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Title: Orange blossoms
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086633/00077
 Material Information
Title: Orange blossoms
Alternate Title: Orange blossom
Physical Description: 25 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Citrus Production Credit Association
Publisher: Florida Citrus Production Credit Association,
Florida Citrus Production Credit Association
Place of Publication: Orlando Fla
Publication Date: January 1962
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Oranges -- Marketing -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Oranges -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1, (May 1942)-v. 25, no. 8 (Nov. 1967).
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 16 repeated in numbering.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086633
Volume ID: VID00077
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 45618176
lccn - sn 00229153

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text
15th. INDIAN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR Official Program


VOLUME


20, Number 1


JANUARY, 1962


I NEW LAIWDS!


Sponsored by INDIAN RIVER CITRUS LEAGUE ,
Directed by FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION


'VICE, Gainesville, Fl.





IND/AN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR WkELCoIES TO ITS PROGRAM...


- Stanley Crockett -


STANLEY B. CROCKETT ...
who has been an inspired leader in
the Texas citrus industry as grower,
nurseryman, industry representative,
organizer of Texas Citrus Mutual, a
member of the U.S.D.A. Subtropical
Research Committee, and developer
of Texas real estate investments in
citrus ... .......... ... .

MARTIN HEARN ..........
our own capable citrus representative,
who is better known as "Florida's in-
ternational 'citrus peddler' and foods
fairs proponent" . . . . . . .


INDIAN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR

"7 JANUARY 11 and 12, 1962


SSEMINAR HEADQUARTERS -- VERO BEACH COMMUNITY BUILDING
Opposite EAST ENTRANCE of INDIAN RIVER COUNTY COURT HOUSE
------------------------------------------- ----- --
Sponsored by
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE

I IN COOPERATION WITH: F.P.Lawrence
F.P. Lawrence


1.0. Watkins








Al Whitmore


INDIAN RIVER CITRUS LEAGUE
FLORIDA CITRUS PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATION
INDIAN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR PLANNING COMMITTEE
****************************************


AL, "BUCK", and FRED

SAY .......


I~'L


John C. Brooks


- Martin Hearn -





FARM VALUE 8 AGRIBUSINESS VALUE-
ALL Florida Crops 1960-61 Season

MILLIONS of DOLLARS

Form Florido- Retoill'


CITRUS


VEGETABLES 175 350 500
LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 240 400 450
OTHER PRODUCTS 146 300 500

TOTAL 948 1,600" 2,4 30



FARM VALUE a AGRIBUSINESS VALUE-
Florida "CITRIBUSINESS "- 1960-61 Season

MILLIONS of DOLLARS
Form Florida" Retail1

ORANGES 336 432 775
GRAPEFRUIT 40 90 170
OTHER II 18 35


CITRUS


TOTAL


(1) This is the estimated Agribusiness value of Florida's crops, either at the time they
cross the state line as they are shipped out, or their retail value if sold in Florida.
(2) This is the approximate retail value of Florida's crops whenever they are sold.
* The $1,600,000,000 State line value of Florida's agricultural crops is approximate-
ly equal to the value of all manufacturing in Florida. It is also about equal to
Tourism, making the three about equal.
** The retail value of $2,430,000,000 is greater than either tourism or manufacturing.


980


550


387


980


387 550
_____________ a


387


550









15th Annual Indian River Citrus Seminar

OFFICIAL PROGRAM -
15th ANNUAL INDIAN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR


Community Center


Vero Beach


January 11 and 12, 1962


THURSDAY, January 11, 1962
MORNING SESSION -- 9 A.M.

Presiding -
Fred P. Lawrence,


Citri
University
Gai


INVOCATION
- Dr. Harold Faust -


culturist
lturist Pastor,
y of Florida First Presbyterian Church
.nesville Vero Beach
'-<<><<>00<<>><>>0><><>>>^><>><>>"


Opening Remarks and Announcements
M. R. Buckalew -
General Manager -- Indian River Citrus League
Vero Beach


JA&*Z6 in OZU^ ?uwiznt5
THE WORLD CITRUS PICTURE

Martin Hearn -
Director, International Trade Division
Florida Citrus Mutual
Lakeland

THE TEXAS CITRUS INDUSTRY

Stanley B. Crockett -
Grower, Shipper, Industry Representative,
and a native Texan
Harlingen, Texas

RECESS
PLANTING TRENDS IN THE INDIAN RIVER AREA


a


- Hugh C. Whelchel, Jr. -
County Agricultural Agent
Saint Lucie County
Fort Pierce


TRENDS IN FLORIDA CITRUS PLANTINGS
- Including Special Soil Preparations -
(Illustrated)
Dr. Al Willson -
Manager, Soils and Horticulture
Minute Maid Groves
Plymouth


AFTERNOON SESSION
1:30 P.M.
Presiding -
Forrest McCullars,
County Agricultural Agent
Indian River County
Vero Beach





PROBLEMS OF MATURE GROVES
IN THE INDIAN RIVER AREA

James T. Oxford -
County Agricultural Agent
Brevard County
Cocoa


Old &w5



elk^^


-J^


RESULTS OF RECENT STUDIES OF
INDIAN RIVER AREA WATER RESOURCES
IN RELATION TO CITRUS PRODUCTION

Robert L. Taylor -
Chief, Hydrology and Hydraulics Branch,
Central and South Florida
Flood Control District
West Palm Beach


RECESS


THE SOIL INSECT PROBLEM

Dr. A. H. Bullock -

Indian River Field Laboratory
Fort Pierce


GROWER ATTEMPTS TO REJUVENATE OLD GROVES

R. E. Norris-

County Agricultural Agent
Lake County
Tavares


* LUNCHEON


0000000000000000000000000000000000000000









INDIAN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR


Presiding -
Hugh C. Whelchel, Jr. -- County Agricultural Agent
Saint Lucie County Ft. Pierce


Gwwnt


PTHE 19RA Pw6&wRO
THE 1962 SPRAY AND DUST PROGRAM


J. E. Brogdon, -
Entomologist, University of Florida
Agricultural Extension Service
Gainesville


THE RATE AND TIMING OF NITROGEN
FOR MARSH GRAPEFRUIT
Dr. Paul Smith -
Plant Physiologist,
U.S.D.A. Field Laboratory
Orlando


DEVELOPING A BETTER GRAPEFRUIT DRINK
R. W. Olsen -

Biochemist,
Citrus Experiment Station
Lake Alfred


Sm *. E RECESS.

PRODUCING GRAPEFRUIT FOR THE FRESH FRUIT MARKET

Dr. Herman J. Reitz -
Horticulturist-in-Charge,
Y Citrus Experiment Station
Lake Alfred


SHAPING CITRUS TREES FOR THE FUTURE


Dr. Dale Kretchman -
Assistant Horticulturist
Citrus Experiment Station
Lake Alfred

S-SAFE USE OF PESTICIDES
Jack T. McCown -
Assistant Citriculturist
Agricultural Extension Service
University of Florida
Gainesville

. . .U. .CHEN
9 LUNCHEON


FRIDAY, January 12, 1962
MORNING SESSION -- 9 A.M.


- Dr. E. W. Cake -


Marketing Economist
Agricultural Extension Service
University of Florida
Gainesville


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AT THE CROSSROADS


- Dr. A. H. Krezdorn -
Head, Fruit Crops Department
University of Florida
Gainesville


RECESS
THE INDIAN RIVER FIELD LABORATORY AND ITS FUTURE

Dr. Herman J. Reitz -
Horticulturist-in-Charge
Citrus Experiment Station
Lake Alfred


SOME THINGS COVER CROPS
COULD DO FOR CITRUS

Dr. A. E. Kretschmer, Jr. -
Associate Agronomist
Indian River Field Laboratory
Fort Pierce

SELECTING THE RIGHT COMBINATION
OF STOCKS AND SCIONS


Dr. Mortimer Cohen -
Associate Plant Pathologist,
Indian River Field Laboratory
Fort Pierce


AFTERNOON SESSION
1:30 P.M.
Presiding: Levi M. Johnson
Martin County Agricultural Agent
Stuart 'h .
. .. . . . . . . In "


Offf & W6 V' fWn &TZ ?

ONE MAN'S VIEWS OF FLORIDA'S POPULATION EXPLOSION

Henry F. Swanson -
County Agricultural Agent .
Orange County
Orlando


FLORIDA'S AGRIBUSINESS AND CITRIBUSINESS


----------------------- --






















































PROGRAMS ARE PLANNED
for the INDIAN RIVER CITRUS SEMINAR
by GROWERS -- EXTENSION WORKERS -- INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES






rioCujo c&tus Az 04cizoon rtaz asocehuz2

ENDORSES THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE AS WORTHY OF YOUR SERIOUS CONSIDERATION:






COLLEGE or not?


You can duck the question, but it's a good idea to face it squarely


This is for the 1961 high school graduate-
and for those parents, even grandparents, ,who
must counsel with their young folk.
All businesses are becoming more compli-
cated, more technical, more scientific. Farming
is no exception. We live in that kind of world.

If he stays on the farm, the young
man must be prepared to cope with technical
and scientific questions. College will help the
farm boy who can soak up knowledge and
apply it to everyday situations later on. Buying
ability via education should be cheaper and
faster than learning entirely by experience. Al-
though not every young man or woman should
go to college, we've never known anyone who
regretted doing so. Whatever the sacrifice, edu-
cation seems always to be worth it.
Whether the young man goes to college or not,
he will find that farming itself is a never ending
education. For however long he lives by the land,
a man must keep learning, thinking, adjusting.
The Furrow believes there's no more satisfy-
ing life than being a farmer. If a boy wants to
farm and can farm-has the land or can get it
-then he ought to farm. Nothing short of dis-
aster should dissuade him. Furthermore, unless
he positively dislikes book learning the odds
are that college will enrich his life and his pocket-
book. Few investments pay better dividends and
what one knows can never be taken away.


If he leaves the farm. The bald truth
is that fewer than 15 per cent of our farm youth
can expect to become owners or operators of
commercial farms. To the other 85 per cent,
we owe these words of encouragement in plan-
ning a lifetime that will be rewarding and useful.
In terms of averages, there is no better invest-
ment, no better insurance of material success,
than education. If the boy leans to a profession
-doctor, lawyer, preacher, diplomat, etc.
-his farm background should not deter him.
He is neither more nor less capable than the
non-farm boy.
If the rural youth cottons to any one of a
hundred vocations more closely related to agri-
culture, his farm upbringing gives him a running
start. He has what the city boy can't buy-an
understanding of rural life. He is not likely
nowadays to become a top nurseryman, geneti-
cist, soil technician, agri-industrialist, rural
banker or breeding expert-to name only a few
-without the stuff that college education can
give him. This is not merely because "the ball
bounces that way," but rather because college can
give him a bit of knowledge-not much really,
but enough that he knows how much more there
is to know. More importantly, education sows
seeds of self-confidence, inspiration, desire, and
(more often than not) humility. These are among
the building blocks of life and character-on
the farm or anywhere.


From the March-April, 1961 issue of THE FURROW
published by John Deere Company.










FROM; FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS


Re: CITRUS PRUNING AND REJUVENATING
by Richard Orr


Lake Alfred, Fla. -Several methods of pruning and rejuvenating
crowded and canopied citrus groves are under investigation at the Citrus
Experiment Station.

According to Dr. D. W. Kretchman, assistant horticulturist, the
most promising treatments appear to be hedging on two or four sides,
plus topping.

Observations and limited information indicate tree responses are
favorable and yields from these treatments, although reduced the first
year after pruning, compare well with unpruned and hedged trees by the
second year.

Hedging appears to be a beneficial practice to facilitate grove
operations, according to the researcher.

Severe hedging to form a tree six feet wide and 15 feet tall offers
considerable promise for producing a tree which can be easily harvested
and which will produce a good crop of fruit.

Dr. Kretchman adds that the possibility exists that by closer
spacing, increased yields per acre might occur.

In an experimental grove plot at the Station, vigorous shoots have
been produced on the inside of trees as well as the outside and fruiting
limbs are becoming closer to the ground following hedging on 4 sides and
topping to 15 feet.

Fruit has a tendency to be produced in clusters, but this does not
appear to cause a lower grade of the fruit when harvested.

Dr. Kretchman reports pruning wounds are healing well and very
little sun scald has been found. Trees appear to be easily sprayed and
harvested and do not impair other grove operations.

All cuts over one inch in diameter were painted with a water base
asphaltum pruning compound.

Dr. Kretchman emphasizes that this information is strictly pre-
liminary in nature because of the short period of time this research has
been underway and the lack of conclusive yield data.

He also warns that other types of citrus may not respond the
same as the Valencia oranges and grapefruit varieties in this experiment.

The frequency of re-topping and the effects on cost of spraying
and harvesting are unknown at this time.

The greatest disadvantage of this treatment is the high cost of
the initial topping. Per tree costs have been as high as $5.50 for
topping alone, using power hand saws. An additional $.50 or more per
tree is required for brush disposal.

Work is now in progress on a mechanical topping machine which may
reduce these costs considerably.


Reproduced by:
FLORIDA CITRUS PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATION


11/1/61




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