Title: Florida clearing house news ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086639/00022
 Material Information
Title: Florida clearing house news ..
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Growers' Clearing House Association
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Winter Haven Fla
Publication Date: August 15, 1929
Frequency: semimonthly (irregular)
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruits -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- Sept. 1928-
General Note: "Official publication of the Florida citrus growers clearing house association."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086639
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01306261
lccn - 30006589

Full Text






Library Comp.,
Bureau of Arig. Econ., 1
U. S. Dept. of Arig.,
Washington, D. %LORIDA CITRUS G1


News


ASSOCIATION


Representing More li O6; 0 'Growers of Oranges and Grapefruit
Headquarters: WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA


10 Cents a Copy
$2.00 a Year


AUGUST 15, 1929


Washington and State Authorities Appreciate Florida's Problem


-Growers Are Given

SCo-operative Talk

At Farmers' Week

Vice President A. M. Tilden
of Clearing House Tells of
Association's Progress

Farmers' Week at Gainesville this
(current) week, attracted a large
number of growers, farmers, dairy-
men and others interested in agri-
culture and its numerous branches
'and the visitors were by no means
lacking in interest, as the event was
opened.
The first day's program was fea-
tured in fact by an atmosphere of
eagerness upon the part of the vis-
itors for the problems confronting
te industry at present are mani-
- d and decidedly out of the ordin-
ary. The advent and depredations
Sof the Mediterranean fruit fly was
of course the reason for the un-
usually eager search for informa-
tion on things agricultural for this
pest has brought with him problems
to nearly every line of agricultural
e'ndayor,.
The fly was not given a formal
"place upon the week's program but
he was thoroughly discussed in-
formally and generally. Many of
the speakers mentioned him of
course as a complicating medium in
.crop planting. Then too, the fly
eradication program necessitated
the absence from the state univers-
ity town of many members of the
,Experiment Station and College of
Agriculture faculty who are busy in
Fighting the pest. Visitors and
authorities were however more opti-
mistic concerning the state's pros-
pects for a victory than would have
,been the case had Farmers' Week
been held a month or two ago.
SThe program devoted to the cit-
rus industry was perhaps more com-
*prehensive than ever has been the
case, for there were few points that
ware not touched upon during the
four days devoted to the subject.
;The Clearing House received an
important place upon the week's
,program, A. M. Tilden, of Winter


Farm Board Secretary


{ *.


CHRIS L. CHRISTENSEN

Members of the Clearing House,
and particularif- inetmbers of- last
year's Committee of Fifty, will be
interested in learning that Chris L.
Christensen, formerly principal ag-
ricultural economist in charge of
the division of cooperative market-
ing, Bureau of Agricultural Eco-
nomics, U. S. Department of Agri-
culture, has been appointed secre-
tary to the Federal Farm Board.
Mr. Christensen, together with L.
S. Hulbert, principal marketing
economist in the same bureau,
worked with the Committee of Fifty
a year ago in the task of setting
up the Clearing House operating
machinery. Both he and Mr. Hul-
bert were intensely interested in
the Clearing House and their en-
thusiasm and help was warmly ap-
preciated by the growers.

Haven, Vice President, speaking on
"The Future of the Clearing
House," on Tuesday. General Man-
ager A. M. Pratt had been scheduled
(Continued on Page Bix)


General Manager Pratt Finds,

Attitude of Open-Mindedness;

Eradication Will Be Thorough

BY A. M. PRATT
Having just returned from Washington, after being in
conference with all of the various departments interested
in quarantine work in Florida, I am happy to announce to
our grower and shipper members that we could not ask for
a more open-minded, fair attitude than was shown in dis-
cussing all sides of the problem. Necessarily this had to be
the attitude of those who were representing the Clearing
House and contacting Washington officials, and fortunately
we found that it was the attitude on the part of official
Washington towards Florida. Of necessity there must be
the strictest firmness in meeting the problem. The eradica-
tion campaign will be even more intense than it has been.
The thoroughness in searching for evidence of the Mediter-
ranean Fly will be greater than ever, and positively no fruit
that is known to be infested, or fruit that is likely to be in-
fested, will be permitted shipped, even if any of our growers
or shippers were short-sighted enough to want to do so. The
processing of fruit is nop to permit the shipment of fruit that
4known-to be or likely to be ,1-tii 42t ~L.t, iis f-.aii : ii-
tional safeguard required in localities where it may "be
thought necessary to make the rest of the United States
doubly sure that the Mediterranean Fly cannot reach their
borders.
The revised recommendations that Washington will be.
announcing are not yet formulated, nor definitely settled
upon, but we are in hopes that instead of requiring all citrus
fruit to be processed, the process treatment, either heat or
cold, will be required only for citrus fruit located in Zone
1 territories. The latest estimate of the number of bearing
citrus trees in Zone 1 is 4,600,000, which is 26% of the bear-
ing trees in the state, the total bearing trees being 17,665,-
000. The estimated number of bearing trees in Zone 2 is
10,281,763, or 407 of the trees in the state, making a total
of 66% in Zones 1 and 2.
Just to what territories treated Zone 1 fruit, and treated
and non-treated Zones 2 and 3 fruit, may be permitted is
yet to be announced, but we are satisfied that every priv-
ilege will be allowed which is consistent with the thorough
(Continued on Page Two)


Volume I
Number 22





Page Zfl-l ff -- NEWS August 15, 1929


AUTHORITIES FAIR
IN STATE'S FIGHT
AGAINST FRUIT FLY
(Continued from Page One)
eradication program which must at
all times be observed.
The time limit as to shipments is
a serious problem. The crop esti-
mate is increasing rather than de-
creasing. Up to December 1st the
movement is limited by the State
maturity tests, which will be strict-
ly observed, and should the balance
of the crop be forced into the
months of December, January and
February, as was originally an-
nounced, your committee sent to
Washington feels that it would be
disastrous, and we are confident
that -Washington is fully impressed
with the necessity of extending the
time limit far enough to permit an
economic movement of the crop, es-
pecially as we pointed out that late
valencias are a late maturing type
of oranges and Marsh seedless are
a late maturing type of grapefruit,
with susceptibility of infestation
being relatively and naturally post-
poned because of immaturity. We
recommend that the very early type
of fruit, like Boone's earlies and
Triumph grapefruit, be required to
be moved early, and that tangerines
and other kid glove oranges should
be the next'in early maturity date.
Washington's attention was called
to the late bloom in our mid-season
crop, or the June bloom as it is
commonly called, which would of
necessity, from a maturity stand-
point, have to be included with the
late valencia group. All these things
Washington is carefully consider-
ing, and we are confident it will
do that thing which is fair to the
rest of the United States as well
as to Florida.
Washington's attention was called
to a rather common misinterpreta-
tion. of the former quarantine,
whereby it was thought that fruit
in Zone 2 territory (or Zone 1)
wolld have to be held until Novem-
ber 1st to comply with the non-host
period. This interpretation is en-
tirely wrong. Washington wants all
early fruit shipped as early as pos-
sible, and there will be no time
limit restrictions as to earliness ex-
cept by the State maturity test.

WALNUT GROWERS FEAR PEST
Control, or attempts at eradica-
tion, of the walnut husk maggot,
said to be first cousin to the Med-
iterranean fruit fly-the cause of
a. California controversy according
to news dispatches-is not properly
responsibility of the county, nor
cqn any money be appropriated for
that purpose, was the decision of
the board of supervisors recently
when an appeal for an appropria-
tion of $7,000 was brought to them
by the manager for the California
Walnut Growers Association, Car-
lisle Thorpe.
"This is an emergency," he de-
clared, "a situation as serious to
the walnut industry as the Mediter-
ranean. fly is to the citrus interests.
There is.a.seventy per cent loss in
some of the infested districts."


Week


W, W4 W 0)
U s s b b o
r4 r r
4n o 4 a, O4 0)
B 3 ,ss W0 0 Sc4 0S to 0 S0 44, 0N I
CON I, tIN 5, uN 5, 40N 5, WC1


Sept. 2-8 ........
Sept. 9-15 .......
Sept. 16-23 ......
Sept. 23-29 ......
Sept. 30-Oct. 6..
Oct. 7-13 .......
Oct. 14-20 .....
Oct. 21-27 ......
Oct. 28-Nov. 3...
Nov. 4-10 .......
Nov. 11-17 ......
Nov. 18-24 ......
Nov. 25-Dec. 1...
Dec. 2-8 ........
Dec. 9-15 .......
Dec. 16-22 ......
Dec. 23-29 ....
Dec. 30-Jan. 5....
Jan. 6-12 .......
Jan. 13-19 ......
Jan. 20-26 ......
Jan. 27-Feb. 2...
Feb. 3-9 ........
Feb. 10-16 ......
Feb. 17-23 ......
Feb. 24-Mch. 1...
Mch. 2'-8 ........
Mch. 9-15 .......
Mch. 16-22 ......
Mch. 23-29 ......
Mch. 30-Apr. 5...
Apr. 6-12 .......
Apr. 13-19 .......
Apr. 20-26 ......
Apr. 27-May 3....
May 4-10 .......
May 11-17 ......
May 18-24 .......
May 25-31 ......
June 1-7 .......
June 8-14 .......
June 15-21 ......
June 22-28 ......
June 29-July 5...


9
60
120
206
369
314
491
771
935
S1080
1162
1396
575
477
1029
1054
378
510
624
489
372
433
485
499
376
361
373
306
265
230
221
150
126
92
50
29
7
4
5
2


Total........32365 16437
The above table showing the car-
lot shipment of oranges from Flor-
ida by weeks and the percentage of
the year's total movement for each
week during the past six seasons,
has anr important bearing upon pos-
sible governmental regulations af-
fecting the coming season's ship-
ments.
Tentative regulations, now being
considered by the gvoernment, will
shorten the coming crop season to


TIME Magazine Set

Straight Following

Article on Florida


Floridians, ever on the alert to
refute false propaganda, innocent-
ly or maliciously circulated as to
conditions in this state, have had
their patience sorely tried during
the past few months because of, the
Mediterranean fruit fly war. News
services, special newspaper and
magazine writers and gossipy (but
careless) letter-writers have
wrought considerable mischief with


1
8
62
113
263
381
471
781
1065
1147
1164
1300
469
458
724
731
771
666
662
734
746
793
764
757
602
558
491
559
697
640
414
192
168
119
62
45
27
16
3
1


22531 19625


1
12
49
227
805
1145
1125
1057
1736
1885
1457
405
1062
1597
1231
1197
487
1022
1166
1074
958
747
646
559
545
571
462
369
295
235
254
243
156
126
75
39
18
2


25090


an embarrassing degree. As the
figures showing average shipments
from Dec. 2 to March 29 inclusive
indicate, the total movement for
this period (for the shipment of
mid-season oranges) would be 15,-
402 cars. From March 30 to July
5 inclusive, the total movement of
late oranges is 4,226 cars or more
than 25% of the movement during
the peak period. Should this aver-
age figure of 4,226 cars be thrown
into the mid-season period, the mar-


their pencils and typewriters, some
even picturing the state as prac-
tically desolated. In fairness to
some, however, pen pictures of the
state's trials and tribulations have
been eminently just for they have
been handled as legitimate news
articles.
Recent articles in both Time and
The Literary Digest have been in-
cluded in the more harmful class
of news and have drawn answers
from one of the Clearing House
shippers. Mr. Randall Chase, of
Chase and Company, wrote the edi-
tors of both of these periodicals,
part of the letter to Time being re-
produced here. The letter to the
Digest was similar to that written


Cd 0e
E 9: c 0
s s" g xa D !"" '
0 0 u
Lo W C V
4, 4, 0I 4, ro


34
223
648
1111
1524
2805
4381
6290
7164
7447
8835
9536
3465
3627
7207
6093
4819
4214
5575
5713
5482
5470
4659
4910
4439
4054
4319
4091
3893
3197
3395
2593
2073
1843
1537
1197
693
582
105
34
7


33220


6
37
108
185-
254
468
730
1047
1194
1241
1473
1589
578
605
1201
1016
803
702
929
952
914
912--
777
818
740
676
720
682.
649
533
566
432
346
307
256
197
116 .
97
18
6
1


149268


keting of both mid-season and late
varieties would instantly become a
problem of tremendous difficulty.
Because of the period of maturity
it is manifestly out of the question
to lighten the mid-season period by
moving mid-season oranges during
the normal shipment time for early
varieties. Hence the question of
shortening the crop season assumes
considerable importance and is a
problem that may work much hard-
ship upon the citrus industry.


to Time. The excerpt from the let-
ter follows:
"The Editor, Time, Inc.,
350 E. 22nd St.,
Chicago, Ill.
Ceratitis Capitata Wied.
"Dear Sir:
"In your issue of July 29, under
'Florida's Shakedown' you mention
certain things as facts about the
Mediterranean Fruit Fly.
"Probably the most erroneous
impression you are giving is that
thousands of citrus trees have been
cut down. There has not been a
single citrus tree in commercial
acreage destroyed, nor has such ac-
tion ever been contemplated.
"You also state there has been


Florida Carlot Shipments By Weeks and Percentage

Oranges


--


August 15. 1929


ffT.nRTnb ~T.RARTNC: FTnLTSF NEW.S


T-- _*


J





AL


little or no production on the thou-
Ssands of acres in Florida. This ab-
solutely is not so. The citrus grow-
ers are cultivating and taking care
of, to the best of their ability, the
new citrus crop which will mature
this coming fall, and which will be
shipped.
"You also state that in the in-
fested areas no new crop can be
planted. The writer wishes to state
most positively that new crops can
be, and are being planted now in
what has been formerly termed 'in-
fested zones.'
"The eradication work has been
'most thorough and efficient. In
Orange County where the fly was
first discovered there have been no
flies, nor traces of flies, found for
over six weeks. In the adjoining
county of Seminole, which was next
to Orange County in the number
of infestations, no flies, nor traces
Sof flies, have been found for over
five weeks. We wish to direct your
attention to the fact that this is the
season of the year when conditions
are most favorable for the breeding
and spread of the fly.
"Officials in charge of eradica-
tion work have recently announced
that several days have passed when
no flies, or traces of them, were
found anywhere in the State of
Florida.
"It is absolutely impossible for
any one to accurately estimate how
many years this pest has been in
Florida. Due to the fact that it has
very lazy habits and does not travel
of its own accord on an average of
more than 400 to 500 feet it could
not have spread over so much ter-
ritory except over a period of years.
"Just at present Florida is suf-
fering vastly more from the cure
than from the pest itself.
"The chances of infesting other
sections of the country are nil. This
has absolutely been proved by the
fact that before the pest was offi-
cially announced millions of fruit
from the so-called infested areas
were shipped into the Southern
states, where no infection has oc-
curred for the reason that during
our shipping season when the fly
might have been carried to other
sections weather conditions and
crop conditions were such as to pre-
clude any possibility of the fly ex-
isting in those sections. To further
substantiate this statement we wish
to direct your attention to the fact
that two adult live flies were cap-
tured early last spring in North
Carolina. This is a matter of rec-
ord in Washington. In spite of the
fact that these flies actually ex-
isted, and undoubtedly others ex-
isted which were not captured, there
has been no infestation in North
Carolina for reasons already men-
tioned.
"Unfortunately tons of printed
matter, photographs, and propa-
ganda has been released and sent
over the country, and particularly
over the eastern states, not from
the government authorities who
should be considered the source of
correct information, but from Los
Angeles, California. This fact is


Bearing and Non-Bearing Citrus Trees and Citrus Acreage

In Zones 1 and 1 & 2 (Combined) As of July 31, 1929
Compiled By Clearing House From Figures Furnished By State Plant Board of Florida
Est. No. of Est. No. of Non-
Est. No. of Est. No. of Non- Citrus Acreage Bearing Trees bearing Trees in Citrus Acreage
Bearing Trees Bearing Trees In Zones 1 In Zones 1 & 2 Zones 1 & 2 In Zones 1 & 2
In Zones 1 In Zones 1 Combined Combined Combined
Alachua ---......---- None 50 1 50,000 30,000 125
Bradford_..........._ None None None 500 100 9
Brevard --------- 598,000 132,700 11,417 703,429 156,165 13,431
Citrus ...----_. ---. None None None 1,000 600 25
Clay____ __ ----- None None None 1,900 600 39
Duval -- ---- 800 70 13 7,700 4,300 188
Flagler --___ 1,800 1,200 47 17,922 11,730 464
Hernando .-- 20,000 4,000 376 70,000 44,000 1,781
Hillsborough .----. 170,000 115,000 4,453 786,000 542,490 20,757
Lake -- 438,200 119,400 8,713 1,251,890 341,188 24,892
Levy ---- 400 1,300 27 1,900 1,100 47
Marion --- 35,000 17,500 820 356,300 168,900 8,204
Orange ----------1,474,700 504,200 30,920 1,638.487 560,275 34,356-
Osceola ---- 47,200 17,200 1,006 179,400 67,600 3,859
Pasco ..._____ 13,600 4,800 287 217,000 77,400 4,600
Pinellas _- 300,000 50,000 5,468 814,664 98,550 14,268
Polk -- 614,700.. 65,400 10,627 4,179,846 444,954 72,26,3
Putnam ---- 150,000 40,000 2,968 294,663 79,941 5,853
St. Johns --_- ___ 14,000 1,800 246 36,106 3,396 617
Seminole --------. 235,800 131,076 4,795 314,398 94,770 6,393
Sumter ..___ 1,800 800 41 53,400 24,400 122
Volusia -------- 483,700 179,300 9,473 691,054 256,019 14,798
Total -___--- 4,599,700 1,385,796 91,698 11,667,559 3,008,474 227,091..
(26% of (32% of State's (27% of (66% of Bear- (69% of State's (66% of State's'
Bearing Trees Non-bearing State's Total ing Trees Non-bearing Total Citrus :
in State) Trees) Citrus in State) Trees) Acreage),
Acreage)
Total Bearing and Non-bearing Total Bearing and Non-bearing Citrus
Citrus Trees in Zones 1 ------- 5,985,496 Trees in Zones 1 and 2 (combined)-.14,676,008,
No. of Bearing Trees in Zones 1 & 2 _-11,667,559 Citrus Acreage in Zones 1 & 2 _. 227,091
No. of Bearing Trees in Zones 1 ------ 1,385,796 Citrus Acreage in Zones 1------- 91,698
No. of Bearing Trees in Zones 2-- .....- 10,281,763 Citrus Acreage in Zones 2.-------.............. 135,398'


borne out by a recent editorial in
the Boston Post.
"The writer trusts that you will
see fit to immediately correct the
false impressions which may have
been given by the articles of July
29, and also use your influence to
off-set the erroneous propaganda
coming from the Pacific Coast.
Yours very truly,
RANDALL CHASE."

President Hoover will recom-
mend to Congress, when it recon-
venes, that the Federal Govern-
ment contribute to the indemnifi-
cation of the Florida growers whose
fruit has been destroyed through
the activities of the Federal Gov-
ernment in the work of eradicating
the Mediterranean fruit fly-U. S.
Daily, July 20.


Exit Dayton, Ky.

As Headquarters

Of Reliable News

Dayton,. Kentucky's recent bid
for publicity at the expense of
Florida, has flopped with a casualty
of one physician's reputation and
the regrettable death several days
ago of the innocent participant in
the farce.
One Dr. Spitzleberger (his initials
are of little consequence) recently
hornswoggled some unsuspecting
newspaper reporter who, possibly


needing a story with which to ap-
pease his editor, soberly and en-
thusiastically wrote a ludicrous
article telling of the illness of a
small boy who had eaten of a fly-
stung orange or grapefruit. The
story was even so lacking in detail
that it failed to particularize as to
the variety of fruit eaten. The
story was given widespread distri-
bution-though how wide is diffi-
cult to ascertain-by the Associated
Press and then, admirers of the
truth confronted Dr. Spitzleberger
and the Cincinnati papers first us-
ing the article, with some depress-
ing refutations.
Doc. was fired from the job,
which he never should have held,
and a reputable physician was called
in who following an x-ray examina-
tion, immediately diagnosed the
case as an abscess of the stomach.
Others interested obtained ready
declarations from the United States
Government to the effect that no
case was on record of a person be-
ing made ill from eating a fruit
stung by the Mediterranean fruit
fly and furthermore (to refute
cther newspapers' stretches of im-
agination) that the fly is quite
harmless as far as mere man is con-
cerned and neither bites nor stings
as had been told.
The following editorial, reprinted
from the Orlando Morning Sentinel
recently, very ably handles the
matter, and sees the affair also as
more or less of a flight of fancy or
fairy tale:


"Just Pure Damfoolishness..
"Once in a blue moon somebody-
pulls a wonderful fairy story or
achieves a flight of the imagination
or falls victim to the delusions of
a most extraordinary post hoc -argu-
ment. All of these elements have.
been crammed into one news story
sent out from Dayton, Kentucky, by
the Associated Press. So amusing.
is the story to us at the center of the
Medfly infestation that we reprint
the thing in full. It reads:
"'Dr. Lawrence H. Spitzelberger
of Dayton, reported what he be-
lieves is the first victim of the. FPr-
ida fruit fly in this locality fn the
case of Bernard Koop, Jr., 11-year-1
old boy, who was taken ill seven
weeks ago.
'Dr. Spitzelberger said the child
was unable to assimilate nourish-:
ment and that death was only a few
days away. He said all kinds of food
were repulsive to the boy. The doc-
tor said the disease resembles ma-
laria fever in its actions.
'Dr. Spitzelberger said he learn-
ed from the boy's parents that the
child was fond of citrus fruits. The
doctor said he had conducted a
series of tests and had established
to his own satisfaction the poison
entered the boy's system by means
of citrus fruits which had been
stung by the Mediterranean fruit
fly.'
"We wonder where the gentleman
with the most peculiar name obtain-
ed his supply of fruit flies for an
analysis of their chemical constitu-
ents. We wonder what analyses the


August 15, 1929


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWST


Page 3





Paffe 4 FCHW1


physician performed upon the blood
of the alleged victim. We wonder
what the personal satisfaction of
Dr. Spitzelberger amounts to in sci-
entific circles. Has he isolated a
germ which differs from that of ma-
laria and which he has found in
specimens of the Mediterranean
fruit fly? Has he observed other
cases of poison from the eating of
Florida fruits or is this boy the sole
consumer?
"The gentleman who clipped the
story from the Chattanooga Daily
Times sent it to us with the ques-
tion, 'Don't you think such dam-
foolishness as this ought to be nip-
ped in the bud?'
"Well nipping wild stories in the
bud is a parlous undertaking; but
as to the damfoolishness of this one
there appears no doubt."-Orlando
Morning Sentinel.


Fruit Inspection

Work Sets Record

The inspection of fruits and veg-
etables by the Bureau of Agricul-
tural Economics of the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture broke
all previous records during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1929. A total
of 266,831 inspections were made,
of which 229,199 were at shipping
points and 37,632 at terminal mar-
kets. There had been no change in
the legal authority providing for
the Food Products Inspection Ser-
vice during the period named, and
the work both in receiving markets
and at shipping points was con-
ducted on the same basis and with
practically the same number of in-
spectors as during previous years.
Shipping point inspections
showed an increase over last year
of 18,367 cars, while receiving point
inspections showed an increase of
5,202 cars of fruits and vegetables.
Twenty-three States showed an in-
crease in shipping point inspections
during the past year and 15 States
showed a decline. Washington
showed the greatest increase of any
State, amounting to approximately
6,000 cars. Florida which showed
a decline in the number of inspec-
tions the year before, showed a
slight increase this year. California,
which showed a great increase in
the number of inspections the year
before, showed a decline this year.
Since inspection of fruits and
vegetables at receiving points was
inaugurated in 1917 and at shipping
points in 1922, the demand for this
service has been steadily growing.
On account of its providing a basis
fdr making sales and adjustments,
shippers and receivers are more
and more appreciating the value of
the service and making increasing
demands for it each year.

A specialist in farm finance and
credit has been appointed to the
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
by the Dept. of Agriculture.-U. S.
SDaily, July 23.


P.' 1


Marketing Problems
(Excerpt from Address by L. M. Rhodes, State Marketing Commissioner,
at Gainesville, Florida, August 13th, 1929, to Farmers
and Fruit Growers.)


Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentle-
men:
The subject which you have as-
signed me, "Marketing Problems,"
is so widespread in its scope, so
complex, and complicated, covers so
many commodities, coming from so
many countries, affected by so
many conditions, and governed by
so many factors, it would be im-
possible to discuss it from all its
different angles.
The Agriculture of the United
States with its investment of $75,-
000,000,000, and a gross output of
$12,000,000,000, the most intens-
ively American industry and by far
the most important single vocation,
is in the limelight just now, in the
presentation of economic problems.
Improved highways, railroad fa-
cilities, ocean transportation and
refrigeration, for the safe and rapid
movement of all kinds of farm pro-
duce, from tropical fruits and veg-
etables to frozen meats, and all
kinds of perishable and staple pro-
ducts, have so linked the agricul-
ture of this country in the insepar-
able chain of world-wide operations
in the production, distribution, and
marketing of its commodities, that
our marketing horizon is the ends
of the earth, and in discussing mar-
keting problems, we are confronted
with local, national, and interna-
tional supply and demand, and must
deal with competitive commodities
from competitive areas, on every
continent and the Isles of the sea.
Approximately 90% of the pro-
duce that farmers of the U. S. offer
the market is directly affected by
foreign production, in foreign mar-
kets to which we export, or in do-
mestic markets into which we sell.
The producers of one-half of our
farm products have to look to for-
eign markets for an outlet for some
part of their produce.
We export agricultural products
to sixty different countries, and the
value of our agricultural imports
coming from seventy different
countries in all parts of the world
is as great as the exports.
So it is obvious that both the
value and demand for our farm
produce is affected by foreign com-
petition.
American fruits are shipped to
all parts of the world. The fruit ex-
ports have increased 250% since
the beginning of the world war.
Our exports of citrus fruits have
shown substantial increases, but
they must meet citrus fruit from
Spain, Palestine, Brazil, South
Africa, Porto Rico, and the Isle of
Pines.
So undoubtedly one of our big
problems is tariff regulations to
protect our home grown products
and just how far to go with that
is a problem within itself.
The difficulties connected with
securing efficient group action
among the.150,000,000 agricultural
producers, from every nation kin-


dred and tribe who are constantly
competing with each other, are so
numerous and enormous that it
seems impossible.
Even the effective, permanent,
efficient organization and unfica-
tion of the various groups of pro-
ducers in the U. S. alone, on a
practical lasting working basis, is
one of our gigantic problems.
The standardization and grading
of commodities to meet the demands
of the trade, compete with competi-
tion, and furnish quality that will
satisfy consumers, and continue to
increase patronage is a problem
that we must meet and solve or go
on the rocks.
Adjustments in agricultural pro-
duce to meet changing conditions is
another problem not easy to work
out.
Intelligent productive programs
and marketing methods, adjusted to
modern requirements based on ade-
quate and reliable information, will
be imperative in the future.
It is just as important to veg-
etable growers of Florida to have
information from Mexico as from
Texas. In other words, they must
know just what their competitors,
both foreign and domestic, are
doing.
Profitable outlets for products
that we can and do grow in abund-
ance is perhaps our biggest problem.
But we also have a problem in
adjusting home production to home
needs in Florida.
One thing is sure, economical
production must be practical, mal-
adjustments in production must be
avoided, offerings will require in-
telligent preparation for market in
all lines of agricultural activities,
or else our difficulties and prob-
lems will greatly multiply.
Florida problems are numerous
and difficult. We are affected by
outside competition. We have 1500
miles of territory from Charleston,
S. C., to Houston, Texas, much of
which competes with us in veg-
etables to say nothing of other sec-
tions.
And our citrus growers have
problems in competition: improve-
ment of quality; regulations of
shipments; elimination of culls or
sorry grade from the market; in-
creasing export market advertising;
the danger of over-production or
under-consumption; the fruit fly
act.
But one of Florida's big market-
ing problems is partly one of pro-
ductive adjustment.
Florida is buying outside the
state meats and fats valued at $48,-
000,000; dairy and poultry products
valued at approximately $34,000,-
000; and feeds, grains, staple veg-
etables, and other food products
valued at approximately $45,000,-
000. The gross value of all fruits
and vegetables shipped out of the
state for the season just closed is
less, I think, than $86,000,000. So
after selling our perishable money


crops, we have a big agricultural
deficit. This is another problem
which should be solved, and I be-
lieve will be. It will require much
time and effort, but it is extremely
important.
And that cheap storage facilities,
equitable transportation rates, ade-
quate finances, and credit facilities
at reasonable rates of interest, large
scale group action among producers
growing similar crops so supply can
be to some extent regulated, con-
stant improvement in cooperative
marketing operations, the stabiliz-
ing effect that may come to agri-
culture through the service of the
Federal Farm Board, the assistance
rendered to agriculture by State
and Federal Departments, Experi-
ment Stations, Agricultural Col-
leges, and Extension Divisions,
coupled with grit, industry, intelli-
gence, determination, and char-
acter, of the American farmers will
eventually solve most of our mar-
keting problems.


California Growers

Will Co-operate With

Florida, Dezell Says

The kindly interest toward Flor-
ida and this state's fight against
the fruit fly by E. G. Dezell, gen-
eral manager of the California
Fruit Growers Exchange shown
when the Clearing House was ad-
vised about the Kentucky physician
claiming that fly-stung fruit had
caused the illness of a patient, is
further indicated by a letter just
received by General Manager Pratt
from California.
The letter took occasion to deny
that California is enjoying Florida's
discomfiture or is profiting at this
state's expense. An excerpt from
the letter is printed herewith, show-
ing that Californians sincerely re-
gret Florida's problem and that the
western growers are eager to co-
operate fully with us:
"Somehow or other, people seem
to think that California is advan-
taged by your fly difficulties. We
received a clipping of an editorial
in the Boston Post intimating that
California was sending out public-
ity on the fly in Florida with the
object of hurting your state. We
have also heard of remarks that
Florida's loss is California's gain.
I know that you and the responsible
people in Florida realize that we
are very much concerned over your
difficulties and that the restrictions
and interference with the distribu-
tion of your crop will directly affect
us. I presume under the new reg-
ulations that these restrictions are
likely to be changed with reference
to the states into which you can
ship, but if the early dates for the
cleaning up of the different vari-
ties are enforced, it is going to
necessitate the sale of a large vol-
ume of fruit early in the season.
Of course we will adjust our opera-
tions in any way we can to help out
in whatever difficulties the situa-
tion develops."


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


August 15, 1929


Page 4





Ags15199FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS P


Revised List of

Shipper-Members

Shows Big Gain

With this issue of the News,
publication of the revised list of
our shipper-members is resumed for
the benefit of the grower members
and others who may be interested.
In line with the terms of the con-
tract, permitting withdrawal from
the Association, or cancellation of
a contract by the Association, dur-
ing the month of June, a few of
the shipper-members withdrew from
the Clearing House as a matter of
form. They of course may renew
their contract at any time and as
a matter of fact several already
have done this. Others are expected
to do likewise as soon as they com-
plete their marketing plans for the
coming season. Four large shipping
agencies, that were not members of
the Association last season, have
thrown their support to the organ-
ization, and, it should be noted,
have added decidedly more tonnage
to the Association's volume than is
represented by members who have
withdrawn, some of whom have as-
sured us they will renew their con-
tracts later. Gentile Brothers, Or-
lando; William G. Roe, Winter
Haven; A. D. Symonds and Son,
Orlando; and H. D. Ulmer, Clear-
water, are the four new shipper-
members, announcements of their
joining having already been made.
Shipper-members who have again
joined the Clearing House after
having resigned during June as a
matter of form and who have there-
fore renewed their contracts, are:
David Bilgore and Co., Clearwater;
International Fruit Corp., Orlando;
and J. M. Mitchell, Elfers.
The following shipper-members
have withdrawn and, up to August
10 had not renewed'their contracts,
yet many of them are expecting to
be with us. However we must pub-
lish this list as withdrawn shipper-
members for the sake of protecting
our grower-members. As soon as
we receive favorable and final an-
swer, several of the following names
can then be included in our official
membership list: Acme Fruit Co.,
Ft. Pierce; G. A. Carey, Plant City;
Ellis-Chase Co., Lakeland; F. E.
Godfrey, Orlando; A. S. Herlong
and Co., Leesburg; Lake Charm
Fruit Co., Oviedo; Nelson and Co.,
Oviedo; K. S. Parrish, Parrish; P.
H. Varn, Plant City; S. J. Sligh and
Co., Orlando; Edwards and Weller
Fruit Co., Thonotasassa; Thomas E.
Ladd, San Mateo; Peace River Fruit
Co., Ft. Meade; Chandler-Davis Co.,
Lakeland and F. W. Bredow, Glen-
wood.
Shipper-members whose contracts
are cancelled by the Clearing House
are: American Fruit Distributors,
Jacksonville; C. H. Evans, Pal-
metto; Montgomery-Snyder Co.,
Tampa; Noggle and Kirkpatrick,
Winter Haven; Ebe Walter and Co.,
Plant City and G. H. White, St.
Cloud.
The past season's record of the


Adams Packing Co ...-. Auburndale
Alexander & Baird ..---... Beresford
American Fruit Growers- ...Orlando
Armstrong, F. C .......------. Palmetto
Bilgore, David, Co ....-- Clearwater
Blake, Ellis G.....-------Lake Helen
Burch, R. W., Inc. _----- Plant City
Cartlege, W. C.. ---- Crescent City
Chase & Co.-----.------------.Sanford
DeLand Packing Co. ------_ DeLand
Emca Fruit Co..--.... Crescent City
Fellsmere Growers, Inc. Fellsmere
Fields, S. A. & Co.. __ Leesburg
Flesch Bros......_- ...---- Auburndale
Florida Citrus Exchange-.......Tampa
Florida Mixed Car Co. _Plant City
Florida United Growers, Inc.
____--- Winter Haven
Fosgate, Chester C., Co. -- Orlando
Ft. Meade Packing Co.....Ft. Meade
Gentile Brothers ----- Orlando
Holly Hill Fruit Products, Inc.
._-----___--__ -Davenport
Indian River Fruit Growers
___.._......._......Wabasso
International Fruit Corp. ___Orlando
Johnson, W. A.____ Ft. Ogden
Keen, J. W. ..____ ----Frostproof
Keene, R. D., & Co. __..--- ---Eustis
Lakeland Co., The ------_. Lakeland
Lake Wales Fruit Packers, Inc.
--- ___---_ Lake Wales
Lamons, D. H. ------------Ft. Myers


Lee, J. C.........----...._.-----... Leesburg
Lovelace Packing Co. Winter Haven
Lyle, J. P....................-------San Mateo
Mammoth Groves, Inc._Lake Wales
Maxcy, Gregg, Co.........-------Sebring
Maxcy, L., Inc.-___...-----. Frostproof
Milne-O'Berry Packing Co.,
_- ...-... ._____ St. Petersburg
Mitchell, J. M.-----........--------.......Elfers
Mouser, W. H. & Co.------- Orlando
Okahumpka Packing Co.
_------ ..______ Okahumpka
Orange Belt Packing Co...---.Eustis
Pinellas Fruit Co .....-St. Petersburg
Richardson-Marsh Corp .--- Orlando
Roberts Bros. Co., Inc. __-Avon Park
Roe, Wm. G. ---___-__ Winter Haven
Roper, B. H..------. Winter Garden
Stetson, John B., Estate of
----_-- ----_--------DeLand
St. Johns Fruit Co....----.... Seville
Stone, Forrest B.-__------- .Maitland
Sunny South Packing Co.. -Arcadia
Symonds, A. D. & Son --- Orlando
Taylor, C. H ----- ----Wauchula
Ufco Packing Co _--------- Ft. Pierce
.lmer, H. D. ----------- Clearwater
Valrico Growers, Inc. ..----. Valrico
Welles Fruit Co. -----------. Arcadia
W. Frostproof Packing &
Canning Co.. __- W. Frostproof
White City Fruit Co--.... White City


Clearing House is expected to be
sufficient incentive for practically
all shippers in the state to join the
Association and to insure a control
of volume close to 90 per cent of
the state's entire crop. If the re-
spective marketing policies of ship-
pers like the Acme Fruit Co., J. J.
Parish, Southern Fruit Distributors,
Dr. P. Phillips, the Manatee Fruit
Company, E. Day and Co., and oth-
ers can be satisfactorily worked out
in conjunction with the Associa-
tion's purposes, the present mem-
bership roll of the Clearing House
will be still further strengthened.
Growers too, who as yet have not
joined the Association (nearly 1,500
new members have, however, joined
to date, a large number voluntarily
signing the past week) are expected
to add support to the Association
before the new season opens. Pub-
lic sentiment and the business inter-
ests of the State are so emphatical-
ly in sympathy with the Clearing
House that the growers feel greatly
encouraged and are joining heartily
their fellow-growers in boosting the
Association's strength.

SADDER, BUT WISER, YES?
An over-eager grapefruit shipper
of the Isle of Pines, anticipating by
several weeks the ordinary first-of-
season shipping, failed to even get
an offer in New York several days
ago for 100 boxes of grapefruit he
shipped there. According to news
dispatches the fruit had good ap-
pearance but the condition was
poor, showing early picking and
green color. The shipper probably
had been given hopes of a profitable
sale because of the excellent price
Porto Rican grapefruit has been
bringing in the Metropolis.


Shipper-Members of Association


A. C. L. Bulletin on

Fight Against Fruit

Fly Will Aid State

Wide-spread circulation, of an op-
timistic tone, of information con-
cerning the progress being made
against the Mediterranean fruit fly,
is being given by the Atlantic Coast
Line through distribution of its of-
ficial bulletin, "Timely Railroad
Topics."
The bulletin's circulation is quite
large and the good it will do Flor-'
ida's cause is tremendous. The
bulletin as issued, reads as follows:
Studies by a Committee of seven
well known entomologists having
determined that the fight against
the Mediterranean fruit fly in Flor-
ida has progressed so satisfactorily
that fruits and vegetables can, with
proper precautions, be shipped next
season without danger of permitting
the fly to spread to other sections,
Secretary of Agriculture Hyde an-
nounced on July 26th, that existing
quarantine restrictions will be mod-
ified accordingly.
This announcement has served
to clear the situation and has given
decided encouragement to every-
body concerned about Florida's fu-
ture. It means that during the next
season Florida growers and land
owners can confidently expect a
return from their labor and invest-
ment and gives every reason to hope


that business conditions will ma-
terially improve.
The discovery of the Mediterran-
ean fruit fly in Florida last spring
was one of the worst blows that has
ever been sustained by any State.
Knowledge of the destructive habits
of the pest and of the fact that once
established in other countries it had
never been eradicated, caused the
greatest concern for the future of
Florida's fruit and vegetable indus-
tries. The feeling of anxiety was
increased when the Federal Plant
Quarantine and Control Adminis-
tration and various states quaran-
tined against Florida products.
The State Plant Board, however,
immediately began control meas-
ures. Funds were made available
by the Federal Government and the
State, and Florida began, with grim
determination, to rid itself of the
pest.
At the outset it was decided that
the fly must.-be eradicate 0 iTbe
methods adopted looked to starving
the fly by the removal of all fruits
and vegetables upon which it was
known to feed, by poisoning it, and
by treatment to kill the puparia in
the soil.
At first it was difficult for the
layman to see what progress was
being made. New infestations were
reported rapidly. Thousands of
boxes of fruit upon which the own-
ers were dependent for their in-
come, were destroyed. Planting of
most fruits and vegetables over a
wide area was prohibited. No one
knew what the future held.
Gradually, however, the effects
of the vigorous fight began to be
apparent. Evidences of the fruit fly
were hard to find in groves where
the required clean-up and control
methods had been followed. New
infestations dwindled. Those inti-
mately familiar with the work be-
ban to have the hope which, as the
fight progressed grew into the con-
viction, that the fly, if not beaten,
was on the run.
The findings of the Committee of
Seven verified this fact and gave
grounds for anticipating the eradi-
cation of the fly.
The fight against the fruit-fly
is not yet won. Indeed, the modifi-
cation of the quarantine is based
upon the Committee's recommenda-
tion that the fight must be prose-
cuted on an enlarged scale and with
renewed vigor. But it is a fight
that in the end promises victory for
Florida, provided there is continued
cooperation and observance of all
requirements.
The Mediterranean fruit fly has
never before been eradicated. But
probably never before has it been
fought by American scientists,
backed by a determined people
whose economic exsitence was at
stake.
Modification of the quarantine
opens the way for a return to nor-
malcy in Florida. From now on it
is confidently expected that con-
ditions in the State will show a
steady improvement that will lead to
the re-establishment of widespread
prosperity.


August 15, 1929


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


Pa e K





Page 6F


The following figures, furnished
by the United States Department of
Commerce, show the grapefruit and
orange exports from New York,
Jacksonville, Tampa, Los Angeles
and San Francisco for the weeks
ending June 8 to July 20:
Week Ending June 8


GRAPEFRU


IT


New York-London _------
New York-Liverpool ----
Los Angeles-London -
Los Angeles-Liverpool ....
Los Angeles-Hull ---._--
Los Angeles-Glasgow -..
Tampa-London -...- -.-

Total ---------
ORANGES
Los Angeles-Liverpool ----
Los Angeles-London ------
Los Angeles-Hull ------------
Los Angeles-Glasgow --.-
Tampa-London .- -

Total .--_--_--.--------------


Boxes
-- 671
S62
---- 5,750
-- 1,700
--- 525
500
.--- 14,743

--. 23,951

------ 17,265
---- 10,530
------ 5,695
------- 1,250
1,848

-- 36,588


ORANGES
London -_----------.- .20,000
Liverpool .-----------12,537
Glasgow ---------1,000
Manchester-------------- 850

Total ----___-----_ -------34,387


Week Ending Ju
GRAPEFRUI


Week Ending July 6
GRAPEFRUIT
New York-London ----
New York-Liverpool_--
Los Angeles-London ---
Los Angeles-Liverpool ----_. -
Los Angeles-Southampton .--
Los Angeles-Glasgow .-------


ne 15


New York-London -----.---
New York-London (crates)
New York-Liverpool ------
Los Angeles-London ----...
Los Angeles-Liverpool -----
Los Angeles-Glasgow ---..
Los Angeles-Manchester --
Jacksonville-London -- .
Jacksonville-Liverpool --.-

Total .- ----... --


Boxes
936
--. 1,107
84
--- 2,350
- 750
5 00
250
-- 1,090
- 166

.-- 7,233


ORANGES
Los Angeles-London ..----. 17,325
Los-Angeles-Liverpool ------ 1,500
Los Angeles-Glasgow ---------- 500
Los Angeles-Manchester ---.2 350
Jacksonville-Liverpool ---------- 2,029


Total ----


21,704


Week Ending June 22
GRAPEFRUIT Boxes
New York-London----- 1,231
New York-Southampton --- 12
New York-Liverpool--- 96
Los Angeles-London ..2------- 3,450
Los Angeles-Liverpool ------- 8,577
Los Angeles-Southampton--.. 1,000

Total ------------14,366
ORANGES
Los Angeles-London -----.- ----- 23,050
ILos Angeles-Liverpool ---------- 28,494
Los Angeles-Southampton ----- 1,000

Total--------------- 52,544


Week Ending June 29
GRAPEFRUIT


Boxes


New York-London _-- 944
New York-Southampton ....-- 1,060
New York-Liverpool.-----------3 35
Ios Angeles-London .--------- 5,100
Los Angeles-Liverpool ..------ 3,796
Los Angeles-Glasgow.--------- 500
Los Angeles-Manchester -----. 250
Jacksonville-Liverpool -.....-- 2,247

Total-........______ .. --------13,962


Boxes
777
39
9,684
6,475
1,500
1,500


Citrus Exports


Total -


GROWERS ARE GIVEN
COOPERATIVE TALK AT
FARMERS WEEK
(Continued from Page One)

to speak but was unable to attend
owing to press of business.
Mr. Tilden's address pointedly
emphasized the necessity of the
agriculturist substituting his in-
dividualism i t h co-operation,
simply because present-day business
demands it. His talk in full is given
herewith as follows:


FUTURE OF CLEARING HOUSE
(Address of A. M. Tilden at Gaines-
ville August 13, 1929)
It is not to the credit of the
American farmer that so many of
the industries which supply his
needs should have strengthened
themselvess by industrial mergers,
eliminating wasteful competitive
niethods, inefficient production and
disorderly marketing, while he has
continued to remain the world's
greatest individualist. The individ-
ualist attitude, while perhaps a
comfort to one's vanity, is not an
attitude likely to successfully stand
present day mass production and
competition. Industry does not de-
pend upon Government for research
work. Much as I, as a farmer, ap-
preciate the research work of the
National and State Agriculture De-
partments, yet how gladly would I
be a part of a company sufficiently
substantial to initiate and perform
such work.
We Florida orange growers have
seemingly begun to emerge from
the chrysalis where we have been
sleeping; and, peculiar to relate, we
have done so at an unusual time.
Generally, co-operative methods
are brought into existence by eco-
nomic crises. Even the most con-
firmed individualist will pay atten-
tion to a general movement when
his business fails to be profitable.
But the Clearing House movement
was originated during the highest
price period ever experienced by
the citrus growers. I think it was
a sign of the times-a sign of the
awakening of the American farmer
to a realization of his importance
in the economic scheme of the
country and of his determination to
show that his intelligence and abil-
ity to meet changing conditions are
equal to that of any so-called group
of business men. No longer is he
willing to say, "Well, it was just
another one of those bad years."
He is resolving that there shall not
be any more of those bad years, at
least no more the responsibility for
which can be traced to him.
Disorderly marketing, wasteful
competition and ignorant distribu-
tion of his product must cease.
There were engaged in the dis-
tribution and marketing of our cit-
rus crop somewhat better than 150
agencies. The competition between
them was keen, frequently resulting
in wasteful methods.. And, ladies
and gentlemen, I want to tell you
that it was greatly to the credit of
the men operating these agencies


.--- -- 20,975


ORANGES
Los Angeles-London --------22,066
Los Angeles-Liverpool ---------- 27,280
Los Angeles-Southampton__.. 1,500
Los Angeles-Glasgow ...-------- 1,250
Los Angeles-Hull ----------- 14,150

Total-- .---66,246
Week Ending July 13
GRAPEFRUIT Boxes
New York-London -- ----- 957
New York-Liverpool------------ 539
Los Angeles-London -----. ---- 4,600
Ios Angeles-Liverpool -.--- 80 300
I.os Angeles-Glasgow ..------- 1,000

Total ------- 7,396


ORANGES
Los Angeles-London --..
Los Angeles-Liverpool-_
Los Angeles-Glasgow --


Total


--.25,350
.--- 300
--. 250

---25,900


Week Ending July 20
GRAPEFRUIT
New York-London -----------
New York-Liverpool----
Los Angeles-London -----
Los Angeles-Liverpool .------
Los Angeles-Southampton --.


Boxes
196
162
1,100
5,401
1,750


Total ------------------ 8,609
ORANGES
New York-Liverpool ------------- 854
Los Angeles-London -- 1,800
Los Angeles-Liverpool .---- 27,005
I.os Angeles-Southampton.--.. 1,500

Total ...----. ---.-------.31,159

U. S. HOPES TO CREATE
FOREIGN CITRUS MARKET
G. E. Lueben of Milwaukee, has
been appointed United States Trade
Commissioner to make a study of
European markets for the Depart-
ment of Commerce to ascertain
prospects for additional American
exports of citrus fruits. His head-
quarters will be in Hamburg, Ger-
many.
The bulk of citrus fruit exports
in past years has gone to Canada
but the Commerce Department says
that there has been a noticeable in-
crease recently in exports of grape-
fruit and oranges to England and
Germany. France and Sweden are
said to be exhibiting interest in
citrus fruits also.


that they saw this and were willing
to associate themselves together for
the betterment of our citrus indus-
try. When we think of our nu-
merous shipper-members, all com-
petitors of each other, assembling
in frequent meeting to discuss, al-
locate and apportion shipments,
deciding what each member shall
be allowed to ship the coming week,
how much shall be allotted to the
key markets, giving freely infor-
mation concerning general destina-
tions, you realize that there is pre-
sented for the first time a compre-
hensive picture of our marketing
and distributing situation, that for
the first time our agencies are
working in the daylight, with a
clear view of the flow and spread
of fruit over the country, and are
no longer working by guess and by
gosh. And I would ask you to real-
ize further that every act of these
shipper-members is subject to the
approval or disapproval of t h e
Board of Directors, in whom is all
authority, which Board is composed
of growers elected by growers.
There are really three depart-
ments in the Clearing House. The
central and authoritative body is
the Board of Directors, composed of
eleven growers. Four of these are
directors at large, voted upon at
the annual election by every grow-
er member. The other seven are
regional directors, representing
seven districts of the State. These
men are voted upon only by the
growers of their district.
On one side of this body is the
Operating Committee of the ship-
pers. This body is composed of
thirteen men who meet weekly dur-
ing the season. They come from all
parts of the State to the Clearing
House office in the evening and
work until the early morning hours,
allowing and allocating the ship-
ments, and deliberating on general
methods of packing house opera-
tions.
On the other side is the Commit-
tee of Fifty, which holds meetings
at stated periods and which also
has an executive committee which
meets very frequently. It is the
purpose of this Committee to con-
stantly keep the Board of Directors
advised of the thoughts and ideas
in the minds of the growers. This
Committee is generally called an
advisory committee. It has per-
formed a very useful function. I
would ask you to bear in mind once
again that every action of this Op-
erating Committee and every action
of the advisory committee which
pertains to Clearing House opera-
tions is subject to the approval or
disapproval of the board. This or-
ganization is grower controlled, and
must remain so.
The Clearing House has com-
pleted its first season and is about
to enter its second. Naturally, the
first year of any organization at-
tempting new and untried things is
a period of stumbling and groping
and trying to find the best way. I
was not connected with the Clear-
ing House its first year, but when
I did become connected by repre-
(Continued on Page Eight)


August 15, 1929


Page 6


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


T





August 15, 1929 FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS Page 7


Florida Carlot Shipments by Months for Six Seasons

The accompanying table shows
the monthly carlot movement of
oranges and grapefruit (and mixed (Each Month's Percentage of Entire Season's Shipments Also Is Shown)
'fruit) from Florida during the past
six seasons as well as the percent- As Reported By United States Department of Agriculture
Jage of each year's total for every
month. In explanation: There were ORANGES
i1,050 cars of oranges moved in Oc- ORA
tober of the season just closed, this
movement being 3 per cent of the
season's total of 32,365 cars. Again, a
in November of the season of 1927- ra - | s
1928, there were 2,945 cars of g I = 0 c
rangess moved, or 18 per cent of P Pw r _4 P, e H P E" c P o
that season's total of 16,436 cars.
.' The table also reveals an inter- Oct ....... 1,050 3. 870 5. 530 3. 511 3. 339 1. 1,114 3. 4,413 3.
eating sidelight relative to even *735
movement of the crops, comparing Nov ..... 3,497 11. 2,945 18. 3,508 16. 3,207 17. 4,707 19. 6,173 19. 24,037 16.
m4,006
,the past season's movement, with Dec. ...... 4,880 15. 4,150 25. 4,858 22. 3,965 20. 5,970 24. 5,162 15. 28,985 19.
its tremendous crop and accompany- *4,830
ing problems, with the movement of Jan. ....... 5,225 16. 3,285 20. 4,050 18. 3,111 16. 4,682 19. 4,196 13. 24,549 16.
Past years. There is a readily pre- *4,091
ceptible difference between the man- Feb. ...... 4,711 15. 1,848 11. 3,814 17. 2,972 15. 4,170 17. 4,585 14. 22,100 15.
-her in which last season's fruit was *3,683
put into the markets and' that of March..... 4,364 13. 1.851 11. 2,728 12. 2,834 14. 2,753 11. 5,372 16. 19,902 13.
former years, the number of cars April ...... 4,487 14. 1,072 7. 2,078 9. 2,392 12. 1,551 6. 4,193 13. 15773 11.
moved each month, or each month's *2,627
percentage of the year's crop, being May ...... 3,441 11. 392 3. 762 3. 563 3. 804 3. 1,956 6. 7,918 6.
,ore uniform and even than is the *1,319
case of the other years. June ...... 710 2. 23 ... 134 ... 70 ... 109 ... 475 1. 1,521 1.
This of course was due wholly to *253
'the Clearing House policy of pro- July ...... ... ... ..... ... 10 .......... ... 7 17
rating the shipments among its ship- *2
-per-members so as to keep the fruit Aug. ......... ... ..... ... 2 ... .. ..... .. ..2
flowing as evenly as it was humanly 32,365 16,436 22,474 19,625 25,085 33,233 149,218
possible to do, to the markets. The
pro-rating, in addition to proving a GRAPEFRUIT
market price factor, resulted also in Oct. ...... 2,170 10. 1,721 13. 768 4. 966 6. 1,848 9. 2,435 12. 9,908 9.
creating and maintaining the con- *1,651
'fidence of the trade and shippers Nov....... 2,107 9. 1,866 13. 2,702 16. 2,129 15. 2,632 13. 2,532 13. 13,968 13.
which is so necessary, particularly *2,328
in a big crop year. Dec. ..... 2,183 10. 1,495 11. 1,748 10. 1,793 13. 1,873 10. 1,623 8. 10,715 10.
*1,785
I HollandI I Is Jan. ...... 2,998 13. 2,026 14. 2,684 16. 2,425 17. 2,305 12. 2,459 13. 14,897 14.
"Judge" Holland Is *2,482
Feb. ....... 3,038 14. 1,838 13. 2,488 14. 2,082 15. 3,382 17. 2,693 14. 15,521 15.
Appointed Counsel *2586
Appointed counsel March .... 3,180 15. 2,185 15. 2,860 17. 2,234 16. 3,031 15. 2,798 15. 16,288 16.
F C i*2g H 2,714
For earning House April 3,416 16. 1,690 12. 2,414 14. 1,606 11. 3,545 18. 2,131 11. 14,802 14.
*2,467
Spessard L. Holland, prominent May ...... 2,549 12. 1,047 7. 1,477 9. 851 6. 1,218 6. 2,305 12. 9,447 8.
attorney of Bartow and former June ...... 223 1. 239 2. 158 175 1. 249 ... 506 2. 1,550 1.
'-county judge of Polk County, has *258
been selected as Legal Counsel for July ...... .... ... 77 ... 5 .. .... ... ... ... ... ... 82
the Clearing House to succeed *13
Judge C. O. Andrews who has been Aug. .......... .. ... ... ... ... .... ... ... ... ... ... .... .
Made a member of the commission
to assist the Supreme Court of 21,864 14,184 17,304 14,261 20,083 19,482 107,178
r Florida. Action in selecting MIXED
"Judge" Holland (as he is popular-
Sly known). was taken Aug. 6th at Oct. ....... 211 21. 437 7. 98 2. 89 2. 49 1. 129 4. 1,013 3.
a meeting of the Executive Corn- N168
a mittee of the Association at Or- Nov...... 1,075 12. 1,129 18. 798 15. 397 11. 554 13. 440 12. 4,393 14.
,mittee of the Association at Or- *732
lando, and followed recommenda- Dec. ...... 1,537 17. 1,433 23. 1,088 20. 619 18. 1,005 24. 526 15. 6,208 19.
,tion of Judge Holland by the *1,034
Committee to Investigate Legal Jan....... 1,694 19. 1,020 16. 787 17. 844 24. 894 21. 424 12. 5,663 18.
P Counsel. *943
The resolution effecting the ac- Feb. ...... 1,483 16. 873 14. 883 13. 529 15. 687 17. 500 15. 4,955 16.
Stion reads as follows: *825
"The Committee received the re- March..... 1,207 14. 678 11. 703 12. 606 17. 544 13. 517 15. 4255 13.
*709
port of the Committee to Investi- April...... 1,169 13. 406 7. 626 5. 361 10. 334 8. 591 15. 3,487 11.
gate Legal Counsel and by unani- *581
.mous action decided to request May ...... 549 6. 213 4. 265 1. 101 3. 129 3. 348 10. 1,605 5.
Judge Andrews to continue to act *267
' as Counsel until September 1, 1929, June ...... 126 1. 29 ... 58 ... 19 ... 29 ... 65 2. 326 1.
at which time it is understood he *54
Swill be assuming his duties as a July ...... .... ... .... ... 5 .. .... ... .... ... .... 5 ...
member of the Commission to as- 2
'sist the Supreme Court of Florida. Aug. ............... 2 ... .... ....
"The Committee further decided 9,051 6,218 5,313 3,565 4,225 3,540 31,912
rto employ Judge Holland as of Sep-
tember 1, 1929." Average monthly shipments.






Pawe F


GROWERS ARE GIVEN
COOPERATIVE TALK AT
FARMERS WEEK
(Continued from Page Six)
senting my district on its board, I
was most agreeably surprised to
find that such a good start had been
made on its fundamentals and that
such a fine spirit of energy and
fairness existed. I found that this
first year, which, as the trying-out
period, was not expected to produce
material or startling achievement,
did the unexpected-real achieve-
ment was accomplished. This is the
more remarkable in that normally
no organization nor business hopes
to do more than lay the bare
groundwork for ensuing accom-
plishment or progress. The Clear-
ing House, however, blessed with an
unusual degree of confidence from
its grower and shipper membership,
not to mention the determination
of,,all to make the venture a suc-
cessful one, not only laid the
groundwork for its aims and pur-
poses but actually succeeded in
making substantial progress.
In examining its audit I find that
out of an income of about $600,000
(4c per box), $289,500 (1.93c per
box) had been spent for advertis-
ing, not in Florida, but in the con-
suming centers; that $75,000 (.50c
per box) had been spent for inspec-
tion of grade and pack; that about
$139,500 (.93c per box) had been
spent for all other items, including
organization, office expense, pub-
licity, etc.; and that there was on
hand a balance of $96,000 (.64c
per box). This shows painstaking
thought and economy.
Let me discuss the fundamentals
of the Clearing House Association.
To start with let us take advertis-
ing. A national agency, whose rep-
utation is second to none, is em-
ployed. Talks on Florida and its
fruits are broadcast during the sea-
son. Commodity advertising policies
are used, and daily, before the
consuming public, the merits of our
fruits are cried. This campaign,
which last year cost nearly $300,-
000, represented an initial attempt
in Florida to advertise Florida cit-
rus rather than a Florida citrus
brand. While the amount spent
might be regarded at first blush as
as quite a large sum, it was in fact
less than one-fifth of what Cali-
fornia spent, the amount invested
by our Pacific rivals touching the
enviable figure of $1,700,000. The
association's campaign was, how-
ever, well directed, and the money
was spent where it did the most
good. Unquestionably it aided tre-
mendously in popularizing com-
sumption of Florida oranges and
grapefruit, for it repeatedly ham-
mered home the superior qualities
of both our oranges and our grape-
fruit. More directly, the campaign
put the Florida orange and grape-
fruit to the forefront as they never
had been before, and without "a
doubt made many new friends for
our citrus, as well as convincing
some who in the past have favored
citrus other than Florida's that our
product is superior to any other.


The Clearing House at present is
working on tentative plans for this
coming season's advertising cam-
paign, and while it is difficult at
this time to place an estimate upon
the probable cost of the campaign,
it is certain that last year's intro-
ductory campaign will be ably sup-
plemented during 1929-1930. When
you observe that our season is only
seven months long, you can readily
see that a concentration of expen-
diture for advertising during such
a period is equal to nearly twice
such an expenditure spread over a
twelve month period.
Then, to take the matter of
grade and pack. It is considered
paramount that our name and the
name and brands of our members
indicate a standard of quality,
a standard of dependability and
honesty. The buyer is entitled
to honest goods, honestly packed,
and to achieve this, we have,
during the packing season, thirty-
f i v e trained inspectors visiting
our plants regularly and daily re-
porting their findings to our office.
And today we can show you the
most complete record in history of
such work so performed. The
shipper members of the association
were quick to see the advantage
of this work, and even the North-
ern trade noted the results early in
the season. This inspection resulted
in a decided improvement in the
grading throughout the association's
territory, and this, it must be re-
membered, even in the face of a
tremendous volume of poor quality
fruit-fruit that ran small and was
scarred by wind-blown thorns and
branches. This phase of the asso-
ciation's work, which is probably
more familiar to the shipper than
to the average grower, has been re-
garded as one of the things most
likely to give Florida an opportun-
ity to compete more equally with
California than has been possible
in the past.
It is most interesting to note the
improvement in the standard of
grade; and I truly believe that by
the middle of the coming season
the Clearing House standard of
quality will mean to the trade what.
we always intended it should mean
-the pack of the Clearing House
members is dependable. This de-
pendability is to be identified by a
Clearing House emblem, an emblem
which will be printed on every box,
on every wrap, to tell the consumer
that he is buying Florida fruit
which has come under this careful
inspection, insuring him a uniform
and dependable grade and quality.
The operating committee of the
Clearing House holds weekly meet-
ings during the season, and at these
meetings allots to each shipper
member the number of cars he may
ship during the coming week. An
examination of last year's ship-
ments will show the most uniform
movement of fruit that we have
ever seen. The shipments dis-
tributed by the association repre-
sented 74 per cent of the state's
total movement. By means of a
pro-rating of the weekly shipments
among each of the shipper-members,


the association opened up the pos-
sibilities in and significance of this
highly important phase of market-
ing. Even distribution of the fruit
into the northern markets is prob-
ably more far-reaching in its direct
benefits to Florida citrus growers
than either standardizing the grade
and the pack or advertising the
fruit, although these phases cannot
of course be ignored or even
slighted. The even flow of the fruit
has an immediate tendency to af-
fect market prices, in that it min-
imizes chances for either over-or-
under-supplied markets. The bene-
fits of the standardization of grade
and the advertising campaign were
more cumulative than immediate.
The operating committee has
taken up the matter of allocation,
and in the latter part of the season
did allocate the movement of fruit
to a very considerable extent. I
mean by this that the shippers were
directed to send only certain quan-
tities to the Northeastern states,
certain quantities to the Southern
and certain quantities to the middle
Western states. This was done in
an effort to prevent any particular
section of the country from being
over-crowded with fruit while an-
other section was short. Especially
was the movement of fruit to the
key markets closely watched. The
receiving brokers, or agencies for
our shipper members, were in-
structed as to how many cars they
should offer for sale in the big key
markets on certain days. So you
see, each broker knew what the
offerings would be and could goy-
ern himself accordingly. W h e n
there was fruit on the track in ex-
cess, it was not simply dumped into
the auctions, but was held on the
track and fed through the auctions
as sparingly as possible.
I think it is plainly evident that
distribution as governed by allot-
ment and allocation, when con-
sidered from the point of view of
the three existing quarantine zones
in Florida, can only be handled in-
telligently by a central agency.
Think what it would mean if fruit
from Zone 3 were shipped in quan-
tity to those Northern states which
alone are available for Zone 2 fruit.
What a shame it would be to have
the parts of the country into which
fruit from Zones 1 and 2 can go,
fed also with fruit from Zone 3,
while the states where only fruit
from Zone 3 can go would be cry-
ing for the lack of fruit.
To my mind, it is indeed fortu-
nate that we have machinery set up
for handling this complicated prob-
lem. If it had to be handled by 140
agencies, each working in total
ignorance of the actions of the 139
others, the result could scarcely fail
to be disastrous.
It is not the fault of the orange
growers in Florida that the Mediter-
ranean fly has been found in their
properties. While it is certainly
their misfortune, yet they are in no
way to blame. The economic situa-
tion created by the quarantine has
caused a tremendous loss of both
money and property which will take
a long time to replace. The spirit


of our people has been wonderful
Their courage and fortitude have'
been the one bright spot in the
whole situation. It is the wish of
our people that the fly should be
eradicated. It is not the wish of
our people that the fly should
spread to other fruit producing sec-
tions of our country, but if the fly
is to be confined to our state until'
eradicated and if this is to be done
for the benefit of the country as a
whole, then I maintain that in all
fairness the people of the United
States should reimburse our grow-
ers for their sustained losses. The
Declaration of Independence says
that every man is entitled to "life,
liberty and the pursuit of happi-
ness." The pursuit of happiness in'
Florida recently has been an illusive
thing. The cardinal principle of our
Government is that there shall be
no confiscation of invested capital
without proper remuneration, and,
based on these principles, the Clear-
ing House Association is making
strong representations to the Na-
tional Government for reasonable
and sympathetic treatment for our
people.
When the Secretary of Agricul-
ture and his department heads came
down to make a personal investi-
gation of the fly situation and to,
discover the most fair and reason-
able regulations, based upon the
work of the research department,
for the shipping of the coming crop,
the secretary requested the Clearing
House to call a meeting of all grow-
ers. This meeting was held at Win-
ter Haven and was so well attended
that amplifiers had to be placed in
the streets and the block in front
of the theatre roped off to take
care of the over-flow crowd. While
the secretary was here he held fre-
quent conferences with the Clear-
ing House Washington Committee,
and has ever since used the exper-
ience and knowledge of the Clear-
ing House men in formulating such
regulations as will best protect the
other fruit producing sections of
the country and yet be practical in
their application to our daily pack-
ing house operations. I think my-
self that it was fortunate that the
growers of the state had a recog-
nized central agency of their own
to handle these matters. If thq sec-
retary had been obliged to consult
with 150 odd shipper agencies his
progress would have been slow and
unsatisfactory.
I presume that most of you have
heard the tale of the Kentucky boy
whose physician alleged that he
had been made ill by eating Florida
fruit infested with fly. The Clear-
ing House immediately made an in-
vestigation of this case and has re-
ceived a report from its examiner,
saying that the original doctor had
been discharged from the case and
other physicians employed, who,
after examination, diagnosed the
case as abscess of the stomach. I
suppose that if I didn't have a suf-
ficient medical training to enable
me to determine such an ailment
as abscess of the stomach, I might,
in my effort to conceal the fact
that I did not really know what the


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


August 15,. 1929


Page S8





August 15, 1929 FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS Pare 9


matter was with my patient, lay
his trouble to almost anything. I
understand that the physicians who
succeeded the original one were
very quick to deny his story and I
can tell you that very quietly but
thoroughly the true story is being
passed around in quarters where it
,will do the most good.
It was a difficult thing to as-
Ssemble into one agency the great
number of concerns whose interests
had been so largely competitive.
The whole effort of the Clearing
House was not to tear down or to
destroy any legitimate operator.
-The whole intention of the Clear-
ing House was to strengthen and
'build up the distributing system of
the state and to provide a medium
through which all these agencies
could work to their own benefit and
especially to the benefit of their
grower clients. Suspicions and jeal-
ousies have been allayed. Honesty
and. integrity of purpose have been
experienced, and as each month
goes by the fairness of attitude of
our shipper members becomes more
evident. We learn as we go, and
steadily find how to smooth out the
rough spots and to coordinate our
efforts in a way that is more mind-
ful of the needs and the good of
'-the producers.
At this time I have to tell you
that not all of the shippers or grow-
ers have joined the Clearing
House. Personally, I can see noth-
ing in the Clearing House attitude,
nor can I find any reason why any
shipper or grower should refuse to
join. Many growers raise the ques-
tion, why should we join the Clear-
ing House when the shipping agency
which handles our fruit is already
a member and, for us, pays the
Clearing House assessment, and au-
tomatically obtains for us all the
benefits and privileges of the as-
sociation? This question I would
answer by saying that we must have
either a grower controlled Clearing
House or a shipper controlled Clear-
ing House. Unless the growers evi-
dence a proper interest and in-
dividually become members, we
shall find that we have a Clearing
House whose members consist main-
ly of shippers, and that was not
the intention of the thousands of
interested growers who originally
organized the Clearing House. If
the Clearing House be grower con-
trolled, if it be grower owned, then
its member growers are in a posi-
tion to demand that their shipping
agencies earnestly carry out the
fundamentals of the Clearing
House and conduct all of their op-
erations, first for the benefit of
the producers, and last for the bene-
fit of the agency. As time goes on,
I believe that any intelligent and
well-meaning shipper will more hon-
estly have to admit to himself that
he is harming his grower clients by
not joining, and I would say to you
now that any grower who does not
urge his agency to become a mem-
ber is doing himself an injustice.
It is gratifying to be able to say
to you that the Clearing House
seems to be making progress.
Whereas in its first year it con-


Bearing Citrus Trees in Florida by Varieties and Counties

Lemon &
Counties Orange Gft. Tang. Lime R. Lemon Satsuma Total
Trees Trees Trees Trees Trees Trees Trees


Alach. ---- 75,358
Baker --------- 164
Bay --------. 5,188
Bradf. -- 1,523
Brev. 5------ 510,888
Brow. 16,877
Calhoun ----__- 94
Charlotte ------_ 33,182
Citrus 18,631
Clay ------ 4,753
Collier ----- 12,735
Columbia ------ 774
Dade .-- _- 157,336
DeSoto ----- 304,568
Dixie -- 1,158
Duval ---__-. 13,371
Escambia _..._.- 341
Flagler ----------. 9,364
Franklin _-- 162
Gadsen ---- 90
Gilchrist ..------.. 1,131
Glades .-----..... 2,751
Gulf ___- __ 1,358
Hamilton __ 48
Hardee ------- 353,681
Hendry 30,637
Hernando _------- 44,805
Highlands -- 482,070
Hillsborough --- 593,977
Holmes __...--_ 6
Ind. River..---- 174,064
Jackson 561
Jefferson ------ 69
Lafayette ___--. 57
Lake ---_---- 860,125
Lee -____-- __. 203,277
Leon ---___- 206
Levy -_ 4,363
Liberty -...-- 173
Madison .------- 109
Manatee ----_- 198,382
Marion ..--.---_ 317,947
Martin ------ 32,340
Monroe ----- --- 4,774
Nassau -- 260
Okaloosa 9
Okeechobee 15,605
Orange ----1,242,290
Osceola -- 128,297
Palm Beach 46,956
Pasco --- ----- 183,756
Pinellas -- 392,540
Polk -------3,062,835
Putnam --- 227,018
St. Johns ---- 30,419
St. Lucie ------ 188,382
Santa Ro. -- 97
Sarasota ------------ 90,811
Seminole 236,976
SSumter ---- -- 75,836
Suwannee 490
Taylor 341
Union _------ 607
*Volusia -- 499,253
Wakulla -- 42
Waltoft 525
Washington ------ 219


4,551
60
1,274
34
160,480
17,396
10
15,222
1,707
278
13,106
36
443,029
106,054
33
827
329
3,043
8
15
60
3,027
46
2
63,639
15,508
21,695
257,617
174,784
4
250,101
176
78
1
282,591
229,118
184
127
7
266,265
43,879
44,896
8,902
7
4,898
223,345
37,419
41,884
64,764
374,658
1,628,992
28,732
3,205
157,604
16
73,969
33,602
9,176
38
4
21
76,853
20
200
43


4,402
15
72
4
28,154
443
23
3,533
142
59
235
9
18,460
36,111
13
249
47
5,504
2

19
110
16

47,507
1,251
16,123
49,120
55,749

17,406
24
4
1
104,145
9,542
79
112
2
1
5,455
32,462
4,352
2,481
2
752
165,179
19,882
2,456
14,594
45,797
223,710
35,910
1,342
37,583
6
2,375
42,499
3,299
24
8
110,629
3
2


76
10

1,244
1,166
100
7

155

6,181
139
8
11


299
3
294
55
15
1,622
248

1,834


1,045
1,102
60
7

541
239
4,380
155,451

544
680
462
4,109
438
287
716
56
10
5,363

1,005
492
139


256


65
40

2,218
1,287
13
317
38
3
175
3
7,118
714
23
33
22
11
8

13
421
5
1
920
450
35
2,092
1,704
1,256
2

1,528
952
12
36
8

1,499
268
899
8,449
3
2
872
4,702
2,409
4,998
437
902
801
435
230
1,867
3
159
400
437
1
3
2
1,592
96
3


3,357
1,756
38,064
1,011

1,363

1,007
234

8
997
52,005

250
24
575
9


5
317
285

72,919
1,656
2
1,849
734
71
26

676


4,662
256
1
210
6
15
2,268
703

17,201
116
34.
414
37
203
634
750
21,157
7,656


87,809
1,995
44,648
2,572
702,984
37,169
1,053
52,354
20,525
6,100
26,406
1,056
632,124
447,586
1,235
15,485
52,755
17,922
180
355
1,147
6,608
2;003
60
466,041
47,901
82,673
742,526
826,779
295
444,661
73,682
1,807
61
1,251,283
443,991
1,275
4,716
183
143
472,142
395,471
86,867
180,057
272
4,673
22,671
1,636,452
188,471
100,403
264,199
814,190
4,917,069
294,419
35,909
390,789
17,353
168,319
314,085
88,921
385
841
689,217
812
21,981
7,903


Total...... 10,846,932 5,189,679 1,149,490 190,849 52,992 235,503 17,665,445


trolled about 74% of the volume, it
is going into its second year con-
trolling about 90% of the total vol-
ume of Florida citrus. During the
spring and summer nearly 1500 new
grower members have joined, and
also the last of the big shippers
have become members.
With such support and such
brains as are at our command we
look to the future with high hopes
and clear courage, satisfied that we
are fundamentally sound and actu-
ated by honest and laudable pur-
poses, which must eventuate in
good for our people.


New Law Settles

Grapefruit Rule

Governor C. C. Young recently
signed a new California grapefruit
maturity bill according to press
dispatches which is of special inter-
est to growers and consumers. The
new law provides'for:
A 6 to 1 standard at time of
picking for grapefruit maturity
with a 25 per cent color standard
in the district south of the San
Gorgonio Pass in Riverside county


and east of the Sierra Nevada
range, comprising parts of the
counties of Riverside and San Diego
and all of Imperial county, and 5%
to 1 with 25 per cent color in the
rest of California.
This will mean a better fruit
going out of California, the sort
that can better compete with the
eastern product. The enactment
of this law is considered to be es-
pecially opportune, for, with Flor-
ida under partial quarantine Cal-
ifornia grapefruit will undoubted-
ly be invited into areas which never
before have given it a trial.


August 15, 1929


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS


Pace 9





age FRDA -LEARNG------- OSE----------- ------ -NE--WS--


FLORIDA CLEARING HOUSE NEWS
AUGUST 15, 1929
Published Semi-monthly by the FLORIDA CITRUS
GROWERS CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION,
DeWitt Taylor Bldg., Winter Haven, Florida.
Entered as second-class matter August 31, 1928, at
the postoffice at Winter Haven, Fla., under the Act of
March 3, 1879.
DIRECTORS


E. C. AURIN .
J. C. CHASE . .
J. A. GRIFFIN . .
F. G. MOORHEAD
R. E. MUDGE .
PHIL C. PETERS . .
JAMES T. SWANN .
A. M. TILDEN .
E. E. TRUSKETT .
ALLEN E. WALKER
R. B. WOOLFOLK .
OFFICERS
J. A. GRIFFIN
A. M. TILDEN .
ALLEN E. WALKER .
E. E. TRUSKETT .
ARCHIE M. PRATT


Ft. Ogden
SOrlando
Tampa
SDeLand
Fellsmere
Winter Garden
Tampa
Winter Haven
Mt. Dora
Winter Haven
Orlando

President
Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary
General Manager


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Per Year: $2.00 Single Copies: 10c

Floridians' Character
The farther the pendlum swings in one
direction the greater its momentum when it
starts retracing its course. This law of action
and reaction is operative not only in physics,
but quite as obviously in the human and
social sphere. It governs the "dance of life."
One rises to dizzy heights on a wave of
stimulation. One sinks to unplumbed depths
the morning after. Similarly, when a com-
munity or region surrenders to the intoxica-
tion of a boom, it must expect an aftermath
commensurate with its inflation. "The big-
ger they come, the harder they fall."
Twenty-six banks in Florida have closed
their doors since July 5. Much ink has been
spilled to attribute this phenomenon of de-
pression to the ravages of the Mediterranean
fruit fly. Undoubtedly this pest has been a
contributory factor, but the fact remains that
the rise and fall of fortune in our peninsular
paradise have almost exactly, paralleled each
other, both in extent and in time consumed.
The unexpected boom which peopled Flor-
ida with millionaires achieved its peak a lit-
tle more than three years ago. It had begun
gathering its force three years before that.
Today the cycle is complete. The curve of
deflation equals that of inflation.
There is considerable encouragement in
this thought. Having sown the wind, Florida
has reaped the whirlwind. But now the har-
vest is about over. The way is opened up
for .a comeback on sound, conservative lines.
The state's climate and fertility remain, and
though hurricanes and pests may recur, these
or their equivalent are the price of existence
.in any region especially favored by nature.
STheir effect can never be more than tempor-
Sary where development does not race ahead
Sof resources and expansion yields to common
sense. Florida is due for better days. The
guaranty lies in the character of her people.
-' -New York Herald-Tribune.


Farm Board Loans and the Clearing
House Plan
One who reads the Farm Relief Act can
but be impressed with the fact that insofar
as it has to do with co-operative associations,
the bill was framed on a conscious or uncon-
scious basis of the California plan of co-op-
erative marketing. A close perusal of the
document has created doubt in some minds
as to whether the Florida Clearing House
Association would come technically under
the provisions of the co-operative section,
since that organization is composed of both
packers and growers; while the bill would
appear to limit participation in the revolv-
ing fund to co-operatives composed exclus-
ively of growers.
We trust that this interpretation on the
part of some who have studied carefully the
act is a wrong one; and that the Florida type
of organization which appears the only sat-
isfactory solution for co-operative marketing
of citrus fruit in this State meets the require-
ments of the act. If it does not it is difficult
to see what benefit Florida citrus producers
could secure from the Farm Relief Act, for or-
ganization on the California plan would nec-
essarily exclude packers and shippers who
are also growers of about 30 per cent of the
citrus fruit. Under such a plan, Florida citrus
could not be distributed in what the Farm
Board would consider an orderly manner.
And that arrangements must be made by
Florida for an orderly distribution of the
citrus crop to receive financial aid is a pro-
nouncement of the newly-created Farm
Board. In fact, their statements to repre-
sentatives of the Florida Citrus Exchange and
the Florida United Growers were fraught
with significance. They said in effect: We
are sympathetic, but; you must consolidate
your co-operative movement and unify your
program looking forward to a more orderly
distribution of the citrus crops of Florida, in
which event we shall go as far as we pos-
sibly can in financing your difficulties.
Meanwhile it appears certain that no
such changes can be made as will assure a
loan from the Farm Board to install equip-
ment and facilities for heating and cooling
processes before the beginning of the com-
ing marketing season; and it was for that
purpose that a loan was requested.
Apart from such a temporary need (and
we believe even that can be taken care of
and will be taken care of), we can ste no
reason why the Clearing House Association
can not take care of itself as it was doing
and planned to do before the passage of the
Farm Relief Bill and as the California group
has done for many years. Certainly if se-
curing a loan were contingent upon drastic
changes in the Florida plan, the loan might
prove to be a disastrously expensive move.
The California citrus co-operative organ-
ization fits California conditions; the Clear-
ing House plan uniquely fills Florida's needs.
If the provisions of the act are applicable to
both types of organization, all well and good
if we need financial assistance. If the pro-
visions of the act fit California alone, we
shall keep plugging away; but that is not
the end of the story, by a very great deal.-
Orlando Sentinel.


Electric Device to

Kill Fly Larvae Is

Not 0. K.'d by Board

The Clearing House has just re-
ceived word from W. W. Others,
entomologist of the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, advising grow-
ers of the introduction of an elec-
trical device claimed to kill the
Mediterranean fruit fly larvae. The
device is not approved by the fed-
eral authorities despite attempts of
the promoters to give the impres-
sion that it meets the approval of
the officials.
Mr. Others' letter to the News
reads as follows:
Orlando, Fla., August 13, 1929.
The Clearing House News,
Winter Haven, Fla.
Gentlemen:
I am in receipt this morning of
a post card which is using the De-
partment of Agriculture as well as
its personnel for advertising pur-
poses. This firm is making an ef-
fort to sell electrical heating de-
vices for the purpose of heating
citrus fruits to kill any larvae of
the Mediterranean Fruit Fly that
might be present. This firm has
never been authorized to proceed
in this manner and neither has any
other firm been authorized to com-
mit such an act. Our experiments
up to this time indicate that elec-
tric current is entirely too expens-
ive to be used for the heating of
citrus fruits in order that these
fruits may enter inter-state com-
merce. The cost for electric cur-
rent was about four, or perhaps
five times as great as high pressure
steam.
Any packing house manager or
other fruit shipper may obtain in-
formation on heating or pre-cooling
by addressing the U. S. Department
of Agriculture, Box 491, Orlando,
Florida. It will interest the grow-
ers to know that Dr. Lon A. Haw-
kins and Dr. Galloway of the De-
partment are here.
Yours very truly,
W. W. OTHERS,
Entomologist.

ARIZONA GROWERS
SEEK FUNDS TO FIGHT
MEDITERRANEAN FLY
A public statement as to whether
funds to fight the Mediterranean
fruit fly will be apportioned was
asked of Governor John C. Phillips
of Arizona recently in a resolution
by citrus growers of the Salt River
Valley.
The sum of $18,000,has been ap-
propriated already, but Dr. Oscar
C. Bartlett, state entomolgist, main-
tains that it is not enough, and
states the governor has refused to
discuss future programs with him.

Northwest Florida Satsuma grow-
ers will hold their annual Satsuma
Orange Festival in Marianna No-
vember 14, 15 and 16. Exhibits
are expected to be unusually com-
plete and to show a big increase
over those of former years.


August 15, 1929


ffT.nRT~nA C.T.T~ARTNC, RnTT.SE NEWS


T>- 1 n




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