Title: Agricultural field notes
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086632/00119
 Material Information
Title: Agricultural field notes
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company -- Agricultural Department
Publisher: Agricultural Dept., Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co.,
Agricultural Dept., Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: December 15, 1946
Frequency: monthly[aug. 1947-]
biweekly[ former nov. 1941-july 1947]
monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1 (Nov. 15, 1941)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1948?
Numbering Peculiarities: Volume enumeration begins with: Vol. 2, no. 9 (May 1, 1943).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086632
Volume ID: VID00119
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 45625504
alephbibnum - 002665095
lccn - sn 00229155

Full Text

ATLANTIC .COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPACT
Agricultural Department
SJacksonville, Florida
&,.A. O'lblley J. S~aods
4 4/ oral Agriultum Agent Agricultural Agent
SE T' e2 .**r U5 19

AMRIGlLTWUAL FIE M NO

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SAS It HaLIDAY SEASON CcmS WIH ITS GOOD WIL AND LL 00W D

r aSS OR TIRUWHMs TIRN TO TnHO iiosl COORDIAL COG R .-

STIIK AND TPATROMAG3 ABS AlWt SO 3W=f TO US IMR=im TN

Sas ISTAR. rAnse ACCS OUR GRPTUL THANKS AND TIW1-
C -> Ift 9 WIS5. MAT TIN WT E1A BRNGYO7 HAPPIN358
*** *f*** * ** ***





ILACKSAR, GA, ,- To meet requirements of themslves and ethers for
dAunble tfeo posts, poles, and lumber, Mesars. Htrrison & Jiams have installed
Md -la b& a in operatio a saull areooting p3ant on Sunnyview Farm located~
btiQt laoekkalohear.and Patterson about one mile north of the highway. Those
men havo invested about $3,400 in this new ontorpriso, including a resorvo sup-
ply o ofteeato for operation of the treating plant. Tho equipment is quito
Maple Id consists of a rooonditionod steam boilor to supply steam for boating
the oroocote in the treating vat, a stool vot 4 1/2 foot wide, 4 1/2 foot Ahigh,
Wad 2. fot long* The vat is under n open covorod shod vhich is equipped with
; a i ista add a 40 foot I beam far handling the timbers into and out of, the
wVt. Mr. 1~iri on now believes that a vat 30 feet long would be preferable,
aiam" this would ake it possible to treat four bundles of posts six foot long
thit. ineseafing the oapucity 25 por cent.

A UahiuN feature of thD operation is a post dobarkor designed by
.R. G. James of latterson.' It is nndo from a hammer mill hoad with hoavy chains
.aoow~d at both ends to the outside flangos of the head. Ono end of tho hafin
ia seoored noor the top of the flange and the other noar the bottom of tho flangi
.ea to opposito sido. Tho next ohain is similarly socured with tho oxception
it is attaohod so that its position is the rovorso of that of those on cithor
gdo i. i other words, attachment of tho chains at author end altorwtosr betwoon
top ada bottom of the flanges. The chains are soourod so thoy swing loosely.
hon tho hoad is, ado to rovolvo at high speed tho chains swing outwardly and
kaook tho bot from the post* Oporation of tho debarking machine is a one man
task. he operator ean debark about 300 poets per day at an average for labor
of 1 l4 eonts per post. Mfr. Harrison says tbr.t tho cost of dobarking the posts
by and U around 5 oants each. To mon are roquirod to koop tho plant in full
tiae aporetita4 They oan turn out 375 troatod posts par day. Polus and lumber
ar- also trectod M. Hrrison says that ho and his neighbors are now using only
.eoaote ftrming in dtolUn houseos and thoy are building other form buildings
IYttr1y of atosotod lumber*




-2 -


U. 8. railroads carried more than 90 per cont of all military freight
during war, plus 98 per cent of total military passongors. War Dopartmont ro-
oapitulation of railroads' sp3lidid wartime job says thoy c~rriod 294,000,000
tons of military cargo and i330 0 1o Pdiitqry passengers in groups of 40 or
more. Intoasod officioncy of roil operations onablo carriers to move this
*ar load with 600,000 fower fought cars, 16,000 fowor passenger cars, and
32f000 fewer locomotives than in 1918. Average railroad omploymont in lost war
ase 500,000 loss than in 1918. Says Army transportation achofs "lsas produo..,
tion depends .on Uss transportationa. NATIOS BUSIMISS



ORLANDO, FLA. At a rocnt mooting of a group of 50 or more includ-
ing growers, shippers, roprosontativos of Fodoral and Stato Agricultural Agon-
oioe, manufacturors of packaging cJchinory, wrapping films, boxboard, ice and-
Dnchanical rofrigorotion, as well as'the railroads and others initial stops
woroMtaken toward the forration of ah organization to develop foots with regard
to the possibilities of pro-peokaging Florida vogotablose It was decided to
organize and incorporcto under the nmn of Florida Vogotable Pro-packaging
Council, a non-profit organization. A committoo was namod to proceed with the
details incident to obtaining a charter. Chairman of the committoo is Mr.
Paul B, DLckann, grower-shippor, Ruskin, Florida, who has taken a loading part
iA tho pr.-packagin movmeont in the Statoe

The packaging of vogotobles ib oonseumr-sizo packages, which is gon-
orally reforrod to as pro-packaging, hoa attained considorablo'volumD on same
terminal markots during rorot yoers. Herotoforo most of tho vogptnble pro-
packaging has boon donor in large markoting contors rather than at shipping
point. The U. S. Department of Agriculture has under way.experinontal work to
detoreine the relative advantages and disadvantages of retailing pro-packaged
vegetahlos and fruits, and is engaged in riking studies of consumer decoptance,
costs, voluno of salos compared with total storo salos, wasto and spoilage,
labor requirements, use of refrigerator cases and cold storage boxes, and suit-
ability of various films and containers. The Florida Agricultural jxporiment
Station is prosontly conducting experiments to detoroino the suitability *of
various films as wrapping metorial, toempraturo requirements of the sovorai
vegotobles when packagod in various films, methods of handling vegetables be-
fore packaging, as woll as ovor-~ll containers for handling the packaged pro-
duots. Since pro-pookaging is a now and revolutionary procedure in the hand-
"ling of vgetables, progressiveo Floridc. growers and shippers are .intorostod
Sto determine whether this omthod has practical application at shipping point
or bother it must be done at destination markots.

Rtolizing that further studios are noodod, the group adopted a pro-
grm of w rk dosignod to supplenont that already being donor. Briefly stated
it isa (1) To study the effect cf certain films, packaging, and handling pro-
coduros, as well as temperatures prevailing during transit on the quality of
produce reaching the consum~or (2) To study the costs, labor, and rmtorials
requirements for harvesting, packaging, and shbiping pro-packaged vogotables,
and (3) To study the retail distribution hf vogtcblos pro-packagod at produo-
tio0 points, During the first season it will be possible to do only limited
work on those problons. Most of the work will be on a laboratory basis, with
a few trial shipjonts tron connorcial operators. While it is expected that
some snap boens, shollod-linc boans and English poas, cauliflower, and lettroo
will be preopaokagod in the Stkto this season, initial studios are oxpeted
to be confined largely to broccoli, tomatoos, colory, and sweoot corn.

-U3.1lO




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