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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Preface
 Main














Title: Biennial report of the Prison Division of the Department of Agriculture of the state of Florida for the years ..
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 Material Information
Title: Biennial report of the Prison Division of the Department of Agriculture of the state of Florida for the years ..
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Prison Division
Publisher: Dept. of Agriculture, Commissioner's Office.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1919-1920
Frequency: biennial
regular
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Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
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General Note: Description based on the 26th Biennial report, 1939/1940.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00086638
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 244123589

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Preface
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
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        Page 11
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Full Text







SEE==


SIXTEENTH


BIENNIAL REPORT


OF THE


Prison Division


OF THE


Department of Agriculture

OF THE


STATE OF FLORIDA



FOR THE YEARS 1919 AND 1920,
ALSO SHOWING STATISTICAL DATA FOR THE YEARS
1917 AND 1918


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.




T. J. APPLEARL. PRINTER, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
-0690.~i


I.


INV, '60


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|| LIBRARY
1' ;
;UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

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SIXTEENTH


BIENNIAL REPORT

OF THE



Prison Division

OF THE


Department of Agriculture

OF THE


STATE OF FLORIDA
'A,


FOR THE YEARS 1919 AND 1920,
ALSO SHOWING STATISTICAL DATA FOR THE YEARS
1917 AND 1918


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


T. J. APPLEYARb. PRINTER, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA








S[0282
















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.


DEPARTMENT OF AGRlCUL.TURE, STATE OF FLORIDA,
C6OMiISSIONER'S OFFICE.


To His Excellency,
Hon. Cary A. Hardee,
Governor of Florida.


Tallahassee, Fla., January 12, 1921.


I have the honor to submit herewith the Biennial Report of
the Prison Division of the Department of Agriculture for the
years 1919 and 1920.
Respectfully submitted,
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.


















PREFACE.



Prior to the adoption of the Constitfition of 1885, the Depart-
ment of Agriculture was known as the "Department of Lands and
Immigration." The Legislature of 1889 established the Depart-
ment of Agriculture. This is the sixteenth Biennial Report
of the Department of Agriculture and the third to be made by
the present incumbent.
There are many people in the State yet who do not recognize
the importance of this Department in other matters pertaining
to their interests.
To submit a report that will give the best results, I find it
necessary to present each branch or division of the Department
separately, treating each distinct from the other.
That the public may be advised of the magnitude and range
of work of the Department of Agriculture, an outline of the
duties of the Commissioner is shown by the following divisions:
1. The Division of Agriculture.
2. The Division of Immigration.
3. The Prison Division.
4. The Pure Food and Drugs, Stock Feed, Fertilizer and Citrus
Fruits Division.
5. The Land Division.
6. The Field Note Division.
7. The Fish and Shell Fish Division.
8. The Oil Inspection Division.
In addition to the above, the Commissioner of Agriculture is a
member of the following boards:
1. The Board of Commissioners of State Institutions.
2. The Board of Pardons.
3. The Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund.
4. The Board of Drainage Commissioners.
5. President of The State Live Stock' Sanitary Board.
6. Chairman of Executive Committee of the State Marketing
Bureau.














SENTIMENT AGAINST LEASING STATE
CONVICTS.


Sentiment against the leasing of State Convicts in Florida
finally won out, and Chapter 7833, Acts of the Legislature, ap-
proved May 24th, 1919, forever settled' the destiny of the State
Convicts in Florida.
This act of the Legislature provided for the following:
1. The abolition of the lease of State Convicts, which should
become effective December 31st, 1919.
2. The Act provided also where the convicts should be worked.
(a) The, disabled of both races and sexes to be kept at "The
State Farm," near Raiford, in Bradford County.
(b) To assist in the proper conduct of "The State Farm,"
seventy-five able-bodied male convicts, in the discretion of the
Board of Commissioners of State Institutions, would also be
retained at this Farm.
(c) The other able-bodied State Convicts to be turned ovei
to the State Road Derartment, for work on the public roads
of the State.
3. Rules and regulations for the working of the State Convicts
to be provided by the Board of Commissioners of State Insti-
tutions directly enforced by the Governor and the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture.
4. Certain Convicts, from time to time, to be employed at the
other State Institutions, when in the judgment of the Board
of Commissioners of State Institutions the labor of said con-
victs can be used advantageously at said institutions.
5. The Act further provided for the levy of a State tax of three-
eighths of one mill on the dollar to assist in the maintenance
of the convicts at The State Farm and' for other necessary
expenses of the State Prison system.

WHERE THE PRISON POPULATION WAS EMPLOYED ON
JANUARY 1, 1921.

At the State Farm, Raiford, on January 1st, 1921, there were
the following female and disabled male prisoners:

W hite Males .................... 102
W hite Females .................. 3
Black M ales .................... 280
Black Females .................. 37


Total ......................... 422














There was also it the State Farm, on same date as provided for
by law, the following able-bodied male prisoners:

W white M ales .................... 13
Black M ales .................... 49

Total ......................... G2

The above figures lhow a total of 484 prisoners at State Farm
on January 1st, 1921.
The remaining able-bodied male prisoners were at the various
State Road Camps, and the State Institutions, as follows:


Camp Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
14
15
16
18
19
22
23
24


Located at .
Altha, Calhoun County,
Hilliard, Nassau County,
Ponce de Leon, Holmes County,
Cleveland, DeSoto County
Macclenny, Baker County,
Sanderson, Baker County,
White Springs, Hamilton County,
Jennings, Hamilton County,
Hague, Alachua County,
Watertown, Columbia County,
Suwanee Valley, Columbia County,
Bishopville. Volusia County,
Crescent City, Putnam County,
Midway, Gadsden County
Parrish, Manatee County
Bunnell, Flagler County,
Panama City, Bay County,
Istachatta, Hernando County,
Zellwood, Lake County,


Total


At Florida State Hospital, Chattahoochee, Florida.... 2
At Girls' Industrial School, Ocala, Florida........... 1


Number
34
35
35
29
3G
35
38
42
29
40
38
38
36
28
23
37
21
25
29

628















TYPES OF CRIMINALS.




From the time of Aristotle, the world's most famous ancient
philosopher, to Loinbroso of today, who believes the criminal is
a special type of man-possessing traits of savagery, morbidity
and insanity-the wrongdoing of mankind has been studied from
many angles and the literature devote. to the subject is volumni-
ous. Merro and Ferri. the modern Italian contemporaries of Lam-
broso, have divided law-breakers into the following five classes:
1. Criminals by pas-ion or impulse. To this class most mur-
derers and personal assailants belong.
2. The insane criminal, whose wrongdoing is the result of dis-
ease, for which there ailpears to be no remedy except restraint.
3. The instinctive-congenital or born criminal-a trait
merged into the insane class. One usually weak or feeble-minded
and therefore lacking in moral stability.
4. The occasional criminal, generally normal, but weak in
character; often the victim of greed, circumstances, temptation
and poverty. This perhaps constitutes the largest clas of crim-
inals.
5. The professional criminal, usually well developed, one who
gets a wrong start in life; gifted with ingenuity and skill, he
spends more time in evading the law in his crookedness than
would provide a good living in right doing. He belongs to a
dangerous class, the members of which take delight in their
anti-social perversions.
In all and by large the criminal may be looked upon as a
detective, ranging from the idiot, at- the bottom round of the so-
cial order, up through, the insane to the skilled confidence man'
who plies a. vocation in which he takes pride .not unlike the
normal or right-acting man does in his achievements.
Bad environment no doubt plays its share in the making of
criminals, but congenital weakness-lack of moral sense or stam-
ina-more perhaps than anything else puts men behind the bars
or under the ban of society.
Mankind has inherited physical and mental traits an:l ten-
dencies, and likewise legislative bodies have followed precedents
in law enactments, customs and enforcement, with too much
of the spirit of retribution or revenge, "an eye for an eye," in
dealing even with first offenders.. LAW IN THE OLDEN TIME WAS
THE SCIENCE OF TORTURE. The bed of justice was a rack, and















thumb screws tore the truth and falsehood-more generally the
latter, out by the roots of the nails. In proportion as education
advanced the condition of the world became better.
The State Prison of Florida has representatives of all classes
of criminals, more of the occasional criminal than any other,
and the question in Florida. as everywhere, is how to handle
the exiles for the best interest of themselves and society. The
negro constitutes a very. large percentage of Florida criminals,
and the same is true of other Southern States. The negro as a
class has a dull or poorly developed moral sense, and lacks men-
tal activity, but, as a rule, he is a more docile prisoner than the
white man.
Multiplicity of Laws.

The law has made many advances in these later years, but it
still abounds in useless verbiage, irritating delays, antiquated
opinions and precedents of one sort or another, very much out
of line with modern life, modern science, modern discoveries
and morern ideas of justice. The tendency, however, in recent
years is the attempt to regulate everything by statute. The
Legislatures of the various States in the last two years passed
over 1,500 new laws, and Florida had a share in this.number.
This growing superfluity of laws, so voluminous that'no one
man can know them, regularly adds to the legal criminal list of
a large number of persons who would not knowingly violate
any law, Few men in these days are exempt under the multi-
tudinous restrictions being constantly imposed, from being guilty
of some offense and liable to criminal prosecution. It was ex-
Governor J. W. Folk, of Missouri, who once said: "When in
doubt, pass a law." Sixty thousand laws have been enacted in
,the United States in the last five years. Only the lawyer-if
this keeps, up-who makes a business of studying the statutes,
will be able to familiarize himself with them and keep out of
jail."
Punishment.

Punishment does not always fit the crime. When one be-
comes familiar with the inequality of penalties he is forced
to the conclusion that the passing of sentences for crime is a
good deal of a lottery. Penalties for.the same crime vary great-
ly in the different States. For example, in Florida the bigamist
is given a limit of five years, while in Georgia he gets ten. For
assault with intent to kill the Florida law provides an extreme
penalty of 20 years, while Georgia decrees ten years as the limit.












11

Four States provide the limit of death for first degree burglary,
while one State puts seven years as the limit. Eight States pro-
vide death penalties for first degree arson, while two States give
a range of from one to ten years in prison. Strikingly arbi-
trary differences will be found in the various States for all
kinds of crime. Altogether the degrees of crime and the pen-
alties provided seem like guess work, when comparisons are
made, and when the range of a sentence is from one to twenty
years it gives a court a good deal of latitude.















THE CONVICT PROBLEM.



There is no economic question of greater importance to the
State or Nation or one which is receiving more consideration
than the question of delinquents of all classes.
At the Industrial School for Girls, Ocala, the records will show
an average attendance of approximately forty since the opening
of the school, four yeai's ago. A new dormitory is in course of
construction, and provision for reeciving forty more is made in
the addition of this building.
The Boys' Industrial School, Mariamia, will show an average
attendance of approximately three hundred since it was estab-
lished some twenty years ago, one-third of which are white and
two-thirds negroes.
The State Hospital, Chattahoochee, has approximately seven-
teen hundred. These unfortunates, different from the others, are
mentally sick, and can be placed in three general classes as fol-
lows: The insane, which includes by far the largest number
of patients; the epileptics and the feeble-minded.
A new institution was authorized by the Legislature in 1919,
to be known as a "State Farm Colony for the Epileptics and
Feeble-Minded." This institution is located near Gainesville, and
will be ready for the reception of this class of the State's un-
fortunates some time during next year.
The State Hospital at Chattanoochee will immediately send to
the Epileptic and Feeble-Minded Colony all the patients 'now at
Chattahoochee, which should be in such a colony. The number
that could be transferred at this time is approximately two hun-
dred. The epileptic and feeble-minded should never 'have been
sent to an insane asylum, but the State had no other place for
them. Think of little children feeble minded, having to spend
a lifetime with the insane. That is what hundreds have done in
this State. Let us hasten the time when those who are now in
Chattahoochee may be sent to a home where they can have at
least a little chance of being developed into citizens.

The State Prison.

The Florida State Prison is located near Raiford, in Bradford
County, on a tract of land comprising more than 1700 acres.
Until January, 1914, the lessees of State prisoners were under
contract to care for the women prisoners and the infirm of both












13

races, the State owning nothing in the way of buildings and
equipment.
To carve out a great farm in the wilderness and jungle, build
stockades and other buildings, furnish and equip the farm and
buildings to care for the convicts of a State. was no ordinary
undertaking. This the Board of Commissioners of State Institu-
tions did, and by the end of the year 1914 had the necessary
buildings and equipment and a large farm cleared and ready
for the plow.
To give some idea of what has been done for the State con-
victs and with convict labor and money derived from tneir hire.
I give below, what one would see today, if he were to visit
the "State Farm"-Florida State Prison:















VALUE OF BUILDINGS AT STATE PRISON
FARM.



For Employees and Prisoners.

Superintendent's residence .................... ...... $5,000.00
Four dwelling houses for attendants .................. 7,600.00
New dwelling (300 yards S. W. dairy plant) ............ 4,000.00
Auditorium .......................................... 2,500.00
Tubercular hospital .................................. 3,500.00
Night guard's cottage ................................ 160.00
Guards' quarters .......................... ........... 1,600.00
Hospital and woman's building ....... .. ............. 7,120.00
W hite m ale building ................................. 4,000.00
Colored male building ................................ 4,667.00
W white male building ......... . ....................... 4,000.00
Two dinner sheds and stockades ...................... 2,000.00

Stables and Sheds for Horses and Mules.

Horse stable and shed ................................ 1,000.00
Two mule sheds and stables .......................... 2,000.00
Six mule sheds .................. ..................... 3,300.00

Buildings at Dairy Farm.

Two silos, Ellerbee ($1,500.00 each) .................. 3,000.00
Dairy rest shed ...................................... 2,000.00
Dairy barn and equipment ............................ 6.000.00
Separating department .............................. 2,000.00
Barn ......................... ....................... 1,500.00
Ox barn ..................... ........................ 1,650.00

Poultry Houses and Equipment.

Chicken farm office and supply house .................. 250.00
Chicken breeding house ............................. 100.00
Brooder house .................... .... .............. 200.00
Growing stock house ................................ 200.00
Three shelters ($100.00 each) ........................ 300.00
Three hospital and fattening pens ($10.0.00 each) ....... 300.00
Seven colony houses ................................. 430.00














Miscellaneous Buildings.

O office .............................................. 1,333.00
Com m issary ............................ ........... 750.00
Power plant and addition ............................. 2,400.00
Sawmill .............................. ............... 1,000.00
Addition to sawmill shed ............................. 133.00
Shed addition to sawmill ............................ 47.00
Barrell factory ...................................... 160.00
Gin house and potato shed ............................ 1,600.00
Barn ...................... ........................ 300.00
Elacksmitn and paint shop ............................ 250.00
Carpenter shop ...................................... 250.00
Plumbing and tool shop .............................. 500.00
Bakery ................. ........ ..................... 400.00
Grandstand ........................................... 200.00
Shoe factory ........................................ 600.00
Boiler house ........................... .... .......... 150.00
Syrup shed ............................. ............ 1,000.00
Smokehouse and storage room ........................ 600.00
C oin crib ................. .......... ................ 1,200.00
Foundry ................................ ........... 250.00
The cob house ........................................ 300.00
O il house .............................. ............. 200.00
Rebuilt oil house ..................................... 100.00
R ice barn ............................ .............. 1,650.00
H harness shed ........................................ 65.00
Potato house .................... ...... .............. 2,000.00
Reddish house and addition .......................... 1,600.00
Depot ..... ........................ ...... ............ 800.00














LIVE STOCK AT STATE FARMS AND ITS
APPROXIMATE VALUE.




Horses and Mules.

132 Horses and mules ............................. $24,425.00
24 W ork oxen .................................... 2,400.00

Hogs.

1,142 Hogs ................................ .......... $14,328.00

Cattle.

121 Breeding cattle ............. ................. $ 8,315.00
297 Native cattle ................................. 6,380.00
150 Dairy cattle ................................... 15,605.00

Poultry.

2,786 Chickens .................................... $ 9,441.00
56 Turkeys ....................................... 244.00












17

CRIMES-THEIR CAUSE, AND PENALTIES.



In the Revised General Statutes of Florida there are more
than two hundred classes of crime mentioned. These range
from minor offenses, where the penalty may be a small fine or a.
jail sentence to the major crimes of murder and rape, where
the penalty of death may be-inflicted.

Capital Crime.

There are only two crimes in Florida punishable -by death, i. e.,
murder in the first degree, without recommendation to mercy
by the trial jury, and rape. *

Life Sentence.

There are only five crimes for which the life sentence is im-
posed, for example: murder in the first degree, with a recom-
mendation to .mercy by the trial jury; murder in the second
degree; for rape, in the discretion of the trial judge; for arson
of a dwelling and for kidnapping a child under fifteen years of
age.

Lesser Crimes.

The great majority of crimes for which the men and women in
the State Penitentiary are serving or those where the sent-
ences are from one year to twenty years.
By examining the tables which follow further on in this re-
port it will be seen what the crimes are, and how many con-
victs are serving for the crimes named.

Crime Waves.

Crime waves come and go like the waves of the ocean. From
the tables, given on another page of this report, it will be seen
that there were more convictions in 1905 than there were in
1920 where the population of the State was practically fifty per
cent. less than it was in 1920.


2-Pr.















Cause of Crime Waves.

There are many things that must be taken into consideration
when considering the waves of crime which come at almost
regular intervals, and which have come in the same way since
the beginning of time.

Prohibition.

Prohibition, no doubt, played its part in the reduction of
crime from 1910 to 1918. Prohibition was not the only cause
but probably the principal cause.

The Present Unrest.

The great crime wave which has been sweeping this country
for the past eighteen months, no doubt, is caused from the lack
cf ability in all matters of business following the World War.
This wave of crime is world wide, and must be death with
firmly and justly. As the countries of the world begin to re-
gain their equilibrium and business becomes more and more
adjusted, the wave of crime will gradually subside.

Penalty for Kidnappers and Highway Robbers.

The death penalty should be inflicted on all those woo, day
or night, hold up private citizens or officials of banks, etc., at
the point of a gun or other weapon and commit robberies.
The kidnaper should be treated like the rapist. "Prove the
crime and hang the criminal" as speedily as the law will per-
mit.











19

COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING NUMBER OF
CONVICTIONS FROM 1905 TO 1920,
INCLUSIVE.




1905 ............... ............. 474
1906 ..................... ........ 435
1907 .............................. 413
1908 ................... .......... 446
1909 ...............................415
1910 .............................. 442
1911 .............................. 450
1912 ............................. 516
1913 ............................. 512
1914 ............................. 553
1915 ............. .............. 639
1916 .............................482
1917 .............................. 501
*1918 .............................. 300
1919 ............................. 427
1920 .............................. 459


CITATION OF LAW WITH REFERENCE TO DRAW-
ING JURORS, AND THE GENERAL CUSTOM
PRACTICED BY THE COURTS.



Sections 2783 and 2784 of the Revised General Statues of
Florida, in effect provide for the drawing of special venires
when the regular panel of petit jurors has been exhausted or will
likely be thausted before a jury is secured, or where no panel
was originally drawn as the law contemplates and authorizes.
An inspection of the provisions of the law as above referred
to reveals that it is left to the discretion of the court to draw
these special venires from the box as is provided by Section
2777 of the Revised General Statutes of Florida, or to order
the Sheriff to summons the same from the bystanders or the
body of the county.
Our experience has been that the court in exercising his
discretion in this matter usually orders the Sheriff to summons .
these special venires from the bystanders or the body of the














county. It frequently happens that these venires are large,
especially when important murder cases are .being tried. The
time of the Sheriff to secure the required number of jurors is
often limited and through this limitation of time in some in-
stances, and through personal feeling of the Sheriff in others,
such venires are composed largely of the "professional juror"
or those who are biased for or prejudiced against the man
tried.
The spirit of our law is that every one charged with the
commission of crime is presumed innocent until his guilt is
established beyond a doubt in a court of competent jurisdiction,
but how can this spirit be executed when our trial juries are
"picked" as herein indicated. I am thoroughly convinced that
nine-tenths of the miscarriages of justice in our trial courts
are a direct or indirect outcome of this practice. The result
is that the guilty go free, the innocent are punished, the work
of our appellate court is burdened, and the duties of the Par-
doning Board increased to unusual proportions.
I would, therefore, recommend that the foreging provisions
of the Statutes of this State be amended to require that all
panels or venires be drawn from the box as is provided in Sec-
tion 2777 of the Revised General Statutes until a better plan is
worked out.

DISTRIBUTION OF PRISON LABOR AT THE STATE
FARM.




To show how the labor is distributed at the State Farm, are
given below the report of tile Superintendent for the month of
October, 1920.

Administrative Department:
Office force ...................................... 4
Help for employees .............................. 8
Office janitor .................................... 1
Stockade and Yards:
Dinning rooms ................................. 16
Hospitals ....................... .............. 10
Dorm itories ..................................... .56
Yard ............................................. 1
Bakery and kitchen ......... ................... .. 11
Laundry ....................................... . 7












21

At guard stands .................................. 3
Sewing ........... ............................. 5
Patching .......................................... 6
Deadheads ................................,........ 3
Guard house laundry and kitchen ................. 8
Maintenance and Upkeep:
Stock room s ..................................... 3
Paint shop ....................................... 2
Carpenter shop ............. ..................... 2
Power plant ...................................... 6
Railroad work .................................... 3
Farm implements ........... ..................... 2
Lights and water ................................ 2
Blacksmith shop ................................. 2
Electric department ............................... 2
International truck ............................... 3
Ford touring car ................................. 1
Plumbing ......................................... 1
Agricultural Work:
Breaking land .................................... 15
Planting ........................................ 38
Plowing ....................................... 17
Hoeing ........................................... 12
Harvesting ....................................... 34
D itching ......................................... 43
M owing ........................................... 12
Hauling .......................... ................ 12
At cane and grist mill ............................ 10
Horticultural Work:
Pruning .......................................... 2
Animal Industry:
Tending mules and horses ........................ 8
Tending range cattle and hogs .................. 8
Poultry .............. .......... ... ..... ......... 17
D airy ............................................ 9
D ogs ............................ ................. 2
Manufacturing:
Lumber Mill ...................................... 8
Shoe shop ........................................ .6












22

Construction and Permanent Improvements:
General repairs .................................. 3
Building construction ............................ 14
Gates and fences ................................. 2
Installing equipment .............................. 2
Wood Industry:
Logging ....................................... 43

Total distribution October 4, 1920 ............ 485

GENERAL MOVEMENT OF PRISONERS AT STATE
FARM, 1920,

Below we submit a statement in tabulated form showing the
general movement 'of prisoners at the State Farm for the year
1920. Under the law all prisoners sentenced to the State Prison
are assembled at the farm for the purpose of general classifica-
tion. They are photographed and fingerprinted, as well as a
general description taken of the person for the purpose of identi-
fication should the prisoner escape. In many instances when
prisoners are received they are in bad physical condition, neces-
sitating their remaining at the hospital for some time so that
they may be given medical attention before being transferred
to the State Road Department. In addition to the above, every
prisoner coming to the farm must be examined by the State
Prison Physician and his or her physical condition noted. If
the prisoner be a male and grades as a number 1, he is imme-
diately sent out to the State Road Camp, but if he grades as 'a
number 2, he must remain at the farm until his physical condi-
tionr has improved to such an extent as to place him in the
grade 1 class. All female prisoners remain at the farm.
The process as outlined above for the general classification
and distribution of prisoners is quite an item of expense which
is directly chargeable to the State Farm Budget under the pres-
ent system. It will be seen, however, that a very large per-
centage of the prisoners are turned over to the State Road De-
partment as soon as properly classified and graded, but that the
whole expense of receiving and transferring is charged to the
State 'Farm. Consequently its output is considerably reduced
and maintenance account correspondingly increased.
In addition to the above charge upon the State Farm, all
prisoners becoming sick and disabled in the camps of the' State
Road Department are transferred back to the Farm Hospital,












23

where they remain until again able to perform road duty. Thus
the expense against the Farm Maintenance account is further in-
creased.
Total Prisoners on Hand First of Year.................. 486
Received from Sheriffs of Counties .................... 460
From State Road Department .......................... 72
Recaptured .......................................... 21
From All Other Sources .............................. 13

Total ............................................. 1,052

Discharged by Expiration of Sentence................. 101
By Conditional Pardon ................. ............... 75
Paroled ................................................ 24
Died from Natural Causes ............................ 7
Sent to State Road Department ........................ 321
All Other Discharges ................................. 40
Total Prisoners on Hand Last of Year................. 484

Total ........................................... 1,052














FINANCES.



Showing in Detail All Moneys Received, and From What Source,
,and All Moneys Expended, and for What Purpose, for the
Four Years Beginning January 1, 1917, and Ending December
31, 1920.

For the four years prior to 1918 all financial transactions for
the Prison Division were handled under the direct supervision
of the Board of Commissioners of State Institutions in a sep-
arate office, under the management of Mr. A. H. Roberts, as
Secretary to the Board. Beginning with the year of 1918 the
office of the Secretary was abolished and the records and other
matters relating to the financial part of this Division were again
placed back under the Department of Agriculture. In this
report will.be found a financial statement showing all moneys
received and all moneys paid out by the Prison Department
for the years 1917, 1918, 1919 and 1920. These tables will show
from what sources the revenue was derived and also in what
manner and for what purpose expended.
The lease of State Convicts was abolished by Act of the
Legislature, 1919, and- consequently to aid in maintain the
State Farm and the prison system in general, after abolishing
the lease of State Cpnvicts, it was necessary for a State tax
levy. The Legislature therefore provided for the annual levy-
ing and collecting of a State tax, for this purpose, of three-
eighths of one mill on the dollar, or so much thereof as may
be necessary on all property liable to assessment, in the State,
and all money derived from such levy shall be paid into the
State Treasury to go into a fund to be known as "The State
Prison Fund." This tax levy, together with the revenue derived
from sales of produce at the State Farm are the only gen-
real sources of support for the State Prison System. We are
glad to note that the State Farms are gradually increasing in
their revenue from sales of produce, and we hope to ultimately
report that the Farms are self-sutaining.















COLLECTIONS FOR ACCOUNT OF THE STATE PRISON
FUND FOR THE YEAR 1917, SHOWING THE AMOUNT
COLLECTED FROM PRIVATE LESSEES OF STATE
PRISONERS AND COUNTY LESSEES, ALSO FOR
PRODUCE SOLD AT THE STATE PRISON
FARM.

Amount Collected from Private Lessees
During 1917 .........................$154,978.32
Amount Collected from County Les-
sees During 1917 .................... 5,193.98
Amount Collected from Sales at State
Prison Farms During 1917........... 29,514.41

Total .............................. $189,686.71

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE PRISON DIVISION OF THE
BOARD OF STATE INSTITUTIONS FOR THE YEAR OF
1917, SHOWING AMOUNT OF MONEY EXPENDED
AND FOR WHAT PURPOSE.




5z
Month rc.




Jan. ...... $ 2,360.511$ 2,638.10 $ 937.38 $ 4,518.11 $ 10,454.10
Feb. ...... 6,932.29 605.20 200.00 734.24 8,471.73
Mar. ..... 4,546.61 1,087.02 1,205.92 1,032.43 7,871.98
April .... 7,989.15 2,567.68 2,690.89 5,082.43 18,330.15
May ...... 23,087.22 4,189.16 857.52 955.69 29,089.59
June ...... 3,658.60 3,012.70 825.55 1,437.00 8,933.85
July ...... 18,016.56 4,111.29 507.47 4,501.13 27,136.45
Aug. ..... 3,087.82 2,216.96 413.08 1,934.43 7,652.29
Sept. ..... 7,630.20 2,862.48 634.01 2,043.01 13,169.70
Oct. ....... 15,107.72 3,422.84 612.97 2,327.29 21,470.82
Nov. ...... 3,068.11 3,158.21 890.28 2,111.00 9,227.00
Dec. ..... 15,285.86 3.076.33 509.58 1,807.71 20,679.48
Total .. $110,770.65 $32,947.97 $10,284.65 $28,484.47 '$182,487.74












26

COLLECTIONS FOR ACCOUNT OF THE STATE PRISON
FUND FOR THE YEAR 1918, SHOWING' BALANCE ON
HAND AND ALL COLLECTIONS AND FROM
WHAT SOURCE.


Comptroller's Balance January 1, 1918.
Warrant No. 4309 Cancelled April 9, 1918
Amount Collected from Private Lessees
During 1918 ........................ $202,581.68
Amount Collected from County Lessees
During 1918 ......................... 4,442.76
Amount Collected from Sales at State
Prison Farms During 1918 ........... 21,190.95
Amount Collected on Account of Refund
for Goods Purchased but Not Delivered
to the Prison Farms................ ) 22.60
Amount Collected from A. C. L. Ry On
Account of Duplicate Vouchers........ 5.00
Amount Collected from State Road De-
partment on Account of Expense of Es-
capes ................................. 178.8;


$ 19,772.27
10.00


3 228,421.82


Total Collections .................. $248,204.09
Disbursements for Year 1918............ $215,635.29

Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1, 1919...... 32,568.80
Outstanding Warrants Jan. 1, 1919...... 458.17


Treasurer's Balance Jan.. 1. 1919 ........


$ 33,026.97














FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE PRISON DIVISION OF THE
BOARD OF STATE INSTITUTIONS FOR THE YEAR OF
1918, SHOWING AMOUNT OF MONEY EXPENDED
AND FOR WHAT PURPOSE.

EC







.jan....... $ 28,247.48 $ 3,504.28 $ 4,405.18 $ 2,700.91 $ 38,857.85
Feb...... .. 15,370.69 2,354.51 516.97 1,780.40 20,022.57
Mar ...... 9,871.25 2,232.08 564.65 1,613.60 14,281.58
April .... 9,317.02 45.74 936.32 2,428.36 .12,727.74
May ..... 7,917.57 2,928.63 801.56 2,422.78 14,070.54
June .... 13,468.72 3,180.25 669.96 1,712.98 19,031.91
July ..... 14,209.02 1,724.50 524.61 2,438.41 18,896.51
Aug ...... .18,027.30 3,36.07 730.21 2,339.94 25,063.52
o E "0af1


15!th I is










Sept. ...... 4,133.270 5,754.91 433.94 1,900.91 12,223.03
OctMay ...... 12,34917.51 2,571.31 660.84 2,285.04 17,865.70
Nov. ...... 5,202.17 4,127.67 1,224.98 1,723.28 12,278.10
Dec. ....... 4,987.21 2,454.57 779.16 2,095.27 10,316.21
totall ... 1$143,700.211 $34,244.52 $12,248.38 $25,442.18 $215,635.29

COLLECTIONS FOR ACCOUNT OF STATE PRISON FUND FOR
YEAR 1919, SHOWING BALANCE ON HAND, ALL COL-
LECTIONS AND FROM WHAT SOURCES.

Balance on Hand Jan. 1, 1919..$ 32,568.80
Amount Collected from Lessees
During Year 1919..... ..... 166,096.56
Received from State Prison
Farms on Account Cash Sales 30,407.81
Cancelled Warrants and Col-
leoted from Other Sources... 510.56


Total Amount Expended During
Year 1919 ..................

Comptroller's Balance Dec. 31,
1919 .....................


$229,583.73

227,097.60


$2,486.13














FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE. PRISON DIVISION OF THE
BOARD OF STATE INSTITUTIONS FOR THE YEAR OF
1919, SHOWING AMOUNT OF MONEY EXPENDED
AND FOR WHAT PURPOSE.





Month.
od 0

SS L S a .g
Jan. ... $ 6,318.14 $ 5,242.50 $ 526.92 $ 2,443.15 $ 14,530.71
Feb. ... 6,916.82 4,256.49 849.12 2,325.45 14,347.88
Mar. ... 6,978.45 3,414.33 667.12 2,040.00 13,099.90
April ... 13.338.47 8,257.47 866.36 2,469.27 24,931.57
May .. 11,869.591 10,264.13 989.25 1,893.30 25,016.27
June ... 13,544.42 19,962.89 678.12 1,706.29 35,891.72
July ... 10,212.41 1,738.46 700.93 2,442.38 15,094.18
Aug. ... 8,002.28 8,180.30 530.84 2,045.97 18,759.39
Sept. ... 9,957.30 1,626.40 712.27 1,831.86 14,127.83
Oct .... 7,869.56 2,512.94 1,180.49 2,526.73 14,089.72'
Nov ... 7,725.42 3,509.86 644.36 1,984.74 13,864.38
Dec. ... 13,265.95 5,187.61 1,209.77 3,680.72 23,344.05
Total .... 1$115,998.811$ 74,153.381$ 9,555.551$ 27,389.861 $227,097.60



RECEIPTS AND BALANCES OF THE STATE PRISON FUND
IN DETAIL FOR THE YEAR 1920.

Amount paid in from Tax Levy from
which no warrants were drawn to Jan. 1,
1920 ..................................j $ 26,752.75
Balance in old .State Prison fund account
account Jan. '1, 1920 .................. 2,486.13
Amount received from sales of produce
at State Prison farm for year 1920.... 45,885.36
Balance collected from lessees on old out-
standing accounts .................... 3,703.98
Amount, received from the % mill tax
levy for year 1920 .................... 130,882.90














Amount collected from State Road Depart-
Sment on account of escapes ..........
Rebates allowed and paid into State Prison
fund ...............................

Vouchers approved by the Board of State
Institutions and paid from the State
Prison fund during year 1920 ..........

Balance in fund Jan. 1, 1921 ........


695.28

7.16 $210,413.56



$187,184.97

$ 23,228.59


FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE PRISON DIVISION OF THE
BOARD OF STATE INSTITUTIONS FOR THE YEAR OF
1920, SHOWING AMOUNT OF MONEY EXPENDED
AND FOR WHAT PURPOSE.





Month. 2 1 3.0" 4
e- r


Jan..... $ 2,567.37 $ ...... 1$ 938.28 $ 1,394.79 $ 4,900.44
Feb. ... 5,549.77 1,813.381. 689.30 1,800.59 9,853.04
Mar. ... 6,637.731 1,733.461 677.131 1,777.091 10,825.43
April ... 4,193.46 5,897.96 1,163.701 15,275.941 26,531.06
May ... 1 8,789.56 3,296.501 991.401 1,223.75 14,301.25
June ... 9,188.28 1,892.501 889.501 2,213.20 14,183.48
July ....1 7,077.701 604.361 1,046.431 5,186.331 13,914.82
Aug. ... .1 16,451.571 9,386.071 1,198.10 1,955.32 28,991.06
Sept. ... 1,610.951 916.15 738.65 5,453.84 8,719.59
Oct. ... 9,292.79 9,729.97 825.611 1,755.971 21,604.34
Nov. .. 10,869.88 3,994.831 1,050.941 1,673.521 17,589.17
Dec. ... 9,577.811 2,407.531 1,461.821 2,324.131 15,771.29
Total 1$ 91.806.871$ 41,672.711$ 11,670.921$ 42,034.471$187,184.97














BIRTHPLACE, COLOR AND SEX OF PRISONERS COM-
MITTED'DURING YEAR OF 1917.


Native of Wnat
State or Country.
Alabama ........
Arkansas .......
Alaska .........
California ......
Connecticut ....
Dist. of Col'bia..
Florida .........
Georgia ........
Indiana ........
Illinois .........
Kentucky .......
Louisiana ......
Massachusetts ..
Michigan .......
Mississippi .....
Missouri .......
New York .....
North Carolina..
Ohio ...........
Pennsylvania .
South Carolina
Tennessee .....
Texas ..........
Virginia .......
West Virginia ..
Bahama Islands.
Cuba ...........
England ........
Greece .........
Italy ...........
Phillippine Isl'ds
Poland ........
Switzerland ....
West Indes Isles
Totals .......


White White Colored Colored
Males. Females. Males. Females. Total.


2
































...


24






166
86

2
1
2


1

1
22


36
4

7

10









3


3






10
4










.N


42
1
1
1
1
1
202
107
3
6
3
3
1
1
1
1
5
25
3
7
42
6
2
12
2
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3


119 2 363 17 ] 501












31

PRISONERS RECEIVED BY COUNTIES DURING 1917.


Alachua ............... 21
Baker .................. 1
Bay ................... 4
Bradford ............... 15
Brevard ............... 9
Broward ............... 0
Calhoun ................ 1
Citrus ................. 2
Clay ................... 3
Columbia .............. 9
Dade .................. 21
DeSoto ................ 24
Duval .................. 93
Escambia .............. 19
Franklin .:........*..... 4
Flagler ................. 1
Gadsden ............... 2
Hamilton .............. 4
Hernando .............. 8
Hillsborough ........... 19
Holmes ................ 5
Jacksbn ................ 23
Jefferson ............... L
Lafayette .............. 0
Lake .................. 4
Lee .................... 5
Leon .................. 8
Levy ................... 4


Libe:
Mad:
Man.
Mari
Mon
Nass
Okal
Oke
Orar
Osce
Pain
Pasc
Pine
Polk
Putn
Sant
Sem
St.
St. ]
Sum
Suw
Tayl
Volu
Wak
Wall
Was


rty ................. 1
ison ............... 7
atee ........ ....... 8
on ................ 15
roe ... ............ 0
sau ................ 4
oosa ............... 2
echobee ............ 0
ige ................ 12
eola ................ 1
n Beach............. 17
0o .................. 4
llas ............... 13
................... 10
am .............-... 12
a Rosa ............. 20
inole ............. 2
Johns .............. 8
Lucie ............... 5
ter ................ 5
annee .............. 7
or ................. 2
isia ................ 12
ulla ................ 0
ton ................ 7
hington ............ 17

Total............... 501











32

CRIMES FOR WHICH COMMITTED DURING 1917.

M urder .................... ....................... 63
Breaking and entering.................................. 105
Larceny of an animal ................................... 25
Uttering forgery ....................................... 8
Wife desertion .......................... ................. 2
M manslaughter ............................................ 20
R obbery ....................... ......................... 10
Assault to murder......................................... 47
Grand larceny ......................................... 80
Illegal sale of intoxicating liquors .......................... 20
Assault to rape....... ................................... 7
R ape .................................................. 5
Having carnal intercourse with unmarried female under 18
years of age.......................................... 6
P erjury .................................................. 8
Forgery ....................................... .......... 20
Bigam y .................................................. 4
Desertion and nonsupport.................. ............. 1
Shooting into a dwelling house .......................... 1
Assault to commit manslaughter............................ 4
Receiving and concealing stolen goods..................... 4
Second larceny .......................................... 5
Criminal trespass ..................... ............... ... 1
Entering without breaking ................................ 9
Crime against nature ....................... ............ 1
Grand embezzlement ..................................... 8
Obtaining goods by a false pretense........................ 8
Feloniously entering a railroad car to commit a misdemeanor 4
Aiding in escapes ......................................... 1
Incest ...................................... ............ 3
Lewd and lascivious cohabitation.......................... 2
Adultery .............................................. 7
Issuing checks without funds in bank to cover.............. 2
Highway robbery ......................................... 1
Burglary ................................................ 1
A rson ................................................... 4
W writing threatening letters................................ 2
Larceny of an automobile................................. 1
Fraudulently changing the mark of an animal .............. 1

Total................................... ..... 501,











33

PRISONERS PARDONED DURING 1917.


INo. Name I Color


SDate


Pardoned


5485 Jas. R. Franks............. Black Jan. 5, 1917
5385 Wright Green ............. Black Jan. 5, 1917
5597 King Williams ............ Black Jan. 5, 1917
A- 369 Robt. McFadden ........... Black Jan. 5, 1917
B- 467 Horace Burton ............ Black Jan. 5, 1917
11966 Joe Newsome .'...........I White Jan. 5, 1917
B- 861 J. W. Setton............... White Jan. 5, 1917
11999 C. F. Hendrickson.......... White Jan. 5, 1917
12304, 0. C. Scarborough.......... White April 25, 1917
B- 569 Oscar Johns ............... White April 1, 1917
12354 A. L. Barrineau ............ White April 1, 1917
11986 Theodore Hawkins ......... Black April 1, 1917
A- 887 Arch Lindsey .............. White April 1, 1917
B- 891 A. D. Lindsay.............. White April 1, 1917
A- 143 Jack Land ................ White April 1, 1917
B- 1 Ollie Bennett ............... White April 1, 1917
9769 S. S. Driggers ............. White April' 1, 1917
B- 4 Joe Turner ................ White April 1, 1917
12488 Manon Land, Jr............ White April 1, 1917
B- 564 Ben Hayward ............. Black April T, 1917
12272 Nathan Edwards .......... White April 1, 1917
12221 Fred VWilliams ............ White April 1, 1917
6705 Watt Morgan .............. Black April 1, 1917
7451 Willie Hall ................ Black April 1, 1917
6740 Jas. Thompkins ........... Black April 1, 1917
6829 Gus Mashby .............. Black April 1, 1917
A- 748 Will Burton ............... Black April 1, 1917
12294 Henry Lawrence .......... Black April 1, 1917
12060 W. A. Crosby............... White May 9, 1917
B- 982 A. C. Odum ................ White May 11, 1917
B- 983 J. L. Gunter................. White May 11, 1917
A- 453 Will Baxley ............... White June 7, 1917
12222 Clifford Painter ........... White June 7, 1917
12495 J. A. Herndon.............. White June 14, 1917
12382 W. L. Moore ............... White June 16, 1917
12745 Sylva Cross ............... Black June 27, 1917
A- 166 Flora Timmons ............ Black June 27, 1917
12309 Gilispie Fisher............. Black June 27, 1917
12744 J. C. Wilroy ................ White June 27, 1917
5379 Will Henry ................ Black Aug. 1, 1917
3--Pr.













PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1917.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date Pardoned

6365 W. M. Jacobs .............. Black Aug. 1, 1917
8456 Wyatt Brewer ............. Black Aug. 1, 1917
8572 Chas. Munroe ............. White Aug. 1, 1917
8367 John McDonald ......... Black Aug. 1, 1917
B- 448 Ben Sellars ............... White Aug. 1, 1917
B- 797 E. L. Holton............... White Aug. 1, 1917
6534 George Rogers ............ Black Aug. 1, 1917
B- 915 Thos. A. Cline............. White Aug. 1, 1917
12105 Richard Tranthum ......... White Aug. 1, 1917
12123 Dick Bellinger ............ Black Aug. 1, 1917
12635 Myrtle King ............... White Aug. 1, 1917
8172 Jordan Bullock ............. White Aug.' 5, 1917
12455 Nathan Johnson ........... Black Oct. 30, 1917
12655 Lloyd Neeley ............. White Sept. 1, 1917
12467 John W. Watson, Jr........ Black Oct. 28, 1917
6097 Will Anderson ............ Black Sept. 1, 1917
8356 W. L. Yates............... White Sept. 1, 1917
8279 John Lawrence ............ Black Sept. 1, 1917
8900 J. M. Kelley............... White Sept. 1, 1917
A- 864 Fred Stanfil ............... White Sept. 1, 1917
6972 Sherman Dickerson ........ Black Sept. 1, 1917
7477 Noble Collins ............. Black Sept. 1, 1917
7173 Butler Hines .............. I Black Sept. 1, 1917
9846 Geo. Williams .............[ Black Sept. 1, 1917
9850 Thos. Grice ............... Black Sept. 1, 1917
9033 Melvin Wright ............. Black Sept. 1, 1917
12310 Herbert S. Stone........... Black Sept. 1, 1917
6699 Henry Lee ................ White Sept. 7, 1917
7585 Henry Elmore ............. Black Sept. 10, 1917
6172 Elijah Carr ................ Black Sept. 10, 1917
9587 N. C. Courtney ............. Black Sept. 10, 1917
1701 |James Yates .............. Black Sept. 10, 1917
5772 Andrew Jackson ........... White Sept. 10, 1917
8040 Silas Williams ............ Black Sept. 10, 1917
B- 80 J. H. Glisson............... Black Sept. 10, 1917
A- 116 Sam Mattres .............. White Sept. 10, 1917
12774 Jesse W. Hunter........... White Sept. 10, 1917
7641 Josie Howard ............. White Sept. 10, 1917
8639 Hester Stone .............. Black Oct. 5, 1917
12645 Henry Bassett ............I Black Oct. 5, 1917














PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1917.-Continued.


No.


12577
A- 534
11929
12562
B- 80
8960
12712
12561
12575
B- 923
12278
A- 29
6951
8762
12973
7311
B- 283
8509
8305
7071
7131
6399
6401
7753
9767
A- 569
B- 16
B- 481
B- 868
B- 574
B- 665
B- 836
B- 976
4697
12709
7871
7291
12508
12627


Color i Date Pardoned


Name


G. E. Murllee ..............
Louis McMalin ............
Roland Alberry ...........
Pink Bryant ..............
W. H. Glisson ..............
Andrew Copeland ........
G. F. Foster ................
F. O, Frier ................
R. F. Adams...............
J. H. Padgett ........ .....
Robt. E. Lassiter ...........
H. B. Kence.... ...... ..
Harrison Townsend ........
W ill Barton ............ .
Roy House ............. ..
Gus Johnson ..............
Harry Jones ...............
Arthur Gill .... .........
Bostdn Davis .............
Robert Mass ........... I
Harrison Lane ...........
Moses Gregg .............
William Stephens ........
W ill Graham .............. I
Ben Hale ................
J. M Norris ...............
George Reppas ............
Frank Chancey ............
Floyd Blackwell ...........
Mollie Ronlact ............
Wallace Ross .............
E. S. Rohn. --------------I
SE. S. Rohn.. ...............
Geo. Adams ..............I
Handy Jones ..............
Thos. Bushnel ..........
Ed. Gadsden ..............
R. F. Colson...............
John Rolle ........... ... I
W ill Davis ................


Black
White
White
White
Black
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
Black
Black
White
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
White
White
White
White
Black
Black
White
White
Black
White
Black
White
Black


Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
*Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
IDec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.


5, 1917
16, 1917
10, 1917
5, 1917
10, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24. 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
S24, 1917
24, 1917
24, 1917
31, 1917












36

PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING 1917.


No.


I Color I Date of Escape


12093
12154
B- 724
12545
12541
12233
12511
B- 644
12384
12570
12534
12540
11543
12580
B- 807
12183
12589
12615
12079
11938
12076
B- '938
A- 602
B- 943
12646
6642
B- 827
9962
6862
12298
B- 167
11916
12631
12007
12188
12009
12832
B- 595

12650


Name


William White.............
James Chastang ...........
Isiah Coleman .............
Wallace Williams .........
Henry Wilson ...........
Nathan Ford ..............
Ira Nichols ...............
Clarence Grant ............
Chas. W alker .............
Joe Sams .................
Joseph Johnson ...........
Geo. Jones .......... .....
Will Johnson ..............
, Virgil Jones ...............
Gus Menefee ..............I
William Beard ............
Joe Douglas ........ ........
Jack Hindley ..............
Henry Carroll .............
Andrew Torries ...........
Jesse Dewey ..............
John Holmes ..............
Bud McLendon ............
Jesse Hall ................
Mark Britt ................
James Chisholm ...........
Will Alexander ............
Otis Fields ...............
Andrew Knight ............
W ill Davis ................
Henry Williams ...........
Frank Randolph ......... I
E. L. Bridgman............
Leland Lake ..............
Rossie Lamps .............
I. Phillips .................
Robert Jackson ...........
Frank Johnson ............
(Alias Joe Berry)
Jas. Hargrove ............


Black
Black
Black
SBlack
| Black
SBlack
Black
Black
1 Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black


Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
March
Feb.
Feb.
March
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
,May
June
June
June
June
June


June 23, 1917


2, 1917
5, 1917
8, 1917
26, 1917
31, 1917
31, 1917
31, 1917
18, 1917
18, 1917
18, 1917
18, 1917
18, 1917
18, 1917
20, 1917
4, 1917
4, 1917
4, 1917
12, 1917
2, 1917
2, 1917
3, 1917
10, 1917
13, 1917
27, 1917
26, 1917
8, 1917
15, 1917
19, 1917
21, 1917
24, 1917
29, 1917
28, 1917
14, 1917
4, 1917
8, 1917
11, 1917
23, 1917
16, 1917


Black














PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1917.-Continued.


No.
12798
B- 579
12363

12228
B- 873
12055
12179
12678
12763
B- 540
12098
12165
12592
9340
11912
12183
12007
12657
A- 572
A- 365
B- 885
8624
12723
12787
12097
B- 450
A- 193

12126
12919

11953
1*81
9503
12404
12732
12039
B- 946
B- 979
12001
8926


Color Date of Escape


Name
Robt. Johnson .............
Joe Ross ............... ...
W alter Artes ..............
(Alias Henry Johnson)
Henry James ..............
Charlie Johnson ...........
John Wynn ..............
W. R. Phillips.............
Clifford Stewart ...........
James Bembry ............
Fred Jackson .............
John Rembert .............
J. H. Coleman...........
Thos. N. Price.............
Fred Bellamy ..............
Tom Maddox .............
W. O. Beard................
L. J. Lake.............. .
Reubin King ..............
Jim Arnold ...............
Jeke Phillips ..............
Ben Doyle ............... ...
Boisey Murphy ............
Arthur Baker .............
Robert Leonard ...........
James Richardson .........
Cooley Marsh .............
Eddie Miller ..............
IAlias Will Jones)
Sam Stewart ..............
Walter Blanton ...........
(Alias Ed Willis)
Ed W illiams ..............
James Harriss ............
Mamie Hamilton ..........
Jack O'Neal ..............
Fred Schrimmer ...........
Sussie Bland ..............
Harry Smith ..............
Ben Talbert ..............
Pearl' Jones ........ .....
Clarence Smith ...........


Black
Black
Black

Black
Black
Black
White
Black
White
Black
Black
White
White
Black
White
White
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black

Black
Black

Black
Black
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black


July
July
July

July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

Oct.
Oct.

Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.


7, 1917
11, 1917
13, 1917

14, 1917
15, 1917
25, 1917
25, 1917
1, 1917
7, 1917
3, 1917
3, 1917
9, 1917
9, 1917
9, 1917
14, 1917
14, 1917
14, 1917
14, 1917
27, 1917
29, 1917
29, 1917
13, 1917
17, 1917
9, 1917
6, 1917
7, 1917
7, 1917

11, 1917
17, 1917

23, 1917
30, 1917
2, 1917
12, 1917
12, 1917
30, 1917
9, 1917
14, 1917
15, 1917
19, 1917













PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING 1917.

No. Name Color Date Recaptured

12456 Will Hainilton ............ Black Jan. 5, 1917
A- 339 Jim Carter ............... Black Jan. 5, 1917
12462 Augustine Pettiway ....... Black Jan. 13, 1917
B- 724 Isiah Coleman ............. Black Jan. 18, 1917
12183 William O. Beard ......... White Feb. 14, 1917
12589 Joe Douglas ............. Black Feb. 14, 1917
1701 James Yates ............. White Feb. 8, 1917
12570 Joe Sams ............... Black March 10, 1917
12154 James Chastang .......... Black April 16, 1917
12646 -Mark Britt ............... Black April 26, 1917
B- 943 Jesse Hall ................ Black April 28, 1917
6862 Andrew Knight ........... Black May 22, 1917
6642 James Chisholm .......... Black May 19, 1317
12298 Will' Davis ............... Black May 24, 1917
12631 E. L. Bridgman .......... White May 14, 1917
12007 Leland Lake .............. White June 6, 1917
12188 Rossie Lamps ............ Black June 10, 1917
(Alias Joe Berry)
12650 (James Hargraves) ....... Black June 23, 1917
12798 Robt. Johnson ............ Black July 7, 1917
B- 579 Joe Ross ................. Black July 13, 1917
12235 Will Fisher ............... Black Jan. 28, 1917
7271 Fletcher Watson ......... Black Feb. 8, 1917
12093 William White .......... Black July 5, 1917
12055 John Wynn ........... ... Black Aug. 1, 1917
12179 W. R. Phillips ............ White July 25, 1917
12076 Jesse Dewey ............. Black Aug. 5, 1917
9962 Otis Fields ............... Black Aug. 5, 1917
12678 Clifford Stewart .......... Black Aug. 8, 1917
11981 Albert Parks ............. Black Aug. 9, 1917
12098 John Rembert ............ Black Aug. 11, 1917
12183 W. 0. Beard .............. White Aug. .16,1917
11912 Tom Maddox ............. White Aug. 28, 1&7
12007 J. L. Lake ................ White Aug. 28, 1917
B- 885 Ben Doyle ................ Black Sept. 4, 1917
B- 979 Ben Talbert .............. Black Sept. 2, 1917
12723 Arthur Baker ............. Black Sept. 26, 1917
A- 572 Jim Arnold ................ Black Sept. 2, 1917
12763 James Bembery ........... White Sept. 17, 1917
B- 450 Cooley Marsh ............. Black Oct. 13, 1917














PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING YEAR 1917.-Continued.

No. Name I Color Date Recaptured

A- 193 Eddie Miller .............. Black Oct. 13, 1917
12126 Sam Stewart .............. Black Nov. 3, 1917
(Alias James Johnson)
12228 (Henry James) .......... Black Nov. 14, 1917
12541 Jemru Wilson ............. Black Nov. 14, 1917
A- 775 Jack Nash ................ White Nov. 19, 1917
12732 Fred Schrimmer ......... White Nov. 17, 1917
12919 Walter Blaton ............ Black Nov. 17, 1917
8926 Clarence Smith ........... Black Dec. 25, 1917


PRISONERS WHO DIED DURING THE YEAR 1917.


Name


Walter Green ............
David Strange .........
Frank Jones .............
Henry Blue ...............
J. W. Green ..............
Frank Johnson ...........
W ill Jackson .............
Thos. McNair .............
Lizzie Smith ..............
Bob Henderson ..........
P. H. Riley ...............
Charlie Blossom ..........
Dave Fendley ...........
John Toles ...............
John Banks ...............
Solomon Joshua ...........
James Brown ............
Charlie Smith ............
J. C. Weatherby ..........
John Russell ..............
William Ricks ............
Cardicks Holloway ........
Chas. Zika ...............
Ben. Holton ...............
Sam Perry ................


Color Date of Death

Black Jan. 12, 1917
Black Jan. 28, 1917
Black Feb. 15, 1917
Black March 4, 1917
Black March 9, 1917
Black March 11, 1917
Black April 12, 1917
Black May 3, 1917
Black May 11, 1917
Black May 4, 1917
White May 21, 1917
Black May 31, 1917
Black June 4, 1917
Black June 16, 1917
Black July 6, 1917
Black July 5, 1917
Black July 12, 1917
Black July 18, 1917
Black July 1, 1917
Black July 28, 1917
White Aug. 3, 1917'
Black Aug. 10, 1917
White Aug. 14, 1917
Black Aug. 24, 1917
Black Aug. 29, 1917


No.


11946
6811
12587
B- 867
1 7234
B-, 460
8147
B- 46
A- 462
A- 144
12514
12711
12542
12270
12731
12100
B- 788
A- 849
12853
B- 999
12818
12865
12332
B- 980
B- 826


--~-~-~---














PRISONERS WHO DIED DURING YEAR 1917.-Continued.

No. Name j Color Date of Death

8- 833 James Davis .............. Black Sept. 21, 1917
B- 189 Charlie (Claude) Stuckey.. Black Nov. 11, 1917
13004 W, S. Wilks .............. White Dec. 1, 1917
12216 Will Grant ............... Black Dec. 28, 1917
12898 Daniel Lee .............. Black Dec. 28, 1917


RECAPITULATION STATE PRISONERS, 1917.

Prisoners on hand Jan. 1, 1917 .................. 1,621
Prisoners committed during 1917 ................ 501
Prisoners recaptured during 1917 .................. 47


2,169


Prisoners
Prisoners
Prisoners
Prisoners


discharged during 1917 .................. 416
pardoned during 1917 .................... 120
escaped during 1917 .................... 78
died during 1917 ........................ 30


Total of prisoners on hand Jan. 1, 1918 ..........


- 644
1,525














BIRTHPLACE, COLOR AND SEX OF PRISONERS COM-
MITTED DURING YEAR OF 1918.

Native of What White White Colored Colored
State or Country. Males. Females. Males. Females. Total.
Alabama ....... 9 .. 17 2 28
Arkansas ...... 1 .. .. 1
Alaska ..... 1 ... ... ... 1
California ...... 1 ... . ... 1
Connecticut ... 1 1
Florida ....... 13 ... 117 4 134
Georgia ........ 9 ... 64 3 76
Indiana ........ 1 ... ... ... 1
Illinois ......... 1 .. 1
Louisiana . .. ... 3 ... 3
Massachusetts .. 1 .. 1
Mississippi ..... 2 ... 2
New York ...... 5 .... 5
New Jersey .... 2 .. ... 2
North Carolina .. ... ... 7 1 8
Ohio ........... 2 ... ... .. 2
Pennsylvania ... 1 .. ... ... 1
South Carolina.. 2 ... 9 3 14
Tennessee ...... 1 ... ... ... 1
Texas .......... 2 ... ... ... 2
Virginia ........ 1 ... ... ... 1
Bahama Islands. .... 5 ... 5
Cuba ........... 2 ... 1 ... 3
Greece ......... 2 .. ... 2
Italy ........... 1 ... ... ... 1
West Indies .... 2 ... 2 ... 2














42

PRISONERS RECEIVED BY COUNTIES DURING 1918.


Alachua ...............
Baker .................
Bay ...................
Bradford ..............
Brevard ...............
Broward ...............
Calhoun ...............
Citrus ...............
Clay ..................
Columbia ..............
Dade .................
DeSoto ................
Duval .................
Escambia ..............
Franklin ..............
Flagler ................
Gadsden ...............
Hamilton ..............
Hernando .............
Hillsborough ...........
Holmes ................
Jackson ...............
Jefferson ..............
Lafayette ..............
Lake ..................
Lee ............ ......
Leon ..................
Levy ..................


Liberty ................ 3
Madison ............... 1
Manatee ............... 8
M arion ................ 5
Monroe .................. 5
Nassau ................ 1
Okaloosa ............... 1
Okeechobee ............ 0
Orange ................ 6
Osceola ................ 2
Palm Beach ....:...... 10
Pasco ................. 9
Pinellas ............... 8
Polk .................. 6
Putnam ............... 3
Santa Rosa ............ 9
Sem inole ............. 4
St. Johns .............. 5
St. Lucie .............. 1
Sumter ................ 1
Suwannee ....... ..... 9
Taylor ................ 9
Volusia ................ 4
W akulla ............... 1
W alton ................ 3
Washington ............ 2

Total ............... 300












43

CRIMES FOR WHICH SENTENCED DURING 1918.

M urder ................................................ 70
Breaking and Entering ................................. 70
Larceny of an Animal .................................. 11
Uttering Forgery ........................ .............. 14
W ife Desertion ............................... ......... 2
Manslaughter .......................................... 16
Robbery ............................................... 4
Assault to Murder ...................................... 20
Grand; Larceny .......................................... 41
Illegal Sale of Intoxicating Liquors.. .................... 12
Assault to Rape ........................................ 6
Rape ... ............................................... 2
Having Carnal Intercourse with Female Under 18 Years Old 5
Perjury ................................................. 1
'Forgery .............................................. 11
B igam y ................................................ 4
N on-support ............................................ 1
Attempting to Break and Enter ......................... 2
Assault to Manslaughter ................................ 3
Receiving Stolen Property .............................. 4
Entering without Breaking ............................ 15
Assault to Rob ........................ ................ 2
Attempting to Commit Arson ....................:....... 1
Resisting an Officer ................. .................... 1
Grand Embezzlement ................................... 3
Obtaining Goods by False Pretense ...................... 6
Carrying Concealed W weapons ............................ 1
Incest ................................................ 2
Lewd and Lascivious Cohabitation ...................... 3
Adultery ............................................... 1
Burglary ....................................... ... ...... 1

Total .............................................. 300














PRISONERS PARDONED DURING 1918.
No. Name Color Date Fardoned


I


13046
A- 648
A- 165
A- 775
9351
B- 641
B- 678
B- 950
12082
13054
13006
12652
12879
12989
12240
12614
12613
12783
12920
12848
12781
12466
12362
8661
9624
9647
6642
B- 64
B- 308
11970
12775
12889
12907
12929
6602
6866
6969
7153
7693
7392
7951


Lewis Jackson ............
E. F. Andrews............
Blanche Lilly .:...........
Jack Nash ...............
J. J Coxwell...............
Charles Campbell .........
Hayden Parker ..........
Elizabeth Johnson .........
Rex Rogers ...............
A. H. Perry ...............
J. A. Phillips ............
W. R. Rhodes ............
Guy Scott .... . .... ...
Mamie Edgerton ..........
Emmett Harris..........
Lee Phillips ..............
Norman Kirkland .........
D. B. Herndon ...........
Frank J. Dunn ...........
Pedro L. Alvarez ..........
Ben Roberts ..............
Rel A. Anderson ..........
John F. Ward ...........
John Guydon .............
Ida Hannah ..............
Buford Wynn .............
Jim Chisholm............
W. ,W. Bumpus ...........
Richard Martin ...........
William Johnson ..........
J. E. Madidox .............
L. M. Emerson ............
James F. Patrick .........
A. F. Lee ................
Robert Lockhart ..........
William Hunter ..........
Henry McKnight) ..........
Henry Shaw ..............
C. B. Scarborough ........
Lewis Green .............
Fred Williams ...........


White
Black
Black
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
Black
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
Black
White
White
White
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black


~


_______- ----------.,.------------------------L.---------


I


Jan.
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
SApril
SApril
April
SApril
April
SApril
April
April
April
April
April
SMay
SMay
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Dec.
Aug.
Aug.


l


17, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918.
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
- 8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
8, 1918
20, 1918
20, 1918
20, 1918
20, 1918
3, 1918
21, 1918
1, 1918
1, 1918
1, 1918
1, 1918
1, 1918
19, 1918
31, 1918
31, 1918
31, 1918
31, 1918
21, 1918
31, 1918
31, 1918











45

PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1918.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date ardoned

'8163 Morgan Christian ......... Black Aug. 31, 1918
9966 Victor Hathcock ......... White Aug. 31, 1918
B- 611 Molly Morton ............ Black Aug. 31, 1918
12180 Nix Stephens ............ White Aug. 31, 1918
12406 John Henry .............. Black Aug. 31, 1918
12376 Horace Ryals ............. White Aug. 31, 1918
12846 Gus Armane .............. White Aug. 31, 1918
12882 Tom Goff, Jr. ............. White Aug. 31, 1918
12901 A. J. Melvin ............. White Aug. 31, 1918
12760 Victor Powell ............. White Nov. 17, 1918
B- 70 William Thomas .......... White Dec. 13, 1918
12241 Frank Witt ............... White Dec. 23, 1918
12252 Jim Perry ................ Black Dec. 23, 1918
A- 147 J. W. Fort ............... White Dec. 18, 1918
5986 Albert Taylor ............. Black Dec. 21, 1918
7596 Dan McKinney ........... Black Dec. 21, 1918
8921 Charles Warren ......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
9155 Turner Williams .......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
9.27 Cip P. Butler ............. Black Dec. 21, 1918
12402 J. A. P. Harris............. White Dec. 21, 1918
12410 G. W. Harris ............. White Dec. 21, 1918
12411 J. A. Dix ................ White | Dec. 21, 1918
13662 N. E. P. Jackson ........... Back Dec. 21, 1918
13088 John Holmes ............. Black Dec. 21. 1918
13205 Jasper Johnson ........... Black Dec. 21, 1918
13209 Grafton Nix ............... White Dec. 21, 1918
13210 Glenwood Nix ............ White Dec. 21, 1918
18231 Elton Woodie ............ Black Dec. 21, 1918
]3235 S. V. Hulme .............. White Dec. 21, 1918
13266 Oscar John ................ White Dec. 21, 1918
5833 Kid Right ................ Black IDec. 21, 1918
7283 I Walter C. Brown ......... White Dec. 21, 1918
7391 James Wright ............ Black Dec. 21, 1918
7551 Amos Coffee .............. Black Dec. 21, 1918
7679 Robert Reaves ........... Black Dec. 21, 1918
7726 Henry Williams .......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
7850 Mamie Watkins ........... Black | Dec. 21, 1918
7862 Reuben Henderson ........ Black I Dec. 21, 1918
7905 Hilliard Crawford ........ I Black Dec. 21, 1918
8193 Ben Bingham ............. Black Dec. 21, 1918
8236 Tom Jackson ............. j Black I Dec. 21, 1918











46


PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1918.-Continued..

No. Name Color Date Pardoned

8714' Will Mention ............ Black Dec. 21, 1918
9024 Streeter Coleman ......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
9101 Sumter Mitchell ......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
9108 Willie Williams .......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
A- 97 Ernest McNe;l ............ Black Dec. 21, 1918
13089 George Jackson .......... Black Dec. 21, 1918
13099 M. J. Pitman ............. White Dec. 21, 1918
13188 C. E. Moore .............. White Dec. 21, 1918
13320 Wm. Weatherford ......... White Dec. 21, 1918


PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING 1918.

No. Name Coior Date of Escape

12384 Charlie Walker ........... Black Jan. 6, 1918
12759 Charlie Lester ............ Black Jan. 6, 1918
12952 Boisey McCall .......... Black Jan. 6, 1918
12539 0. W. Clarke ............. White Jan. 20, 1918
12764 Eddy Lewis ..............I Black Jan. 23, 1918
12814 Charles B. Kersey ........ j White Jan. 23, 1918
12648 Nathan Beverly ........... Black Feb. 6, 1918
12938 Willie Stephens ........ Black Feb. 8,1191S
12997 Manuel Reyes ............. White Feb. 27, 1918
12849 Carlton Davis ........ .... Black March 4, 1918
12571 Charlie Jones ............. Black March 11, 1918
12772 Sam Lasson ..............; Black March 21, 1918
12498 Best Parker .............. Black March 13, 1918
12931 J. S. Cook ................. White March 31, 1918
12949 Robert Davis .............. Black April 4, 1918
12476 Renelder Miller ........... Black* April 6, 1918
A- 814 Will Smith ............... Black March 30, 1918
12525 Henry Turner ............ Black April 25, 1918
B- 618 Robert Malachie ........... Black May 2, 1918
13185 Mack Hill ................ Black May 8, 1918
B- 901 Jas. W. Lawrence ......... Black May 9, 1918
12557 Willie Johnson ........... Black May 13, 1918
B- 785 Johnnie Johnson ......... Black May 13, 1918
B- 231 James Cobb .............. Black May 14, 1918
12183 W. 0. Bard .............. .White May 16, 1918
12331 W. C. Raines ............. White | May 16, 1918













PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1918-Continued.

No. I Name I Color I Date of Escape

12093 William White ............ Black May 19, 1918
12531 Jack Anderson ............. Black May 19, 1918
13016 Clyde Thomas ............. Black May 22, 1918
12932 James Graham ........... Black May 22, 1918
13000 Purvis Moody ............. Black May 23, 1918
A- 328 Sam Sheppard ............ Black April 28, 1918
9485 Ed Braxton' ................ Black May 30, 1918
9468 John Jones ............... Black May 30, 1918
B- 917 Lewis Mitchell ............ Black June 1, 1918
12299 Will Brown .............. Black June 1, 1918
12462 Augustine Pettiway ....... Black June 1, 1918
B- 255 Henry Miller ............. Black June 5, 1918
12789 William Harrison ......... Black June 14, 1918
8566 Elijah Miller ............ Black June 18, 1918
B- 176 Will Jackson ............. Black June 19, 1918
13114 C. A. Phelrs .............. White June 25, 1918
13106 Silas Chisholm ..... .. Black June 26, 1918
12682 Charles Jacksoi ::......... Black June 28, 1918
11912 Tom Maddox ............. White July 10, 1918
12501 John Ashley .............. White July 10, 1918
13064 Belton Crimm ............. Black July 17, 1918
12949 Robert Davis ............. Black July 15, 1918
12088 Adam Jenkins ............ Black- July 17, 1918
12517 James Hancock ........... Black July 17, 1918
13286 Eugene Watson ........... Black July 18, 1918
12165 J. H. Coleman ............ White Aug. 9, 1918
B- 167 Henry Williams .......... Black May 29, 1917
12540 George James' .............. Black Feb. 18, 1917
13128 Henry Smith .............. Black July 23, 1918
9835 Jim Williams ............. Black July 24, 1918
12059 Orlando Rogers .......... White July 20, 1918
12376 Horace Ryals ............ White July 20, 1918
12080 Robert Williams .......... Black July 25, 1918
13294 Charlie Brown ............ Black July 29, 1918
13298 Seth Scott ................ White July 30, 1918
13305 Henry Jackson ........... Black Aug. 11, 1918
9485 Ed Braxton ............... Black Aug. 14, 1918
12425 Chester Teal ............. Black Aug. 16, 1918
13276 Jackson Williams ......... Black Aug. 22, 1918
B- 533 Jesse Barnes .............. White Aug. 22, 1918
B- 534 Joe Barnes ............... White Aug. 22, 1918














PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1918-Continued.


INo.

12839
13279
B- 956
B- 337
12516
12054
7259
12735

12947
12521
12405
13317
12680
12941
13273
13281
12098

12419
13327
12894
13230

13295
12835

13245
13314
13273
13337
12188
12992
12713
12209
13141
12539
B- 416
9638
11994


Color Date of Escape


Name

Daniel Arron ............
Clarence Padgett ..........
Will Edwards ............
W ill W right ...............
Clarence Wynn ...........
George James .............
John Robinson ...........
Henry Brown, alias Willie
W illiam s ...............
Otis Gibson ..............
Willie James ............
Walter Woods............
C. S. Carter .............
Asa Barber .............
Lige Lovett ...............
Monroe Allen .............
John Henry ..............
John Rembert, alias Frank
Thom as ................
W ill Allison ..............
JW. E. Meator .............
James Chastang ..........
James Olive ,alias J. H. Cole-
m an ...................
James Roberts ...........
Henry Brown, alias Willie
W illiams ............ ...
Charles Johnson ..........
W ill Latimer .............
Monroe Allen ............
Lawrence Redding ........
Rossie Lamps ............
Henry Harrington ........
Dutch Brewer ............
Richard Newberry ........
T. J. McManus ...........
Oscar Clark ............. .
Charlie Wilson ............
Joseph Hickerson .........!
Tom Collins .............. I


Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
April

Sept.
Sert.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.


Black Oct.
Black Oct.
White Oct.
Black Oct.

White Nov.
Black Nov.

Black Nov.
Black Nov.
Black Nov.
Black Nov.
White Nov.
Black Dec.
White Dec.
Black Dec.
Black Dec.
White Dec.
White Dec.
White Dec.
Black Dec.
Black I Dec.


White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black

Black
Black
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black


25, 1918
25, 1918
29, 1918
29, 1918
2, 1918
4, 1918
12, 191S

10, 1918
16, 1918
29, 1918
7, 1918
7, 1918
14, 1918
16, 1918
25. 1918
25, 1918

26, 1918
28. 1918
29, 1918
31, 1918

2, 1918
4, 1918

4, 1918
7, 1918
7, 1918
22, 1918
28, 1918
20, 1918
27, 1918
27, 1918
27, 1918
29, 1918
29, 1918
29, a918
30, 1918
30, 1918













. 49


PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING 1918.

No. Name Color Date Recaptured


12384
12759
12952
12539
127G64
12C48
12997
12408
11949
9485
9468
B- 917
13114
13064
12944
12165
B- 167
12540
13128
12059
12376
13294
13298
9.485
12425
B- 533
B- 534
12839
13279
B- 956
12516
7259
12735

12521
12405
13273
13218
12098

13327


Charlie Walker ..........
Charlie Lester ............
Boisey McCall ...........
0. W Clarke .............
Ed Lewis ................
Nathan Beverly ...........
Manuel Reyes ............
Best Paker ...............
IiRbert Davis ..............
Ed Braxton ..............
John Jones ...............
Lewis Mitchell ...........
C. A. Phelps .............
Belton Crimm ............
Robert Davis .............
J. H. Coleman ...........
Henry Williams ...........
George James .............
Henry Smith ............. .
Orlando Rogers ...........I
Horace Ryals .............
Charlie Brown ............
Seth Scott ...............
Ed Braxton ...... .......
Chester Teal .............
Jesse Barnes ...........
Joe Barnes .............
Daniel Arron ... .........
Clarence Padgett .........
Will Edwards ...........
Clarence Wynn ...........
John Robinson .:..........
Henry Brown ,alias Willie
Williams ...............
Willie James ............
Walter Woods ............
Monroe Allen .............
John Henry ..............
John Rembert, alias Franki
Thomas ................ I
W. E. Meaton .............


Black
Black
Black
White
Black
Black
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
Black
Black
White
Black
Black
Black
White
White
Black
White
Black
Black
White
White
White
White
Black
Black
Black


Black Sept.
Black Sept.
White Oct.
Black Nov.
Black Nov.

Black Oct.
White Oct.


Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
March
April
June
June
SSept.
Aug.
Nov.
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
A ug.
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.


7, 1918
13, 1918
7, 1918
21. 1918
25, 1918
13, 1918
27, 1918
.16, 1918
5, 1918
3, 1918
30, 1918
17, 1918
6, 1918
1, 1918
18, 1918
7, 1918
13, 1918
13, 1918
24, 1918
2, 1918
5, 1918
30, 1918
1, 1918
14, 1918
21, 1918
24, 1918
24; 1918
25, 1918
25, 1918
6, 1918
6, 1918
1, 1918


31, 1918
31, 1918


4-Pr.















PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING YEAR 1918.-Continued.

ou. Name Color I Date Recaptured

12894 James Chastang ......... Black Nov. 18, 1918
13245 Charlie Johnson ........... Black Dec. 20, 1918
12992 Henry Harrington ........ I White Dec. 28, 1918


PRISONERS WHO DIED DURING 1918.


Name


Ella Price ................
James Chappele ..........
Arthur Hughes ...........
Best Parker ...............
Fate Smallwood .... ......
SJohn Newbold ...........
Lonnie Grimes ............
Clarence Graham ..........
Beulah Turner ...........
Walter Wilson .......
Pleas Singleton ...........
Le2 Bryant ...............
Jim Cole ................
Shadrick Lloyd ...........
Robert Green .............
Joe Hogan .......... ....
Alonzo Taylor ...........
John Brockton .........
R. L. Johnson.............
Henry Brown .............
Robert Johnson ..........
Chester Scarborough ......
W A. Holland ............
Henry Lamb .............
Edward Howard ..........
Sam Brugess .............
J. P. Woodruff ...........
Tom Brooks ..............
Jim Wilkinson ...........
Mose Thompson ..........
John Joshuare ............
Henry Williams ..........
Lewis Hollam .............


Color I Date of Death


'Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black.
Black
Black
Black
White
White
White
White
Black
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black


Jan.
Jan.
March
March
April
April
May
May
June
June
June
June
June
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct..
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.


15, 1918
25, 1918
24, 1918
16, 1918
1, 1918
13,, 1918
3. 1918
14, 1918
12, 1918
16, 1918
17, 1918
28, 1918
30, 1918
17, 1918
23, 1918
29, 1918
6, 1918
15, 1918
27, .1918
1, 1918
3, 1918
19, 1918.
5, 1918
8, 1918
16, 1918
15, 1918
18, 1918
13, 1918
18, 1918
16, 1918
25, 1918
28, 1918
29, 1918


No.

12945
B- 303
13061
12408
B- C01
12147
13192
12928
A- 598
9817
A- 103
13271
9399
12416
12976
13237
13290)
13197
8341
13233
12798.
11984
12902
13211
13079
A- 245
13284
12644
9006
12704
B- 859
B- 167
12796












51

PRISONERS WHO DIED DURING YEAR 1918.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date of Death

B- 436 Mahla Edwards ........... Black Oct. 29, 1918
13083 Chester Nellicliff ......... Black Nov. 1, 1918
12014 Ed Sloan ................ Black Nov. 5, 1918
B- 943 Jesso Hall ................ Black Nov. 7, 1918
11982 Jim Crockett ............. Black Nov. 7, 1918
12192 Daniel Pinn .............. Black Oct. 24, 1918
A- 660 Milton Smith ............. Black Nov. 15, 1918
B- 374 Frank Richardson ........ .Black Nov. 11, 1918
B- 93 John Thompson ........... Black Nov. 16, 1918
13257 Roy A. Jones ............ White Nov. 20, 1918
E- 572 Grover C. Brown ......... Black Nov. 22, 1918
9929 Robert Barnes ............ Black Nov. 20, 1918
13282 Will Kerr ................ Black Dec. 1, 1918
12081 Washington Tukes ........ Black Dec. 3, 1918
12909 Jim Robertson ........... Black Dec. 16, .1918


RECAPITULATION STATE PRISONERS 1918.

Prisoners on Hand January 1, 1918 .............. 1,525
Prisoners Committed During 1918.............. 300
Prisoners Recaptured During 1918 ............. 42

Prisoners Discharged During 1918.............. 400
Prisoners Pardoned During 1918 ................ 91
Prisoners Escaped During 1918.................. 103
Prisoners Died During 1918 ................... 48
Prisoners Paroled During 1918................... 6


Total Prisoners on Hand Jan. 1, 1919........

DISTRIBUTION OF PRISONERS JANUARY 1, 1919.

At State Prison Farms ..............................
At Private Lessee Camps................ ........... .
At Camps of State Road Department....................
At County State Road Camps..........................
At Insane Asylum (Patients) ...........................
At Girls' Industrial School ............................


1,867






648


1,219



444
471
127
166
2
9

1,219














BIRTHPLACE, COLOR AND SEX OF PRISONERS COMMITTED
DURING YEAR OF 1919.


Native of What State I
or Country j


Alabama .............. 9 1 7 2 19
Arkansas ............. 1 .. .. 1
Arizona ..... ......... 1 .. 1
Colorado .............. 1 .. 1
Delaware ............. 1 .. 1 .. 2
Florida ............... 49 1 141 6 197
Georgia ............... 18 .. 64 2 84
Illinois ............... 2 .. .. .. 2
Indiana .............. 1 .. .. 1
Kentucky ............. 1 . .. 1
Louisiana ............ .. 3 3
Maryland ............. 4 .. 1 .. 5
Massachusetts ......... 6 .. .. .. 6
Mississippi ........... 1 .. 1 .. 2
Michigan ............. 2 .. .. 2
Missouri ............. 1 .. 1
Nevada ............... 1 .. .. .. 1
New York ............ 5 .. 1 .. 6
New Jersey ........... 2 .. .. 2
North Carolina ....... 3 .. 15 .. 18
North Dakota ......... 1 .. .. .. 1
Ohio ................. 1 .. .. .. 1
Pennsylvania ......... 3 .. 1 .. 4
South Carolina ....... 7 .. 21 .. 28
Texas ................ 4 .. 3 .. 7
Tennessee .............. 2 .. .. .. 2
Virginia ............... 2 .. 5 .. 7
Austria ............... 1 .. .. .. 1
Bahama Islands ...... .. .. 7 .. 1 7
Canada ............... 1 .. .. 1
Cuba ................. 1 1
England .............. 1 .. .. .. 1
Greece ................ 3 .. 3
Haiti ................. .. 1 1
Italy ................. 3 .. .. .. 3
Russia ............... 1 .. .. .. 1
Scotland .............. 1 .. -.. .. 1
Spain ................ 1 .. 1
Totals .............. 142 2 273 10 427












S 53

PRISONERS RECEIVED BY COUNTIES DURING 1919.


Alachua ............... 4
Baker ................. 1
Bay .................... 1
Bradford .............. 11
Brevard ............... 9
Broward ............... 0
Calhoun ............... 3
Citrus .................. 2
Clay ................... 5
Columbia ............... 13
Dade ................... 33
DeSoto ................. 15
Duval .................. 93
Escambia .............. 11
Flagler ................ 0
Franklin ................ 1
Gadsden ................ 8
Hamilton .............. 11
Hernando .............. 3
Hillsborough ........... 14
Holmes ................ 0
Jackson ................ 17
Jefferson ............... 5
LaFayette ............. 2
Lake .................. 5
L ee .................... 3
Leon ................ ... 4


Le
Li
M
M
M
M
Nt
01
*01
Or
Os
Pi
Pt
Pi
P(
Pi
St
Se
St
St
Si
S
T
V

Vx
W
W;


ivy .................. 6
berty ................ 4
adison ................. 9
anatee ............... 5
arion ................. 8
onroe ................ 5
assau ................. 1
kaloosa ............... 3
keechobee ............ 1
range ................. 3
sceola ................ 1
alm Beach ........... 11
sco ................... 6
nellas ............... 5
olk ................... 8
utnam ................ 13
anta Rosa ............ 4
em inole ............... 0
. Johns .............. 10
t. Lucie .............. 4
im ter ................ 3
uwannee ............. 15
aylor ................ 6
olusia ................ 4
'akulla ............... 3
ralton ................ 9
rashington ............ 6

Total for year........ 427












54

CRIMES FOR WHICH SENTENCED DURING 1919.

M urder .................................................. 53
Breaking and entering .................................. 95
Larceny of an animal ................................. 19
Uttering forgery ........................................ 3
Wife desertion ......................................... 6
Manslaughter ......................................... 24
Robbery ................................... ............ 10
Assault to murder ....................................... 29
Grand larceny .......................................... 77
Illegal sale of intoxicating liquors .......................... 1
Assault to rape ...................... ................. 10
Rape ................................................. 5
Having carnal intercourse with female under 18 years old.. 5
Forgery ........... .................................... 18
Perjury .................................................. 1
Bigamy .............. ........ ........... .......... 5
Non-support ..................................... ....... 3
Attempting to break and enter ...............: ......... 1
Shooting into dwelling house ............................. 2
Assault to manslaughter ................................ 5
Receiving stolen property ................................ 2
Larceny ................. ....... ......................... 1
Entering without breaking ............................... 4
Assault to rob ........................................... 1
Crim e against nature ..................................... 3
Grand embezzlement ..................................... 9
Obtaining goods by false pretense ........................ 5
Incest ............................................ ...... 1
Lewd and lascivious cohabitation ........................ 3
Adultery .....,............................................ 4
Issuing check without funds in bank ...................... 3
Burglary ................................................. 2
Keeping gambling house ................................. 3
Accessory to grand larceny .............................. 1
Altering mark of animal ............................... 1
Fornication .............................................. 1
Burning private property ................................ 2
Arson ................................................... 2
Larceny of Auto .......................................... 6
Aiding in escapes ........................................ 1

Total ................................................. . 427













PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1919.

iNo. Name Color Date Pardoned

7259 John Robinson ............ Black Jan. 4, 1919
11948 Ed Alexander .............I Black Jan. 4, 1919
13190 Raymond Peters .......... White Jan. 4, 1919
12917 Arthur Grenoble .......... White Feb. 1, 1919
9720 George Kouvis ............ I White Feb. 21, 1919
12591 F. J. Morton ............. White Feb. 21, 1919
13160 Paul Custer .............. White Feb. 21, 1919
13377 R. L. Stevenson ........... White April 15, 1919
13269 Erin Settles ........... Black April 15, 1919
13315 Oliver Ward .............. White April 30, 1919
A- 207 Gus Revels ............... White May 21, 1919
13187 C. C. Hicks ............... White May 30, 1919
13373 Filipe Harbonero ......... White May 5, 1919
13172 Little Jimmie Green ...... White May 4, 1919
0983 Simon Rey ............... Black June 18, 1919
A- 336 Lewis Bennett .......... Black June 18, 1919
13078 Alva Edrington ......... White July 8, 1919
B- 913 W. H. Hoskins............ White July 9, 1919
12258 Burton Logan ............. White July 9, 1919
12259 Wilbur Logan ............ White July 9, 1919
13152 Carl E. Adams ............ White July 11, 1919
6731 John Hall ................I Black July 17,. 1919
6792 John Refro ............... Black July 17, 1919
6834 Neal Guyton ............. Black July 17, 1919
7349 Jim Sharpe .............. Black July 17, 1919
7456 Kid James ................ Black July 17, 1919
7696 Geoge Mosely ............ Black July 17, 1919
7801 Frank Singleton .......... Black July 17, 1919
7856 Joe Waltore .............. Black July 17, 1919
7883 Willard Ellis ............. Black July 17, 1919
7915 Marion Shavers .......... Black July 17, 1919
8194 Will Smith .............. Black July 17, 1919
8497 William Mitchell ......... Black July 17, 1919
8555 January Adams ............ Black July 17, 1919
9074 Henry Williams .......... White July 17, 1919
9758 Melvina Brown ........... Black July 17, 1919
9921 Ernest Buckner .......... Black July 17, 1919
A- 70 Wyatt Usury ............. White July 17, 1919
A- 205 J. B. Bray ............... Black July 17, 1919
B- 104 Tom Simmons ............ Black July 17, 1919
B- 533 Jesse Barnes ... ...... White July 17, 1919














PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1919.--Continued.


Name


B- 941
11906
11987
12168
12599
12902
13047
13066
13153
13158
13212
13285
13336
13451
11920
B- 183
13C18
13087
8402
B- 264
B- 265
7926
13239
13479
8833
12404
12997
13279
13595
13008
12878
13458
9164
8585
9680
12436
6625
7557
13307
13122
A- 284


Color Date Pardoned


Henry Gary ..............
A Hood ............ ; ...
David Roseborough .......
Ed Jones .................
James M. Disney .........
John McNeil .............
Dave McLendon ..........
Lock Addison ............
Frank McHugh ...........
Ches Lang ...............
W ill Cole ................
Will Herrington ..........
Aran Home .............
J. L. Dixon ...............
Joe L. Long ..............
William M. Dees .........
B. Gonzalis ..............
V. M. Buggs ..............
Henry Daniels ...........
Melt Bonner .............
Cleve Bonner .............
John W illiams ............
S. S. M illigan ............
Milton Barker ............
Z. T. Enterkin ...........
Jam ie Diaz ..............
Manuel Reyes ............
Clarence Padgett .........
Ambrosio Martiniz ........
John Crawley ............
Frank Frazier ............
Charles Rodevalt .........
John Tucker ......... :...
Ben Conyers .............
Fannie Watley ............
Cassie Williams .........
Robert Lewise ............
Telford Roof ..............
E. C. Harris .............
E. C. Grace ............. .
Tim Butler ............. .


I


No.


Black
White
Black
Black
White
Black
White
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
Black
White
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
Black


I


July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.

De.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.


17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919'
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
17, 1919
8, 1919
21, 1919
21, 1919
8, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919
24, 1919











57

PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1919.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date Pardoned

A- 75 Marion Carlton ........... White Dec. 24, 1919
12821 Cecil Duront ............. White Dec. 24, 1919
A- 463 Oscar Dunham ........... Black Dec. 24, 1919
8825 William Fain ............ Black Dec. 24, 1919
8788 Will Jackson ............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
12109 Willie Wyatt ............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
13263 E. C. Crawford ............ Black Dec. 24, 1919
7846 John Smith ............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
13156 Jerry Taylor .............. White Dec. 24, 1919
12451 Will Hightower .......... Black Dec. 24, 1919
7836 Henry McNeil ............ Black Dec. 24, 1919
7747 James Henry ............ Black Dec. 24, 1919
8863 Jesse Lindsey ............ Black Dec. 24, 1919
8123 Joe Bowles ............... EBlack Dec. 24, 1919
8205 Willie Davis ............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
12403 Sidney Weise ............. White Dec. 24; 1919
A- 338 Elia.s VMontgomery ........ Bla-k Dec. 24, 1919
B- 563 Sol Hayward ............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
S9259 C. J. Phelps .............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
A- .294 John Simms ............. Black Dec.. 24, 1919
8206 Will Richardson .......... Black Dec. 24, 1919
A- 189 Charlie Smith ............ I Black Dec. 24, 1919
12574 Rosa Spanish ............ Black Dec. 24, 1919
13412 Rex ,eeves .............. White Dec. 24, 1919
8185 Bob Sallage .............. Black Dec. 24, 1919
6352 Jake Caves ............... Black Dec. 24, 1919













PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1919.

No. Name Color j Date of Escape


13076
12766
B-1474
12788
13121.
12883
12829
13308
13126
6651
B- 404
8401
9687
11940
13215
12403
13332
12699
13289
12867
13434
13144
13390
13396
13517
.13519
13531
12573
A- 339
12778
B- 579
12900
13291
13177
12803
B- 931
13521
13000
13444
13057
13130


Carl Pringle .............
Lige Gainey .............
W ill Cole .................
Chester Ford .............
J. P. R oss ................
Harry Larson ...........
Eddie Johnson ............
L. E. Christopher .........
W illie Spicer .............
Tom Scott ...............
Priestly Mack ............
Joe Daniels ...............
Frank Sampson ..........
Henry Green .............
Moultry Whitten ..........
Sidney W eise ............
Lee M ills .................
Robert Campbell ..........
Fred Bird ................
Junior Simmons ..........
Leroy Gibbs ..............
Tom Singletary ...........
Lloyd McClure ............
W ill Loveless ............
Claud Starling ...........
Prince Albert Brooks......
Leroy Edwards ..........
Herbert Spanish .........
Jim Carter ..............
Major Perry ..............
Joe Ross ................
David Wright ............
Clarence Thomas .........
Robert Micchell ...........
Joe Varns ...............
.Charlie Frambo .........
Henry Williams ..........
Purvis Moody ............
Isaac Hand ...............
Wallace Pleas ............
Joe Hanks ...............


White Jan.
Black Jan.
Black Jan.
Black Jan.
White Jan.
White Jan.
Black Jan.
White Jan.
Black Feb.
Black March
Black March
Black March
Black March
Black March
Black March
White March
Black March
Black April
Black April
Black April
Black April
Black April
White Arril
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black. May
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black Feb.
Black March
Black May
Black May
Black May
Black j May
Black May


1, 1919
1, 1919
20, 1919
21, 1919.
22, 1919
13, 1919
20, 1919
28, 1919
5, 1919
1, 1919
2, 1919
3, 1919
3, 1919
23, 1919
23, 1919
23, 1919
27, 1919
13, 1919
15, 1919
21, 1919
20, 1919
25, 1919
28, 1919
1, 1919
13, 1919
,13, 1919
14, 1919
11, 1919
11, 1919
11, 1919
11, 1019
17, 1919
20, 1919
20, 1919
13, 1919
17, 1919
22, 1919
23, 1919
21, 1919
27, 1919
28, 1919














PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1919.-Continued.

No. Name I Color Date of Escape

12687 Pleas Williams ........... Black May 27, 1919
13434 Leroy Gibbs .............. Black May 2, 1919
13469 Will Gibbs ............... Black June 12, 1919
13400 Marvin Nichols ......... White June 17, 1919
13606 Ed Mizelle ............... Black June 21, 1919
B- 30 Bed Doughtery ........... Black July 4, 1919
12540 George James ............. Black July 11; 1919
13146 Walter Hubbard .......... Black July 10, 1919
13421 George Redding .......... Black July 13, 1919
13350 Cassius B. Smith ......... White July 27, 1919
13355 Mike Dominick ........... White July 27, 1919
13557 Ernest Landrum .......... White July 27, 1919
13097 Flanders Ferrell .......... White July 31, 1919
13429 Tom Dixon ............... White Aug. 17, 1919
A 706 J. Mitchell Anderson....... White Aug. 17, 1919
11932 James Cobb ............... Black Aug. 19, 1919
B- 721 Herbert Ford ............ Black May 8, 1919
13464 Oscar Brown ............. Black Aug. 20, 1919
12589 Joe Douglas ............. White Aug. 31, 1919
13584 Noah Young .............. Black Aug. 30, 1919
13535 J. L. Frazier ............. Black Sept. 21, 1919
12544 Arthur Mason ............ Black Sept. 27, 1919
13432 I. C. Fussell .............. White Oct. 5, 1919
13612 J. F. Whitfield ........... White Oct. 5, 1919
13615 Will Tatum .............. White Oct. 5, 1919
13578 Ben Rogers ............. White Oct. 5, 1919
13474 Rudolph Wilson .......... White Oct. 5, 1919
13467 Bert Steadman ........... White Oct. 5, 1919
13616 John Thompson .......... White Oct. 5, 1919
B- 820 Harry Armstrong ......... White Oct. 8, 1919
13528 Joe Washington .......... Black Sept. 7, 1919
13647 J. J. Lester .............. White Oct. 31, 1919
12824 W. A. Ingram ............ Black Nov. 9, 1919
12991 Hugh Alderman .......... White Nov. 9, 1919
13388 Martin Chesser ........... White Nov. 9, 1919
13327 W. E: Meader ............ White Nov. 17, 1919
13453 Charlie Favors ........... White Nov. 18, 1919
B- 495 Eugene Rover ............ Black Nov. 25, 1919
13312 J. E. Parkerson .......... White Dec. 2, 1919
13464 Oscar Brown ............. Black Dec. 9, 1919
13698 Mitchell Johnson ......... Black Dec. 9, 1919













PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1919.-Continued.

No. Name Cour uace of Escape

13737 Richard Adams ........... Black Dec. 9, 1919
13613 0. K. Mintz ............... White Dec. 20, 1919
13707 Will S. Harrison ......... White Dec. 20, 1919
'038 Joe Hickerson ............ Black Dec. 22, 191.9
13793 Will Armstrong ........... Black Dec. 22, 1919
12384 Charles Walker .......... Black Dec. 22, 1919
12947 Otis Gibson .............. Black Dec. 22, 1919
12318 Robert Hopps ............ Black Dec. 29, 1919
12350 Geo. Jones ............... Black DEc. 30, 1919
A- 778 I Elijah Jones ............. Black Jan. 20, 1919

PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING YEAR 1919.

No. Name Color Date Recaptured
13076 Carl Pringle ............. White April 28, 1919
13308 L. E. Christopher ......... White Feb. 5, 1919
13126 Willie Spicer .............I Black Feb. 6, 1919
B- 404 Priestly Mack ............ Black April" 4, 1919
12403 Sidney Weise ............. White March 29, 1919
13332 Lee Mills ................ Black March 29, 1919
12699 Robert Camrbell .......... Black April 16, 1919
13434 Leroy Gibbs .............. Black April 20, 1919
13144 Tom Singletary ............ Black May 3, 1919
13519 Prince Albert Brooks ...... Black May 17, 1919
12573 Herbert Spanish ........ Black May 11, 1919
A- 339 Jim Carter ..... 4 ......... Black May 11, 1919
B- 579 Joe Ross ................. Black May 11, 19,19
12900 David Wright ............ Black May 17, 1919
B- 931 Charlie Frambo ............ Black May 17, 1910
13521 Henry Williams .......... Black May 22, 1919.
13000 Purvis Moody ............ Black May 17, 1919
13057 Wallace Pleas ............ Black March 12, 1919
12687 Pleas Williams ........... Black IMay 27, 1919
13400 Marvin Nichols ........... White June 17, 1919
13606 Ed Mizelle .............. Black June 21, 1919
B- 30 Ben Doughtery ........... Black. f July 6, 1919
13540 George James ............. Black Sept. 10, 1919
13146 Walter Hubbard .......... Black Aug. 10, 1919
13350 Cassius B. Smith ......... White July 30, 1919
13355 Mike Dominick ........... White | Aug. 30, 1919
13557 Ernest Landrum .......... White [ July 30, 1919














PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING YEAR 1919.-Continued.

No. Name color Date Recaptured

13097 Flanders Ferrell ........... White Aug. 1, 1919
13429 Tom Dixon ............... White Sept. 2, 1919
A- 706 J. Mitchell Anderson ...... White Aug. 19, 1919
11932 James Cobb .............. Black Dec. 4, 1919
B- 721 Herbert Ford ............... Black | Aug. 10, 1919
12571 Charlie Jones ............. Black Aug. 14, 1919
13464 Oscar Brown ............. Black Sept. 13, 1919
12589 Joe Douglas .............. White Sept. 3, 1919
13432 I. C. Fussell ............. White Oct. 7, 1919
13612 J. F. Whitfield ............ White Oct. 7, 1919
13615 Will Tatum .............. White Oct. 9, 1919
13578 Ben Rogers .............. White Oct. 5, 1919
13474 Rudolph Wilson .......... White Oct. 7, 1919
13467 Bert Steadman ........... White Oct. 7, 1919
13616 John Thompson ........... White Oct. 9, 1919
B- 820 Harry Armstrong ......... White Oct. 8, 1919
13647 J. J. Lester ............... White Oct. 31, 1919
12991 Hugh Alderman .......... White Nov. 9, 1919
13388 Martin Chesser ........... White Nov. 9, 1919
B- 495 Eugene Rover ........... Black Dec. 4, 1919
13273 Monroe Allen ............. Black Dec. 2, 1919

PRISONERS DIED DURING YEAR 1919.

No. Name
12011 Slater Ellison ............ Black Jan. 30, 1919
12026 James Parker ............ Black Feb. 1, 1919
12063 Oscar McFashion ......... Black Feb. 2, 1919
13368 Augustus Simmons ....... Black Jan. 28, 1919
13124 Robert Porter ............ Black Feb. 7, 1919
13600 Sam Gilliard ............. Black June 21, 1919
13562 Will Thompson ........... Black June 2, 1919
13168 Robert Black ............. Black July 16, 1919
B- 167 Henry Williams .......... Black July 30, 1919
A- 306 Judge Baker ............. Black Aug. 11, 1919
13352 Ben Simmons ............. Black Sept. 2,1919
A- 572 Jim Arnold .............. Black Sept. 20, 1919
13159 Lonnie Pinkney .......... Black Nov. 12, 1919
11951 John Beeman ............. Black Nov. 15, 1919
13542 Lonnie Dixon ............, White Dec. 2, 1919
9286 David L. Gordon ......... Black Dec. 22, 1919












62

RECAPITULATION OF STATE PRISONERS, 1919.

Prisoners on hand January 1, 1919 ................1,219
Prisoners committed during 1919 ................ 427
Prisoners recaptured during 1919 ................ 48
-- 1,694
Prisoners discharged during 1919 .................. 319
Prisoners pardoned during 1919 ................... 108
Prisoners escaped during 1919 .................... 92
Prisoners paroled during 1919 ..................... 31
Prisoners died during 1919 ........................ 16
566
Total prisoners on hand December 31, 1919 .... 1,128

Distribution of State Prisoners.

At State Prison Farms .................................. 486
At State road cam ps .................................... 627
At Chattahoochee as patients ............................ 8
At Chattahoochee as laborers ............................ .2
At Girls' Industrial School, Ocala, as laborers .......... 5

1,128













63

BIRTHPLACE, COLOR AND SEX OF PRISONERS COM-
MITTED DURING THE YEAR OF 1920.


Native of Wnat White White Colored Colored
State or Country. Males. Females.I Males. Females. Total.


Alabama .......
Arkansas ......
California .....
Connecticutt ...
Florida ........
Georgia .......
Illinois ........
Indiana ........
Kentucky ..
Louisiana ......
Maryland ......
Massachusetts ..
Missouri ......
Michigan ......
Mississippi .....
'Montana .......
North Carolina..
New Jersey ....
New York .......
Oregon .........
Pennsylvania ...
South Carolina..
Tennessee .....
Texas ..........
Virginia ........
West Virginia ..
Wisconsin ......
Austria Hungary.
Bahama Islands.
England ........
France .........
Germany ......
Greece .........
Ireland ........
Italy ...........
New Guinea ....
Norway ........
Russia .........
Scotland ........
Tqtal ........


14
4
3
2
61
20
7
1
2
1
6
3
1
2


6


1































1


133
61




2
1


1
1

8

1

1
27
3
3
5
3


10







1


I


183 3 264 9- 459


74]-


I


21
4
3
2
203
82
7
1
2
3
7
3
1
3
1
1
12
3
10
1
6
31
5
5
8
3


10
1

2
1
3
2
3



2
1
















PRISONERS RECEIVED BY


Alachua ................
Baker ..................
Bay ........ ..........
Bradford ...............
Brevard .................
Brcward ...............
Caltoun ................
Citrus .... ..... .. .....
C lay ...................
Colum bia ..............
D ade ..................
D eSoto' ................
Duval ................
Escambia ..............
Flagler ................
Franklin ...............
Gadsden ...............
Hamilton ...............
Hernando ..............
Hillsborough ...........
H clm es ................
Jackson ...............
Jefferson ...............
LaFayette ..............
Lake ...................
Lee ...................
Leon ...................


COUNTIES DURING 1920.


Levy ................... 0
Liberty ................ 3
Madison ............... 2
SM anatee ............... 16
M arion ................. 11
M onro ................ .. 8
Nassau ................. 2
*Okalocsa ............... 5
Okeechobee ............ 1
Olange ................. 10
Osceola ................ 1
Palm Beach ........... 15
Pasco .................. 3
Pinellas ................ 11
Polk ................... 13
Putnam ................ 7
Santa Rosa ............ 7
Seminole ............... 1
St. Johns .............. 4
St. Lucie ............... 6
Sumter ............... 2
Suwanee ............... 10
Taylor ................. 3
Volusia ...'............. 16
W akulla ...............
W alton ................. 8
Washington ............ 3

Total for year ....... 459












65

CRIMES FOR WHICH SENTENCED DURING 1920.

M urder ................................... .............. 38
Breaking and entering .................................. 96
Larceny of an anim al .................................... 11
W ife desertion ............................. ............. 4
M manslaughter ............................................ 24
Robbery .... ............ .............................. 17
Assault to m urder .................................... 39
Grand larceny ............................. ............. 117
Illegal sale of intoxicating liquors ........................ 2
Assault to rape .................. .. .......... ........... 6
Rape ......................... ........................... 2
Having carnal intercourse with female under 18 years old.. 1
Forgery ................................................ 28
Bigam y .................................... ............. 5
N on-support .............................................. 2
Shooting into dwelling house ............................ 1
Assault to manslaughter ................................ 1
Receiving stolen property ................................ 9
Larceny of auto ..................... .. . ............... 14
Entering without breaking ............................... 4
A assault to rob ................... ..... .... ............... 2
Crime against nature .................................... 6
Grand embezzlement ........................... .......... 4
Obtaining goods by false pretense ........................ 4
Incest ...................................... ....... .... 3
Lewd and lascivious cohabitation ....................... 2
Highway robbery ...................................... 1
Burglary ................................................ 7
Carrying implements into jail to aid escape .............. 1
Attempt to burglary ................................... 1
Arson ............................... .................... 1
P erjury ............................. ... ....... ........... 1
Enticing female from home for immoral purpose .......... 1
Throwing missiles into railroad train ...................... 1
Sodom y ............................... ... ................ 1
Manufacturing intoxicating liquors ........................ 2

Total ................................................. 459


5-Pr.











66

PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1920.

No. Name Color Date Pardoned

5106 Will Jackson ............ Black Jan. 10, 1920
6442 Major Moore ............. Black Jan. 10, 1920
6553 John Wright ............. Black Jan. 10, 1920
7640 Jack Barnes .............. Black Jan. 10, 1920
0494 Frank Merrell ............ Black Jan. 10. 1920
A 134 James Blackwell .......... Black Jan. 10, 1920
13616 Marcus Snow ............. White Jan. 10, 1920
12021 Willie Williams ........... Black Jan. 20, 1920
A- 615 Turner Andrews .......... Black Feb. 9, 1920
13432 I. C. Fussell .............. White March 2, 1920
13565 Paul Ratliff ............... White Feb. 20, 1920
13596 Roy Slaughter ............ White Feb. 20, 1920
13682 James Ross ............... White March 16, 1920
13669 Lee Paxton .............. White July 10, 1920
12181 Harry Wilson ............ White July 10, 1920
14000 W. S. Tucker ............. White July 10, 1920
13681 Manuel Corelis .......... White July 12, 1920
6858 Fred Jenkins ............. Black Aug. 20, 1920
8047 Abe Wheeler .............. Black Aug. 20, 1920
9219 Sam White ............... Black July 20, 1920
9493 Will Mason ............... Black July 20, 1920
A- 337 John Roberts ............. Black July 20, 1920
B- 534 Joe Barnes ............... White July 20, 1920
B- 781 G. I. Johnson ............. White July 20, 1920
B- 805 Jesse Alderman ........... White July 20, 1920
13020 Carrie Cole ............... Black July 20, 1920
13103 John Goff ................ White July 20, 1920
13111 Rosario Urso ............. White July 20, 1920
13818 I Will Taylor .............. White July 20, 1920
13854 IJ. P. Parker .............. White July 20, 1920
13298 i Seth Scott ............... White July 20, 1920
13496 Marvin Hobbs ............ White July 20, 1920
13693 Charlie Mbsley ............ White July 20, 1920
13773 E. A. McGuffie ........... White July 20, 1920
7347 Paul Wilson .............. Black July 20, 1920
8242 Will Barber .............. Black July 20, 1920
B- 71 B. F. Carter ............... White July 20, 1920
B- 437 Green Wheeler ............ Black July 20, 1920
B- 710 Sallie Shaw .............. Black July 20, 1920
B- 854 Alfred Simmons .......... White July 20, 1920














PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1920.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date Pardoned

12040 Claude Holzendorf ........ White July, 20, 1920
12276 Johnnie Larry ............ Black July 20, 1920
12830 Dan Carlton ............. White July 20, 1920
13179 John C. Davis ............ White July 20, 1920
13380 Jesse Barwick ............ White July 20, 1920
14021 Albert Dean .............. Black July 20, 1920
8720 Jordan Scott .............. Black July 20, 1920
9355 Jim Green ............... Black July 20, 1920
9510 Joe Moultrie ............. Black July 20, 1920
9783 Charles Harper .......... BlacK July 20, 1920
A- 41 Mattie Hamilton .......... Black July 20, 1920
A- 357 Lige M. Brown ........... Black July 20, 1920
B- 45 Lee Collins ............... Black July 20, 1920
12090 Doll Lewis ............... Black July 20, 1920
12091 Brewister llis ........... Black July 20, 1920
12266 Will Harris ............... Black July 20, 1920
12612 Simon Simpson ........... Black ,July 20, 1920
12892 Manly Luck .............. White July 20, 1920
13134 Otto Erbans .............. W white July 20, 1920
13456 J. L. Patrick ............. White July 20, 1920
12653 J. L. Hollingsworth ....... White July 20, 1920
B- 740 Lige Jordan .............. Black July 20, 1920
12681. John Morgan ............. White July 21, 1920
13555 Edwin Legler ............. White July 21, 1920
8195 Wiley Whitfield ........... Black Aug. 7, 1920
14047 A. I. Lowman ............. White Aug. 18, 1920
14048 Floyd Braswell ........... White Aug. 18, 1920
13823 Walter Glisson .......... White Aug. 24, 1920
8167 Cornelius Williams ........ Black Aug. 24, 1920
13524 0. L. Owens .............. White Aug. 24, 1920
13802 Raymond Brooks ......... Black Sept. 28, 1920
13655 Henry F. Russell .......... Black Sept. 29, 1920
13653 Fred L. Bragg ............ White Oct. 6, 1920
14046 H. L. Beck ............... White Oct. 15, 1920
14078 John Hamlin ............. White Nov. 11, 1920
13349 J. E. Crane ............... White Nov. 18, 1920
13511 J. C. Black ............... White Nov. 18, 1920
2427 Joe Peacock .............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
8122 Will Edwards ............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
8927 Jim Lowry ............... Black Dec. 19, 1920














PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1920.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date Pardoned

8961 Frank Ruth ............... Black Dec. 19, 1920
9052 J. H. Rogers .............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
9220 William Buggs ........... Black Dec. 19, 1920
13614 W. H. Dean ............... White Dec. 19, 1920
12358 Millie Barrantine ......... White Dec. 19, 1920
13025 E. L. Childers ............. White Dec. 19, 1920
9589 Arline Vickers ............ Black Dec. 19, 1920
A- 883 Frank Green ............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
14074 Sherman Pelton ..........' White Dec. 19, 1920
13115 J. J. Coleman ............. White Dec. 19, 1920
12059 Orlando Rogers ........... White Dec. 19, 1920
12223 Will Moore ........................ Black Dec. 19, 1920
12663 Eddie Green .............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
9501 Israel Grant .............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
B- 500 Ivy Williams ............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
13497 Claude Hobbs ............ White Dec. 19, 1920
13487 Ed Stanley ............... White Dec. 19, 1920
13299 Alvin Caruthers .......... White Dec. 19, 1920
B- 804 E. L. Locklier ............ White Dec. 19, 1920
9730 George Smith ............. I Black Dec. 19, 1920
8457 Bisbee DeSue ............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
12934 Spencer Slaughter ........I Black Dec. 19, 1920
12231 Sebren Rigden ............ White Dec. 19, 1920
12957 Joe Edwards .............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
13790 V. T. Lockart ............. White Dec. 19, 1920
13791 Bertha Rogers ............i White Dec. 19, 1920
8702 Johnnie Johnson .......... Black Dec. 19, 1920
9490 John Everett ............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
9165 Will Brown ............... Black Dec. 19, 1920
A- 290 Tom Smith ............... Black Dec. 19, 1920
7969 John Patterson ........... Black Dec. 19, 1920
9768 T. C. Cannon ............. White Dec. 19, 1920
8567 Andrew Wingfield ........ Black Dec. 19, 1920
9842 Frank Hicks ............ Black Dec. 19, 1920
9848 Joe Brown ................ Black Dec. 19, 1920
B- 63 Ed Brown ................ Black Dec. 19, 1920
B- 119 Jake Reid ................. Black Dec. 19, 1920
13844 Gordon H. Waterman .... White Dec. 14, 1920
13526 Jack Armitage ............ White Dec. 19, 1920
14054 Frank M. Charles ......... White Dec. 19, 1920












69

PRISONERS PARDONED DURING YEAR 1920.-Continued.

No. Name I Color j Date Pardoned

14055 Ed Geiger ................ White Dec. 19, 1920
14188 Bessie Haywood .....:...... Black Dec. 19, 1920
13762 John T. Lee .............. White Dec. 19, 1920
B- 905 Zack Sirmons ............. White Dec. 19, 1920
13142 Lee Morris ............... White Dec. 19, 1920
7647 Ed Brinkley .............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
13321 E. J. Asselta ............. White Dec. 19, 1920
8204 John Leonard ............. Black Dec. 19, 1920
14223 Johnnie Jones ............ White Dec. 19, 1920
14058 John Clemons ............. White Dec. 23, 1920
14261 R. M. Carroll ............. White Dec. 23, 1920


PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING 1920.

No. Name Color Date of Escape


Curley Hendley ...........
Flynn Johnson ............
Sam O'Neil ..............
James Edwards ..........
Willie Ware ............
Tommie Day ..............
Arthur Baker ............
Charlie Norman ..........
Monroe Allen ............
Jerry Murphy .............
John Collins ............ .
C. S. Carter ..............
LeRoy Gibbs .............
John Aiken ...............
Will Buchanan ............
Martin H. Joy ............
James Chastang ..........
D. L. George ............
Math Wililams ............
Will Edwards .............
J. N. Rogers ..............
James Chastang ........
Darwin Woods ...........


Black Jan.
Black Feb.
Black. Feb.
Black Feb.
Black March
Black March
Black March
Black IMarch
Black March
Black April
White April
White April
Black May
Black April
White May
White May
Black May
White June
White June
Black June
White May
Black June
White June


13267
13586
13679
13811
13827
13053
12723
13672
13273
13838
13864
13317
13434
7394
13850
13902
12894
13646
13701
A- 46
13938
12894
13966













PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1920.-Continued.

No. Name Color Date of Escape

13942 Richard Carter ........... White June 8, 1920
13960 A. D. Cooper ........... White June 8, 1920
13794 Hugh Howell ............. White June 10, 1920
13652 J. D. Slaughter .......... Black June 15, 1920
13977 Mike Hatrack ............ White June 17, 1920
13938 J. H. Rogers .............. White June 17, 1920
13651 J. E. Smith ............... Black June 19, 1920
13950 Zeke Johnson ............ Black June 21, 1920
13872 Ben Williams ............. Black June 26, 1920
B- 820 Harry Armstrong ......... White July 9, 1920
13796 W. D. White ............. White July 9, 1920
13735 Thomas Demarry ......... Black July 9, 1920
13731 Lowden Woodward ....... Black July 9, 1920
13774 Willie Wright ............ Black July 13, 1920
13434 LeRoy Gibbs ............. Black July 14, 1920
13989 John Mills ................ Black July 15, 1920
13508 John Wesley .............. Black July 15, 1920
13814 Sam Kemp ............... Black July 20, 1920
13303 Bernice Lasaine ............ Black July 25, 1920
12904 Norman Kimball .......... Black July 25, 1920
13837 Harry Williams .......... Black July 25, 1920
13924 Jasper McNeeley ......... Black July 25, 1920
12589 Joe Douglas .............. White July 25, 1920
13988 Harry Edwards ........... White July 25, 1920
13218 Plumer Sheppard ......... Black June 8, 1920
13262 Dean Cheatham .......... Black June 8,. 1920
13975 Jesse Simmons ........... Black July 13, 1920
13961 G. R. Miller .............. White July 29, 1920
13401 Randall Thomas .......... White Aug. 3, 1920
13990 Clinton Hale .............. White Aug. 7, 1920
13987 Frank Reynolds ........... White Aug. 7, 1920
13975 Jesse Simmons ........... White Aug. 8, 1920
13281 John Henry .............. Black Aug. 11, 1920
13106 Silas Chisholm ........... Black Aug. 11, 1920
13021 Richard McPherson ....... Black Aug. 11, 1920
13735 Thomas Demarry ......... Black Aug. 12, 1920
13969 Jake Booker ............. Black Aug. 15, 1920
14022 Bill Esaw ................. Black Aug. 17, 1920
13667 E. J. Smith ............... White Aug. 20, 1920
13966 Darwin Woods ........... White Aug. 24, 1920















PRISONERS ESCAPED DURING YEAR 1920.-Continued.


No.


13798
13319
12054
12539
13577
B- 76
13852
13527
A- 890
13203
14012
13942
13915
13938
13977
13941
13974
13987
13876
13958
13939
8469
13306
13884
13446
13694
13963
13738
11914
13625
14182
1P030


Color Dateof Escape


Name


John Dolan ...............
Frank Martin ............
George James ..............
Oscar Clark ..............
H. H. Johns ............
Charles McCray ..........
Willie Hamilton .......
John Murray .............
John Hagan ............
John Rogers ..............
W ill Sanders .............
Richard Carter ...........
W. D. Williams ...........
J. H. Rogers .............
Mike Hatrack .......:....
W ill J. Young .............
Norman Andrews .........
Frank Reynolds ...........
James L. Grayson ........
George E. Miller ..........
Mervin E. Dunne .........
Wallace McRae ...........
Rollie Ferguson ..........
M. P. Driggers ...........
John Brown ..............
Grady Kelley .............
James Hedgewood ......
Luther Wilson ............
John Lewis ..............
Fred Ulrich ...............
Frank Williams ..........
George Baker ............


White
Black
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
Black
Black
White
White
White
Black
White
Black
White
Black
White


Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.


24, 1920
8, 1920
9, 1920
12, 1920
12, 1920
13, 1920
17, 1920
26, 1920
27, 1920
9, 1920
8, 1920
6, 1%20
6, 1920
6, 1920
6, 1920
6, 1920
6, 1920
6, 1920
7, 1920
7, 1920
16, 1920
20, 1920
25, 1920
9, 1920
16, 1920
16, 1920
7, 1920
3, 1920
18, 1920
22, 1920
27, 1920
30, 1920














PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING YEAR 1920.


No. I Name 1 Color


B- 825
13267
12723
13434
12713
13838
13864
12158
12894
13646
13701
Ae 46
13938
12894
13966
13942
13794
13652
13977
13938
13464
B- 820
13796
13735
12093
13434
12904
12589
13988
13219
13262
13975
13961
9573
13384
13990
13987
14022
13312
9960


Paul Simmons .............
Curley Hendley ...........
Arthur Baker ............
LeRoy Gibbs .............
Dutch Brewer ............
Jerry Murphy .............
John Collins ............
Rossie Lamps ............
James Chastang .........
D. L. George ..............
Math Williams ...........
Will Edwards ............
J. N. Rogers ..............
James Chastang ..........
Darwin Woods ..........
Richard Carter ...........
Hugh Howell ............
J. D. Slaughter ............
Mike Hatrack ............
J. H. Rogers ........ ....
Oscar Brown .............
Harry Armstrong ..........
W D. W hite .............
Thomas Demarry .........
William White ...........
LeRoy Gibbs ..............
Norman Kimball ..........
Joe Douglas ..............
Harry Edwards ..........
Plumer Sheppard ..........
Dean Cheatham .........
Jesse Simmons ...........
G. R. M iller .............
J. W Farwell ...........
Charlie Walker ..........
Clinton Hale ............
Frank Reynolds ..........
Bill Esaw ...............
J. E. Parker ..............
Robert Whiting ...........


Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
Black
Black
White
White
Black
White
Black
White
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
Black
White
White
Black
Black
Black
White
White
Black
White
White
Black
White
Black


Date Recaptured

Jan. 6, 1920
Jan. 5, 1920
April 12, 1920
March 31, 1920
April 6, 1920
Oct. 13, 1920
Oct. 13, 1920
May 6, 1920
May 20, 1920
June 23, 1920
June 16, 1920
June 3, 1920
May 26, 1920
Aug. 27, 1920
July 20, 1920
June 22, 1920
June 28, 1920
June 15, 1920
June 20, 1920
June 20. 1920
June 25, 1920
July 10, 1920
July 10, 1920
July 28, 1920
July 8, 1920
July 14, 1920
July 29, 1920
July 26, 1920
SJuly 26, 1920
June 9, 1920
June 9, 1920
July 28 ,1920
July 29, 1920
Aug. 4, 1920
Aug. 4, 1920
Aug. 13, 1920
Aug. 13, 1920
Aug. 18, 1920
Aug. 25, 1920
Sept. 1, 1920















PRISONERS RECAPTURED DURING YEAR 1920.-Continued.


Color Date Recaptured


Oscar Clark ...............
W ill Jackson ..............
Richard Carter ............
W D. W illiams ............
J. N. Rogers ..............
Mike Hatrack .............
Norman Andrews ..........
Frank Reynolds ...........
James L. Grayson ........
George E. Miller ..........
W illie W right ............
Darwin Woods ............
M. P. Driggers ............


PRISONERS DIED DURING YEAR 1920.


Mack Bowers .............
John L. Branch ...........
W ill Marlow ..............
Kinlaw Huggins ...........
Harry W hite ..............
William James ............
Isaac McCall ..............
John Rix, .................
Ike Edwards ..............
Harry Sanders ............
Tanner Brown ............


Black Feb.
White March
Black March
White April
Black April
Black July
Black July
Black Sept.
Black Nov.
Black Nov.
Black Dec.


12539
B- 176
13942
13915
13938
13977
13974
13987
13876
13958
13774
13966
13884


White
Black
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
White
Black
White
White


Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
*Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.


18, 1920
2, 1920
21, 1920
7, 1920
7, 1920
7, 1920
7, 1920
7, 1920
8, 1920
8, 1920
7, 1920
8, 1920
10, 1920


13751
13399
9590
13758
13112
13889
14045
13629
B- 110
B- 945
14025


19, 1920
12, 1920
25, 1920
7, 1920
20, 1920
22, 1920
16, 1920
29, 1920
23, 1920
23, 1920
26, 1920















RECAPITULATION OF STATE PRISONERS 1920.


Prisoners on hand January 1, 1920 ................ 1,128
Prisoners committed. during 1920 .................. 459
Prisoners recaptured during 1920 ................ 53
Conditional pardons revoked 1920 ................ 2

Prisoners discharged during 1920 .................. 251
Prisoners escaped during 1920 .................... 95
Prisoners pardoned during 1920 .................. 131
Prisoners paroled during 1920 .................... 29
Prisoners died during 1920 ...................... 11


1,643


517


Total prisoners on hand January 1, 1921 ................1,125

DISTRIBUTION OF STATE PRISONERS.

At State prison farms .................................... 484
At State road camps ..................................... 628
At asylum as patients ................................... 10
At Chattahoochee as laborers ............................ 2
At Boys' Industrial School as laborers .................. 1













GAIN-TIME ALLOWED FOR GOOD CONDUCT.

With reference to Chapter 6917, Acts of 1915, known as the
Gain Time Law, the following table has been compiled showing
the number of days allowed off of the various terms of sentence
for good behaviour.



Length of Sentence-
4 tC 0 CC1j
Days Years Days Years Days
One Year ............. 24 ... 24 ... 341
Eighteen Months ..... ... ... 42 1 141
Two Years ........... 36 ... 60 1 305
Thirty Months ........ ... .. 84 2 99
Three Years .......... 48 ... 108 2 257
Four Years ........... 60 ... 168 3 197
Five Years ........... 72 ... 240 4 125
Six Years ............ 84 .. T 324 5 41
Seven Years ......... 96 1 55 5 310
Eight Years .......... 108 1 163 6 202
Nine Years ........... 120 1 283 7 82
Ten Years ........... 180 2 98 7 267
Eleven Years ........ 180 2 278 8 87
Twelve Years ........ 180 3 93 8 272
Thirteen Years ....... 180 3 273 9 92
Fourteen Years ....... 180 4 88 9 277
Fifteen Years ........ 180 4 268 10 97
Sixteen Years ........ 180 5 83 10 383
Seventeen Years ...... 180 5 263 11 102
Eighteen Years ....... 180 6 78 11 287
Nineteen Years ....... 180 6 258 12 107
Twenty Years ........ 180 7 73 12 292














RULES AND REGULATIONS.


Governing the Care and Maintenance of State and County Con-
victs in the Convict Camps of the State of Florida.



No. 1. The Officer in charge of a body of convicts is herein
designated Captain or Warden. All minor officers working un-
der a Captain or Warden and who have charge or custody of
convicts are herein designated guards.
No. 2. Captains or Wardens must know the rules and regula-
tions governing the care, maintenance and control of convicts,
and they shall see that all guards are made familiar with each
and every rule before assuming their duties as guards.
No. 3. When at any time convicts are uesd temporarily at
any of the State institutions, as provided for by law, the Super-
intendent of the institution or institutions where they may be is
hereby designated Captain or Warden in charge of said convicts
and shall be responsible to the Board of Commissioners of State
institutions and the Commissioner of Agriculture, for the custody
of said convicts.
No. 4. Captains or Wardens of all convict camps shall re
quire each and every convict to wear at all times the uniform
of the Florida State Prison, which shall be regulation stripes
or any other uniform prescribed by the Board of Commissioners
of State Institutions, and the Commissioner of Agriculture in
conformity with law.
No. 5. Captains or Wardens shall keep on hand for each
prisoner, at all times, two suits of clothes, one hat or cap and
one pair of shoes, and shall cause each convict to bathe all
over not less than once a week and put on clean clothes, and
during the winter each convict must be furnished a sufficient
amount of underclothing to insure protection from the cold.
No. 6. Good and comfortable quarters shall be furnished for
the convicts at every camp, and there shall be separate rooms
provided for eating and sleeping; rooms must be swept out
thoroughly every day. The floor of the dining room must be
scrubbed once a week, and sleeping rooms as often as neces-
sary. Good comfortable mattresses must be supplied for the
convicts to sleep on with such other bedding as is necessary
and the same must be kept clean. White and colored prisoners
shall be worked and housed separately.















No. 7. The convicts must be furnished good and wholesome
food in sufficient quantities, thoroughly and well cooked.
No. 8. The Captain or Warden at each camp shall report to
the. Commissioner of Agriculture at the end of each month the
name of each convict punished during the month, and the kind
and amount of punishment inflicted. No cruel or inhumane
punishment shall be inflicted upon the convicts, nor more than
ten licks shall be administered in any single punishment, and
no convict shall be punished or his naked skin.
No. 9. The Captain or Warden shall be the only person who
is to administer punishment to a convict and no one else shall
correct or punish a convict. No guard shall strike, curse, or
otherwise abuse any of the convicts.
No. 10. Convicts must be furnished medicine and medical
attention when necessary for their proper care, and when a
convict becomes sick enough to need medical attention he must
be kept in the camp -until discharged by tEe attending physician,
Each sick convict must be furnished such food as the attending
physician shall prescribe.
No. 11. If a convict dies from natural causes the Captain
or Warden shall furnish the Commissioner of Agriculture a
certificate from the attending physician as to the cause of
death. If the convict dies without the attention of a physician,
or suddenly from any cause whatsoever, an inquest must be
held and a transcript of the evidence and a copy of the verdict
must be furnished the Commissioner of Agriculture and the
Attorney General without delay.
No. 12. No person shall be allowed in the prison camps or
around the stockades while under the influence of intoxicating
liquors, -and no intoxicating liquors shall be allowed in the
camps. No guards, captain of guards, foremen, or any one in
anyway connected with the management of convicts shall be
allowed to indulge in the use of intoxicants while on duty or in
the camps.
No. 13. Captains or Wardens of camps will be held strictly
responsible for the conduct of all prisoners under their charge,
whether trusties or not, and no trusty shall be allowed the
privilege of wandering about at large from the camp, thereby
giving him an opportunity of committing an act of violence or
any other unlawful act. All trusty convicts must be kept under
guard after sundown and not allowed away from the stockade
or camp unless accompanied by a guard.
No. 14. Captains or Wardens shall not allow gambling (for
money or other things of value) with cards or any other device.















in or around their camps or stockades. Prisoners violating this
rule may be punished and employees violating said rule must
be discharged from service.
No. 15. Convicts shall not be required to work on Sunday,
nor more than sixty hours in any one week, which shall in-
clude the time going to and returning from work. This regula-
tion does not refer to cooks or yard men.
No. 16. From the first day of June to the fifteenth day of
September, Captains must allow the convicts not less than one
hour and a half at noon, to rest from labor and to eat their
dinner or midday meal, and the remainder of the year the con-
victs must be allowed one hour at noon to rest and eat their
dinner.
No. 17. Each and every stockade or building or any other
place in which convicts are confined must be screened with wire
netting, with such mesh as the State Prison physician shall
designate.
No. 18. Captains or Wardens shall report by wire at once
to the Commissioner of Agriculture the name and number of
any State convict who may escape from their respective camps,
custody or control, and shall give full information by first mail
as to when and how each escape was effected, and what efforts
were made to recapture said escaped prisoner. When a prisoner
has been recaptured and returned to camp notice must be im-
mediately wired of such recapture to the Commissioner of Agri-
culture.
No. 19. Captains or Wardens must require each guard em-
Sployed in his camp to subscribe to an oath of office for the
faithful performance of his duty and proper conduct while act-
ing as such guard, which oath shall be forwarded to the Com-
missioner of Agriculture for his.approval. Blanks for this pur-
pose will be furnished upon application to the office of the
Commissioner of Agriculture.
No. 20. No one who is not in some way connected with the
State Prison Department or who is recognized as having au-
thority shall be allowed to converse with a prisoner while at
work, and all persons having business with a prisoner confined
in a camp must get permission from the Captain or Warden or
Guard in charge of the camp before this privilege shall be
allowed.
No. 21. It shall be the duty of the Supervisors of State Con-
victs to see that the above rules are faithfully observed and en-
forced, and the failure on the part of any Captain or Warden
or Guard to observe and enforce these rules shall be reported by














the Supervisor of State Convicts to the Commissioner of Agri-
culture, with all the facts connected therewith, and all irregu-
larities he may discover.
No. 22. All monthly reports by Supervisors of State Convicts
and all special reports shall be made in duplicate, the original
forwarded to the Commissioner of Agriculture, and the duplicate
to the Governor.
No. 23. All orders made by the Supervisor of State Convicts
and approved by the Governor and Commissioner of Agriculture
must be obeyed, but in cases where they may appear unreason-
able Captains or Wardens or Guards may appeal to the Board
of Commissioner of State Institutions where they shall be given
a hearing as to the merits of the case.
No. 24. Each Captain or Warden shall give to every prisoner
coming into his camp a written receipt for any money or other
valuables which may be in the possession of the prisoner when
received at the camp, and shall mail a duplicate of such receipt
to the Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallahassee, Fla. When
any or all of such money or valuables shall be returned to the
prisoner, his receipt shall be taken for same, and when all
have been so returned the Captain or Warden shall take up the
original receipt and mail to the office of the Commissioner of
Agriculture, as aforesaid. Each receipt must show the name and
number of the prisoner and Captains or Wardens will be held
responsible for the loss of such money of valuables or for
damage to same while in their custody or control.
No. 25. Each Captain or Warden shall give to every prisoner
received by him at the prison camp a receipt for any clothes
or wearing apparel of such prisoner, which under the law a
prisoner is not allowed to wear in the prison camps, and shall
mail a duplicate copy of such receipt to the Commissioner of
Agriculture at Tallahassee. When any such clothes or wearing
apparel is returned to the prisoner, his receipt shall be taken
for same, and when all clothes or wearing apparel are returned
the Warden shall take up the original receipt and mail same
to the Commissioner of Arigculture as aforesaid. Each receipt
must show the.name and number of the prisoner and Captains
cr Wardens will be held responsible for the loss of any such
clothes or wearing apparel or any damage to same where it is
apparent that carlessness or negligence on the part of Captains
or Wardens was the cause of such damage. Provided, however,
that when a prisoner has a sentence longer than two years
that the prisoner himself may dispose of his clothes or wearing
apparel in such manner as he may elect, and a statement cf












8S

such disposition over the signature of the prisoner shall be
taken in duplicate and forwarded to the office of the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture.
No. 26. In accordance with law, the right to modify, repeal
cor add to these rules and regulations is reserved by the Com-
missioner of Agriculture and the Board of Commissioners of
State Institutions.
No. 27. These rules must be kept posted inside each sleep-
ing cell or dining quarters and also in a conspicuous place near
the entrance to each stockade.
No. 28. The above rules and regulations are made to apply
to county as well as State convicts, and the responsibilities of
Captains or Wardens or Guards apply equally to both.















SOME RECOMMENDATIONS



The Governor and his Cabinet constitute the Board of Com-
missioners of State Institutions. The Board has direct control
and supervision of the State Prison (officially known as The
State Farm, at Raiford, in Bradford county; the Florida State
Hospital for the Insane, at Chattahoochee, Gadsden county; the
Industrial School for Boys, at Marianna, Jackson county, and
the Industrial School for Girls, at Ocala, Marion county.
On account of the many and varied duties demanding the at-
tention and thought of the Governor and Cabinet, often inter-
fering with the time necessary to give careful supervision to
these reformatory institutions, I would recommend the follow-
ing:
That the Legislature, at its next session, which convenes on
April 5, 1921, provide for a "Board of Control of State Institu-
tutes," the said Board to have direct control and supervision of
The State Farm, the State Hospital, the Industrial School for
Boys, and the Industrial School for Girls.
These institutions had a combined population on January 1,
1921, of more than 3,000 persons, adults and youths, and many
require constant care and watchfulness. Each year finds an in-
crease in the number of these deficient classes.
My recommendations are based on the following grounds:
1. It would insure better management.
2. It would insure closer co-operation.
3. It would place all the work under one management.
4. It would mean economy in the end.
5. It would mean ability to place responsibility.
G. It would mean regular supervision instead of "call on de-
mand."
This Board of Control, if created, would, under the Constitu-
tion, be subordinate to the Commissioner of Agriculture and the
Board of State Institutions.

WORKING COUNTY CONVICTS ON THE PUBLIC ROADS.

The lease system for State convicts was abolished in Florida by
Act of the Legislature in 1919. The able-bodied male convicts
are now worked on the public roads.
No one can justify the lease system for State convicts. Be-
sides, if the labor for State convicts is profitable for private in-
dividuals, it should be profitable for the State, if properly man-
aged, and the State should have the labor.

0-Pr.














If the lease system, is bad for State convicts it is much worse
for the short-term county convict. The term of sentence for
county convicts runs from thirty days to six months, the average
sentence being about four months. To justify the lessee of the
short-teim county convicts in paying the usual high price for
their labor, the i;oor unfortunate prisoners are, immediately after
conviction, rushed to the more or less temporary stockades and
put at the very hardest of labor, and in the broiling sun at that,
before they have had time to get "seasoned," the great majority
of them having spent some time in jail before conviction.
Many of these poor unfortunates have lost their lives from ex-
posure and others have become broken in health.
The leasing of county convicts ought to be abolished. It is
inhuman.
Women County Convicts.

The law that permits women, county convicts to be carried to
the stockades where the male convicts are worked and there used
as "domestics" should be amended, even though the leasing of
county convicts is not abolished.
I believe that it is right and proper for Boards of County Con-
missioners to hire the women to responsible persons for domestic
purposes, and in some instances as farm laborers, but their hire
should not go beyond this.
Some Boards of County Commissioners, and 1 say this to their
credit, will not lease the women along with the men, for that is
just what it amounts to. Yet there are others who, like Shylock,
want the "pound of flesh," and be it said to their shame are leas-
ing the women prisoners, white and black.

THE CONVICTS SHOULD BE PAID MORE ON RELEASE.

The State convicts on release from prison are paid the sum of
$10.00. No one for a moment will say that this is enough. If
the convict happens to be a "short termer," and has had the
good fortune to have had decent clothes when he was convicted,
and has been successful in keeping them, the $10.00 he received
on discharge may pay his railroad fare to his destination or to
his home, if he does not live very far.
Ninety per cent. of State convicts on being discharged from
prison have no citizen's clothes. Many have no home and friends
to go to. The $10.00 received as a discharge fee is not sufficient
to pay transportation. It is not sufficient to buy the commonest
clothes, suit, shirt, underclothes, hat and shoes. What must the
poor fellow do? Were it not for the milk of human kindness that














sparkles in the breast of most human beings, he would have to
begin his journey home in the stripes of a convict, and I am re-
liably informed that some discharged prisoners have had to do
this.
In nearly all communities where the convicts are worked there
are people who have pity on these poor unfortunates, and when
the discharge is received a suit of clothes, in most instances one
old and faded and which has been for some time in the discard,
is brought, and it takes the place of the prison stripes. In this
garb, further supplemented with an old hat, old shirt and old
shoes, the poor convict is then ready to begin his journey, in most
cases he knows not where.
Our boasted civilization should not stand for such conditions
as I have mentioned, even though the one most affected is noth-
ing but a convict.

CONCLUSION.

I am sure there is no perfect prison system to be found. It
was not perfect three hundred years ago when men were con-
fined in dungeons, and when there were more than one hundred
crimes where the penalty was death, and when the food given
was bread and water.
I am glad, however, that we live in a better day. When we
know that every offender of the law is not a criminal at heart.
and when a prison can be a place where punishment for crime
is not the only thing to be considered.
Florida's prison system is not perfect, but it will compare
favorably with the best. Let us hope that it may be the best.
To make it the best we should know first hand what is there,
and then with honest, earnest purposes improve where improve-
ment is needed.
False statements and unfair criticisms will not make for better
conditions or for a better State Prison System.
The board that has the direction of the Prison System, as well
as the direction of The Florida State Hospital, the Boys' Indus-
trial School and the Girls' Industrial School, invites our citizens
to visit these institutions. This board is made up of the Gov-
ernor and all of his Cabinet, and it welcomes suggestions, when
given in the proper spirit.
Respectfully submitted,
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 12, 1921.














GENERAL LAWS GOVERNING CARE AND MAINTENANCE
OF STATE AND COUNTY PRISONERS.

CHAPTER 59G3-(No. 94.)

(Acts of 1909.)

AN ACT to Amend Section 4109, of the General Statutes of the
State of Florida, Relating to Labor of County Convicts as
Amended by Chapter 5705, Acts of 1907.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. That Section 4109 of the General Statutes of the
State of Florida, as amended by Chapter 5705, Acts of 1907, re-
lating to the labor of county convicts, be, and the same is hereby
amended, so as to read as follows:
4109.-County Convicts May Be Put to Labor.-The Board of
County Commissioners of each County may employ all persons
in the jails of their respective counties under sentence upon con-
viction, for crime at labor upon the streets of incorporated cities
and towns, or upon roads, bridges and public works in the several
counties where they are so imprisoned, or the said Boards may,
in their discretion, hire out such prisoners to be kelt and worked
either within the county where the crime was committed or in
any other county in the State of Florida. But no Board of County
Commissioners shall lease or hire out any female convict or any
male prisoners sick and diseased to such an extent as not to
be able to perform manual labor. Said county convicts shall be
kept and worked under such rules and regulations and supervi-
sion as may be prescribed by the Commissioner of Agriculture,
with the advice and approval of the Board of Commissioners of
State Institutions, and the Commissioner of Agriculture, with the
approval of the Board of Commissioners of State Institutions,
shall have the power to enforce all such rules and regulations.
Upon the failure of any lessee or other person in charge of said
county convicts to comply with such rules and regulations, the
Commissioner of Agriculture, with the approval of the Board
of Commissioners of State Institutions, shall have the right to
require said county convicts returned at the expense of the party
or parties working the same to the county jails of the county in
which they were convicted; Provided, That before hiring, leasing
or letting out such prisoners, the said Board of County Commis-
sioners shall advertise for at least thirty days in one or more of
the county papers their intention to lease, hire or let the said














prisoners, thereby giving those who desire to bid for such pris-
oners an opportunity to be present, either in person or by at-
torney, and submit their respective bids therefore.
In the event county convicts are leased under the provisions
hereof, the proceeds arising therefrom shall be paid into the
County Treasury as a special fund, to be expended under the di-
rection of the County Commissioners solely for the purpose of
maintaining, working and repairing the public roads, bridges
and river crossings of the county and purchasing suitable tools,
implements and materials therefore.
It shall be the duty of Supervisors of State Convicts to inspect
and supervise all county convict Camps whether said camps are
maintained by lessees or Boards of County Commissioners, under
,the direction of the Commissioner of Agriculture. Said super-
visors shall make written reports to the Commissioner of Agri-
culture and shall send duplicate copies of said reports to the
Board of County Commissioners of the county in which said con-
victs so inspected were sentenced.
It shall be the duty of the Board of County Commissioners,
when working county prisoners on the public works of the coun-
ties, to provide clothing, shoes, etc., for said convicts, and when
leased out, the lessee company shall furnish clothing, shoes, etc.,
in either case, as are required for State prisoners in the State.
It shall be the duty of all Boards of County Commissioners hir-
ing out convicts for work to make provision for each convict so
leased or hired out, and ot receive upon being discharged, trans-
portation back to the place from which he was sentenced, or its
equivalent in money for such purpose, and in addition the sum
of three dollars ($3.00) when his sentence is for a, less period
than four months, and for all prisoners whose term of sentence
shall be more than four months, the sum of five dollars ($5.00),
the same to be paid out of the hire derived from the lease of said
convicts.
And when the County Commissioners work their prisoners on
the public works of the county the same amounts shall be paid
to the prisoners discharged from said works out of the Fine
and Forfeiture Fund of the county the same as is above provided
when the convicts are leased.
This law shall become effective upon its passage and approval
by the Governor, or its becoming a law without such approval.
Approved June 3, 1909.













CHAPTER 5907-(No. 98).

(Acts of 1909.)

AN ACT Providing for and Requiring the Separation of White
and Negro Prisoners, and Male and Female Prisoners, While
in Confinement in the County Jails of this State.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. The County Commissioners of the respective coun-
ties of this State are hereby required, within twelve months from
the passage of this Act, to so arrange the jails of their respective
counties that it shall be unnecessary to confine in said jails in
the same room, cell or apartment white and negro prisoners, or-
male and female prisoners.
Sec. 2. That from and after the passage of this Act, as soon
as the jails are arranged so that this Section may be complied
with, it shall be unlawful for white and negro prisoners to be
confined in the county jails of this State in the same cell, room
or apartment, to be so confined as to be permitted to comingle to-
gether; and it shall likewise be unlawful for male and female
prisoners in said jails to be confined in the same cell, room or
apartment, or to be so confined as to be permitted to comingle
together, and it shall be the duty of the Sheriffs of this State to
confine and separate all prisoners in their custody or charge in
accordance with this Act.
Sec. 3. The County Commissioners of the several counties of
this State are authorized to appropriate from the General Revenue
Fund of the said counties such moneys as are necessary to to
carry into effect the provisions of this Act.
Sec. 4. Any Board of County Commissioners and any Sheriff
willfully refusing to carry out and comply with the provisions
of Sections 1 and 2 of this Act in their respective spheres of duty
shall be removed from office by the Governor.
Sec. 5. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this Act
are hereby repealed.
Sec, 6. This Act shall take effect immediately upon its passage
and approval by the Governor.
Approved June 7, 1909.















CHAPTER 7809-(No. 27).

AN ACT to Amend Chapter 7325 of the Acts of the Legislature
of 1917, the Same Being Entiled "An Act to Create a State
Convict Road Force and to Authorize the Working of Certain
Prisoners on Same; to Provide for Their Housing, Feeding,
Clothing, Guarding and General Care; to Provide for Their
Transportation, Supervision and the General Conditions Un-
der Which They Shall Be Worked."

Be It Enacted by the Lcgislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. There shall be-and is hereby created a State Con-
vict Road Force, which shall include all male State or felony
prisoners who, in the judgment of the State Prison Physician,
are capable of performing any of several duties incident to road
construction and maintenance; except, that there shall be re-
tained at the State Prison Farm or other State Institutions
seventy-five (75) Class One Prisoners.
Sec. 2. The said State Convict Road Force shall be directly
under the supervision and control of the State Road Department
subject to the supervision of the Governor and the Commissioner
of Agriculture; and the said State Road Department is hereby
authorized to employ such additional assistants and clerical
help, employ such guards and make such purchases as may be
necessary for the efficient and economical employment of the
State Convict Road Force herein provided for.
Sec. 3. Should any prisoner employed on the State Convict
Road Force become permanently disabled while so employed,
he shall be transferred from the State Convict Road Force to
the hsopital of the State Prison Farm and there maintained
in a similar manner as are other prisoners on said Farm until
the expiration of his term or until his condition of health shall
improve to such an extent as to permit his return to the State
Convict Road Force.
Sec. 4. The Laws and regulations as now in force effecting
the escape and discharge of prisoners, and gain time for faith-
ful service, shall apply to all prisoners used in the State Convict
Road Force as provided in this Act.
Sec. 5. The State Road Department may apply the labor of
.the State Convict Road Force to any or all highway construc-
tion or maintenance done under the supervision of said Depart-
ment. The several prisoners employed on the State Convict
Road Force shall be clad in some distinctive uniform, other than















the regulation stripes, said uniform to be selected by the State
Road Department with the approval of the Governor and Com-
missioner of Agriculture; except, that prisoners subject to pun-
ishment may be required to wear the regulation stripes as a part
or all of the necessary punishment.'
Sec. 6. All prisoners employed on the State Convict Road.
Force shall be transported, housed, fed, clothed and guarded,
from such funds as are or may hereafter be apportioned for the
use of the State Road Department.
Sec. 7. Chapter 7325, Laws of Florida, Acts of the Legisla-
ture 1917, and all laws or parts of laws in conflict herewith
are hereby repealed.
Sec. 8. This Act shall take effect and become a law January
1st, 1920.
Approved June 10, 1919.

CHAPTER 7833-(No. 51).

AN ACT Providing for the Care, Maintenance and Control of
State Convicts, and Providing for the Carrying Out of the
Provisions of This Act, and Making an Appropriation There-
for.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. On or before the twentieth day of December, 1919,
the State Prison Physicians shall examine and grade all male
State convicts into two grades or classes, to-wit: Grade or
Class One, which shall consist of all able-bodied male convicts
capable of doing a reasonable day's work at manual labor;
Grade or Class Two, which shall consist of all female convicts
and all male convicts which shall not have been placed in Grade
or Cla-ss One. It shall be the duty of the State Prison Physician,
or Physicians, on the first of each calendar month to examine
all male prisoners at the State Prison Farm and ascertain and
certify what prisoners are classed in Grade One and are avail-
able for work on the State Convict Road Force under the pro-
visions of this Act and the Superintendent of the State Prison
Farm shall immediately notify the State Road Department at its
headquarters of the number of prisoners so certified as being
available, if any, and the State Road Department shall, as soon
as practicable, send an authorized guard or guards to the State
Prison Farm and take charge of such available prisoners and
place them in the camp or camps maintained by the State Road














Department. All Grade or Class One convicts, except seventy-
five in number, to be placed upon the State Prison Farm, shall
be delivered to the ,State Road Department for wor4 upon the
public roads of the State, to be cared for and maintained out
of funds provided by said State Road Department. All Grade
or Class Two convicts, including all female convicts, shall be
placed and kept at the State Prison Farm; Provided that such
Grade or Class Two convicts as can be used to advantage upon
the public roads without detriment to the well-being or health of
such convicts, may also be placed upon the public roads. The
Board of Commissioners of State Institutions shall have the
right to transfer temporarily such State convicts from the State
Prison Farm to other State Institutions under their supervision
and control as can be used advantageously at such institutions.
Sec. 2. All 'State convicts shall be maintained and worked
under rules and regulations to be provided by the Board of
Commissioners of State Institutions and shall be at all times
under the supervision of the Commissioners of Agriculture and
the Governor. White and negro convicts worked upon the public
roads of the State or of any County of this State, shall be
worked in separate squads and confined in separate vans, stock-
ades or other structures. All convicts assigned to the State
Road Department under this Act, when the grading provided
for in said Act in December, 1919, shall be delivered to the
State Road Department at such place or places as they may
designate. All State convicts assigned the State Road Depart-
ment after December, 1919, shall be delivered to said State
Road Department at the State Prison Farm.
Sec. 3. No State convict shall be required to mork than
sixty hours in any one week or more than eleven hours in any
one day, which time shall include the time spent in going to
and returning from work and no convict shall be required to
perform during such time any labor in excess of his ability to
perform without impairment of his physical condition.
Sec. 4. That for the expense of the maintenance of the con-
victs at the State Prison Farm, and other expenses of the State
Prison System, other than the care and maintenance of such
convicts as may be delivered to the State Road Department,
there shall be annually levied and collected a tax of three-eighths
of one mill on the dollar, or so much thereof as may be neces-
sary, on all property liable to assessment in this State, and all
moneys derived from such levy shall be paid into the State
Treasury to go into a fund to be known as "State Prison Fund,"
and so much thereof as may be necessary to carry out the pro-

7-Pr.











90

visions of this Act is hereby appropriated and is made subject
to be expended by the Board of Commissioners of State Institu-
tions for the purposes hereinbefore mentioned and the Comp-
troller is hereby authorized and directed to draw his warrant
in payment of any such expenses when approved by the Board
of Commissioners of State Institutions.
Sec. 5. All existing laws insofar as they do not conflict with
the provisions of this Act shall remain in full force and effect,
and all laws and parts of laws insofar as they do conflict with
the provisions of this Act be and the same are hereby re-
pealed.
Sec. 6. This Act shall take effect upon its passage and ap-
proval by the Governor, or upon its becoming a law without such
approval.
Approved May 24, 1919.















ARTICLE 8 OF REVISED GENERAL STATUTES OF
FLORIDA.



DUTIES OF SUPERVISOR OF STATE CONVICTS.




6268. Appointment and Compensation of Supervisors.-The
Governor shall appoint not exceeding four Supervisors of Con-
victs at an annual salary not exceeding fifteen hundred dollars
each, and actual travelling expenses. The said expense as pro-
vided for in this section shall be paid by the Board of Commis-
sioners of State Institutions out of the State prison fund.
6269. Term of Employment.-Any supervisor appointed under
this article shall hold his appointment subject to the will of the
Governor and not to exceed four years, unless reappointed by
the Governor.
6270 (4163). Qualifications and Duties.-Said supervisors
shall be men of ability, integrity and firmness of character.
They are hereby clothed with full power, authority and super-
vision of the convicts and convict camps of the State under the
direction of the Commissioner of Agriculture and the Board
of Commissioners of .State Intsitutions.
It shall be his or their duty to enforce the law, rules and
regulations issued by the Commissioner of Agriculture and the
Board of Commissioners of State Institutions relative to the
labor, punishments, food, clothing, lodging, guarding, and all
matters relative to the sanitary condition of the prison camps
and the general care and treatment of the convicts. It shall be
the duty of any supervisors so appointed to make written de-
tailed reports to the Commissioner of Agriculture after visit-
ing each camp, and upon each visit. It shall be the duty of
such supervisors to visit all of the prison camps as frequently
as the Commissioner of Agriculture, the Governor or the Board
of Commissioners of State Institutions may require, but not less
than once in every forty days. It shall be the duty of such
supervisors to make careful inquiry in the county from which
any prisoner may have been sentenced when in their opinion
a prisoner is deserving of State aid,-to have his pardon applica-
tion presented to the Board of Pardons.













If after due investigation it shall be the opinion of any super-
visor that a prisoner has not the means to prepare his or her
papers in proper form to present to the Board of Pardons, it
shall be the duty of such supervisor to apply to the clerk of
any court in this State for copies of such record matter as may
be in the custody of said clerk, whose duty it shall be to furnish
same properly authenticated, without charge for same. Said
supervisors shall do all such things as may be required by the
Board of Pardons to have such papers in proper form, and
where any expense necessarily attaches, the same shall be pre-
sented in an itemized bill to the pardoning board for their ap-
proval, upon which the Comptroller is authorized to issue his
warrant for the payment of said bills out of funds arising from
the hire of State prisoners.
6271 (4164). To Visit Camps.-It shall be the duty of any
supervisor appointed under this Article to visit any or all of the
county convict camps in this State upon the request of the
Governor and to make written reports to the Governor con-
cerning the condition of same. The Governor and the super-
visor of State prisoners are hereby empowered to enforce such
rules and regulations concerning the care, management and
supervision of county convict camps as may be deemed -neces-
sary to give them the same treatment and protection as is re-
quired by law and by the rules of the Board of Commissioners
of State Institutions, relative to State prisoners.




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