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Title: Orange blossoms
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086633/00097
 Material Information
Title: Orange blossoms
Alternate Title: Orange blossom
Physical Description: 25 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Production Credit Association
Publisher: Florida Citrus Production Credit Association,
Florida Citrus Production Credit Association
Place of Publication: Orlando Fla
Publication Date: November 1964
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Oranges -- Marketing -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Oranges -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1, (May 1942)-v. 25, no. 8 (Nov. 1967).
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 16 repeated in numbering.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086633
Volume ID: VID00097
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 45618176
lccn - sn 00229153

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text



SFLORIDA Ci




DEPENDABLE CREDIT











VOLUME 22, No. 11 NOVEMBER, 1964


Farms + Cities = THANKSGIVING

Our Horn of Plenty, so often a symbol of our Thanksgiving, is
full and overflowing again this year. It seems appropriate
that the national observance of the correlation between farm
and city, designated as FARM-CITY WEEK, culminates with
Thanksgiving Day.

In recent years the phrase "Agri-Business" has been
coined to define this inter-dependence between farmer
and city dweller. No longer can the farmer suffice
S solely with what he produces on his land--he must
call upon the industrialist, the city dweller, for home
equipment and supplies, machinery, schools and hos-
pital services, even entertainment; likewise, the man
in the city obviously depends on the grower for food
and fiber.
Various Farm-City Week observances are being
planned. Lake County Agent Bob Norris features
an Agri-Business luncheon where farmers, ag-
ricultural leaders in related industries, civic
officials and legislators, manufacturers, trade
sales and service representatives mingle in ob-
servance of their mutual growth and purpose.
In Orange County Agricultural Agent Henry Swanson annually arranges an exhibit held at the
County Agricultural Center which is open to the public throughout the entire Farm-City Week,
November 19 25. Merchants, growers, and service organizations are invited to participate
in the hibit by means of displays to acquaint the public with their part in Agri-Business.
Flor'i Citrus Produtitn Credit Association welcomes this opportunity to thus get acquainted
wit ourneighbQ 1I iOrange County, and through the media of a series of color slides with
voice an ti&uoi tel jour neighbors in Orange County farms and cities about us.

HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING !
---------- ----------- - - - - ---







"ORANGE BLOSSOMS"


One of the most crucial requirements of today's world

S ***.. is that the concept of continuing life-long education be forthwith built into the
b habit patterns of basic thinking of all the people. Terminating the individual's
Educational process with graduation from anything is unthinkable in such a world
Sas we now occupy. THEODORE WALLER
..... .'......,,....: .~A.s i ~ee now occu y.=.'==a~.==....'..... ....
....... Agreeing with Mr. Waller, you CITRUS GROWERS TOUR -- November 12
may want to dust off your thinking cap and Indian River Field Laboratory; Ft. Pierce
answer the ringing of the school bells.... *
Demonstration of aerial spraying techniques will highlight
the Annual Citrus Growers' Tour at the Indian River Field
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 Laboratory Thursday afternoon, November 12th. The de-
r GROVE HEATING CLINIC -- November 10 monstrations will include both conventional aircraft and
%' G & S Packing House; Weirsdale helicopters and will be the first item on the program, be-
ginning at 1:30 p.m. After the aerial spraying demonstra-
ural Agents Bob Norris (Lake County) and EdselW. tion, station personnel will conduct tours of the various
Marion County) are now issuing joint invitations to experimental plots to explain the research work currently
interestedin grove heating problems and develop- underway. Six experiments have been designated to make
Attend a Clinic and Equipment Demonstration on
, November 10th. The program is scheduled to be-
"Methods of Determining Leaf Coverage of Aerial
0 a.m. at the G & S Packing House at Weirsdale, Sprays............. Dr. Robert Blo
panel of experts from the Agricultural Experiment SPerformance of Rangpur Lime. Dr. Robert Bulloc
"Performance of Rangpur Lime, Trifoliate Orange
will join Fred Lawrence, citriculturist, and DaltonDr. Mortimr
and Other Rootstocks" ..... Dr. Mortimer Cohen
i, agricultural engineer, both with the Florida Ag-e o P O t P
S o Sr to a e q n f "Response of Pineapple Oranges to Profile Drainage
\\ Extension Service, to answer questions of the
A box lunch on a dutch-treat basis will be avail- ...........................Dr. David Calvert
"Insecticide Trials" ................ Dr. Bullock
oon, withthe equipment display and demonstration P U P D
"Rootstock Performance Under Poor Drainage Con-
g in the afternoon at the nearby Bud Boyer Grove.
I l l l l i editions" ........................... Dr. Cohen
1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ditions . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Cohen
CITRUS BUSINESS CONFERENCE ..........
SCITRUS BUSINESS CONFERENCE .......... "Fertility Trials" .................. Dr. Calvert
November 9 10 Tours are scheduled to begin at 2 p.m., with the program
SCitrus Commission Building; Lakeland concluded by 4 p.m. While the program is designed tobe
primarily of interest to growers of the Indian River area,
ed by the Florida Citrus Commission under the growers from other parts of the state are also welcome.
n of Dr. William E. Black, Director of Economic ||11111||11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
h of the Florida Citrus Commission, this two-day r, GROVELAND CITRUS SEMINAR November 17
will be held at the Florida Citrus Commission New Vocational Agriculture Bldg.; Groveland
inLakeland from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. each day.
cs, and the results of marketing research feature Already in progress, this series of programs is being co-
ntly in the program. sponsored by the Groveland Department of Vocational Ag-
1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 riculture and the Lake County Agriculture Department. Be-
CITRUS FIELD DAY -- November 11 ginning on October 6th and meeting at 7:30 P.M. on the
' Nora May Hall; Winter Haven first and third Tuesday nights of each month, the school
will run through February 2, 1965. L. Dale Carlton, Di-
Field Day, sponsored annually bythe Citrus Com- rector of Grower Relations Division, Florida Citrus Mutual,
f the Florida Bankers Association, is slated for will discuss Selling Fruit by the Pounds of Solids Method"
,Wednesday, November llth, at Nora Mayo Hall at the meeting on November 17th. Ensuing topics include
ir Haven. A full day is planned, covering a range "Rootstocks and other factors in relation to cold tolerance";
s, including marketing research, education, labor, "Rootstocks and Virus Diseases"; "Some New Developments
ok-ahead. in Citrus Research"; a discussion of sprays, and a tour of
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 the USDA Foundation Farm Grove, which will be held on
FARM -CITY WEEK -- November 19 26 January 18, 1965 beginning at two in the afternoon.
SCheck with nour local Countv An nt! 111 1111l l lll lll lll l llllllllllll11 11111111111111111111


'Iil

Agricult
Rowan (
growers
ments tc
Tuesday
gin at 1
where a
Station
Harrisor
ricultura
growers
able at n
following





Conduct
direction
Research
session
Building
Economi
prominel




A Citrus
mittee o
10 a.m.
in Winte
of topic.
and a lo




Don't for
Farm-Cit
Agent ma
an exhibit
education]
Agricultu
recogniti


observances during National POLK COUNTY CITRUS SCHOOL ON
er 19 to 26. YOUR County METEOROLOGY AND COLD PROTECTION
vent planned -- a luncheon, While the school bells have already been packed away on
better way to 'continue our this one, Polk County Agent Jack McCown deserves recog-
ed with our Neighbors in nition for the four sessions of this school whichwere held
of this Farm-City Week in during the month of October. A demonstration of various
types of grove heaters was a part of one of the sessions.
111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111


get to check for local o
y Week, from Novemb
y have some special e
itor show. There's no
n' than to get acquaint
re through observance
on of AGRI-BUSINESS.


PAGE TWO








PAGE THREE NOVEMBER, 1964


- --


CITRUS INDUSTRY GREETS NOVA


- 4- 4- 4-


\ UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE
CROPS RESEARCH DIVISION
\ 1 BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND


NOTICE TO NURSERYMEN AND FRUIT GROWERS RELATIVE TO THE NAMING
OF A NEW TANGELO HYBRID VARIETY


/

/


AND RELEASE


The Crops Research Division, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Department
of Agriculture, hereby releases a new tangleo variety, NOVA. This variety
was produced by the U. S. Horticultural Field Station, Orlando, Florida.
The cross was made by Dr. Jack Bellows in 1942, first fruited in 1950,
and was selected by Drs. Philip C. Reece, C. J. Hearn, and F. E. Gardner.
Under Florida conditions, it is as cold-hardy as the Orlando tangelo.

NOVA (Orlando No. 426-9-22) originated from a cross of Clementine tangerine
X Orlando tangelo (Citrus reticulata Blanco X (C. reticulata X C. paradisi
Macf.)). Although the tree shows strong mandarin characteristics, the fruit
has the same size and shape of the pollen parent, Orlando tangelo; con-
sequently NOVA is classed as a tangelo.

The fruit is earlier ripening, sweeter, and more highly colored than the
Orlando tangelo. The fruit is of medium size, with a smooth orange colored
peel that is close fitting but is easily removed. It ripens in October and
reaches its prime in November. The flesh is orange-colored, firm and juicy.
The flavor is pleasant and sweet. Total soluble solids may range from 101
in late September to 137. or more by December. Acids usually stay within a
fairly narrow range (approximately 1%) during these months. The fruits are
seedy in mixed plantings and usually have 11 segments. The twigs are
thornless.

NOVA is introduced because it ripens earlier, has better colored peel, and
has a more pleasant and sweeter flavor than Orlando tangelo. This variety
has been tested only in Florida. It is recommended for trial plantings on a
limited scale until it has been more widely evaluated.

A limited supply of budwood of this new variety is available and will be pro-
rated to those who apply before November 15. Requests for budwood should
be addressed to Dr. Philip C. Reece, U. S. Horticultural Field Station, 2120
Camden Road, Orlando, Florida 32803.


(Date /96
Date


Acting Director, Crops Research Division


U. S. Secretary of Agriculture
Orville Freeman (second from left)
with our Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture Doyle Conner, visits
with Drs. C.J. Hearn and Philip C.
Reece, citrus hybrid propogators,
as Dr. William C. Cooper, Leader
of Citrus Research Investigations
at the USDA Horticultural Station
of Orlando, looks on.


-4-


;-4- 4


~c~C ^^


-Dr. Frank E. Gardner -


4-4-4-4- 4- 4-
The development of the NOVA
Tangelo, announced here, came
through the influence of Dr. Frank
E. Gardner during the years since
1942. The development was com-
pleted and the new variety intro-
duced at the FLORIDA CITRUS
RESEARCH FOUNDATION FARM
which is furnished to the Depart-
ment of Agriculture by the citrus
growers of Florida through their
contributions, in order to provide
new and needed hybrid varieties to
meet the demand of Florida's fresh
fruit market.


- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4 4- 4- 4-


NOVEMBER, 1964


PAGE THREE








FARM CREDIT GROUP OUT IN FORCE


Figuring prominently in the annual meeting of
the Florida Council of Farmer Cooperatives,
held at Orlando October 20th were representa-
tives of the Farm Credit Administration in addi-
tionto the production credit association mana-
gers shown above. Mr. William Pettit, Asst.
Vice President of the Columbia Bank for Coop-
eratives; and Mr. Hallie Hearn, Florida repre-
sentative for the Federal Intermediate Credit
Bank of Columbia, South Carolina, attended the
meeting, as well as Mr. Aubrey Fowler, general
manager of the North Florida Production Credit
Assn., not shown in the above picture.
Three of the production credit managers serve
on the Board of Directors of the Florida Coun-
cil of Farmer Cooperatives Mr. J. E. Dukes
(Northeast P. C.A.); Mr. Aubrey Fowler(North
Florida P. C. A.); and Mr. Al Whitmore (Florida
Citrus P. C.A.).

One of the features of the day-long meeting
was the Youth Luncheon, honoring the F.F.A.
and 4-H Club winners in contests sponsored
by the Florida Council.


"Continuing their education" might be a theme
for the above study of PCA men attending the
afternoon conference on "Wage & Hour Regu-
lations" at the Florida Council of Farmer Co-
operatives' annual meeting. Reading from far
left are: Ed Dukes general manager, North-
east PCA; David Lunsford Branch Manager,
Eustis Office, Florida Citrus PCA; John Paul
Payne general manager, Central Florida PCA;
A. H. Whitmore (standing) general manager,
Florida Citrus PCA; and Russell Willis, general
manager, Gulf-Ridge PCA.
--------------.-------


PERSONAL -- WINTER HAVEN will soon be
the new address for the V.E. Lowes. Vee, who
works with Lacy Tait out of the Winter Haven
office of Florida Citrus Production Credit Asso-
ciation, plans to move his family--wife Laura,
Linda 15, and Cindy 11 -- to the home they
have purchased at 535 Avenue "L", S.E. They
leave Plant City with regrets, but look forward
to many new friends in Winter Haven while still
close to their old ones.


"ORANGE BLOSSOMS"
Published by: FLORIDA CITRUS
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATION
Orlando, Florida -
as a NEWSLETTER to its members
and the Florida Citrus industry;
and incorporating, when appropriate,
the Official Program of the annual
Citrus Institutes or Seminars directed by
the Florida Agricultural Extension Service.


METEOROLOGISTS
OFFER PRE-WEATHER
TESTING SERVICE


SThe Federal-State Frost Warning Service in
Lakeland is completing arrangements to provide
a free grove thermometer testing service for
Florida citrus growers, which will be carried on
in the various frost-warning districts during
early November. According to, Warren Johnson,
Meteorologist in Charge, liquid in the thermo-
meter's column can separate while in storage
or in the field, causing the thermometer to vary
in accuracy over .the year. He said that in most
cases, instruments in error can be adjusted to
read correctly. Aftertesting, those instruments
which cannot be adjusted will have the degree
of error written on an accompanying tag. The
meteorologist will al so re mark the scale
markings so the instrument can be easily read.
Growers will be notified as to where the tests
will be conducted.


Ir~p~crw~c~crcccc~


"O RANGE BLOSSOMS"


PAGE FOUR




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