• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Main
 Back Cover














Group Title: Annual report of the Florida Department of Citrus
Title: Annual report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086634/00007
 Material Information
Title: Annual report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Commission -- Dept. of Citrus
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee?
Publication Date: 1979-1980
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruit industry -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: The Florida Department of Citrus.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1969/70-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Title varies slightly.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086634
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02397748
lccn - 76643586
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
Full Text
'.120, 1 c 3 q3'


THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CITRUS

ANNUAL REPORT

For the Fiscal Period
July 1,1979 to June 30,1980


pr 778'(;


DcBIz~,


CoP.3


(~
7:1













FRANK L. BOUIS
Leesburg
ALBIN P. CRUTCHFIELD
Deland
JOE L. DAVIS, SR.
Wauchula
WILLIAM F. EDWARDS
Dade City
DAVID O. HAMRICK
Vice Chairman
Bradenton
ARLEN N. JUMPER
Chairman
Ocala
MARGARET E. LOWRY
Tampa
GEORGE G. McCLURE
Apopka
R. V. PHILLIPS
Haines City
KARICK A. PRICE
Orlando
DANFORTH K. RICHARDSON
Vero Beach
CHARLES M. SHINN, JR.
Winter Haven


Commission

Members

1979-80



















From the Desk of the


Executive Director


A new decade began with the 1979-80
fiscal year and with the Florida Department of
Citrus and the Florida Citrus Commission
deeply involved in matters that drew more than
passing attention from the citrus industry.
One subject that attracted unusual interest
and high attendance for Commission meetings
dealt with the consideration of a petition from
the Florida Citrus Processors Association to
reduce the Florida minimum standard for
natural fruit solids (Brix) in frozen concentrated
orange juice to the standard of identity
established by the United States Food and Drug
Administration.
The petition for change suggested that
Florida retail and institutional packaging of
frozen concentrated orange juice at the higher
state levels meant a disadvantage in the
consumer market when competing with out-of-
state interests that packed at lower Brix
requirements and offered product at lower
prices than Florida-packed juice.


The Commission adopted an amendment to
a Florida Department of Citrus rule that
eventually will equate the Florida standard of
44.8 degrees Brix with the FDA standard in
effect on December 1, 1981.
A progression of steps leading toward that
equivalence was to begin July 15, 1980, when
the minimum level for natural fruit solids in
frozen concentrated orange juice packed in
Florida for federal government purchases
would be identical with the FDA's 41.8 degrees
Brix.
Product packed and certified for shipment
out of Florida to Canada and other export
markets after December 1, 1980, also will equal
the FDA requirement. But the minimum on that
date for product packed in the state for sale or
shipment within the United States will be 43.2
degrees Brix, considered the average for juice
extracted for processing as frozen concentrated
orange juice.
Then, one year later, the minimum for
Florida-packed product is to be identical with
the FDA standard in effect on that date.
Meanwhile, industry factors hope to obtain
the cooperation of other citrus industries in the
United States in prevailing upon the FDA to
increase the minimum standard of identity for
frozen concentrated orange juice to the 43.2
degrees Brix level.
Another matter of industry concern was the
apparent illegal use of washed pulp solids in
frozen concentrated orange juice packaged
outside Florida. Efforts of the Department of
Citrus to define and control the use of this by-
product of the processing procedure were
intensified during the year.








Legal attack on the Department of Citrus
rule requiring Florida identification on all
processed grapefruit products, which was
successfully defended in the Court of Appeal,
continued with arguments before the Florida
Supreme Court. Also pending in court is a
similar rule regarding the stamping of Florida
identification on fresh citrus fruit.
Through a referendum conducted by the
Department of Citrus, Florida growers
authorized the reimplementation of the
Mechanical Harvesting Research and
Development Program for another six years.
The new program will follow the guidelines of
the first, which ended with this fiscal year. That
means that an assessment will be placed on
every box of fruit moved commercially, with the
tax not to exceed a total of three cents for the
entire six-year period. The Commission voted
not to exercise the tax during the 1980-81 fiscal
year.
In the area of legislative action, one bill was
enacted that resulted in major revision of a part
of the Florida State Statutes, described as the
Citrus Code, calling for the first adjustment in
the basic citrus advertising excise tax in 17
years. The new law establishes a variable tax
rate per box of fruit to be based upon crop sizes.
An excellent marketing potential surfaced
with the shipment of Florida fresh oranges to
Taiwan. The possibility of a marketing
opportunity there for Florida processed citrus
brought about plans for a Three Party Program
to be initiated next year.
In Japan, the largest export market for
Florida fresh grapefruit, the promotion of that


fruit continued with the support of advertising
and merchandising programs in the principal
marketing areas. In the season ahead,
merchandising activities will be expanded in the
continuing effort to better acquaint the
consumer with fresh grapefruit.

Strong advertising and merchandising
efforts figured in an increased demand among
Canadian consumers for Florida citrus fruits
and products, a turn-around from the sales
decline of the previous season.

Marketing of Florida citrus in both domestic
and export markets should be strengthened by
investigations of an ad hoc Commission
committee interested in Florida identification
for Florida brands and for brands packed outside
the state but using Florida bulk juice and packing
to Florida standards.

Reorganization of the Department of Citrus
field staff continued, highlighted by the
appointment of a foodservice promotional
manager. This move was made in order to
enlarge upon the role of Florida citrus in the
rapidly-expanding foodservice market.

Again, the efficient performance of the
Department of Citrus staff is reflected in the fact
that the general operating section of the 1979-
80 budget was 1.6 per cent below the
operational spending for the previous fiscal
year.

The following pages of this Annual Report
will provide greater detail about activities of the
Florida Department of Citrus in the 1979-80
fiscal year.






















Administrative and

Legal Affairs


Efforts to streamline the efficiency and
productivity of the various Department of Citrus
administrative functions continued during
fiscal year 1979-80 with noticeable results. In
many instances, these efforts meant increased
workloads without increase in personnel as
well as a highly desirable ratio of administrative
cost to program expense.
Monitoring continued on proposed federal
trade regulation rules on food advertising and
labeling currently pending before the Federal
Trade Commission, the Food and Drug
Administration and the United States
Department of Agriculture that could adversely
affect the citrus industry.
The staff developed six industry-sponsored
bills and served as principal industry liaison as
the bills moved through the state's 1980
legislative process. One enacted bill was a
major revision of the basic citrus advertising
excise tax which had not been adjusted for 17
years. The new law established a variable tax
rate per box of fruit based upon crop sizes. The
immediate result was an increase in grapefruit
taxes for the 1980-81 season, with a probable
increase in orange taxes in 1981-82.
Controversy accompanied six days of
rulemaking hearing that produced more than
1,000 pages of testimony from an overflow
audience and resulted in the lowering of
minimum Brix levels for retail and institutional
packs of frozen concentrated orange juice.
Approval was given to preparation of a
petition to the Food and Drug Administration to
increase the federal standards of identity
minimum for frozen concentrated orange juice
from 41.8 to 43.2 degrees Brix to more









accurately reflect the current average of raw
fruit used in the production of frozen
concentrated orange juice.
Steps to define and control the use of
washed pulp solids and to bring enforcement
actions against illegal uses were intensified and
will be continued.
Assistance was provided the industry
through the preparation for adoption by the
Florida Citrus Commission of 10 amendments
to Department of Citrus rules under the
Administrative Procedures Act, by the
preparation of 86 contracts and by the
processing of 1,726 citrus fruit dealer license
applications and 2,334 permits authorized by
law in six separate areas.
More than 1,200 pages of permanent
records in the form of minutes resulted from a
total of 116 regular and special meetings of the
Florida Citrus Commission and various
committees.
The personnel unit handled more than 680
direct employee actions with the Department of
Administration involving career service
employees.
Distribution was made of more than
250,000 pieces of mail, a reduction of 50 per
cent from the previous year due to the close
review of materials and the purging of mailing
lists in an effort to control costs.
The reproduction unit processed over
1,450 work orders resulting in more than 2.6
million impressions.





















Public/Industry


Relations


Traditional public relations functions
continued to occupy much of the time of the
Department of Citrus public/industry relations
staff during 1979-80. This covered such
activities as releases of news stories to the
media, special articles for a variety of
publications, speeches, general correspon-
dence and preparation of the State of Citrus, the
monthly newsletter to the industry which
appeared with a new format early in the year.
The staff was responsible for the
coordination of Department of Citrus
involvement in a number of special promotional
projects, including the nationally televised
Tangerine Bowl postseason college football
game at Orlando and the King Orange
Jamboree parade that precedes Miami's annual
Orange Bowl postseason college football
classic. Sponsorship of the Ladies Professional
Golfers Association "Lady Citrus" tournament
at Orlando also continued.
The Department of Citrus became involved
in a major tennis tournament for the first time
through a sponsor's role in the inaugural United
Airlines Sunbird Classic at Haines City. The
event was declared an immediate success
because of the tournament of champions
format that limited competition to winners of
major women's tournaments during the year.
The Rolling Orange vehicle and the Florida
Citrus Queen completed a full calendar of
appearances at parades and civic festivals
around the state and again supported the
annual Florida Citrus Queen Pageant organized
by the Florida Citrus Showcase in Winter
Haven.









Another special project completed during
the year was production of a new film, "Citrus:
Beyond Vitamin C," produced for the use of
medical and related professions. In conjunction
with the introduction and distribution of the
new film, the staff initiated a procedure to
remove all outdated films from the Department
of Citrus library and to consolidate the
distribution services.
The program for supplying complimentary
citrus juices to the state's official welcome
stations continued through the year, but with a
funds limit of $100,000 that was imposed by the
Florida Citrus Commission.
In the year ahead, the staff will begin
negotiations to renew the Florida Department of
Citrus contract that ends in 1980-81 for citrus
industry sponsorship of the Sunshine Pavilion
at Walt Disney World. Described as one of the
more popular attractions in the Magic Kingdom,
the pavilion lured 2.3 million visitors during the
calendar year 1979.









Mechanical harvesting research and
development maintained a steady pace during
the year, with limb shakers and ground pickup
systems registering the most success. An air
shaker, a limb shaker and a tractor-drawn rake
reached the prototype stage, with machinery
adaptation extended to bedded citrus plantings.
Field research with shakers indicated
considerable advantage to the harvest of
Valencia oranges early in the season.
Secondary testing of abscission chemicals
disclosed one group of active compounds that
Scientific Research appeared promising for effectively loosening
lentific Resh fruit on trees. Temperature studies were
conducted in an effort to predict results when
using chemicals under different weather
conditions.
In the area of processing, computer control
of citrus juice evaporators was adopted by one
commercial plant with the promise of
considerable savings in the cost of steam. This
control also can detect any inefficient
operations in the evaporator.
A survey is being conducted to study
variations in. the physical and chemical
properties of Water extracted soluble orange
solids in order to establish an identity for this
product. Under examination are consistency,
Brix, color, pectic substances, sugars and acids.
Estimations of the quality of frozen
concentrated orange juice packed outside
Florida have revealed irregularities in some
samples. To detect the presence of water
extracted soluble orange solids in orange juice,
the Department of Citrus developed a
fluorometric method, which has been proposed









as an official procedure of the Association of
Official Analytical Chemists, and an atomic
emission spectroscopic method which
distinguishes between Florida and Brazilian
juices.
The medical and nutritional research group
at the University of Florida's College of
Medicine continued to explore the benefits of
citrus pectin to diabetics and the ability of pectin
to reduce serum cholesterol levels.
The fresh fruit researchstaff found two new
fungicides that act effectively against
Alternaria, for which no fungicide currently is
available, and another fungicide that showed
significant action against sour rot, which also
has no known control.
A new trailer evacuation system for
removing residual fumigant from loads prior to
shipment to Japan resulted from a cooperative
project involving a major exporter and the
Florida Department of Agriculture. And a
procedure was found to minimize the risk of
excessive residues of diphenyl in tangerine-
type fruit.

Good test data was obtained on a new
growth regulator which appears to raise the
ratio of oranges from 1-2 points when applied in
June or July.























Economic Research


Because the proposed Brix change in
frozen concentrated orange juice was a subject
of major concern for the citrus industry in 1979-
80, the economic research staff developed a
report on the economic impact of the proposal.
The report included an evaluation of the
feasibility of out-of-state packing of the product,
along with an evaluation of the effects of
volume changes on prices and revenues.
International trade continued to be of
interest, with particular concern for competition
in the Canadian market. Canada is an
expanding market for orange juice, but Brazil's
share of this market has increased. In a major
studyon the market there, it was concluded that
price relationships between U.S. and Brazilian
products are important determinants of export
volumes and that Department of Citrus
advertising efforts should continue to recognize
the competitive nature of this market as it is
further developed.
A 1977 study of the Three Party Program
for the foreign marketing of Florida citrus was
updated. The new study revealed that the
program is effective in most European markets
and less costly than price discounting as a
means of developing and maintaining markets
in Europe.
The relationship between retail demand,
generic advertising, prices and movement of
grapefruit juice in the U.S. was analyzed, with
preliminary findings revealing that Department
of Citrus generic advertising is very effective in
increasing FOB revenue. In fact, an average
return of $10.44 was realized from each dollar
spent on this type advertising. A similar study is
underway on demand for orange juice.









An evaluation of the economic impact of a
proposed cancellation of lead arsenate, used in
speeding the maturing of grapefruit, indicated
that this action would result in a shortened
marketing season and in larger volume
shipments each week, reducing prices and
revenues. It is estimated that revenues would
have been reduced $6 million per year at the
FOB level if the proposed ban had been in effect
during the 1971-72 through 1978-79 seasons.
The Environmental Protection Agency accepted
the analysis as the official economic impact
evaluation.
The computer program used to generate
Department of Citrus fresh fruit shipment data
was streamlined. Revisions allow weekly
reports to be generated on fund-raising
shipments and shipment reports by Department
of citrus districts.
Studies underway include an economic
evaluation of retail-packed high density (4-plus-
1) frozen concentrated orange juice;
development of a demand forecasting model
based on A. C. Nielsen Company data to be used
in outlook reports for processed orange
products; an evaluation of the impact of
shipping holidays on volume of fresh fruit
shipments and FOB price, and continued
evaluation of questions concerning imports and
exports.









A year ago, discussion centered around the
changing marketing environment and the need
to evaluate the Department of Citrus programs
and policies for continued growth. These
factors have been the subjects of study and
change in the past year, with in-depth
investigations of the marketing universe and
the citrus industry.
One of the more important sources of
information and guidance is the recently
completed "Processed Orange Strategy Study".
Some of the key findings were that, in the
il arketing past decade, orange juice has moved from the
status of a breakfast beverage to a national
institution.
Additionally, the extended use campaign
has been very successful. It is still a valid
premise for orange juice communications as a
background theme, but encounters problems of
new family patterns, lack of away-from-home
availability and the rise of "moderation"as an
important value. The study also indicated that
the quality of 100 per cent orange juice, itstaste
and purity are prized by consumers. Purity has
the capacity of placing citrus growers and
processors of orange juice in that small group
regarded as "still on the side of the consumer".
Consumers appear to have a high regard for
orange juice at a time of general low regard for
most food products. However, the study showed
that frozen concentrated orange juice in its
present form and packaging is seen as
"inconvenient" and old-fashioned in terms of
modern technology. Chilled orange juice, while
enjoying an increase in popularity, has
limitations of bulk and price.








And finally, it seemed evident that
opportunities for away-from-home sales of
orange juice are great, both in play and work
situations. It would appear that consumer
needs are not being met and opportunities are
not being fulfilled. An orange juice-habituated
public is spending more hours in more numbers
away from home, but home is the present focus
of orange juice positioning.
Even when at home, the away-from-home
mind-sets operate. It is imperative, therefore,
that new forms and delivery systems come into
focus for the industry. Orange juice needs to be
where the people are.
Among the changes that are being
implemented is a complete reorganization of
the field merchandising staff in,order to put more
emphasis on the away-from-home market, plus
a revised trade incentive program that will allow
field personnel to support individual brands in
promotional activities.
The commodity advertising program has
been restructured to communicate better with
working women, with younger people and with
singles and other potential consumers who
previously were not an important part of the
target audience.























Advertising


The Department of Citrus media program
for processed oranges underwent a change in
creative execution of advertising midway
through 1979-80. The "Celebrity" campaign
was completed and replaced by the
"Anticipation" commercials which performed
extremely well in a six-months in-market test.
The series presented a strong and appealing
taste story while continuing the concept of "It
isn't just for breakfast anymore".
Devoted almost entirely to television, the
major portion of the media program was
network programming which covered 39weeks
and was spread widely across most of the day
designed to reach a prime target audience at
home during one or more of those time periods.
As monies became available in the second half
of the year due to the large crop, spot television
was added in leading markets.
Favorable results are anticipated from a
repeat of the prior year's newspaper coupon
advertisement program which delivered four
redemption coupons to a circulation of 39
million readers.
Coupon promotions supported fresh
tangelos, Temple and round oranges in
newspaper advertisements placed during the
winter and spring months, with the first results
indicating positive acceptance.
Like the promotional activity for oranges,
the advertising for processed grapefruit was
concentrated in television. Three waves of
network television in contrasting time slots
were supported by spot television in the top
markets for processed grapefruit.









Two commercials were used during the
year, one featuring frozen concentrated
grapefruit juice and the other the rapidly
expanding chilled form. Plans for the next fiscal
year call for an extension of the current
television program, to include canned
grapefruit juice and structured on a base of
daytime television.
Fresh grapefruit also relied heavily on
television, using spot scheduling in three
principal areas, including the southern region
where a development program also was
supported by two newspaper coupon
advertisements.
Advertising support for fresh grapefruit in
Japan was increased, but shipments were
reduced by a late crop and higher prices for fruit.
A test of advertising which combined fresh
and processed grapefruit in the same
commercial was conducted in Canadian
markets during the year. Plans call for the
expansion of grapefruit support in Canadian
markets through network television in the new
fiscal year.























Merchandising


A great deal of attention was given during
the year to study and change that might be
necessary in preparing the Department of
Citrus merchandising field force for the 1980's.
Consideration of these matters resulted in
important changes in programs and staff
alignments in areas of retail, foodservice and
school marketing.
The trade incentive program, which was
redesigned to assure equitable treatment for all
food trade factors, was approved and authorized
by the Florida Citrus Commission. New
guidelines were implemented and are to serve
as basis for most merchandising work in the
future. Lending support to this concept is the
recently enacted "Brand Advertising"
legislation which has allowed more funds to be
allocated for incentive activities, thereby
assuring the citrus industry of even more
substantial promotional benefits.
A complete reorganization of the field force
has been consummated and will be operational
for the new fiscal year. The reorganization took
into account the changing markets for Florida
citrus, with the increased emphasis upon
foodservice, the new trade incentive program
with varied work assignments and higher grade
job classifications, as well as a reduced work
force.
The headquarters staff in Lakeland
underwent change to accommodate the new
positions of retail promotional manager and a
foodservice promotional manager, assignments
dictated by the changing marketing patterns
and the need for greater specialization.









The school marketing program, which was
changed during the year from a concept of
distributor incentive payments to one of
promotions for schools, continues with a
number of innovations in promotional
programs. The nutritional consultants,
previously assigned to the professional public
relations agency in New York, have been added
to the Department of Citrus field staff.
The 1979-80 fiscal year marked the first
complete year for the expanded fund-raising
program which promotes the sale of fresh citrus
as a method of generating funds for groups and
organizations supporting service and other
projects. A tracking and measuring system has
identified this as a growing area for the
distribution of Florida citrus and additional
developments are planned for this program next
year.























International

Marketing


European brand advertising conducted
under the Three Party Program of the
Department of Citrus posted a slight increase
during 1979-80 over the previous year. As in
the past, the program continues to be
instrumental in building consumer demand for
Florida citrus by keeping Florida identification
on the shelves of European supermarkets.
The largest share of the citrus juice market
in Europe belonged to retail and institutional
packs of frozen concentrate with 55 per cent of
the projected volume. Ready-to-serve citrus
juice in paper cartons, reconstituted in Europe,
accounted for 25 per cent of the share, while
chilled juice in glass held the remaining 20 per
cent.
Total movement of citrus juices from
Florida undertheThree Party Program likelywill
reach approximately 15 million single
strength equivalent gallons, up by 1.5 million
gallons over last year.
Exports of fresh citrus from Florida to
markets other than Canada probably will total
10.4 million cartons, about 1 million cartons
under last year's record. Of this total,
approximately 10 million cartons will be
grapefruit, primarily in pink and red varieties.
Currency and economic problems in Japan
meant a slight decrease in exports of fresh
grapefruit from Florida to a level of 6 million
cartons. Japan is Florida's largest export
market for fresh grapefruit.
A promotional effort for fresh grapefruit
initiated during the year was a Two Party
Program involving the Department of Citrus and
retailers in West Germany and Holland. The
innovation is expected to prove even more









successful with the launching in the 1980-81
fiscal year of a trade incentive program
designed to encourage greater participation in
promoting Florida citrus.
Recent negotiations with Taiwan resulted
in the movement of 65,000 cartons of fresh
oranges to that market this year. Trips to
Taiwan by Department of Citrus staff members
supported opinions that markets existed there
for processed citrus products as well as fresh
fruit. As a result, a Three Party Program is
planned for next fiscal year for processed citrus.
Meanwhile, efforts will continue to obtain
relief from the preferential tariff situation which
hampers the shipment of Florida citrus to
European markets and from the restrictive
quota system through which Japanese officials
limit imports of fresh oranges and frozen
concentrated orange juice.























Market Research


Projects associated with possible changes
in Florida and national standards of identity for
frozen concentrated orange juice, which
dominated activities of the Department of Citrus
market research staff in 1979-80, likely will
continue to do so in the new fiscal year. A
petition from the Florida Citrus Processors
Association to lower the level of Brix or natural
fruit solids in frozen concentrated orange juice
sold in CE.nada prompted the Florida Citrus
Commission to authorize two taste tests in that
country.
One test indicated no clear-cut preference
for frozen concentrated orange juice packed
in Florida at 44.8 degrees Brix and at 41.8
degrees Brix, the level at which other Canadian
product is packed. The second test did show
consumer preference for a Florida packed
frozen concentrated orange juice of 44.8
degrees Brix over a Brazilian-based product
packed in Canada to 41.8 degrees Brix.
A series of group interviews, prompted by
renewed interest in the possibility of marketing
a higher density frozen concentrated orange
juice, indicated that reduced cost per serving
provided the best basis for advertising and
promotional messages.
Planned for the new year are two projects
to secure information that might prevail on the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration to boost
standards for frozen concentrated orange juice
from the present 3-plus-1 to a higher density 4-
plus-1 product.
A year-long in-store audit of frozen
concentrated orange juice packed outside
Florida showed little change in the amount of
display space devoted to this product.








Another major project is aimed at
determining how best to market Florida orange
juice in the next decade, following up on the
success of an earlier study that pointed the way
toward the concept of extended use of orange
juice at times other than breakfast.
A commercial for television in Canada was
tested to learn if fresh and processed grapefruit
products could be promoted in the same
commercial. The result was positive and the
concept will be expanded in Canada and may be
explored next year for use in the United States.
Other projects under consideration for
1980-81 are a study of Japanese retail trade
practices, a taste test by Japanese consumers
of Florida frozen concentrated orange juice and
blends of Florida and Japanese Mikan juice,
plus an evaluation in the United States of trade
incentive programs as an alternateltocouponing.
One major change was effected during the
year in companies supplying market research
services, with National Purchase Diary (NPD)
selected to supply information on in-home
consumption of processed citrus products.





















Food Publicity and

School Marketing


The foodservice trade advertising
campaign conducted by the Department of
Citrus during the 1979-80 fiscal year continued
to expand the role of Florida citrus products in
the area of institutional marketing.
The campaign included a repeat of the prior
year's three package promotional programs
with themes of "OJ on the Rocks," "Florida
Citrus Carnival" and "It Isn't Just for Breakfast
Anymore".
The fifth annual Florida Sunshine Recipe
Contest for representatives of the industrial
feeding area was expanded to eight entrantsfor
the first time and the contest and citrus recipes
received widespread publicity through the
efforts of the news media.
The Department of Citrus attracted officials
from leading institutions to the eight nutritional
seminars conducted across the *nation. In
addition, Florida citrus was promoted through a
number of trade incentive promotions designed
to encourage greater use of citrus on menus
and in special events.
An annual brunch for food editors of
leading newspapers and magazines attracted
more than 200 persons and resulted in feature
articles, photographs and recipes for Florida
citrus in several hundred publications.
Department of Citrus programs were explained
during participation in the annual convention of
American Women in Radio and Television and
press kits were developed and made available to
media broadcasting staffs.
A supermarket nutrition program was
initiated and a trained nutritionist visited eight
of the largest markets to better acquaint










consumers with Florida citrus fruits and
products. This market effort is supported by a
newsletter distributed to supermarket groups
as well as utilities groups, broadcast media and
dietitians and home economists.
School lunch nutritionists and managers
made use of five package promotions directed
toward the preparation and serving of Florida
citrus products in school lunchrooms.
Entrants from 47 states competed for a
place in the finals of the National Recipe
Contest conducted for school lunch personnel.
The winning recipes will be made available in
the form of a booklet.
Materials for inclusion in the special media
kit prepared by the Walt Disney Educational
Media staff have been completed and will be
made available to schools in the 1980-81 fiscal
year.










The receipts for the fiscal year 1979-80
reflect an increase in revenue for the
Department of Citrus of approximately $2
million over the previous year, an increase of
more than 6.5 per cent. Investment earnings
accounted for over $1 million of the increase,
due to the abnormal interest rates encountered
during the fiscal year, ranging from a low of 10
per cent to a high 17.5 per cent.


Financial Report


RECEIPTS
Assessments
Investments & Other
TOTAL


1978-79
$29,190,693
2,690,568
$31,881,261


EXPENDITURES
Marketing $28,451,276
-Non-Marketing 3,649,265
TOTAL $32,100,541


1979-80
$30,090,129
3,908,178
$33,998,307

$28,993,010
3,626,660
32,619,670


The net expenditures during the year
increased by more than $891,000, due
primarily to the expansion in merchandising
promotions.

The assessments collected by the
Department were based on the following 1979-
80 citrus taxes:
FRESH PROCESS


Orange (per box)
Grapefruit (per box)
Temple (per box)
Tangerine (per box)
Tangelo (per box)
Honey Tangerine (pei box)


100 10C
13C 13C
7C 5C
7C 5C
7C 5C
7C 5C


The members of the citrus industry
continued to demonstrate strong support for the
Department in the payment of assessments,
with the result that the Department once again
was able to sustain only a minimal annual loss
in assessments of less than $1,000 for the fiscal
period.








State of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF CITRUS
Lakeland, Florida

CITRUS ADVERTISING TRUST FUND
SUMMARY STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ALL FUNDS


TOTAL NET REVENUE BOXES:

FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 1979

RECEIPTS: Assessments
Other Income


EXPENDITURES:


July 1, 1979 to June 30, 1980
PRIOR
YEAR
1978-79

236,500,361

S 30,317,657
29,190,693
2,690,568


TOTAL CURRENT YEAR RECEIPTS

TOTAL AVAILABLE
Admin. & Gen. Operations
State General Revenue Charge
Scientific Research
Citrus Harvesting Research
Economic Research
Sub-Total NON-MARKETING EXPENSE
Marketing Administration
Public/Industry Relations
Market Research
School Marketing-General Operations
Institutional General Operations
Merchandising General & Field Operations
Promotions
International Programs
Advert. General Adv. & Admin
P.O.S. Matls & Whse
-Gift Fruit Promotions
Consumer Advertising
Coupon Redemption
-Rebates
Total Advertising & Rebates

Sub-Total MARKETING EXPENSE

Release of Certified Funds

Sub-Total CASH EXPENDITURES

Inventories & Deposits Net Change

Transfer to Coupon Redemption Res

TOTAL EXPENDITURES


FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1980


INCREASE
(DECREASE)

43,905.429

$( 917,350)
899,436
1,217,610

2,117,046

$ 1,199,696

193,775
( 33,887)
86,324
283,524)
14,707
22,605)
28,818)
357,816)
117,414
(3,689,824)
299,823
222,265
569,608
250,629
138,399)
289,087)
16,918
2,080,647
1,450,989
37,385
3.158,453

541.734

163,667

$ 682,796


31,881,261

S 62,198,918

886,636
637,241
1,047,526
882.296
195,566
3.649,265
116.219
964,800
782,248
4,767,481
256,950
2,347,882
1,495,133
667,150
229,262
917,949
60,610
15,426,189
49,148
370,255
17,053,413

28,451,276

( 163,667)

31,936.874

1,937

859,800

32,798.611

S 29.400,307


CURRENT
YEAR
1979-80

280,405,790

$ 29,400,307
30,090,129
3,908,178

33,998,307

$ 63,398,614

1,080,411
603,354
1,133,850
598,772
210,273
3.626,660
87,401
606,984
899,662
1,077,657
556,773
2,570,147
2,064,741
917,779
90,863
628,862
77,528
17,506,836
1,500,137
407,640
20.211,866

28,993,010

-0-

32,619,670

210,480

-0-

32,830,150

S 30,568,464





















ASSETS
ENT ASSETS:

with Treasurer $1,154,025
in Transit 221.583
with State Board of Admin. 500
ving Fund 12.000
story Fund 14,000

al Cash

JNTS RECEIVABLE.
Board of Admin.-Interest Earned $727,779
iIlaneous 4.617
al Accounts Receivable

STORIES
iy Materials $363,100
iy World Tickets 4,540
iduction and Other Supplies 26.551
tific Research Materials 105,776
Total Inventories

TMENTS BY STATE BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION:

ID EXPENSES

. CURRENT ASSETS.

I ASSETS

dance and Utility Deposits

OTHER ASSETS:

CITRUS ADVERTISING TRUST FUND

.ssets.
$246.125
ngs 636,759
lure and Equipment-Office 313,825
winery and Equipment-Scientific 1.549.753
188,474
native 36.842


FIXED ASSETS

SALL ASSETS


State of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF CITRUS
Lakeland, Florida

CITRUS ADVERTISING TRUST FUND

June 30, 1980
BALANCE SHEET
LIA
CURRENT LIABILITIES
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE:
Payables to Vendors
State General Revenue (2%)

Total Accounts Payable

DEPOSITS HELD IN TRUST:
$1,402,108 Tax Bond Deposits
Total Deposits

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES:

732.396 RESERVE AND FUND BALANCES:

RESERVES
Cancelled and Restored Warrants
Workmen's Comp and Utility Deposits
Unemployment Compensation
Inventories
499,967 Revolving Funds
Depository Fund
35.469,613 Coupon Redemptions
Total Reserves
13,263
OPERATING FUND BALANCE: (Statements)
$38.117,347 Encumbered Operating Funds (1980-81)
Unencumbered Cash Reserve Fund
Unencumbered Operating Funds

2,482 Unencumbered Special Funds:
Orange Stabilization Fund
2.482 Harvesting R & D Fund

$38.119,829 Total Operating Fund Balances

TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES

TOTAL CITRUS ADVERTISING TRUST FUND


ABILITIES



$3.397,152
232.686





$3,527


$1,751
2.482
8,000
499,967
12.000
14,000
3,379.800



8.330.320
2.000.000
10.271.261


8.215.042
1,751,841


$3,629.838




3.257


$3,918,000


$30.568.464


$34.486.464

$38,119,829


$2.971,778 TOTAL INVESTMENT IN FIXED ASSETS:

$41.091.607 TOTAL ALL LIABILITIES


$3,633.365


$2,971,778

$41.091.607






















Staff Members


DR. W. BERNARD LESTER
Executive Director
J. HARDIN PETERSON, JR.
General Counsel
JAY B. HAVISER
Administrative & Legal Affairs Director
THOMAS POBJECKY
Staff Attorney
RICHARD W. MAY
Finance & Accounting Director
WILLIAM F. JONES
Public/Industry Relations Director
DR. JOHN ATTAWAY
Scientific Research Director
DR. DAN L. GUNTER
Economic Research Director
DOUGLAS R. OFFER
Marketing Director
WILLIAM P. GORDON
Advertising Director
HARRY R. RIXMAN
Merchandising Director
FRED S. FORSEE
International Marketing Manager
GEORGE deJAGER
Market Research Director
FRANCIS J. MULKEEN
Food Publicity & School Marketing Director
ROBERT E. HOLLIS
General Services Director



































Florida Department of Citrus

P. 0. Box 148

Lakeland, Florida 33802



Florida Department of Citrus. 1980
This public document was promulgated at an
annual cost of $1.054 73, or $.753 per copy for
the purpose of reporting the annual activities of
the Florida Department of Citrus




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs