• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The tragical death of a apple-...
 The alphabet said backwards in...
 All round the clock face
 One, two, buckle my show
 The months
 The four seasons
 A frog he would a-wooing go
 Fe, fi, fo, fum!
 The house that Jack built
 Old Mother Hubbard and her dog
 Little Bo-Peep
 The Lion and the Unicorn
 Little Boy Blue
 The death of Cock Robin
 The Roman figures
 Three little kittens
 The old woman and her pig
 Molly the milkmaid
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: Uncle Charlie's book of nursery rhymes : a book of alphabets, stories and pictures.
Title: Uncle Charlie's book of nursery rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086482/00001
 Material Information
Title: Uncle Charlie's book of nursery rhymes a book of alphabets, stories and pictures
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Griffith, Farran, Browne & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith Farran Browne & Co., Limited
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1897?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on front endpaper.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086482
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224884
notis - ALG5156
oclc - 244482799

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    The tragical death of a apple-pie
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The alphabet said backwards in rhyme
        Page 29
    All round the clock face
        Page 30
        Page 31
    One, two, buckle my show
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The months
        Page 38
    The four seasons
        Page 39
    A frog he would a-wooing go
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Fe, fi, fo, fum!
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The house that Jack built
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Old Mother Hubbard and her dog
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Little Bo-Peep
        Page 59
    The Lion and the Unicorn
        Page 60
    Little Boy Blue
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    The death of Cock Robin
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The Roman figures
        Page 76
    Three little kittens
        Page 77
    The old woman and her pig
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Molly the milkmaid
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Back Matter
        Page 94
    Back Cover
        Page 95
        Page 96
Full Text
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FAVOURITE NURSERY BOOKS.

Edited by UNCLE CHARLIE.
FULLY ILLUSTRATED.

In Picture Boards. Price One Shilling.
Cloth Elegant. Price Eighteenpence.


Uncle Charlie's Sunday Book. Pictures and Stories from the
Bible.
Uncle Charlie's Nursery Song Book.
Uncle Charlie's Short Stories about Animals. In words
of one Syllable.
Uncle Charlie's First Book. For the Kings and Queens of
the Nursery.
The Babies' Museum; or, Rhymes, Jingles, and Ditties for
the Nursery.
My Pet Book. Pictures and Stories of Animals.
Uncle Charlie's Book of Fairy Tales.


GRIFFITH FARRAN BROWNE & CO. LIMITED,
35 BOW STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON.







UNCLE CHARLIE'S BOOK

OF

NURSERY RHYMES


A Book of A /phabets, Stories, and Pictures


GRIFFITH FARRAN BROWNE & CO. LIMITED
35 BOW STREET, COVENT GARDEN
LONDON





THE


TRAGICAL


DEATH


APPLE-PIE


An Easy Way to learn the


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Alphabet





Apple
Pie


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a piece in hand




THE ALPHABET


SAID


BACKWARDS


IN RHYME.


(To be Learned


by Heart.)


Y


and


W.V.


U T S, and R Q P,

O N M, and L K J,

IHG, FED, CBA.


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X,






ALL ROUND THE


1 One 1


3 Three


2 Two 2


4 Four 4


5 Five 65


CLOCK


FACE.


6 Six 6






ALL ROUND


7 Seven


9 Nine 9


8 Eight


10 Ten 10


12 Twelve 12


CLOCK


FACE.


11 Eleven


11


THE





One, UCvo, Buchle m2 Sboe.

SOne,
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Shoe
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Three, Four, Shut the Door,


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Five, Six, Pick Up Sticks,


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Seven, Eight, Lay Them Straight,


Nine, Ten, A Good Fat Hen,







Eleven, Twelve, Who Will Delve ?


13


Thirteen,, Fourteen, Maids A-Courting,


11


12


14






15


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Fifteen, Sixteen, Maids A-Kissing,
U

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Seventeen, Eighteen, Maids A-Waiting,


16


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Nineteen,


Twenty,


19






Pray, Dame,


My Plate is Empty,


20


Give me some Supper.


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THE MONTHS.

JANUARY brings the snow,
Makes our feet and fingers glow.
FEBRUARY brings the rain,
Thaws the frozen lake again.
MARCH brings breezes loud and shrill,
Stirs the dancing daffodil.
APRIL brings the primrose sweet,
Scatters daisies at our feet.
MAY brings flocks of pretty lambs,
Skipping by their fleecy dams.
JUNE brings tulips, lilies, roses,
Fills the children's hands with posies.
Hot JULY brings cooling showers,
Apricots and gilliflowers.
AUGUST brings the sheaves of'corn,
Then the harvest home is borne.
Warm SEPTEMBER brings the fruit,
Sportsmen then begin to shoot.
Fresh OCTOBER brings the pheasant,
Then to gather nuts is pleasant.
Dull NOVEMBER brings the blast,
Then the leaves are whirling fast.
Chill DECEMBER brings the sleet,
Blazing fire, and Christmas treat.





THIRTY days hath September,
April, June, and November;
February has TWENTY-EIGHT alone;
All the rest have THIRTY-ONE,-
Excepting Leap Year, that's the time
When February's days are TWENTY-NINE.







THE FOUR


SEASONS.


SPRING. SUMMER.


WINTER..


AUTUMN.









A FROG HE WOULD A-WOOING GO.











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A FROG he would a-wooing go,
Whether his mother would let him or no.
So off he marched with his nice new hat,
And on the way he met a Rat.


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A FROG HE WOULD A-WOOING GO


When they came to the door of the Mouse's hall,
They gave a loud knock, and they gave a loud call.
"Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within?"
"Oh yes, Mr. Rat, I am learning to spin."

" Pray, Mrs. Mouse, now give us some beer,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer."

'" Pray, Mr. Frog, will you give us a song,
But let it be something that's not very long."
"Indeed, Mrs. Mouse, I shall have to say No;
A cold has made me as hoarse as a crow."

"Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog," she said,
" I'll sing you a song that I have just made."
But while they were making a merry din,
A Cat and her Kittens came tumbling in.

The Cat she seized the Rat by the crown,
The Kittens they pulled the little Mouse down.
This put Mr. Frog in a terrible plight,
So he took up his hat and wished them "Good-night."

As Froggy was crossing a silvery brook,
A lily white Duck came and gobbled him up.
So this was the end of one, two, three-
The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-ee.






































Fe, Fi, Fo, Fum!
I smell the blood of an Englishman;
Be he alive, or be he dead,
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.


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The Queen of Hearts
She made some tarts
All on a Summer's day;
SThe Knave of Hearts
He stole the tarts
.. .And took them clean away.

The King of Hearts
Called for the tarts
And beat the Knave full sore:
The Knave of Hearts
Brought back the tarts
And vowed he'd steal no more.







Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet
Eating curds and
whey ; -! .
There came a big

Who sat down
beside her
And frightened
Miss Muffet
away.








The House that Jack Built.


THIS IS

THE HOUSE


THA 7T A CK


BUILT


THIS IS

THE MALT


JACK BUILT.


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THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT


THIS is the RAT,
S That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House,
That Jack built. -


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THIS is the CAT,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House,
That Jack built.











THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT


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THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT


THIS is the DOG,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House
That Jack built.










HIS is the COW
With the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House
That Jack built.






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT







THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

THIS is the MAIDEN all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog, that worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat, that ate the Malt,
That lay in -the House that Jack built.


THIS is the MAN all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog, that worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat, that ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.


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THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

THIS is the PRIEST all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog, that worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat, that ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.























THIS is the COCK that crowed in the morn,
That waked the Priest all shaven and shorn,,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog, that worried the Cat,.
That killed the Rat, that ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.







THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

















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THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT


HIS is the FARMER
Who sowed the corn,
That kept the Cock
That crowed in the morn,
That waked the Priest
SAll shaven and shorn,
That married the Man
All tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden
All forlorn,
That milked the Cow
With the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House
That Jack built.














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Old Mother Hubbard and her Dog.

OLD Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone;
When she came there the cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.

She went to the baker's,
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back
The poor dog was dead.

She went to the joiner's,
To buy him a coffin,
And when she came back
The dog was a-laughing.

She took a clean dish,
To get him some tripe,
And when she came back -1 ,a
He was smoking his pipe. j

She went to the grocer's,
To buy him some fruit,
And when she came back
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tavern,
For wine, white and red,
And when she came back
The dog stood on his head.







OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER DOG


She went to the kitchen,
Some broth to prepare,
And when she came back
The dog sat in a chair.

She went to the hatter's,
To buy him a hat,
And when she came back
He was feeding the cat.

She went to the cobbler's,
To buy him some shoes, .
And when she came back
He was reading the news. ,

She went to the tailor's,
To buy him a coat, w
And when she came back
He was riding the goat.

She went to the barber's,
To buy him a wig,
And when she came back .
He was dancing a jig.

The dame made a curtsey,
The dog made a bow;
The dame said, "Your servant,'
The dog said, "Bow, wow."











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Bah! Bah! Black Sheep, have you any wool ?
Yes, Sir; Yes, Sir; three bags full:
One for the Master, and one for the Dame,
And one for the little Boy who lives down the lane.


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Little Bo=Peep.


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LITTLE BO-PEEP has lost her sheep,
And don't know where to find them;
Leave them alone and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.


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LITTLE BO-PEEP


Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep
And dreamt she heard them bleating,
For when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were still a-fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them.
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.

The and the
Lion N Unicorn.






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THE Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the Crown;
Some gave them white bread, and some gave them brown,
Some gave them plum-cake and sent them from town.









Little
Boy
Blue


Come! Blow me your horn.






LITTLE BOY BLUE


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'Th Cow's in the corn !
The Cow's in the corn!







LITTLE BOY BLUE

And where's


The Little Boy that looks after the sheep
The Little Boy that looks after the sheep?


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He's under the haycock


Fast asleep.






LITTLE BOY BLUE


Will you wake him?


No, not I,


For if I do, he'll be sure to cry.


This is the end of Little Boy Blue,
and the
Tail of his Sheep.













HUMPTY DUMPTY sat on a wall;
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;
Not all the King's horses, nor all
the King's men
Could set Humpty Dumpty up
again.


A..'t i *


JACK and JILL went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down, and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.













OLD KING COLE was a merry old
soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
And he called for his pipe, and he
called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers
three.


RIDE a cock-horse to Ban-
bury Cross
To see a young lady ride
on a white horse;
With rings on her fingers,
and bells on her toes,
She shall have music
w-herever she goes.

WO'O!,


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WHAT Shoemaker makes shoes without leather,
With all the four elements put together,-
Fire and Water, Earth and Air;
And every customer has two pair?
(A Horse Shoe-smith.)






























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I LOVE little Pussy, her coat is so warm,
And if I don't hurt her, she'll do me no harm;
So I'll not pull her tail, nor drive her away,
And Pussy and I very gently will play.


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The Death of Cock Robin.


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WHo kill'd Cock Robin?
I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow;
And I kill'd Cock Robin.


Who saw him die?
I, said the Fly,
With my little eye;
And I saw him die.


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Who caught his blood?
I, said the Fish,
With my little dish;
And I caught his blood.


Who made his shroud?
I, said the Beetle,
With my little needle;
And I made his shroud.





















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Who will dig his grave?
I, said the Owl,
With my spade and shovel;
And I'll dig his grave.


Who will be the Parson?
I, said the Rook,
With my little book;
And I will be the Parson.




































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Who will be the Clerk?
I, said the Lark,
If 'tis not in the dark;
And I will be the Clerk.


Who'll carry him -to the grave?
I, said the Kite,
If 'tis not in the night;
And I'll carry him to the grave.









































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Who will carry the link?
I, said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute;
And I'll carry the link.


Who will be chief mourner?
I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love;
And I'll be chief mourner.


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Who'll sing a Psalm? Who will bear the pall?
I, said the Thrush, We, said the Wren,
As she sat in a bush; Both the cock and the hen;
And I'll sing a Psalm. And we will bear the pall.
Who'll~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~- sigaPsl Wowl ba hepl
I, ai th Trus, e, ai th Wen
As sh satin: a us;ot tecok ndth hn
And I'll sng a Psal. And we ibarte al


































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Who'll toll the bell?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull;
I'll toll the bell.

All the birds of the air fell a-sighin' and a-sobbin'
When they heard of the death of poor Cock Robin,
When they heard of the death of poor Cock Robin.















The Roman Figures.

X shall'stand for playmates TEN;
V for FIVE stout stalwart men;
I for ONE, as I'm alive;
C for a HUNDRED, and D for FIVE;
M for a THOUSAND soldiers true,
/ And all these Figures I've told you.

X stands for 10.
V ,, ,, 5.
I ,, ,, 1.
C ,, ,, 100.
D ,, 500.
M ,, 1000.











Three Little Kittens.


THREE little kittens
LOST their mittens,
And they began to cry,
"Oh, mother dear,
We sadly fear
Our mittens we have lost!"
"What! lost your mittens,
You naughty kittens;
Then you shall have no pie!"
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.


The three little kittens
FOUND their mittens,
And they began to cry,
"Oh, mother dear,
See here, see here,
Our mittens we have found!"
"What! found your mittens,
You darling kittens;
Then you shall have some pie."
Purr, purr, purr, purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.









The Old Woman and her Pig.






; i ONCE upon a time there
was an Old Woman sweeping
her room, when she found
a silver sixpence, so she
went to the market, and
bought a Pig.


A


Going home,
Woman and the
to a stile, and
Please, Pig, go
stile.


the Old
Pig came
she said,
over the


-But the Pig would not.







THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG

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A little Dog came run-
ning that way, and the Old i
Woman said, Please, Dog,
bite Pig; for the Pig will
not get over the stile, and
I shall not get home to-
night.





But the Dog would not.
.4



So she went a little along
the road, and found a Stick, .t( -
and she said, Please, Stick,
beat Dog; Dog will not bite
Pig, Pig will not get over
the stile, and I shall not
get home to-night.



But the Stick would not.







THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG


Then she came to a Fire,
S and she said, Please, Fire,
burn Stick; Stick will not
beat Dog, Dog will not bite
Pig, Pig will not get over
the stile, and I shall not
get home to-night.


But the Fire would not.





The Old Woman a little further
on saw some Water, and she said,
Please, Water, quench Fire; Fire
Swill not burn Stick, Stick will not
beat Dog, Dog will not bite Pig,
-j4 Pig will not get over the stile,
and I shall not get home to-
night.


But the Water would not.


rl~rl



a







THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG


Next she came to an -
Ox, and she said, Please,
Ox, drink Water; Water
will not quench Fire, Fire
will not burn Stick, Stick ,
will not beat Dog, Dog
will not bite Pig, Pig will
not get over the stile, and .. ., ,-
I shall not get home to-
night. ..
But the Ox would not.




Just then a Butcher came by, t ,5i
and she said, _p
Please, Butcher, kill Ox;
Ox will not drink Water,
SWater will not quench Fire,
Fire will not burn Stick,
Stick will not beat Dog,
Dog will not bite Pig,
Pig will not get over the stile, '
and I shall not get home to-night.


But the Butcher would not.







THE OLD WOMAN AND


Then she looked up, and saw
on a tree a Rope, and she said,
Please, Rope, hang Butcher;
Butcher will not kill Ox..,
Ox will not drink Vater,
Water will not quen'ch Fire;
Fire will not burn Stick, "
Stick will not beat Do,),
Dog will not b1ite Pig.
Pig will not get .ver the stile,
and I shall not get home to-night.







But the Rope :'-
would not. ..


HER PIG


1 ,.

] ---2 ... i:





;.4.


-2-








THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG


So the Old Woman went a
little further and saw a Rat, and
she said,
Please, Rat, gnaw Rope;
Rope will not hang Butcher,
Butcher will not kill Ox, '
Ox will not drink Water,
Water will not quench Fire,-
Fire will not :-,urn Stick,
Stick will not 1beat Dow,
Dog will not bjite Pig,, -
Pig will not get over the stile,
and I shall not get home to-night .. i





But the Rat
-would not.


- I~-'\r ~~~~jm h~ i .ui
.b. -.~ 1
MU
~. :~9:
.~ i







THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG


A little way off, and the Old
Woman came to a Cat, and she
said,
Good Cat, kill Rat;
Rat will not gnaw Rope,
Rope will not hang Butcher,
Butcher will not kill Ox,
Ox will not drink Water,
Water will not quench Fire,
Fire will not burn Stick,
Stick will not beat Dog,
Dog will not bite Pig,
Pig will not get over the stile,
and I shall not get home to-night.


And the Cat said, I WILL.







THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG


So the Cat began to kill the Rat,
The Rat began to gnaw the Rope,
The Rope began to hang the Butcher,
The Butcher began to kill the Ox,
The Ox began to drink the Water,
The Water began to quench the Fire,
The Fire began to burn the Stick,
The Stick began to beat the Dog,
The Dog began to bite the Pig,


The Pig got over the stile 1









THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG


/I s' P.



Aj

I;.T kll


And so the Old Woman got home that night.








Molly the Milkmaid.


Molly the milkmaid


Was milking the Cow,


FI

'
.r~
,

J

r






MOLLY THE MILKMAID


And Robin was mowing the Lawn,


Betty was mixing a mash for the Sow,






MOLLY THE MILKMAID


When the Postman came by with his horn.


The Postman he blew a very shrill Call,






MOLLY THE MILKMAID


-.,,, -J. }-,- ...




Which terrified Beauty the Cow,
She threw over Molly
and milkpail and all


S C. "w .
Knocked down Betty,
and trod on the Sow!!
Tossed up Robin,
who caught in a bough!!








MOLLY THE MILKMAID


L-I

aB-~


And then


U.,-F~.


Jumped over the wall!!!!





























Three Children sliding on the ice,
All on a summer day


i \:~-' 7^: "-'
AK7
...- .. ,,


.I ,. '
















Now had these Children been at home,


It so fell out, they all fell in,
And the rest they ran away.


Or sliding on dry ground


il~ '




























*-.~~t *0~~ FL 1 flL'.j
&~


Ten thousand pounds to one penny, They had not all been drowned.



N5


This is the end
of the sad
story of the


* Three Children who
went sliding on
the ice.


I- 1'*** r
I-r;i.




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