly as big as at first thought. The
rains, which caused the talk for the
big crop and the big bloom, have


Inches Insertions Adv. Printed


410
410
410
410
410
410
410
410
410
410
160
350
350
360
350
350
360
350
350
350
360
140
140
140
140
140
140
60
140
250
250
250
250
250
250
110
110
110
110
60
60
140
440
250
330
320
320
110
100
100
100
510
70
70
70
70
70
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80

14,680
17,870


31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
10
27
27
28
27
27
28
27
27
27
28
10
10
10
10
10
10
4
10
23
23
23
23
23
23
9
9
9
9
4
4
10
26
13
21
16
16
6
6
6
6
17
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5

1073
1161


171,678,367
206,381,139


4,357,856
4,909,997
11,925,638
9,368,634
8,984,854
19,668,973
17,097,771
5,759,118
4,705,087
3,164,108
2,410,500
2,153,844
1,604,583
1,561,308
1,233,596
4,526,847
2,186,128
1,812,753
3,943,566
1,404,000
1,294,476
459,450
711,890
1,255,130
358,700
1,346,720
1,340,560
687,172
1,180,880
810,865
806,380
528,609
951,625
1,031,481
1,397,917
942,678
902,403
809,784
676,737
1,109,324
1,116,384
583,850
5,508,620
4,341,467
3,363,339
8,643,888
6,880,048
492,486
410,196
678,588
458,472
2,480,185
415,060
202,710
157,500
151,735
61,380
165,060
95,370
139,458
292,824
218,676
149,880
223,470
226,782
227,520


scab and melanose than usual. In
some cases the leaves of the trees
seem to be shedding, others are get-
ting brown. In some groves the
water level has approached the feed-
ers of the trees. In other cases the
drop seems excessive for other rea-
sons.
At any rate there is at least the
usual amount of talk going on about
how the crop is dropping and at just
this stage the talk seems unusual
for there actually seems in many
cases evidence warranting the
change from the big crop talk to a
normal crop talk.


Publication
Boston Herald ---
New York Times-_--_ -----
Philadelphia Post-Ledger .--
Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph --
Baltimore Sun -----------
Cincinnati Enquirer .-----
Cleveland Plain-Dealer -......
Detroit Free Press ---.........
Chicago Tribune-....--.. --
Atlanta Constitution __-........_
Nashville Tennessean .------


Time: Any morning this month.
Place: Mrs. Northern House-
wife's breakfast room.
Characters: Mrs. Northern
Housewife (The Missus), her
husband (The Mister), Little
Jimmie and Somewhat Older
Ethel.
Little Jimmie: Say, how's it come
you gave Ethel more orange juice
than me?
Somewhat Older Ethel: That's
what she ought to've done, smarty-
you're not big enough to waste or-
ange juice on, anyhow.
Jimmie: Is THAT so! Well, I
don't have to smear grapefruit on
my face to make dimples, you'll no-
tice!
The Missus: For pity's sake, chil-
dren, be quiet! There's enough
juice here for everybody. Dear,
will you have another glassful?
The Mister (Coming up for air
out of the morning paper): Huh?
What'd you-? Oh, yes, I'll take a
little more. Where'd you get this?
The Missus: They are Florida or-
anges and the best I've had this win-
ter. There's a grapefruit in the re-
frigerator if you'd rather have it
than the orange juice.
The Mister: You bet I would; a
glass of orange juice and a grape-
fruit ought to keep even my credi-
tors away-let alone the doctor.
Jimmie: Can I have part of your
grapefruit, Daddy?
-_Ethel: Why don't you eat his
breakfast for him and be done with
it?
Jimmie: Aw, run around the
block. You're just sore because you
won't have enough grapefruit to
smear on that chin dimple of yours.
The Missus-(Places a halved
grapefruit before her husband who
proceeds to bore in with more noise
and gusto than the law allows): The
grocer told me yesterday that he
has had a regular run on Florida
oranges and grapefruit this year
and wanted to know why I had ask-
ed him especially for Florida fruit.
The Mister: What did you tell
him?
The Missus: I told him I had ask-
ed for Florida fruit because I had
seen it advertised.
The Mister: Yes, and that's prob-


Circulation
142,862
699,978
475,002
355,587
193,258
179,386
291,749
313,890
1,143,014
132,455
63,145


Rotogravure Totals ---.. 3,990,326


Inches Insertions


350
350
350
350
350
320
320
260
290
110
140

3,190


10
10
10
10
10
9
9
7
8
2
3

88


Rotogravure Advertisements
Total Space No. of


ably the reason why your grocer has
had such a good demand for it this
year. The Florida orange and grape-
fruit growers have gotten together
down there I understand and have
organized some sort of clearing
house, I think they call it. They are
giving California a run for her
money, too.
The Missus: Well, I only hope they
don't raise the price of oranges and
grapefruit on us.
The Mister: So do I, but the fruit
is fresh, of course, and if they put
it into the market regularly I don't
think we need to worry about pay-
ing more for it. Even if we did it
would be all right. If they give us a
good quality fruit it is only natural
that they will demand more for it.
The Missus: Yes, I suppose that's
true.
The Mister: You see the whole
thing is an economic move. This
Clearing House of theirs does a lot
more besides advertising, from what
I can gather. The growers are put-
ting up their fruit under the same
grade and pack and the dealers
don't have to buy "pigs-in-pokes"
any more. On top of that, their
clearing house regulates the ship-
ments so that the markets get only
what they need each day. It's just
a plain case of recognizing the laws
of supply and demand. They keep
fruit coming up here:into the mar-
kets in an even flow so that the de-
mand for it remains at a steady
level. The result is we will always
have good fruit available and at a
reasonable price. The Florida-.
The Missus (Interrupts him):
Just the same I saw in the paper
only last night where the Florida
growers had received three or four
million dollars more for their fruit
than they got last year.
The Mister-(Looks at his watch,
makes a hole-in-one with the last
of a soft boiled egg and jumps to
his feet) : That's the point exactly.
Their Clearing House has gotten
them back that much money over
last year's crop in spite of the fact
that they shipped more fruit into
the Eastern states than they did last
year. Here, kiss me good-bye, I've
got to run!
CURTAIN


No. of Times
Adv. Printed
1,428,620
6,999,780
4,750,020
3,555,870
1,932,580
1,614,474
2,625,741
2,197,230
9,144,112
264,910
189,435

34,702,772


Our Own 1-Minute Drama
OR

Hurrah for the Clearing House!


NEWS Page 5


,iril 25, 1930


I






Page 6


Never Before Done--

And--Who Did It?

In the history of the citrus indus-
try today there is no record outside
of Florida of forty or more highly
competitive shippers getting to-
gether and continually working out
their common industry problem.
Nearly two years ago over forty
citrus shippers in Florida recogniz-
ed the need for more organized ef-
fort. They recognized their mutual
dependence upon each other and the
fallacy of each operator striving in
the dark to accomplish something
which could be handled so much bet-
ter if they could arrive at some
means of interchanging information,
proper means of self-control and
general direction as to plans and
policies.
Group Action Pays'
These shippers individually, no
matter how earnest, could not have
accomplished what they have this
year. By collective group action
their interests have been unified on
fundamentals with the result that
they were able to get seventy-three
cents per box more on grapefruit
from the eleven northeastern states,
where quarantine regulations forced
them to put more fruit in the same
time than a year ago.
Although California has been pop-
ularly thought of as shipping very
light during the past season, never-
theless from the time Florida start-
ed shipping until April 1, California
put into the four Eastern markets
only seventy-one cars less than a
year ago. Yet these Florida ship-
pers by working together were able
to average ninety-seven cents per
box more on oranges at these same
auctions than a year ago.
Abnormal Shipments
Three thousand nine hundred
seventy-one more cars of citrus were
forced into the Eastern states than
normal. Nevertheless the teamwork
of the shippers, who got together,
made it possible to realize out of the
Eastern auction markets, .alone,
practically two and one-half million
dollars extra money.

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MAN-
AGEMENT, ETC., OF THE FLORIDA
CLEARING HOUSE NEWS, PUBLISHED
SEMI-MONTHLY BY THE FLORIDA CIT-
RUS GROWERS CLEARING HOUSE AS-
SOCIATION AT WINTER HAVEN, FLA.,
AS REQUIRED BY ACT OF CONGRESS
OF AUGUST 24, 1912.
FOR THE PERIOD ENDING
APRIL 1, 1930
Publisher: Florida Citrus Growers Clear-
ing House Association, Winter Haven, Fla.;
editor: T. G. Hallinan, Winter Haven, Fla.;
owner: Florida Citrus Growers Clearing
House Association, a co-operative organi-
zation of Florida citrus growers, incorpora-
tors for which are:
Allen E. Walker, Winter Haven, Fla.; T.
S. Carpenter, Jr., Crescent City, Fla.; W.
M. Igou, Eustis, Fla.; Dr. E. C. Aurin, Ft.
Ogden, Fla.; C. 0. Andrews, Orlando, Fla.;
R. E. Mudge, Fellsmere, Fla.; James T.
Swann, Tampa, Fla.; James Harris, Lake-
land, Fla.; Norman A. Street, Winter Ha-
ven, Fla.; James C. Morton, Auburndale,
Fla.
There are no bondholders or mortgagees.
(Signed) T. G. HALLINAN,
Editor.
Subscribed and sworn to before me, Es-
/ sie H. Noland, Notary Public. on the 14th
day of April, A. D. 1980. (SEAL). My
commission expires Feb. 22, 1982.


FLORIDA CLEARING

If we had no institution in name
but had gotten together and accom-
plished the things which we have,
this report would be signed some-
thing like this:
"Those actively contributing to
this splendid teamwork, forgetful of
their individual needs where indus-
try needs were in conflict, contrib-
uted not only the four cents per box
but time, effort, judgment and good
will. Each shipper's proportionate
contribution is indicated by the per-
centage figure opposite his name.
This figure shows the relative
amount of business contributed
from the grower-members of such
shippers in the magnificent effort of
this constructive get-together pro-
gram."
C. H. Tonnage Proportion
The contributing members with
their proportionate Clearing House
tonnage contributed, are as follows:
Shipper Pet. of C.H.
Florida Citirs Exchange-_ 48.2%
American Fruit Growers ..- 12.0%
Gentile Brothers Co..----- -- 5.5 %
L. Maxcy, Inc -------. 3.2%
Burch and Mixed- -- 2.8%
Wm. G. Roe & Co ..----- ----2.5%
W. H. Mouser & Co .----- ---2.4%
Adams Packing Co .-------- 2.3%
Gregg Maxcy ___ -----.------. 2.2%
Richardson-Marsh Corp. 1.8%
David Bilgore & Co ._---- ----1.6%
R. D. Keene & Co- --- 1.4%
Alexander & Baird-- --- 1.3%
D. H. Lamons Sales, Inc- 1.2%
Dixie Fruit Co .. __ -------- 1.0%
Holly Hill Frt. Prod. Co_ .. .9%
J. W. Keen-__......._ ....----- .8%
A. S. Herlong & Co ....---- .8%
Overstreet Bros. -------- .8 %
Chester C. Fosgate Co .---_-- .8%
Tampa Union Terminal ---... .7%
Eustis Packing Co...-----.---. .6%
B. H. Roper-- --- .6%
H. C. Sullivan.. ...------------- .6%
J. M. Mitchell -- -------- .6%
Merrion & Dodson -------- .5%
Orange Belt Pkg. Co .---.--- .4%
Welles Fruit Company ....- .4%
S. A. Fields & Co -------- 4%
Nelson & Company ....--------. .3 %
J. C. Lee-----....- --------- . .3%
Emca Fruit Co ___ ---- .3%
Sunny South Pkg. Co....-----. .3 %
-Stetson, J. B.,'Estate --...- .2%
C. H. Taylor_ ....____..-------- .2%
Browder-Fowler Frt. Co ..... .1%
Lovelace Packing Co .----- -
Symonds, A. D. & Son ..-- -
J. P. Lyle--------------
W. D. Middleton .....------- -

Total ------ ._.------..----100.00%


Encouragement Felt

That Quarantine May

Be Lifted Next Fall

Frequently the question is asked
"What's your guess as to the quar-
antine next season?"
Florida produced about two bil-
lion individual citrus fruits. Out of
these two billion fruits a total of
four individual fruits were found
in the entire season's crop that con-
tained any evidence of larvae or
other stages of Mediterranean fly


HOUSE NEWS

life. Four out of two billion or two
out of one billion. The other 1
billion 999 million 999 thousand 996
citrus fruits were free from any
known evidence of the Mediterran-
ean fly. This condition is the result
of the first year's effort in eradica-
tion. A most remarkable achieve-
ment.
With this wonderful thing accom-
plished and with the starvation
period this season beginning April
15, two months in advance of last
season (June 15), we have not only
the ground already gained by the
past year, which has been most mar-
velous, but we also have the addi-
tional advantage of two months over
last year in the way of continued
starvation for the last fly.
Under such conditions and with
confidence that Washington will
soon be appropriating what funds
may be necessary to make it possi-
ble to verify officially our continued
freedom from the fly, we feel war-
ranted in expecting that the quaran-
tine will be lifted next season or if
not lifted entirely, lifted with the
exception of possibly a few of our
neighboring Southern States who
may still think it necessary to pro-
tect themselves against the fly.


Wood Denies Sending

Man Here To Get Data

For Reimbursement

A get-rich-quick artist, according
to press dispatches, is reported to
be calling on Florida growers in an
effort to profit by any reimburse-
ment for fruit destroyed in the Med-
iterranean fruit fly campaign which
may possibly be granted by the gov-
ernment.
This solicitor represents himself
to growers as having been sent to
Florida by Chairman Will R. Wood
of the House Appropriations Com-
mittee, to obtain information from
growers as to losses sustained in
the eradication fight. No such rep-
resentative has been sent to Florida
by Chairman Wood it seems, this
point being made clear by the Con-
gressman in a statement to Repre-
sentative Herbert J. Drane at Wash-
ington. Mr. Drane telegraphed the
Tampa Morning Tribune, April 22,
concerning the matter, Mr. Drane's
telegram reading as follows:
"Chairman Wood of the Appro-
priations Committee advises me he
has a letter from a lady at Pomona,
Fla., saying that a man giving the
name of Beard is representing him-
self to growers as having been sent
by Chairman Wood to ascertain
losses of growers through fruit fly
eradication with a view to reimburse-
ment, and that Beard is entering
into contracts with growers by
which he is to receive 15 percent of
any monies, recovered. The Chair-
man disclaims having sent any one
for that purpose and repudiates any
statement of that character. He
wishes to warn the public against
signing any contract with any per-
son whatsoever and requests me to
give publicity to this statement."


ADril 25. 1980


E PLURIBUS UNUM

(Continued from Page Four)
made. California was not responsi-
ble, for during this time California
put in five hundred more cars in the
public auction markets than a year
ago and within seventy-one cars in
the eastern auctions. This accom-
plishment has been made without
loss of individuality and with no
actual merging of shipping inter-
ests.
The Clearing House did not take
over the marketing. Each shipper-
member did his own marketing.
Each shipper-member sent his own
wires, attended to his own diver-
sions and was fully responsible for
his own actions with the trade and
his grower customers. However, the
results were made possible only by
getting those results together. The
"together" idea was made possible
by the control of supplies every
week, by the confidence resulting in
every shipper knowing that those
supplies were controlled and what
those supplies were going to be next
week as well as this. The confidence
of the trade finally and after two
years, has been established. They
know today that Florida is on the
job and that the Florida citrus in-
dustry, as a body, is directing its
affairs instead of "every man for
himself and the devil take the hind-
most."
Supplies Controlled Also
The creation of the prorating
committees at the key markets,
where the fruit has been sold at auc-
tion, controlled the supplies at those
auction markets through members
of the trade in whom the buyers had
confidence. The interchange of ac-
curate and comprehensive market
information permitted every shipper
having the accumulated knowledge
of the entire membership. This in-
formation not only told him the
complete range and the average of
f.o.b. prices every day but pointed
out the danger signal of how many
cars were rolling unsold and how
many cars were rolling to auction
and to what auctions.
Instead of being staggered and
losing their nerve at the end of the
season because of realizing Florida
had to, on account of quarantine
conditions, ship more grapefruit
than it ever had in the allotted time
left, these shippers, working to-
gether, determined how much fruit
should go into storage and then
quietly and firmly met the situation
and maintained the grapefruit mar-
ket at the same high level; extended
the marketing period for grapefruit
six weeks and will show a good re-
turn on an average on that grape-
fruit which is being held in storage
today to slowly and evenly feed to
the markets in the absence of fur-
ther shipments. This and concen-
trated advertising and many other
things in the "together" idea have
brought back to the growers of
Florida by actual comparisons of
money invested, $16.00 for every.
dollar invested in the Clearing
House assessment.




April 25, 1930 FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS Page 7





Clearing House Control
In
DOLLARS AND CENTS
Herewith is a summary of an analysis of this season's Clearing House ship-
ments and auction sales up to April 1st. The net return to Clearing House
growers from the northeastern markets alone amounts to $2,442,409 MORE
than was received last year in these same markets!
Control of supplies into these auction' markets-an exclusive Clearing
House operation-plus the Association's prorating of shipments, improve-
ment of grade and pack and increase in consumer demand through advertis-r
ing, are the UNANSWERABLE reasons for this showing.

Possibly you didn't know it, but-
More grapefruit was moved into the northeastern states this season than
during the same period last season;
The orange movement into this territory was practically the same as it
was last year;
Last season's grapefruit in the four northeastern auctions averaged $1.00
net on the tree;
This season's grapefruit in the same markets averaged $1.73 net on the
tree;
Last season's oranges in these markets averaged 85c;
This season the oranges averaged $1.82;
Last year California sold 5,709 cars of oranges in the northeastern auctions
and ONLY 71 fewer cars this season;
Nearly as many Florida oranges and grapefruit were sold in the western
auctions this season as were sold there last season;
This season California put 3,132 cars of oranges into westernauctions and
last-year ONLY 2,549 cars;
Florida oranges in the western auctions averaged 56c net on the tree;
This year in the same auctions our oranges averaged $2.01;
Last year Florida grapefruit in the western auctions averaged 78c;
This year our grapefruit averaged $2.05;
To obtain the $2,442,409 GAIN in the northeast auctions, Clearing House
growers paid $148,262.40 in 4-cent assessments;
This means that for every four cents invested by the growers generally in
the Clearing House, they were returned 64 cents!





FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


FLORIDA

CLEARING HOUSE

NEWS

APRIL 25, 1930

Published Semi-monthly by the FLORIDA CITRUS
GROWERS CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION,
DeWitt Taylor Bldg., Winter Haven, Florida.

Entered as second-class matter August 31, 1928, at
the postoffice at Winter Haven, Fla., under the Act of
March 3, 1879.


E. C. AURIN
J. C. CHASE .
J. A. GRIFFIN
F. G. MOORHEAD
R. E. MUDGE
PHIL C. PETERS
JAMES T. SWANN
A. M. TILDEN
E. E. TRUSKETT
ALLEN E. WALKER
R. B. WOOLFOLK


J. A. GRIFFIN
A. M. TILDEN
ALLEN E. WALKER
E. E. TRUSKETT .
ARCHIE M. PRATT


DIRECTORS


OFFICERS


Ft. Ogden
Orlando
Tampa
DeLand
Fellsmere
Winter Garden
Tampa
Winter Haven
Mt. Dora
Winter Haven
Orlando
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary
S General Manager


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Per Year: $2.00 Single Copies: 10c


Worthwhile Advertising
The rotogravure page included in this issue
of the News contains one of the large roto-
gravure advertisements used by the Clearing
House this past season in its national adver-
tising campaign. The page is an actual repro-
duction from the rotogravure section of the
Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph of November 17,
the photographs surrounding the Clearing
House advertisement being the same as were
used in the Pittsburgh paper that date.

It will be noted that this particular ad.-
and there were eleven reproductions of this
same ad. in as many papers-dominates the
entire page. In other words, the ad. is so
large that the publisher of the newspaper in
which it appeared felt it best to fill up the
rest of the space on that page with news and
human interest photographs rather than to
"bury" any small ads. that could have been
placed on the same page. The advertisement
in actual space, is equal to about one-half
page. The significance of this lies in the fact
that the advertisement, costing of course only
what one-half page costs, so dominates the
page that the actual value of the advertise-
ment is practically equal to that of a full
page advertisement. It was because the As-
sociation's agency recognizes this fact that
this particular size advertisement was used
rather than the more expensive full page ad-
vertisement which has but little superiority
in value over the space in question.

.Rotogravure advertisements were carried
in a number of newspapers in the principal
markets, the entire list being shown in the
table elsewhere in this issue of the News.
.Ro&i'oravr i d--vertisements appeared in the
,papers in question 88 different times. The


combined circulation of the papers in which
rotogravure advertising occurred is 3,990,326.
Counting the number of times the various
rotogravure advertisements appeared, the
table will show that Clearing House roto-
gravure advertisements were printed 34,702,-
772 times-about one to every four persons
in the United States or, what is more valuable
from an advertising standpoint, more than
eight times for every reader of the eleven
newspapers which carried the rotogravure
advertising. As the table shows, insertions
in rotogravure sections appeared from 7 to 10
times, the rotogravure advertisements in the
Atlanta Constitution and Nashville Tennes-
sean appearing only twice and three times re-
spectively because of the limited period in
which fruit was marketed in the Southern
embargoed states.

While it was the purpose, in enclosing a
reproduction of the large rotogravure adver-
tisement, to give Clearing House growers an
idea of what the advertising campaign has
been this year, there is still another point
which, if followed out, will be of big help to
the growers themselves. After looking over
the rotogravure page and the advertisement,
mail the page to some one in the north whom
you know who probably does not read any
of the eleven newspapers which carried these
rotogravure advertisements, and also ask
them to show it to their friends. The adver-
tisement is one which no Florida grower may
be ashamed of. It is admittedly a fine piece
of work and what is far more important tells
its story in such a forceful and attractive man-
ner that it obviously is of tremendous value to
the growers in their effort to increase con-
sumer demand.

The Clearing House News has reproduced
from time to time some of the smaller adver-
tisements which were used during the past
season. These smaller advertisements were
of two different sizes, one being three news-
paper columns wide and about ten inches
high and the other being what is known-as
an "attention-getter," two newspaper col-
umns wide by five inches high. These three
sizes constituted the Clearing House Associa-
tion's campaign. The illustrations used in the
three column advertisements were the same
to a large extent, variety being obtained by
changing the position of the illustrations in
the advertisements. The text or reading mat-
ter of the advertisements was. changed fre-
quently, this manner of handling thus giving
the effect of a series of different advertise-
ments. Economy, of course, was one of the
primary reasons for handling the advertising
in this manner, expense of having different
illustrations prepared being the chief factor
which determined this policy of using a limit-
ed number of illustrations.


Destroy Fruit Only

New Ruling Means

The work of cleaning up in Flor-
ida was begun the middle of this
month upon almost state-wide pro-
portions. Governor Doyle E. Carl-
ton had previously designated Thurs-
day, April 17, as "official clean-up
day" and reports from all parts of
the state indicate that there has
been an almost universal effort to
rid the state of possible breeding
places for the Mediterranean fruit
fly.
A recent bulletin issued by the
government may have caused some
confusion in the minds of growers
and others in that the bulletin stated
that it would not be necessary to ,
destroy trees and plants which bear
hosts to the fly. Chairman W. C.
O'Kane of the Federal Fruit Fly
Board in clarifying this bulletin
said that the regulation refers
ONLY to the trees and the plants.
In other words, the trees or the
plants do not have to be cut down. '
The fruits however must be remov-
ed. Last year it will be remember-
ed that the trees and plants them-
selves were cut down or at least cut .
back. This year such action will
not be necessary. The fruits them-
selves merely are to be removed.
Some of the most dangerous hosts
of the Mediterranean fruit fly are,
in addition of-course to citrus fruit,
the avocado and the persimmon. It
is particularly important that these
hosts be removed. The non-com-
mercial plants because they are non-
commercial frequently are overlook- .
ed by growers and other property
owners and it is highly important
that all of them should be removed
from the trees.
There are several other danger-
ous hosts of the fly some of them in
the order of their importance or
degree of susceptibility being the
surinam cherry, guava, peach, man-
go, loquat, pear, plum, fig, papaya,
barbadose cherry and the white
sapota.
The loquat, the surinam cherry,
the guava and the peach are prob-'
ably the most predominate plant of
this last named group. Thousands
of property owners both citrus
growers and residents of towns or
cities have from one to all of these
particular plants in their yards. It
is quite easy to overlook them but
it is essential that their removal be
done immediately. The fly does not
generally lay her eggs in citrus, the
avocado or the persimmon while this
fruit is immature. This condition
does not always hold good however
in the other plants and fruits nam-
ed. Hence, the government requests
the destruction during the host free
period of these other host fruits.
Don't delay another day. Remove
these hosts now and when our next
shipping season arrives we at least
will be able to say to the govern-
ment that we have done our part.
That statement is going to make it
pretty difficult for Uncle Sam to
brand us further as "dangerous to
the other states."


Page 8 1


.


April 25, 1930




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