• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Busy days
 Back Cover






Group Title: Busy days : stories and pictures for the nursery
Title: Busy days
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086597/00001
 Material Information
Title: Busy days stories and pictures for the nursery ;
Series Title: Santa Claus series
Alternate Title: Busy days
Physical Description: 37 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lothrop Publishing Company. d4 pbl
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1897
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Creative activities and seat work -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Girls -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1897   ( local )
Juvenile literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1897   ( local )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Family stories   ( local )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated.
General Note: Engraved title page.
General Note: Includes prose and verse and text in double columns.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086597
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223068
notis - ALG3316
oclc - 18756980

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Busy days
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Back Cover
        Page 42
        Page 43
Full Text
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BUSY DAYS




STORIES AND PICTURES FOR THE NURSERY


ILL USTRA TED





BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY


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COPYRIGHT, 1897,

BY

LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.


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READ-ING THE PA-PER.

It is pa-pa's pa-per, / //
Come and see!
I can read it quite
As well as he.
Here is an A,
And here a D,
A fun-ny Q,
And a crook-ed Z.
And here, oh, here
Is a toss-it and bake-it -
THE NEWS.
Pat-ty-cake T. T .



A LIT-TLE MOTH-ER.

I must make my dol-ly a dress that fits;
'Tis a shame to have her look this way;
Her oth-er was torn in-to lit-tie bits,
When Ton-y shook her so yes-ter-
day.
SHere's nee-die, and thread, and thim-ble
too,
so Bs-i Oh, I've so much to do so much to dol



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THE ST. BER-NARD PUP-PIES.


HAND-SOME LIT-TLE FEL-LOWS.


THE ST. BER-NARD PUP-PIES.

Here are the beau-ti-ful pup- win-ter oft-en losetheir way in
pies that the Eng-lish boys the great snow-storms of the
and girls went to see at the Alps; and a house-hold of men
big Lon-don dog-show a few who live inthe moun-tainskeep
weeks a-go. The ba-bies went this brave kind of dogs and send
too. The chil-dren looked them out to hunt for lost trav-
some at the lit-tle dogs be- el-lers. If there is a man with-
Scause they were so hand-some, in reach these strong good dogs
but more be-cause they were will find him and dig him out
of the best and brav-est kind of the drifts and help him to a
If dogs in the world place of safe-ty. They are
Trav-el-lers in Eu-rope in called St. Ber-nard dogs.


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TORN FROM A SKETCH-BOOK,


One day I peepec
ist's book where he
ures, and I saw
fun-ny that I tore it
Sin BABYLAND. Wh
ist had seen any
pret.-ty things he ha
lit-tle shape of it on
:" There was a shape
rag-ged shoe, and
> . .


PICT-URES.


d in an art- head, and a ba-by's fat arm,
makes pict- and a rogue with a bot-tle of
a leaf so jam, and a big dog's head
out to put with a lit-tle pup-py's head
en the art- a-top of it, and a ba-by sop-
fun-ny or ping him-self in a4wash-bowl,
ad made a and ev-er so man-y "ats, and a
* this page. pair of chub-by feet, and a
of a lit-tie lit-tle black girl in a hood, and
i roost-er's a horse eat-ing out of a bag.:
S,.,


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THREE LIT-TLE PETS.


THREE LIT-TLE PETS.
Three lit-tie bos-sies stand yon-der,
But-ter-cup, Dai-sy and Tot;
Wait-ing and long-ing for sup-per,
For the milk, that a-las! com-eth not.

"Dear! dear !" cries' But-ter-cup cross-ly,
With a whisk of her lit-tie red tail,
How many more hours, I won-der,
Ere we wel-come the old wood-en pail."

"Oh, come, now," says lit-tle Tot, gay-ly,
"Don't stand there and scold all the day;
But com-fort your-self, in the mean-time,
With a wisp of this fra-grant new hay."

Lit-tle Miss Dai-sy stands lis-ten-ing,
Nev-er a word does she say;
Her eyes so in-tent-ly are watch-ing
The house door just o-ver the way.

And here comes, at last, the young mas-ter
Through the shad-ows of twi-light so dim,
Bear-ing the old wood-en milk-pail,
' Foam-ing and filled to the brim.













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TWO LIT-TLE ROGUES.
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TWO LIT-TLE ROGUES.


The best place to go, to for a
good time, is' Grand-ma's.













ROB-BY AND HEL-EN.

Rob-by and Hel-en went to
their grand-ma's, last sum-mer.
She lives on a farm. Rob-by
and Hel-en had good times
there. They tum-bled on the
hay. They gath-ered ap-ples.
They cracked bu.t-ter-nuts.
Some-times they got in-to
mis-chief, and came in-to the
house cov-ered with bruis-es
and scratch-es.


Rob-by likes to climb o-ver
fenc-es and stone walls. Once
a large stone rolled down on
his fin-gers, and two of his
fin-ger-nails came off.
Hel-en oft-en got in-to trou-
ble, too, for she fol-lowed
R;ob-by al-most ev-er-y-where,


ALL A-BOARDI


and what-ev-er he did, she tried
to do.
One day they were in the


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TWO LIT-TLE ROGUES.


or-chard, and Rob-by. saw the
girl bring out the churn and
set it up to dry a-gainst the
sideof-the house. Up jumped
Rob-by. "Oh, I've thought


DOWN THE HILL.


of such fun, Hel-en," said he.
" Let's put kit-ty in the churn,
and roll her down that lit-tie
hill at the -side of the house.
You- wait here while I get
my lit-tle pig grand-ma gave
me.
I will," said lit-tle Hel-en;
and when Rob-by came back


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she was stand-ing on a bench
be-side the churn. Then she









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put the pig in, and Rob-by
put the kit-ty in. Kit-ty tried,.
put thae kit-ty in. Kit-ty triebiJ44


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TWO LIT-TLE ROGUES.
to climb up the side. She had ouL and ran off with a lit-tle
to be pushed back three times bark.
be-fore they could get the Rob-by and Hel-en laughed
cov-er down. They tipped the -
churn o-ver and be-gan to roll
it down the hill.
Poor lit-tie kit-ty! poor lit-
tie pig-gy! how they) did
squeal and mew as they were
rolled o-ver and o-ver, shut upI
in that churni
But just as they got to the

S. ROB-BI KNOWS NOW HOW THE PIG AND CAT FELT.

S- till their lit-tle fac-es were red.
SThen they carried up the
churn to roll again. But
kit-ty and pig-gy could not be
coaxed back; and it was no
I, ffun to roll the churn with noth-
ing iln it.
5 "s What was to be done?
REAL FPUN THIS TIME! Then Hel-en said, Oh,
bot-tom of the hill, the cov-er Wob-by, oo det in and me'll
came off! Kit-ty flew a-way woll oo down !"
with a bound, and pig-gy came Rob-by said that would be

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THE ANX-IOI
" heaps of fun So he crept
in-to the churn, feet first,
with his head out, so as to see
the fun. A-las, for Rob-by!
he had e-nough fun for that
day, It was ver-y nice un-til
he got to the hill, and be-gan
to roll down. Jolt and bump,
jolt and bump He thought
he nev-er would stop At last


~''~~"~"''~''"''` "? '~;'i "


THE ANX-IOUS DOG-GY.


S-LTake care, lit-tle mas-ter,
-- Or you'll fall in I
That wa-ter js up
To your ver-y chin.
SPlease don't please don't,
I My mas-ter dear-
0, I wish your moth-er
,*it. WXouldn't send you here!
For oh lit-tie mas-ter,
What could I do,
If you should fall in, ,
But jump in too ?

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JS DOG-GY.
he got to the bot-tom. He :
crawled out, but he was too
diz-zy to stand. Ev-er-y-thing
seemed to go round and round,
and his face turned so ver-y
white that Hel-en ran for
grand-ma.
Poor Rob-by! he had to
stay in bed all the rest of
the day.






THE BEAU-TI-FUL BA-BIES.


See the sweet sum-mer
ba-bies! A great pamnt-er


paint-ed them man-y, man-y
years a-go, in a coun-try a-cross
the sea. He did not dream
then how the chil-dren of oth-er
coun-tries, in years to come,
would like to look at his beau-
ti-ful pict-ure! You may think,
if you choose, that these pret-ty
crea-tures are the-four sea-sons.
met to-geth-er to plan a long
hap-py new year for you.


Lit-tie Miss Jul-i-et had
a great scare the first day
she spent in the coun-try.
She and the French doll
were sit-ting out in the tall
green grass. She had lain
down a-gainst a lit-tle hil-
lock, when all at once a
Sgreen-and-brown drag-on so
Jul-i-et called him -looked
down from" a grass-blade


up-on her with two
round, dread-ful eyes.


great,
The


JUL-I-ET SEES THE DRAG-ON.
French doll faint-ed a-way.
Jul-i-et ran in to tell grand-ma.
Grand-ma said this ver-y
dread-ful green-and-brown drag-
on was a grass-hop-per.


" -.- ". .- .'- '













































Little Pen lives all alone with her grandma. She has no-
body to play with except her dolls. To-day she is playing
church. Her man-doll, Frank, whom you cannot see, is preach-
ing. See how straight Pen sits!


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"I CALLED TO IN-VITE YOU TO TAKE A WALK.

MRS. MOUSE AND HER VIS-I-TOR.


S One night last week a
strange thing hap-pened to
. rs. Mouse. She was sit-ting
in her door, knit-ting on a
brown-and-white stock-ing for
her old-est, when a shad-ow
fellon the ground. She looked
up and saw a most el-e-gant


be-ing stand-ing be-fore her.
I called, ma-dame." said
he, to in-vite you to take a
moon-light walk."
Mrs. Mouse re-fused, and he
de-part-ed. But she oft-en won-
ders who he was and what would
have hap-pened if she had gone.


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U"TH LITTLE MOTHER.'

-.






PICT-URES TO COL-OR OR DRAW.


HOPE AT THE SEA-SHORE.
PICT-URES TO COL-OR OR DRAW.


How Hope clapped her
hands.when she first saw the
blue, blue sea! How she
laughed at the lit-tie brown
don-key with his big ears!
Mam-ma laid the gold and
pur-ple aff-ghan on his back,
and Hope rode up and down
the soft grey sand. The sun
was hot, but Hope's blue-
trimmed hat shad-ed her, and
she raised her Jap-an-ese
par-a-sol. Soon, too, the sea-


breeze blew, and flut-tered her
gold-en locks, 'and her rose-
col-ored skirts; and Hope was
so jolly that the don-key stuck
out his red tongue as if he
were laugh-ing too.
Next morn-ing there was
bet-ter fun still. Hope and
her ba-by sis-ter, in their blue
dress-es, went down to the
beach and sat un-der a big buff
um-brel-la, and dug wells, and
built snId houses.


4.. -.









HOW THE WALK WAS SPOILED.

One fine May day Meg and her doll Maple
went out for a walk. Maple got her name
from having been a post of a maple chair; she had
blue-ink eyes, and a good nose had been whittled
on her face, and Mleg was very fond of her.
They had not gone far before they came to
a bank of dandelions. They sat down on its
golden plush to
rest, but just as
Maple.had fallen
MEG AND MAPLE. sleep the g
asleep t h e (1o g
from a meat-cart rushed across
-the road at them, and though HE CAME RIGHT ON!
Meg said, "Hush! you will wake the baby!" and motioned
him away, he came right on, barking at every step, and Maple
woke. And oh, how Maple cried because
she was robbed of her nap! Meg talked
to her, and sung to her,
and kissed her, and
hushed her and hushed
and hushed her, but she
YOU'WILL WAKE THE BABY could not quiet her, and
they had to go back home with their walk
all spoiled, and Maple was cross all day. MEG COULD NOT QUIET HER.

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OUT-LINE PICT-URE TO COL-OR.-SLATE PICT-URE.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-" DON'T EAT UP MY CHRIST-MAS WREATH "


SLATE PICT-URE.-CHRIST-mAS Evu 'W THE WOOD'.


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PICT-URES TO COL-OR OR DRAW.


I [HE LIi-'TLE BAK:LR.


PICT-URES TO COL-OR OR DRAW.

Lit-tle flax-en-haired Pe-ter's "I can make a pud-ding,"
.' moth-er dressed him up clean said lit-tle Pe-ter.
S in green jack-et and trow-sers, So he poured wa-ter in-to
S and red stock-ings, and sent the bowl of ber-ries, and stirred
S him out to play while she went in flour un-til it was thick.
to- make a call. Then he set it in the old red
Lit-tle flax-en-haired Pe-ter brick ov-en, and ran out to play.
played un-til he was hun-gry. He ranin a-gain just as his
16: Then he went in. No one moth-er came home. She
was there, and he could not found him with a raw lit-tie
S o-pen the cup-board door. ber-ry pud-ding in his hand.
A pan of floor stood on the The lit-tie bak-er had for-
ta-ble, and a bowl of ber-ries. got-ten to build a fire!


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A CHEISTMAS TREAT.


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THE NAUGH-TY BLACK CHICK-EN.
1


THE NAUGH-TY BLACK CHICK-EN.


The Chick-i-ty Fluffs lived
in the fin-est coop in Cur-rant
Bush Row. It had a real
door with leath-ern hinges,
and a but-ton, and all the slats
were nailed on true and even.
There were ten of the Chick-
i-ty Fluffs, and nine were
good, and one was naugh-ty-
the black chick-en. He it was
who al-ways hopped in-to the
wat-er and up-set it; he who
scratched dirt in-to the meal;
he who in-trud-ed in-to the
oth-er coops, un-til all the
moth-er-hens hat-ed him, and
wished Mrs. Chick-i-ty Fluff
had lived to bring up her
chil-dren prop-er-ly.
Now there was al-ways
plen-ty to eat in Cur-rant
Bush Row grain, crumbs
and meal three times a day,


ing places all a-bout. But
one morn-ing the black chick-
en, who had been gone ev-er
since sun-rise, came back to
the coop, drip-ping with dew,
and a bright light in his eye
- ah, that was a rogue's eye
if. ev-er there were one! "I
have found a beau-ti-ful coun-
try!" said he, "a coun-try
full of love-ly soft scratch-ing-
places, with paths\ be-tween,
and they are just as full as
they car ht- o( ~ ki~ds of
seeds, and all kinds of bugs
and worms. Come and see-
it is just through that fence!"
And where think you it was?
In the gar-den! And what
think you happened? A fierce
lit-tle dog flew at them, and
barked them out, and came
ver-y near catch-ing the naugh-


and there were good scratch- ty black chick-en by the leg.


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AR-THUR.


BY M. B


Do you see this boy in the sai-lor hat,
Who looks so jol-ly and gay and fat,
With a lit-tie pug.nose, and two bright, brown eyes,
And ten bus-y fin-gers to make mud pies?
Well, the whole of this song is a-bout his pranks,
His say-ings and do-ings, his quips and cranks,
The games that he played, and the works that he did,
Who pet-ted and kissed him, who scold-ed and chid;
The things he made up, and the thing he knocked down,
Out-doors and in-doors, in coun-try and town,
The dreams that he dreamed in his sleep-ing at night,
The mis-chief he did while the sun-shine was bright,
The rows he kicked up, and the tan-trums he had,
The good that was in him, as well as the bad,
His tops and his mar-bles, his kite and his ball -
This is the song that will speak of them all!
How he teased his small sis-ter, and both-ered the cat,
Tore holes in his trous-ers, and smashed up his hat,
Got sick from much can-dy, got well with much pain,
And then was all read-y to get sick a-gain -
I hope you will like him, the dear lit-tie elf,
For I know in my heart, that I love him myself I




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AR-THUR.


---







PICT-URES TO COL-OR OR DRAW.
--------- -----^ ,.




















sky is blue; but the gar-den and box-is stone col-or, with touch-es
lawn are white with show. of dull red and blue; and the
The on-ly green things flow-ers- you sute-ly know



Miss Sun-shine calls the south vblos-som yel-low as a sol-id bit
U'. ''
win-dow other bit of sum-mer. thef suflow-er potn-shine.en-ish red; the
Get your brush-es and Mboxiss Sn-shine her-self, with-es
paints "and col-or the pict-ure pink cheeks and gold-brown
and see ifhis not right, hair, wears a dull blue gown,
The walls are light ol-ive, with gold-en hair rib-bons, sash,
the cur-tain cream-y gray; the and col-lar.


.-. .- .. ... -.... .. .' .
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PICT-URES TO COL-OR OR DRAW.
.'---------------------------- -


THE BA-BY'S DOLL.


PICT-URES TO

The black-haired ba-by
fast a-sleep. -He lay on
great crim-son so-fa.
black eye-lash-es rest-ed or


COL-OR OR DRAW.


was
the
His
Shis


moist pink cheeks. He did
not once stir a-mong the white
pillows. He was cov-ered
close with the pink and gold
blank-et. Joe, his doll, was
sure that he was a-sleep.
Joe's lit-tle green suit was
ver-y tight-fit-ting, but he


up his arms, o-pened


his mouth, and spoke a-loud:
Of .all bad things," said
he, the worst is to be a
ba-by's doll! you have no
rest! He takes you to pound
with! He takes you to sweep
with! He takes you to strike
his moth-er and sis-ter with!
You nev-er go to bed! You
are left ly-ing a-bout! You
are held by a string while he
sleeps! Pit-y, oh, pit-y the
sor-rows of a ba-by's doll !"


threw


t !






CHRISTMAS EVE.


CHRISTMAS EVE.

Now where, 0, Little Boy Budge,
Now where, 0, Little Girl Trudge,
Now where are you going, tell me?

" O, we are going nowhere,
For we have already been there,
We have been to the Christmas Tree."

And what, 0, Little Boy Budge,
And what, 0, Little Girl 'Trydge,
Did the Christmas Tree bear for you ? -

"It bore these baskets of toys,-
It bore these boxes of joys, "WE HAVE BEEN TO THE CHRISTMAS TREE.
And this sweet doll dressed all in blue."

Naught else, 0, Little Boy Budge,
Naught else, 0, Little Girl Trudge,
Naught else on its boughs did.you see?

'O yes, it shone with a Star
That rose in Bethlehem far;
And the Christ Child sat in the Tree."






THE WA-TER-ING POT.


THE WA-TER-ING-POT.
Of all the play-things, large or
small,
That mon-ey could have
bought,
S None ev-er pleased the ba-by
like
Her lit-tle wa-ter-ing-pot.

Not larg-er than a pep-per-box
It was, and yet the spout
Could send a doz-en ti-ny rills
/-7 Of wa-ter trick-ling out.

t' She made it rain up-on the grass,
i .She sprin-kled plant and seed,
And mam-ma's pret-ty pan-sy patch
Kept ver-y fresh in-deed.

One day a storm came, and the walks
Were all too wet for play,
And ba-by had to stay in-doors
The whole long, lone-some day.

She played with stove, and doll, and blocks,
Ard wash-tub by the hour;






THE WA-TER-ING POT.


At last she filled her wa-ter-ing-pot,
But what was there to show-er ?

Now ba-by had a gyp-sy hat,
And all a-bout the crown
Were dai-sies thick and white; she.took
The dain-ty tri-fle down.

And such a sprink-ling as she gave
Its po-sy-wreath-ah me!
And such a wilt-ed thing it was
You would have laughed to see.

And did we scold our lit-tle girl-
Our bus-y bee? Oh, no.
How could we ? for she on-ly thought
To make the dai-sies grow.


MAM-MA'S LIT-TLE DRAW-ING CLASS.


e-;i .r i: ; :;:. -::.;;i -; ~:?;I::::':~;:~ ":B i :;::;'' ~':' ::r:?: *i: S'







A WIN-TER DAY'S STO-RY.


GO-ING TO SCHOOL.


COM-ING HOME


A WIN-TER


DAY'S


STO-RY.


"Whith-er, oh, whith-er,
So dole-ful-ly? "
We are go-ing to learn
Our A. B. C.


Go-ing to s ud-y
Our Ps and Qs;
But what is the use,
What is the use ?


One thing is sure,
They're a crook-ed set,
And that's all there is
To the al-pha-bet.


c



















:- :
h-
ihj I'i


" Whith-er, oh whith-er,
So joy-ful-ly ?"
We are run-ning a-way
From our A. B. C.


We've learned as much
As we care to know -
Crook-ed is S,
And'round is O.


The lit-tle old man
At the cor-ner sells
Taf-fy and pea-nuts
And car-a-mels.


t lt-' I .. -.. .l 7 I -, ,,. -, _. I.ka W-. ,

















































































































































V 9






THE FIRST TIME.


THE FIRST TIME.


Here are bon-ny
Bess and Kate,
And the lit-tle Nan-ny,
Come out to skate.

Three lit-tle girls,
So bold and gay;
In a min-ute more,
A-way a-way,

We shall see them fly-ing,
I sup-pose,
Each with her cheeks
Red as,a rose.


Bess cries, I can-not
'Stand at all."
And Kate screams out;
SI know we'll fall.!"

And the lit-tle Nan-ny
Shrieks, Oh my!"'
And all three to-geth-er
Be-gin to cry.

And that is the way
That Bess and Kate,
And the lit-tle, Nan-ny,
SLearn to skate.


















































































































IN THE JAM CLOSET.


"When the cat's away,

The mice will lay."


1 "/ '"


:
.:. i
?-






AN A-PRIL DAY.















SUN-SHINE. SHOW-ER.
AN A-PRIL DAY.
With song and ban-ner they marched a-way;
The sky was blue that A-pril day;
There was no one to shake a head, and say,
" The house is the bet-ter place to play."
'Twas warm, and the grass was green and gay,
And they marched with a ban-ner, marched a-way.

But sud-den-ly rain be-gan to fall;
They ran to the house for a cape, or a shawl,
And bor-rowed their moth-er's par-a-sol,
Quite sure that she wouldn't care at all.
A squall it was but an A-pril squall,
And ter-ri-bly fast the drops did fall.
















































































MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER DOGS.































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