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 Front Cover
 Three Christmas boxes
 Back Cover






Title: Three Christmas boxes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086566/00001
 Material Information
Title: Three Christmas boxes
Alternate Title: 3 Christmas boxes
Physical Description: 14 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1899
 Subjects
Subject: Christmas stories   ( lcsh )
Christmas stories -- 1899
Juvenile literature -- 1899
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Christmas stories
Juvenile literature
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Story in verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086566
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001868283
oclc - 16054699
notis - AJU2801

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Three Christmas boxes
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9-10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Back Cover
        Page 18
Full Text




































































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THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES.


DEAR children, gather round my knee,
A simple story, you shall hear;


In which I


hope, you all will see,


How strong a brother's love appears;---


The joy that doing


good imparts,


Where true forgiveness fills the heart.


Look at this howling,


hunted


All wild with pain, and fear she flies;
These wicked boys are at her heels,
And vainly to escape she tries.
With blood, and bruises covered o'er,


Poor little Fan can run


passer-by,


no more


with pitying heart,


Has stopped the hail of cruel stones;
Poor Fan has reached her master's door,


And there, with sad and


plaintive


moans;


With broken limbs,


and piteous cries,


She licks his gentle hand,


and dies!


The Baldwin Library
University
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dog!


Some






Three Chv'stmas Boxes.


Frank was a noble, manly youth,
As frank by nature, as by name;
And when he saw poor Fan was gone,


The tears rolled down his face


He clasped her to his


like rain!


sobbing breast,


Then laid her tenderly to rest.


was a bitter


blow to


Frank;


But when
Had played


he knew, a brother's hand,
this cruel, wicked prank;


'Twas almost more, than love could stand.


For Tom had tied


to Fanny's


tail---


The horrid, clanging, fatal pail!

And now again, the happy time,


Of Christmas bells, is drawing
And soon will greet, with merry


near;


chimes,


The crowning
When songs


day of


all the year;


of gladness, fill the land,


And love, and joy, go hand


This


in hand.






Christmas Boxes.


Now, Santa-Claus, at Christmas


time,


Can all the acts of children see;
And as their deeds, are good or ill,
So will their Christmas presents be t


You see him
His good-wife


smiling on


They talk of Tommy's
And Santa-Claus wil


wicked
th angry


him there.

work;
frown,


" wickedness like this, my love,


With punishment, must be put down;


His cruel play shall cost him


dear,


No present will he get this


up, and spoke


the buxom


year.

dame;


A kind, and feeling heart had


"Dear husband, though your
17 _)


judgment


blame,


With mercy, let it tempered be;
We'll try his heart, with grief and


But lVad him back to hope


in his easy chair,


Sa) s,


Then


she!


pain,


Three


again."






Three Christmas Boxes.


Old Santa-Claus, then,---with


a kiss,


You might have heard a mile around;


The good


old dame,


with love embraced,


And chuckled low---a


merry


sound.


Then both their heads,
To see what could, of


together


laid,


Tom be made.


And, after


many


doubts


They hit at last upon
By which, they hoped. tl


Might


grow


and fears,
a plan;
he wicked


to be an honest man.


And what the lesson proved to be,


And how it worked, you'll shortly


And "Merry


Christmas,"


now had


And Frank, and


Will, were happy


Three boxes, bearing each a name,
That ready seemed, to burst with


Lay fair, before


their


eager


boys;


toys;


sight,


And filled them with


boy,


see.


come,


a wild delight.






Christmas Boxes.


With cries of joy,
Soon had their
What store of Dre


then, Frank and Will,
boxes opened wide;
cious toys were there,


With many useful things beside.


A piece


of Fairy-land


it seemed,


Or something, that the boys had dreamed


But where was


Tommy, all this


A sad, unhappy boy was


time ?


he!


With fear and pain,


his heart was


No gleam of hope, could Tommy see.


He seemed


to feel the cruel stones,


And hear poor Fanny's


dying


groans.


So, while


his brothers,


filled the house,


With joyous shouts, and cries


of glee;


Poor Tommy dared not touch his box;
An empty one, he feared to see.
With tears of shame, he stole away,
No joy for him that blessed day!


filled,


T~Yee






Christmas Boxes


The happy brothers, then looked round,


To know why


And saw,


Tom so


with wondering


That Tommy


quiet kept;
surprise,


from the room had


crept;


They saw his box, unopened there,


And heard


Then


Said,


noble Frank,


him sobbing on the


stair.


with pity moved,


"Will, go send poor


Tommy


here;


But don't come back again yourself,
Until I've made this trouble clear;


Go, brother


dear, and make him


To have his share


of Christmas


Frank, in looking


through


his box,


Had noticed


with astonished *eyes:


A dobhile
Which


share of
filled him


books and toys,


with a glad


surprise:


And quickly ran, at once to see,


box could empty


Now


come,


fun.


Three


be.


If Tommy's






Three Christmas Boxes.


So now, that


brother


Will had


He raised the lid,


with gentle care;


And saw, that not a toy or book,


Of


any kind, was hiding there.---


Thought


of poor Fan, with passing


sighed,


and, closed


the lid


again.


He stood a moment, deep


in thought,


Then yielding


to his generous


heart;


Filled Tommy's box, up to the brim---


Of all his treasures, gave
Then blushing, with the


That sweet


him part!
rosy glow,


forgiveness, can bestow;--


Went softly from the quiet room,
That Tommy might be there alone;
And never need suspect the truth,
Of what his brother's love had done.
Ah! noble heart, so bright and fair
No angry hate could harbor there.


gone,


Then


pain,






7Tree Christmas Boxes.


And now, with saddened steps and slow,
Poor Tommy creeps into the room;
His heavy eyes, are dim with tears,


His boyish


face, is dark with gloom;


For well he knew, that justice


Would say, "no Christmas


toys


grim,
for him.


He sees, that brother Frank is gone,


And only Willie's


dog


is there;


(A sister, she---to luckless Fan.)
The sight is hard for Tom to bear.
It brings to mind his sin again,


And fills him

He turns away frc


with remorse and

>m Willie's pet,


Alas! he cannot bear the sight;


When suddenly, his face


lights up,


He glows with wonder and delight.---


A moment stands, with eager


eyes;


Then breathless, to his box he flies.


pain






Chris'mas Boxes.


Just where
But now,


he left it,


there it stands;


'tis full and running o'er,


With books, and toys, and wondrous things;


Where he


had nothing seen before!


He took them out, with trembling


hands;


Then, all at


once, amazed


he stands.


What


is it, that poor


That dyes his


cheek


Tommy sees?
s with burning


He finds, upon a cross-bow tied,


A card,


which


bears his


brother's name.


Frank meant, that Tommy should not know---


But Santa-Claus


had willed


'Tis done! and


Tommy's


stubborn


Is broken down with honest shame;


He knows,


that Frank has filled


his box,


Without a single word of blame.


His tears are flowing,


thick and fast,


True penitence, he feels at last.


pain;


it so!


heart,


Three






Three Christmas Boxes.


As quickly
His own pet


rushes back again--
dog, is in his arms,


bitter


pain.


the other door,


And smiling walks across the floor.


Then Tommy,


holding out his


Said, "brother
My own dear p


(Here


" And
A bett


;er


Frank,


I've brought


)et, for you to keep,


scalding


if you'll take her now


from


boy, I'll try to


Frank's honest eyes, are full


He holds


poor Tommy to


his breast,


your darling,


brother


And let me set your heart at rest.


Be kind,


and good,


in word and deed,


And that is all the pay I need."


NY.


Quick


as a flash, he leaves the room;


And seems to soothe his
Dear Frank comes in 1


dog,


you


Tommy dropped a


here,


tear.)


me,


" Take


back


of tears;


dear,


be."




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