• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The wonderful story of Baa-Baa
 Baby Bun as driver
 Nifty and Scrubby
 What was the trouble?
 Bun and his wonder-ball
 What happened to the black...
 Bow-wow
 Naughty in nap time
 The talking clock
 Bun at the farm
 Baby Bun and Mother Hen
 Bun's babylands
 The Christ-mas cards
 "Playing Mamma" - The father's...
 Lit-tle Mar-ta's mar-ket-ing
 Clar-i-bel's ten-ants
 About my lamb - The kitten that...
 A lit-tle French girl
 Back Cover






Group Title: Santa Claus series
Title: The little one's friend
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086484/00001
 Material Information
Title: The little one's friend pictures and stories for the babies
Series Title: Santa Claus series
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bridgman, L. J ( Lewis Jesse ), 1857-1931 ( Illustrator )
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1897
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations by L. J. Bridgeman, and others.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086484
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224123
notis - ALG4384
oclc - 51521963

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The wonderful story of Baa-Baa
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Baby Bun as driver
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Nifty and Scrubby
        Page 12
        Page 13
    What was the trouble?
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Bun and his wonder-ball
        Page 16
        Page 17
    What happened to the black horse
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Bow-wow
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Naughty in nap time
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The talking clock
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Bun at the farm
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Baby Bun and Mother Hen
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Bun's babylands
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The Christ-mas cards
        Page 32
        Page 33
    "Playing Mamma" - The father's care
        Page 34
    Lit-tle Mar-ta's mar-ket-ing
        Page 35
    Clar-i-bel's ten-ants
        Page 36
        Page 37
    About my lamb - The kitten that ran away
        Page 38
        Page 39
    A lit-tle French girl
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Back Cover
        Page 42
        Page 43
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MY PAPA'S HORSE,, HERO.









LITTLE ONE'S FRIEND



PICTURES AND STORIES FOR THE
BABIES.


ILL USTRA TED



BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY












































COPYRIGHT, 1897,
BY
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.









THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BAA.


One day in
spring Baby
,"i Bun's mam-
ma said, I'm
BABY BUN. going to take
you to the farm to-day."
Baby liked that; and when
he was ready to go, what do
you think he had in his hand?
"A dolly?" Oh! no. His
dear little woolly lamb.
"Why don't you take your
new horse, Baby? asked mam-
ma. Doesn't he want to go?"
Oh! yes," said Baby; "but
Baa-Baa is sick, so I must take
him to-day."
Poor Baa-Baa did look


badly. One ear was gone, one
leg was broken, and his head
hung down in a forlorn way.
He was wrapped in an old
doll-blanket, and Baby carried
him very carefully.
When they got to the farm
Baby trotted about, looking till
he found the very greenest,
freshest grass anywhere near
the farmhouse.
There, Baa-Baa, eat all
you want," said Baby.
While Baa-Baa stood look-
ing at the grass,
but before he
had begun to
ea t, Farmer
Robbins came
that way. FARMER ROBBINS.
"How do you do, Baby
Bun ?" said he. "Come and
see the Bossy in the barn."
Baby looked at Baa-Baa.






THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BAA.


Farmer Robbins said, "Oh!
you need not worry about him;
animals sometimes like best to
be alone when they eat."
So Baby went with the
farmer to see the Bossy, and
left Baa-Baa
to eat the
THE BOSSY. fresh tender
grass as he liked.
After Baby Bun had seen
the Bossy, Farmer Robbins
showed him the pigs and the
horses and the ducks, until it
was dinner-time.
Then, after dinner, Baby
took a drive with mamma.
He did not forget Baa-Baa, but
thought, He will have plenty

3j
.7


of time to eat all he wants."
When mamma said, Now,
we must go home," Baby ran
to get his pet. There stood
Baa-Baa just where he had
left him but oh! oh! oh !-- ,'
he had two ears, his broken foot
seemed to have grown on again,
and his head was up just as it
should be!
Baa-Baa is all" well!"
shouted Baby, "Baa-Baa is
all well!"
Baby always thought it was
the fresh grass that had cured
his pet, but mamma knew that
kind Farmer Robbins had
mended Baa-Baa while Baby
was at dinner.


BAA-BAA IS ALL WELL NOW 1





















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OMMA 1 N~LT b~I~I






BABY BUN AS DRIVER.


BABY BUN AS DRIVER.


SBarney was'
a fat, strong
little donkey.
The children
S had a small
gay cart which
he could draw,
so they had
great fun driv-
1^ "ing about.
SBut Baby's
mamma al-
BARNEY. .
ways said
"No," when Baby wished to
go with the children; perhaps
telling him that Jane, the nurse,
would take him some time. To
go with Jane, however, was not
what Baby Bun wanted.
At last, Baby thought he
would invite some other grown-
up. person to go with him.
His mamma was not well and
never went to drive, so he first
asked his dear old grandmam-


ma; but she said, I am too
old." Then he asked his Aunt
Helen; but she said, "I am
too busy." Then he asked his
Aunt Sue; but she said, "Oh!
I should be afraid."
That was the worst of all,
Baby Bun thought. -He was
four years old and of course
he could take care of her.
One day,
soon after this,
his mamma
had a visitor,
a lady who
showed that
she kn e w'
Baby was a
big boy even
if he did wear
dresses. So
Baby walked
UP to her and BABY BUN AS DRIVER.

said, ",I should like to take you
to drive in the 'Barney cart.'"






BABY BUN AS DRIVER.


Miss Dare was delighted
and said she would go as soon
as he and Barney were ready.
When they got into the cart
Miss Dare said, "Where are
we going ?" Well," said Baby


go to the stable, and though
Baby pulled and scolded, to
the stable they went. Never
mind," said Miss Dare. I
shall like to visit the stable and
we can go to the farm another


THE RIDE IN THE BARNEYY CART."


Bun grandly, "we'll go all over
the farm and out on the main
road and everywhere." That
will be fine!" said Miss Dare.
The donkey started.
"That road leads to the sta-
ble," said Baby Bun, "but we
will go the other way."
But when they came to the
the two roads Barney chose to


time. How nicely you drive,
Baby Bun!"
After seeing the horses and
driving back to the house, Miss
Dare thanked Baby and told
mamma and grandmamma and
the aunties that she had had a
delightful drive. And you
may be sure Baby Bun was a
proud and happy little boy.


S-=-r-.-


~I~ ~3"~9n~~~.
~"~'`~-~i:
~s;--


)Br






NIFTY AND SCRUBBY.


NIFTY AND SCRUBBY.


Nifty, Bun's canary, was a
great dandy and a great pet.
When Bun's mamma sat down
to sew, she often put Nifty's






55









BUN S MAMMA.
cage on the seat which extended
around the bay window.
Once, when she came back
after having been out of the
room a long time, she found
that.Nifty had company! Com-


pany inside his cage! What
do you think of that ?
There sat Nifty on his lower
perch, and close beside him sat
the rustiest, dirtiest, scraggiest
little bit of a mouse that you
ever saw.
They made a strange-looking
pair: Nifty so gay and sleek in
his yellow coat, and Scrubby
(as Bun's mamma named the
mouse), so shabby and dingy
in his rough dull fur.
No one knew how they got
acquainted; but after this, the
mouse came almost every day.
When Nifty's cage was taken
down and Bun's mamma was
quietly seated in another part
of the room, Scrubby'would
generally appear. 'But if he
did not come soon, Nifty would
give a soft low chirp and repeat
it until Scrubby heard the call.
Then Scrubby would come ruri-






NIFTY AND SCRUBBY.


ning across the room and up
to the window seat, and, squeez-
ing himself in between the wires
of the cage, would scramble up
on the perch beside Nifty.
Scrubby was always hungry.
It was never long after he got
into the cage before he went to
Nifty's seed dish to have a feast.
Nifty would let him eat a
little while, but when he thought
Scrubby had had enough, he
would hop over to him, and,
catching hold of Scrubby's long,
thin tail, nip it with his bill.
Oh! how Scrubby hated to
stop eating! but oh! how Nifty
did hurt his tail! He always
had to leave the delicious seed
and go and play with Nifty.


After they had had a good
frolic, Scrubby would squeeze
between the wires. of the cage


BUN'S PETS.


again and scamper away to his
home which was somewhere
about the fireplace.
The mouse came day after
day, either of his own accord
or in answer to Nifty's chirp.
Wouldn't you like to see
Nifty and Scrubby ?


1. a


"YOU HAVE HAD ENOUGH, SCRUBBY !


t~i~i~-F~ C ~ Ip ~-----sl-~SI






WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE?


WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE?


Baby Bun and Fritz the dog
were the best of friends. They
ran races, tumbled over each







BABY BUN AND FRITZ.
other, and had fun all day long.
When Fritz saw Baby Bun
coming, he would crouch down
all ready for a spring, and Baby
Bun would dash after him;
and the boy would laugh so,
and the dog would bark so, that
you could hear nothing else.
But one day, when Fritz as
usual expected a good play,
Baby Bun called out, "Go
away, Fritz! keep off Don't
jump on me! "
Fritz could hardly believe


his flopping ears; so he kept
slowly on his way toward Baby
Bun.
But Baby Bun again called
out, Go away!" and then
Fritz saw, by the way, Baby
Bun kept moving off and shout-
ing, that he really did not mean
to play with him at all.
Poor Fritz put his tail be-
tween his legs and went sadly
away. He could not think
why Baby Bun would not play
with him.
As Fritz passed the barn, a




FRITZ IS UNHAPPY.
man called out, "Here, Fritz,
old fellow Come in here!"
Fritz was glad to have any
one speak to him, so he went






WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE?


into the barn to tell the man
how very badly he felt about
Baby Bun.
"He knows something is
wrong," said another man who
was in the barn.
He will be all right soon,"
said the first man. Then they
both took hold of Fritz and


and wondering still about Baby
Bun, he heard little feet running
over the grass. He jumped up.
Yes, it was Baby Bun, who
called, "0, Fritz! Now come,
Fritzie! Nice doggie!" and
they were soon rolling over in
the grass, one of them barking
and the other laughing.


FRITZ IS HAPPY AGAIN.


put him into a
gave him a bath!


big tub


and


Fritz did not like it at all;
but oh! how fine he looked
when he came out of the tub!
As he lay sunning himself


Then they lay still; and Baby
Bun hugged Fritz and said, I
am so glad you are clean again.
Mamma told me not to play
with you when you were all
covered with black ditch mud!"


'K.~





BUiN AND .HIS WONDER-BALL.


BUN AND HIS


WONDER-BALL.


Baby Bun did not know at and unrolled the paper. A
all what his Auntie meant ball it was, to be sure so
when she said, "Bun, I have big that it took Bun's two
bought you a wonder-ball," so hands to hold it. It was made
of gay red worsted, and Bun
thought it was rather heavy.
SI have brought you a toy
s knitter, too," said Auntie.
"Come and sit by me and I
Swill teach you to knit."
In a little while a very lit-
tle while, because it is so very
nice and easy Bun had
learned to knit, using the
worsted of his big wonder-ball,
of course. That was what it
was for, Auntie said.
Bun knitted and knitted.
Suddenly, pop !
out on the floor
fell a little pack-
age. It was a
he watched his Auntie as she chocolate! I wonder where
took a bundle out of her bag that came from," said Bun.






BUN AND- HIS WONDER-BALL.


"You wonder?" said Auntie. Why, wonders come out of
wonder-balls. Don't you know that, little Bun ?"
Bun clapped his hands, saying, "Oh! I
think wonder-balls are fine, Auntie. Do
they always have chocolates in them? "
"Wonder-balls always have wonders in
them," said Auntie; and that was all she
would tell little Bun about it.
The next day Bun knitted more,
Sand more won-
Sders dropped
out of the ball.
A bright penny,
a candy bird, a
wee, wee bottle
of cologne, and
a whistle -all these came; and,
besides, the strip of knitting was
growing so long, too!
By and by Bun had a piece of the knit-
ting long enough to make a fine pair of
reins to play horse with, and there' was
no more worsted. The last thing he found
was a pretty pink box, and in the box was a
china cat and five little kittens !
Wouldn't you like to learn to knit if
you had a wonder-ball ?






WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


pe ol


DONO AND DOBBIN.


WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


Baby Bun was taking his
nap. He -had been a very
naughty boy that morning.
He would not mind his nurse
when she called him to come
into the house, and he would
not put away his new horse
with which he had been play-
ing. So while Baby Bun was
asleep the new horse stood out
on the lawn. He was a big


black horse and his name was
Dobbin. As he stood there
who should come along but
Dono the big puppy!
When Dono spied the horse
he thought he had found a
playfellow; so he went up to
Dobbin and sniffed at him.
Dobbin did not stir. Dono
then put a paw up and hit
Dobbin; but the black horse






WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


never even turned his head.
Then Dono thought this the
strangest animal he had ever
seen. He began to play more
roughly with it. He bit the
shiny harness, took Dobbin's
head into his mouth, jumped
on him, rolled him over and
over, pulled out his tail, and
bit a great hole in his side.
Just'then his master called,
" Dono!" and Dono ran away.
After dinner Baby Bun went
out to play again; but oh!
what a pitiful-looking horse he


DONO INVESTIGATES DOBBIN.


found! Poor Dobbin was so
scratched and torn and bitten


OH, HOW SORRY BABY WAS!
that he could never be mended.
Oh! how sorry Baby Bun was
that he had not minded Nurse.
Dobbin was not fit to play
with any more; but Nurse put
him up in the toy closet, and
whenever Bun
fretted about hav-
/ ing to put his play-
/ ~things away, she
only needed to
point just once to
poor Dobbin.









B OW-V O W.


BY E. F.


His name was Bow-wow.
Just Bow-wow and noth-ing
else. It could-n't have been
a-ny-thing else ver-y well. Not
" Rover," for he al-ways staid
at home. Not "Fris-ky," for he
nev-er frisked. Nor "Spot"
nor Li-on for he was-n't
spot-ted nor li-on col-ored. But
he did "bow-wow" a large
share of his time.
And he had naught-y look-
ing teeth, and his eyes were
full of sparks, and his hair
stood up all o-ver his head,
and there he would sit, white
and shag-gy and fierce, on his
lit-tle mis-tress' bal-co-ny, right
in a-mong her or-ange trees
and ger-a-ni-ums and pots of
ros es, and just bark and
growl and look mur-der at ev-
er-y lit-tle boy and girl that
came "prowl-ing round" to see


Miss Ju-lie. That was what
Bow-wow called it, for they
did ling-er at the gate and
steal up the path as still as
they could, for fear that watch-
ing, wick-ed Bow-wow would
see them and bark; and Bow-
wow called that "prowl-ing."
But Bow-wow nev-er did
bite. For al -ways, just as
they thought he was go-ing to
spring, lit-tle Ju-lie would come
out and say Hush up, Bow-
wow!" and he would "hush;"
or else she would go down and
meet her play-mates, and when
Bow-wow saw that, he would
cut his bark short and say,
" O, if it is some-bod-y she
likes, it's all right!"
No, Bow-wow nev-er did
hurt a-ny-bod-y, and I don't be-
lieve he ev-er will! He mere-ly
de-lights to hear his own voice.


















































































A JOLLY RIDE.






NAUGHTY IN NAP TIME.


NAUGHTY IN NAP TIME.

Baby Bun had been put to As he lay with his nose be-
bed to take his nap. And tween the bars of his crib he
Nurse had gone downstairs to saw his slippers on the chair
get her dinner. All was quiet. near.
I wish I didn't have to go Oh! I can play 'choo-
to sleep," thought Baby Bun. choo!"' said Baby Bun; and
he reached over and got
one of his slippers.
"Choo-choo! choo-
choo !" Up and
Down the crib
went the red
morocco train;
but in a few
minutes Baby
Bun thought of some-
thing else. Suppose
he should put on his
Sar slippers And get out
e oof bed I
Oh! naughty Baby
Bun! Lie down again
"I wish I had something here and go to sleep like a good
in my crib to play with! child. But no the red slip-







NAUGHTY IN NAP TIME.


pers were soon on
and Baby Bun clam-
bered over the side
of his crib to the
chair.
Bump! Whack!
Oh, what a hard hit '
his head got! And
how it hurt! Baby
Bun did not often
cry, but this made .
the tears come.
He got up and
stood rubbing his
poor little head. Over
He did not want side of
to play any more.
He looked at his nice bed. "I
think I will take my nap now,"
said Baby Bun.
When Nurse came to take
him up he was fast asleep; but
he soon waked.
"Why, you have your slip-
pers on said Nurse.
Soon she found the bump;
and then Baby Bun told her


K->


Lt e
cse crib.


how he had played
" choo-choo !" and
climbed out of the
crib and fallen off
the chair.
The next day
when he went to
take his nap Baby
Bun said, "You'd
better take away the
chair so I can't reach
my slippers." And


i -.- J

then he turned over and went
to sleep as soon as he could.


- 51 I
- -"'**-;






THE TALKING CLOCK.


THE TALKING CLOCK.


In mamma's room there
was a china dish with a cover.
On this cover was a pretty rose,
and when you
took hold of
the rose and
lifted the
cover, you
would find
candy.
,,l One day


when Baby Bun was left alone
in the nursery for a few minutes
he happened to think of that
dish of candy in mamma's room.


Mamma was not at home.
Nurse was busy. Baby Bun
went out into the hall and
down the stairs. He went
quietly and listened all the
time, fearing lest Nurse should
find out that he was not in the
nursery.
Suddenly, just before he
opened mamma's door, he
heard a queer voice saying
'_ very slowly,
^- d" Go- back !
S Go back!
I Baby Bun was
Frightened and
looked all about,
i.' but he could see
I no one. Yet still
/ i '" \ that very slow,
solemn, strange
8l voice kept on,
saying distinctly,
"Go back! Go back!"
Baby Bun felt more and






THE TALKING CLOCK.


more afraid. What should
he do?
"Go-back! Go back!"
said the voice again.
And this time Baby Bun
obeyed the command.


He ran upstairs as fast as
ever he could. He did not care
if Nurse did hear him now. In
fact he wanted very much to
find her or somebody. Just
as he reached the nursery, how-


ever, he heard the front door
close; and then his mamma
called him. Down he ran, not
stopping to listen this time;
and you may be sure he told
his mamma all about it.


His mamma was sorry he
had been so naughty as to go
to get the candy; but she told
him it was the good old clock
that spoke to him and told him
to go back.


_f Q


U T i

OL ed._


~






BUN AT THE FARM.


DOWN BY THE DUCK POND.


BUN AT THE FARM.


When Baby Bun was in the
country, of course the thing
he liked best to do was to go
down to the farm; though
there were a great many other
interesting places.
For at the farm, there was
everything, it seemed to Baby
Bun. There were horses, and
hay carts, and dump carts, and
the carry-all. There were big
barns with ladders to climb
and with hay to jump into.


There was the orchard,
where you could find blossoms,
or green apples to throw to
the pigs, or ripe apples to eat.
The pigs lived near the barn;
big, funny old grunters, and
darling little pink piggies that
were so cunning.
Baby's own garden was
down at the farm, too; and
the pastures one for the
cows, one for the calves, and
one for the sheep; and be-





BUN AT THE FARM.


sides all this there was the
poultry yard.
Baby Bun always threw corn
to the hens and chickens, and
looked in the nests for eggs,
first; and then he would run
down to the duck pond. This
was not a real pond, but a
small place arranged for the
ducks to swim in.
Bun sailed boats there some-
times; but what he liked best
was to keep the ducks swim-
ming from one side of the
pond to the other.
The ducks liked it for a lit-
tle while, but they got tired of
it before Baby Bun did.
One. day, one of the largest
ducks tried to get out. Baby
Bun ran quickly round to the
other side of the pond to chase
him back info the water.
The ground was a little wet
at the edge of the duck pond.
Baby Bun was running fast
and his foot slipped just at the


brink of the water, and in he
fell with a great splash.
The pond was not deep
enough to be dangerous, but
Baby Bun was well frightened.
He screamed and gurgled






:

K'"'



"DRIPPING, LIKE A WATER-CART."
with his mouth full of water,
and the ducks quacked in ter-
ror and waddled out and away
as fast as ever they could.
Baby Bun had to walk
home "dripping like a water-
cart," as Nurse said. He has
always been more careful since,
when near the duck pond.






BABY BUN AND MOTHER HEN.


BUN CHASES THE RUNAWAY CHICKEN.


BABY BUN AND MOTHER HEN.


SBaby Bun went out to see
the little chickens. It was
safe for him to go out in the
farmyard alone, for the horses
were gone to the blacksmith's
to get new shoes put on, and
the cows were out in the fields.
Be a good child, Bun, and
nothing will hurt you," Baby's
mamma had said; and don't
touch the chickens." So Baby
Bun trotted off to the big
S cherry-tree where Mother Hen

:I-, C C


and the downy chickens lived.
There they were the cun-
ning, yellow things- just out-
side the coop. Mother Hen
was out with them that morn-
ing, and she was cluck-cluck-
ing very earnestly to her babies;
and what do you think she
said ? Why, just about what
Baby Bun's mother had said
to him:. "Be good little chick-
ens, and nothing will hurt you;
and keep close to me."






BABY BUN AND MOTHER HEN.


But one little chick was
naughty. He did not keep
close to his mother but ran
away:
Baby Bun ran after him and
caught him. Baby only wanted
to pet him, but he was fright-
ened and began to cry. Mother
Hen heard him, and when she
saw that Baby Bun was hold-
ing him, she called out fiercely,
"Cluck! cluck! cluck! cluck!"
and this time it meant, What
are you doing to my child?
Let him go! "
Baby Bun did not let the
chicken go ; he was so soft and
yellow and cunning. Then
Mother Hen flew up and
pecked Baby Bun's cheek.
This frightened Bun and he
began to cry.
His mamma heard him,.and
came out. She took the little
chicken away from Baby Bun
and put him on the ground be-
side Mother Hen.


Then she said, If you had
not touched the chicken, Mother
Hen would not have hurt you."
And Mother Hen just then
was saying to her little one,
"If you had kept close to me,
Baby Bun would not have
caught you."
And Baby Bun and the lit-


MOTHER HEN ATTACKS BABY BUN.


tie chicken both knew that
their mothers were right.






BUN S BABYLANDS.


MAMMA READS TO BABY BUN.


BUN'S BABYLANDS.


Bun always liked to be in
the nursery when the toy closet
was put in order. From the
high shelves and far-back cor-
ners where he could not reach,
Nurse would bring many treas-
ures which he had not seen for
a long time; and he was as
glad to play with them as if
they had just come from the
great toy shop down town.
*The last time that Nurse


put the closet in order, she
brought out a whole pile of
BABYLANDS.
"Oh! Nursie, do let me
have them to look at," said
Bun. I have not seen them
for a long time." And soon
Bun was on the floor, with
BABYLANDS strewn all about.
When his mamma came into
the nursery he was still busy
with them, so she read some of


-N






BUN S BABYLANDS.


the pretty stories and funny
jingles to him.
Then she said, "Now I
want to tell my little boy some-
thing I have seen to-day. I
have been to a place where
there are a great many poor
sick children. They are so sick-
that most of them have to lie
all day in their little beds."
"Can't they have their toys
in bed ?" said Bun. I played
with my little dump cart and
my bicycle boy, when I had a
cold, don't you know ?"
"Yes," said mamma, "but
you were only a very, very little
sick, and not weak like these
children. Their hands are too
weak and tired to lift anything
heavy. -I was just thinking


how nice it would be if they
had some pretty picture books
which were not at all heavy.
It might help them to forget
their pain."
":Oh! mamma," said Bun,
"'my BABYLANDS aren't a bit
heavy, and they have lovely
pictures! Let's give them to
the little sick children, mam-
ma!" and Bun began to col-
lect the scattered magazines.
"Oh! isn't it nice that I
didn't tear them, mamma?
And I'll save my new ones,
too; the sick children can have
those when I get another pile."
Dear little man!" said his
mamma, kissing him.
So that is what became of
Bun's BABYLANDS.


WHAT" BUN DID WITH HIS BABYLANDS.


P_ __~ __






THE CHRIST-MAS CARDS.


THE CHRIST-MAS CARDS.


A RING at the door;
The post-man said:
" Some-thing here
For the cur-ly-head-

" For the cur-ly-head
A bon-bon box;
And a big en-vel-ope
For sweet Gold-Locks."

Who could have sent them ?
Af-ter a pause,
Some-bod-y whis-pered,
San-ta Claus! "


" And mine has a heart
On the cov-er too,"
Glee-ful-ly shout-ed
Lit-tie Boy Blue.

Leave the ten-pins,
And drop the ball,
Christ-mas cards
Are bet-ter than all!

San-ta Claus' let-ters
They are,? In-deed,
You lit-tle folks
Should learn to read !


~T-FI












































































































THE BABY ARCHDUCHESS. MARIA HENRIETTA STEPHANIE GISELA ELIZABETH, OF AUSTRIA.


3.


_ ___I






"PLAYING MAMMA. THE FATHER'S CARE.


"PLAYING MAMMA."


Kitty-Kate-
Katherine-
Kit likes to
play "mam-
ma." Mam--
ma mends
stockings
every Satur-
day. So


does Kitty-Kate-Katherine-Kit.
With her needle and wool she
sits on her stool, draws her
stocking over her hand and
sews blue stitches criss-cross all
over the little red heel. Some-
times mamma picks them out;
but sometimes she lets Kitty-
Kate-Katherine-Kit wear them.


THE FATHER'S CARE.

The darling birds are warm.
Yes, feather on feather "
All close together,
The darling birds are warm!
They care not whether
'Tis stormy weather,
For they are safe from harm.
With feather on feather,
Tho' it's stormy weather
The darling, birds are warm.
























"MON-EY?" LIT-TLE MAR-TA SAID NOT A WORD.


LIT-TLE MAR-TA'S MAR-KET-ING.


Mar-ta did not like her
break-fast. She sat in her
high chair and made frowns'
at her bread and milk. She
made frowns at her gin-ger-
bread, too. And then she
thought a big naugh-ty thought.
After break-fast this Mar-
ta took a bas-ket on her'lit-


tie fat arm, and o-pened the
street-door, and went round
the cor-ner to the mar-ket.
Frau Halle knew the lit-tle
bare-head-ed girl. "Ah, Mar-
ta," said she, "what wilt thou
have? Did the moth-er send
thee to buy the din-ner?"
"I like- not the moth-er's






CLAR-I-BEL'S TEN-ANTS.
din-ners," said lit-tie Mar-ta. picked her up and car-ried
"What wouldst thou like?" her a-way. "I saw the street
said the Frau, smil-ing. door o-pen, and I came af-ter
"I would like," said Mar- thee, thou rogue! What if
ta, "chick-ens' hearts, and wish- the rag-man had stol-en thee!
bones, and a plum bun." I ought to spat thee."
"So thou would-st, thou Lit-tie Mar-ta was not "spat-
dear! And hast thou the ted," but she was un-dressed
mon-ey?" and put in her bed to stay
Mon-ey? Mar-ta had none. all day; and there was on-ly
Then a voice spoke be- bread and milk on her lit-
hind her, and her moth-er tie tray for one long week.


CLAR-I-BEL'S TEN-ANTS.


In Clar-i-bel's gar-den there
is a dar-ling lit-tie fam-i-ly that
live in a dar-ling lit-tie house.
The house is a bro-ken flow-
er-pot, and the fam-i-ly are
birds. Lit-tie fan-cies of-ten
come in-to Clar-i-bel's ,mind,
and last spring she asked pa-
pa to fas-ten the bro-ken pot


a-gainst the wall and see if
some birds would take it for
a nest. Well, a pair of birds
did take it, and they brought
up their fam-i-ly a-mong Cla'r-
i-bel's ro-ses, right where she
could look from her win-dow
and see all the hap-py home-
life of the lit-tie ten-ants.






ABOUT MY LAMB.--THE KITTEN THAT RAN AWAY.


ABOUT


MY LAMB "CAPER."


MY LAMB.
This is my lamb, "Caper."
He leads by a ribbon and four
wheels, for his legs do not walk.
But he is alive, for he has two
voices somewhere in him; a
squeaky one that he says ma-
a-a with, and a deep one that
he says "ba-a-a" with. You have
to squeeze him in two spots
when you wish to hear his voices.


THE KITTEN TI

Colly was a nice kitten, jet-
black, fat and round. She was
Mary White's pet, and Mary
White helped Colly's mother
to bring her up to be a well-
bred cat. She was very pre-
cious to them both and often
and often they both said to her,
" Above all things, Colly, never
runaway. Kittens who runaway


-AT RAN AWAY.

get hurt. Remember, Colly!"
But one day Colly sprang out
of the window and ran off
across the fields. In one of
them she caught a little field
mouse. I will be sure to come
here again," said Colly joyfully.
Pretty soon' she came to the
woods. Sheran up a tree and
down again. Then she ran up


_ 1;_ ~






THE KITTEN THAT RAN AWAY.
another. Surely she was hav- "Oh, no, not at all! said
ing a good time. When she Colly, I am a tame cat."
Tame cats do not live in
the woods," said the dog.
I do not live in the woods."
"Yes, you do; I saw you.
I am going to chase you."
Please don't," begged Colly.
Just then a man came along
and whistled the dog away.
But Colly was afraid after that,
and she dared only go in the
deep grass and weeds, and it
was night when she got home
and her fur was full of burrs.
went up. a third tree she found a She has not run away since, but
bird's nest. It had three little I she is not as happy as she was


IJIIUJ 1i1 ILV J. II L. v -vaIy
one," said Colly. But just then
the mother-bird flew home and
pecked her head, and Colly fell
from the tree to the. ground.
Oh, how she cried and howled!
And before she got out of the
woods she met a dog. He was
|a big hunting dog. "Hello!"
he said, "you are a wild cat."


before, for she dreams every
night of cross mother-birds and
big hunting dogs.






















THE RAD-ING LES-N.
THE READ-ING LES-SON.


A LIT-TLE FRENCH GIRL.


A-dele is a pret-ty lit-tie
French girl. You would not
un-der-stand her when she
speaks. If she wish-es to
say "yes," she says "out;" if
she wish-es to say "no," she
says non; and she says
"mer-ci," in-stead of "thanks."
But you would un-der-stand
her smile and her laugh, and
you would like to play with


big doll.


A-dele calls


him "old Plon-Plon." 'Some-
times she dress-es him like
the clown in the cir-cus and
makes him dance; and some-
times he is a sol-dier. Plon-
Plon was a birth-day pres-
ent. Plon-Plon has a drum.
Plon-Plon is nev-er ver-y
far a-way from A-dele. He
rests his poor, jer-ky ; legs'





A LIT-TLE FRENCH GIRL.


on the so-fa while she has
her read-ing les-son with- mam-
ma; and he of-ten lies on the
ta-ble and looks on while she
goes o-ver her ac-counts; for
lit-tle French girls are taught
to reck-on up their can-dy
mon-ey and their nut mon-ey
and their toy mon-ey. Re-
mem-ber this, Plon-Plbn," A-
dele some-times sad-ly says to


ey, that mon-ey is gone,
gone!"
She says it in French, but
Plon-Plon un-der-stands.
And then A-dele and Plon-
Plon, and the nurse in her
white cap, and the lit-tle sis-
ter, go out to walk and play
in the beau-ti-ful Gar-den of
the Tuil-er-ies, and Plon-Plon
beats, his drum with the help


him, "if you. spend your mon- of two pretty white hands.


AD-DING UP THE CAN-DY MON-EY.





It



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ho










V..''' '


0wo oly Old Puns

Two ojbly old punsters, keen rivals in trade,
Kept.ssdps where all elegant toys were displayed.
One'morn, as old Thomas.walked down to his store,
A sight he beheld which made him.feel sore,
Foriold Simon, his rival, had hungt-n a nail -
k i6notice which read These ships ai for sai,"
Then.,old Tom scratched his pate and soon formed a plan-
S Which he thought would eclipse the other old man.
.. i d he yowed that he would not be left in th4 nire,'
S. : .hy^ ,huhngput a sign, .These balloons. arefor higher."
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