• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Publishers' note to parents
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Baby world
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: A new baby world : stories, rhymes, and pictures for little folks
Title: A New baby world
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086480/00001
 Material Information
Title: A New baby world : stories, rhymes, and pictures for little folks
Uniform Title: St. Nicholas (New York, N.Y.)
Physical Description: xvi, 199, 1 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 ( Editor )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: De Vinne Press
Publication Date: c1897
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled from St. Nicholas by Mary Mapes Dodge.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086480
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224623
notis - ALG4889
oclc - 02980136

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Front Matter
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
        Page v
    Dedication
        Page vi
    Publishers' note to parents
        Page vii
    Preface
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Table of Contents
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
    Baby world
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
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    Back Cover
        Page 201
        Page 202
    Spine
        Page 203
Full Text
























































































The Baldwin Library

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READ FOR .' OLD

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READY FOTHE 'O',,






A NEW

BABY WORLD

STORIES, RHYMES, AND PICTURES


FOR LITTLE


FOLKS


COMPILED FROM ST. NICHOLAS
BY MARY MAPES DODGE


THE CENTURY CO. NEW-YORK















































Copyright, 1897, by THE CENTURY CO.


The De Vinne Press,
New-York.






























.lit ~DEDICATED TONWi
LITTLE FOLK
EVERYWHERE.



HIM "fill.'.i l:''
ON, I
Iff


it r


























PUBLISHERS' NOTE TO PARENTS.

THE remarkable success of BABY WORLD in its various editions here
naturally results in a fresh compilation of similar selections from
ST. NICHOLAS, in which only the favorite and most popular contribu-
tions to the earlier editions have been retained. Fully three-fourths
of the present volume is made up of material newly selected from re-
cent volumes of the magazine. Pictorially, and in other respects,
this NEW BABY WORLD claims to be an advance upon its predecessors.









To THE BABIES, LARGE AND SMALL;
S To THE CHILDREN, ONE AND ALL.



Baby world is a busy world,-
Is n't it, children dear?
Full -of sights you must see and know,
Full of sounds you must hear,
Full of things that "you must not touch,"
Full of puzzles both great and small,
Full of people you love so much!
And, oh, such a pleasant world after all!

That is your Baby world, spick and span;
And here is a book on the self-same plan.
Perhaps you '11 find it alive and glad
As any world you ever have had.
There are dogs and horses, kittens, birds,
And songs and stories and happy words;
And skates and hooples, sleds and toys;
Merry girls and frolicsome boys,
Flowers and trees, and landscapes fair;-
Why, you '11 think you are out in the open air!
Well from its pages may sunlight shine,
For Baby world floats in a light divine.





Yes, Baby world is full of joy,
Full of merriment, love and light;
And you, my girl! and you, my boy!
Can help to keep it fair and bright.
Pleasant speech and a cheerful face,
A willing heart and gentle grace,
A love of God, and a soul that is true,-
These are the light that can shine from you.

Glad Baby world! bright Baby world!
With joy like a great blue sky unfurled!
With your Slumberland, Fairyland, Storyland, all;
Your stars so great, and your clouds so small;
Your torrents of tears that are gone in the sun,
Your mountains of trouble that vanish in fun,-
What could we big folk do without you?
We with our sweet loving trouble about you ?
Why, we could do nothing but cry all day
If Baby world ever should pass away!

Then up and around us, ye little folk! Look!
There's a world of your own in this beautiful book.
And just as long as. you please you may stay;
And whenever you please you may scamper away.
M. M. D.









































SUCH A COMICAL WORLD!









"SUCH A COMICAL WORLD!"


















CONTENTS.


PAGE
ALICE'S SUPPER . . .. ... Laura E. Richards 145
" ALL ABOARD FOR THE MOON !" Picture, drawn by . V Nehlig . 79
"ANNA, MANA, MONA, MIKE . ... .. .Lee Carter .... 59
ANIMALS OF BERNE, THE .... .. .. . .Pauline King .. 147
AT RECESS. THE DANCING BEAR. Picture, drawn by .. M. Walcott .. 133
BABY'S JOURNEY . .. .. .. .. .Laura E. Richards 95
BABY'S SUNNY CORNER, THE. Picture, drawn by .... Mary Hallock Foote 94
BALLAD OF A RUNAWAY DONKEY, THE . ... .. .Emilie Poulsson Io, iii
BARGAINS FOR SCHOLARS .. ... .. Anna M. Pratt 69
BELL-RINGERS, THE ... . . ..... .A D. .... 134, 135
BENNY AND HIS BOATS ..... . . M. L. B. Branch 186, 187
BERTIE'S FIRST DAY AT SCHOOL .. ... . S. Mary Norton 6
BEST TREE, THE .. ........ ..... Janet Sanderson 96, 197
BICYCLE SONG .... .... .. ..... .Harriet Prescott Spofford 89
BIG BOOBOO AND THE LITTLE BOOBOO, THE .. .. Gertrude Smith ..
BINGO, BUSTER AND BEAU ... . . .TJames Harvey Smith 58
BOBOLINK AND THE CHICK-A-DEE, THE . . .. M. Ella Preston .. 127
BOB'S WAY .. .. ....... ....... Tudor Jenks ..... 74
BOY AND THE TOOT, THE ...... .. ..... S. ........ 73
BRIGHT SIDE, THE ..... . . . .Algernon Tassin .. r12
BROTHERS, THE....... . ..... Agnes Lewis Mitchill 65
BUMBLE-BEE, THE .... ........... ..au. .... ra E. Richards 146
BUMBLE-BEE AND THE GRASS-HOPPER, THE . ..... . 65
BUMBLE-BEES, THE .... . . NellK. McElhone 189


"BUT THEN, IN SUMMER, YOU Picture, drawn by .
CAN PLAY ON THE BEACH!"
CAMPING . .. . . .
CAT AND RAT THAT LIVED IN AN OVEN, THE .
CAT-PRANKS. Pictures, drawn by . . .
CHUMS. Picture, drawn by . . . .
XI


. Kobb ... 28

S.Agnes Lewis Mitchill 50
S. Margaret R. Gorseline 86
S. J. G. Francis .... .123
. Dolph facing page i









CIRCUS ELEPHANTS HAVING A Picture
GOOD TIME BY THEMSELVES.
CIRCUS ELEPHANT'S SATURDAY NIGHT BATH, THE. Picture
CITY CHILD, THE . . .
CLOSE OF THE DAY, THE .......... ......
CONCEITED MOUSE, THE . . . .
CRADLE SONG . .. .
CUP OF TEA, A . .
DEAD DOLL, THE . . . .
"DEAR ME, LUCY ANN, IF YOU'RE
NOT MORE CAREFULLER OF YOURSELF,I Picture, drawn by
YOU'LL NOT LAST TILL CHRISTMAS!"
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UP AND DOWN, THE. Picture, drawn b
DOLLS' CHRISTMAS DINNER, THE. Picture, drawn by .
DON'T You THINK THAT WINTER'S Picre, drawn by
PLEASANTER THAN ALL? .
DORA AND HER RING . . .
DOT AND THE NEW MOON . . .
DOWN IN THE MEADOW . . .. .
EARLY AND LATE . . .
EIGHT GOOD THINGS ABOUT DOBBIN . .
ELEPHANT AND THE GIRAFFE, THE . .
ENOUGH FOR TWO. Picture, drawn by . . .
FAIRY GODMOTHER, A . . .
FALL TO THE KNEES, A . . . .
FAMILY DRIVE, A ... .... .. .. ..
FAMILY DRUM CORPS, A . . .
FAMILY GROUP, A. Picture.... . .
FERN-SEED . . .
FIELDS, THE . . . . ...
FOUR LITTLE PIGS . . .
FOURTH OF JULY STORY, A . ........
FROG'S FOURTH OF JULY, THE . . . .
FROM "FIDO" . . . . .
GENUINE MOTHER GOOSE, A . . . .
GINGER-BREAD BOY, THE . . ....
GOING TO THE MOON ......... ....
GOOD BOY BRIGADE, THE. Picture . . .
GOOD FRIENDS . . . . .
GOOD-NIGHT. Decorative Design . . .
XII '


. J Carter Beard .. i8o


. Alfred Tennyson .
M.L.V. . .
. Ella Foster Case .
. Margaret Johnson .
. E. L. Sylvester .
. Margaret Vandegrift .


. Aug. D. Turner .


y H. Sull . .
V. Prard ..

. John Bolles . .


I8o
184
65
S16, 17
85

S57
182


II


S103

9

27


. Horatio Nelson Powers o1
.Anna E. Langdon 190
SRuth Hall . .. 184
. S. Reed . 87
. M. Af ....... ..142
. Charlotte Osgood Carter 31
. J Carter Beard 93
. Mary Bradley .. 188
. Mae St. John Bramhall 12
.Stephen Smith ..... 72
. Malcolm Douglas, 191,192,193
... . 49
. Agnes Lewis Mitchill 10
SThomas Tapper 157
. alcolm Douglas .05
. . . 56
. Mary A. L. Eastman 29
Tudor Jenks...... 66
Alfred Brennan ... 164.
. 96
. .. . 78
.. . 98
. . 76, 77, 78
. Albertine Randall Wheelan 200








PAGE
"Go'WAY Go'WAY! THEY'RE FLOWERS!" Picture, drawn by George Varian .. 16
GRANDMAMA ...... ........... ... Helen Hopkins .. 113
GRANDMA'S NAP ... ..... ......... ... L. M D. .. ... 82, 83, 84
GRANGER GRIND AND FARMER MELLOW. . .. John Bennett 148, 149
GREAT BICYCLE RACE AT GRASSHOPPERTOWN. Pictures,drawnby I W. Taber . 172, 173


GREEDY TOAD . . .. ..
GRUMPITY MAN, THE . ......
HALLOA, OLD SCUTTLE! . .
Ho, FOR THE CHRISTMAS TREE! NO Picture
ONE BUT THE BABY MAY PEEP.
How CURIOUS! . .
How DID SHE KNOW? . .....
How JOHNNY GOT A GUN . .
HOWLERY, GROWLERY ROOM, THE . .
HOW ROB COUNTED THE STARS . .
HOW THE SLIDE WAS SPOILED . .
How THEY RIDE...... . .
" IF WISHES WERE HORSES, THEN Picture
BEGGARS WOULD RIDE" .
IF You'RE GOOD . .
I HAD A LITTLE ROW BOAT . .
IMAGINARY CASE, AN . . ...
IN TOP TIME . .
IN JAPAN ... .. ... . .
IS N'T IT QUEER? . . .


"I 'VE BRINGED YOU A LITTLE Picture, drawn by
DOLLY B Picture, drawn by .
DOLLY, BOSSY" . .
JINGLES . . . . .
KETTLE, THE . .
KITE TIME. Picture ... ... ... ...
KITTENS' PICNIC, THE ..... . . .
LAND OF NODDY, THE . . . .
LION MET A LITTLE BOY, A . ... .
LITTLE BERTIE . . .
LITTLE BOY NAMED JOHNNY, A . . .
LITTLE ELF, THE . . . .. .
LITTLE MAN OF MORRISBURG, THE . . .
LITTLE MISCHIEF . . . .. .
LITTLE MR. BY-AND-BY . . . .
LITTLE PERI-WINKLE .......... .
XIII


:, drawn by


S. Eliza S. Turner 189
S. Frank H. Sweet . 30
. . . II8

SGeorge Varian .... .64

S. Tudor Jenks .. 59
S. Caroline Evans . 88
S. A. Ogden .. 60, 61
S. Laura E. Richards 18


. . . . 102
. Tudor Jenks ...... 120
. Eva L. Carson 114, 115

. .. Kate Robertson .... .148


S. James Courtney Challiss, 198
. Cornelia Redmond 121
. L. Sylvester. ..... 21
. Henry Reeves . 131
. Juliet Wilbor Tompkins 171
. Mrs. H. M. Greenleaf 142

. J. C. Bridgman .. 143

. John Kendrick Bangs 175
S. Laura E. Richards 68
. .. . 85
. Tudor Jenks .. o8, 1o9
. Rossiter Johnson 183
. M. MD...... 54, 55
. M.. D. ...... 129
Cornelia Redmond .21
. .John KendrickBangs .. 15
S. William Wye Smith 8
S MM.D..D ...... 70,71
. Clinton Scollard ... 153
S. . .. 107


. .


.
.
.
.
.
.







PAGE
LITTLE PET PUG AT THE CIRCUS, THE . .. Tudor Jenks ..... 22, 23
LITTLE RED HEN . . . .... Eudora S. Bumstead 90, 91
LITTLE TOMMY TRIM . . . .... Mary Elizabeth Stone 12
"LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER, SING FOR YOUR SUPPER." Picture ... ..... 146
"LOOK OUT, THERE!" Picture, from a carving by ... .Joseph Lauber. . 177
LOST HOURS ....................... Sydney Dayre ..... 68
MARCH- AND APRIL. Pictures ................... ... ..112, 113


MAY-TIME IN THE COUNTRY. Picture, drawn by . .
MERRY CHRISTMAS . . . . .
MIDNIGHT EXPRESS, THE. Picture, drawn by . .
MISS LILYWHITE'S PARTY . . . .
MOON MUST LOVE ME VERY MUCH, THE . .
MR. ELEPHANT RINGING Picture, drawn by . .
THE BELL FOR DINNER
MY CHOICE ...........
MY LADY IS EATING HER MUSH . . .
MY TINY DAUGHTER DOLLY . . . .
NEEDLE, THE . . . .
NEW MOTHER GOOSE JINGLE, A . . .
NEW MOTHER GOOSE RHYMES . . . .
NORSE LULLABY, A . . .
"NOW" AND "WAITAWHILE") . . .
NUMBER ONE . . . .... .
"OH, MR. FAIRY, PLEASE". . . . .
OLD MAN BY THE GATE, THE . . .
ONE DAY AN ANT WENT TO VISIT HER NEIGHBOR .
ON THE FERRY . . . ... .
ON THE -ROAD TO LONDON TOWN . . .
OWL, THE EEL, AND THE WARMING-PAN, THE . .
PAINTING A CARD FOR MOTHER'S BIRTHDAY. Picture .
PERFECT GENTLEMAN, A. Picture, drawn by . .
PICTURE, THE . . . .
POLITE OWL, A . . . .. .
"POOR LITTLE LAMB HAS BEEN Picture. .......
RUNNING TOO HARD! THE" .
POPULAR POPLAR TREE, THE . . . .
PRACTISING SONG . . . . .
PROBLEM IN THREES, A . . . .
PUNKYDOODLE AND JOLLAPIN . . . .
PUSSY AND THE TURTLE . . . .
XIV


. Mary Hallock Foote .
. Charlotte Brewster Jordan
. Culmer Barnes .
. George Cooper. .
. Frederick B. Opper .

. J C. Beard . .

. Delia Hart Stone .
S. F. Butts . .
. Dorothea Lummis .
. Laura E. Richards .
. Dorothy G. Rice .
. Dorothy G. Rice .
. M. L. Van Vorst .
. Nixon Waterman .
. Charles R. Talbot. .
. Wilfrid Wilson Gibson .
. Thomas S. Collier .
. M. L. Van Vorst .
. . . .
. E. M. Winston .
. Laura E. Richards .
. Frederick Dielnan .
. J. H. Dolh . ..
. Mary Mapes Dodge .
. . . .


. Mary Hallock Foote


. Blanche Willis Howard.
SLaura E. Richards
. Eudora S. Bumstead .
. Laura E. Richards .
. M.MD. .. 158


156

195
98
9
'5

7

30
127
13
166

194
4, 5
136
124
1"9
151
84
102

49
190
107
124

179
199
13


137

163

155
57
107
1, 59


. .








PUSSY AND HER ELEPHANT .. . . .
PUSSY'S LESSON . . . . .
QUITE A HISTORY. (After the German.) . . .
RACE IN THE AIR, A. Picture . . .
RAINY DAY, A. Picture ...............
READY FOR HER FIRST DIP Picture, drawn by . .
IN THE BIG OCEAN.
REAL UNCLE REMUS STORY, A. Picture, drawn by .
ROBBER RAT AND THE POOR LITTLE KITTEN, THE .
ROBIN, THE .. ..... . . . .
SANTA CLAUS STREET IN JINGLETOWN . . .
SCISSORS, THE .... . . . .
SECOND KITTEN'S HUNT, THE . . . .
SHOE PLAY ....... . . . .
SHOPPING . . ... . ... .
SING, SING! WHAT SHALL WE SING? . .
SOMETHING BETWEEN A GOOSE AND A PEACOCK. Picture
SONG OF THE SKIPPING ROPE, THE . . .
"SPEAK!" Picture . . . .
STORY OF THE MORNING-GLORY SEED, THE . .


PAGE
H. annah Moore Johnson, 52,53
.C. D.L........ 104
. Arlo Bates ..... .176
. .. . 176
. . . 88

.C. M. Relyea ... .144

. William E. Kline 174
. Katharine Ple . 99
. Anna Chase Davis 1oo, o10
. Sarah I. Burke . 198
. Laura E. Richards 166
. Tudor Jenks . 160, 161
. Edith Goodyear ... 20
S. W. Gibson.... .. 150


. Anna B. Patten
. George Varian .
. Margaret Eylinge


STORY OF MOTHER HUBBARD TOLD IN JAPANESE PICTURES, THE


STRANGER CAT, THE . . .
SUNDAY, SIXPENCE IN THE PLATE . .
"' SUPPOSE! . . . .
TAKING DOLLY'S PHOTOGRAPH . . .
TENDER-HEARTED ARAB, A . . .
THAT LITTLE GIRL . .
THERE'S NOTHING VERY IMPORTANT THE MATTER
THERE WAS A SMALL SERVANT CALLED KATE .
THEY WERE HAPPY AND DID LAUGH . .
THIMBLE, THE . . .


. .. N. P. Babcock .
. William Wye Smith.
.. E. L. Sylvester
. Sydney Dayre .
. Frederick B. Opper.
. Claude Harris .



J. G. Francis .
. .. Laura E. Richards .


"THIS HAT IS GETTING Too SMALL FOR US." Picture, drawn by J H. Dofph .. ..
THREAD, THE ................. .Laura E. Richards
THREE LITTLE SISTERS. From a painting by William Page .. .......
TIDES, THE ......... ............ Thomas Tapper ....
TILTING .......... .... .. .. .....A. DeF. Lockwood .
TIRED LITTLE MOTHER, A . . .... Laura Richards .
TURKEY'S NEST, THE ................ .. Frank H. Sweet ....
UP IN A BALLOON . . . ...... . .....
"UPSET ME IF YOU DARE! PLEASE DON'T! Picture . . . .


S 123
S. 65
* 130
. 8
. 178
1 69
62, 63
S 126
14
S. 154
Io6
S. 162

. 56
S. 118
S. 122
. i68







PAGE
WARRIOR BOLD, A. Picture ............ ...... . .92
WATERPROOF FOLK. . ..... . . Agnes Lewis Mi/chill 133
WAY THINGS VANISH, THE . ..... . Elizabeth Chase. 170
WEATHER RECEIPT, A .. .... .. . .. Anna M. Pralt .. 143
WEE LITTLE HOUSE WITH THE GOLDEN THATCH . ... .. ..... .126
WHAT AND WHERE ? .. ... .. . A. nna Hamilton . 85
WHAT COULD THE FARMER Do? .... . . .GeoreilliamOgden 1038,139
) 140,141
WHAT PUSSY SAID ...... .. . . ... Sydney Dayre .. .. 14
"WHAT TIME DOES PAPA COME?" Picture. .. .... .... 117
"WHEN WE HAVE TEA" ... ... . Thomas Tapper ... 31
WHERE'S MOTHER? .... .... .... . Sarah S. Baker .. .. 51
WHICH OF THESE LITTLE BOYS Silhouette picture, drawn by Elise BJhm .. ... 24
LIVES IN YOUR HOUSE? .
WHICH OF THESE LITTLE GIRLS Silhouette picture, drawn by Elise Bimn ... 25
LIVES IN YOUR HOUSE ? .
WHY CHERRIES GROW ... .. . .... Clinton Scollard ... 93
WINDMILL, THE .. ....... ........ f. D........ 80, 8I
WINTER DAY, A . .. . .M. L. Van Vorst . 26
WISHES .. .. ...... .... .. ....... Florence E. Pratt 152
WORDS INCLINED TO JINGLE. : . ... .. Annie E. De Friese 19
YANKEE NAPOLEON: "BRING ON YOUR Picture 175
DUKE OF WELLINGTON . .


XVI

































































FROM A PAINTING BY J. H. DOLPH.


CHUMS











BABY WORLD.



THE BIG BOOBOO AND THE LITTLE BOOBOO.
BY GERTRUDE SMITH.

AND one morning Robbie's father stood by his bed, and
Robbie was sleeping, and sleeping, and sleeping.
"Boo-boo!" said Robbie's father.
Robbie opened his eyes and sat up.
"Boo-boo!" he answered sleepily.
"Boo-boo!" said his father again, and jumped at him.
"Boo-boo!" answered Robbie, and now his eyes were
wide open.
Then the big Booboo took the little Booboo up in his
arms and carried him down to the garden-for they lived all
the time in the garden, and only slept in the house.
And the garden was full of roses, and daisies, and pinks,
and many, many flowers besides.
In the shade of a great big tree was a tiny little lake.
And what do you think? The little Booboo took off his
nightgown and waded out into the lake!
I I






He had his bath in the little lake in the garden-not in
a bath-tub at all, but in the little lake in the garden.
The water came up, up, up to his chin, but he was n't a
bit afraid.
.' L "Im a fish! I 'm a fish!"
he shouted, and down he
splashed and swam like a fish!
He was only four years old,
the little Booboo, but he could
certainly, certainly do a great
many things for his age. He
a could swim as well as his father!
St And the big Booboo sat on
a rock and watched him.
He often swam in the lake
himself, and knew what fun it
was.
And little maid Annie came
down the walk and told them
that breakfast was ready.
So out of the water Robbie came, and soon had his legs in
his trousers.
For the little Booboo wore trousers too, and a coat, and
a pair of suspenders-just like his father's!
And then they went over to breakfast on the other side of
the garden,-they always ate in the garden, where mama
came out and joined them.
But before they sat down to the table the big Booboo stood
2







on his head! on the smooth green lawn he stood on his head!
It was a way he had, when he was glad, of surprising the
little Booboo. -i
The table was set where the -t-
roses grew all over a shady arbor. J
And little maid Annie -
brought out the cakes,
and the toast, and the
chocolate too.
Then mama, all
dressed in blue and
white, jumped out
into sight from be- t
hinda bush, and said:
"Boo-boo! Who
knew?-not you. I
have been all the time
in the garden. I saw U
you taking your bath!" j
And the big Booboo laughed,
"Ha! ha!"
And the little Booboo laughed, "He! he! Did you
see me?"
And so the day began-a happy, happy day.
For the big Booboo and the little Booboo always were
thinking of things to do, and having the best of times.





1EW
MiOTHERI GOOSE
RHYMES.


D. r C,
Mow-wow, litte dog, have you any n.me ?
s Sir, two, but they don't me&n tIe sme,
Ene from my master, he cais me 'hbamp,
A ndi one from the neighbors, they cll me Smp.

-nish your meal, then softly steal,
t see my ine lady try her new wheel.
i'| Lhe's bumps on both elbows,
S scrabc on her nose;
Sut she does t care
SIf her wheel only goes.









iltie IoBn B' er:ce
Sat in theb aorb .i
-. 2.
W hearing gy new tie.
Some other boys stared
As is graces he aired '"
y ing Don't we look fne!
Oh f



Hos lost er s oe,
^ I' ^ nd e intI tell where to ,fnd it.

nd cease Le uest,
,' o1 eove 0t tne cest


4' d ., Ian. shoe

Lelnn it.






BERTIE'S FIRST DAY AT SCHOOL.


[The following little story is told to a girl of three, by her mother. The mother imitates
the voices of the different animals, and when she comes to the "A B C" part she takes an
alphabet-card and the little girl shows her how Susie and Bertie said their letters to the teacher.]

ONE day Bertie's mama gave him a little book, and a tin pail full of
nice things for dinner, and told him to go to school.
Bertie went a little way up the road, and met a dog. He began to be
lonely, for he had no one to walk with,
V"" so he said, "Doggie, don't you want
to go to school with me?" But the
._ dog said only, "Bow-wow!" and ran
away.
Bertie went on, and pretty soon
Si- he met a lamb. "Don't you want
'' 'to go to school with me?" said he.


But the lamb said only, "Bah! bah!"
and ran away.
Then Bertie met a cow with long, I I
sharp horns; but she did not look as I,
if she would hurt a little boy. So he i
said, "Bossy, don't you want to go to ,i \
school with me?" But the cow said ,
only, "Moo-o, moo-o !" and went on V
eating grass.
A little way
on Bertie saw a
pig. "Piggy, don't you want to go
to school with me?" he said. But the
pig only said, "Ugh! ugh !" and lay
...Y down in the sun.
By and by Bertie saw a path that
came down a hill into the road. Just
',J as he got to the path a little girl ran
out. into the road. It was Bertie's
cousin, Susie.
"Where are you going, Cousin Susie?" he said, when she came near.
I am going to school," said the little girl, showing him her books.






SOh there is where I am going," said Bertie. "May I go with you?"
"Yes," said Susie; "but we must hurry. Don't you hear the bell ringing?
-What have you in your pail?"
"A piece of bread and butter, a
nice little pie, a nice little cake, and
an apple," said Bertie.
By this time they were at the
school, and they both went in.
The teacher asked their names.

Bertie told his name, and the little
girl said her name was Susie.
Then they stood by the teacher
and said-("What did they say ?")-
"A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L,
M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X,
Y, Z."
When Bertie came home, he said: -
"Mama, I met a dog and asked him to
go to school, and he said, Bow-wow!' and I asked a lamb and he said,
' Bah bah!' and I asked a cow, and she said, Moo-o, moo-o !' and I asked
a pig, and he said, 'Ugh! ugh!' and none of them would go with me.
Then I met Cousin Susie, and she went with me."


















MR. ELEPHANT RINGING THE BELL FOR DINNER.







THE LITTLE MAN OF MORRISBURG.


H, the little man of Morrisburg
Who would a-fishing go!
He put three fish into a tub,
And thought he 'd have a throw!
One was a dace, and one was a perch,
And one was a speckled trout;
And just as sure as he put them in,
He'd fail to pull them out!
Oh, the little man of Morrisburg,
Who would a-fishing go!
With fisherman's rig, when he grows big
He '11 know just where to throw!


"SPEAK "
8







































THE DOLLS' CHRISTMAS DINNER.


MISS LILYWHITE'S PARTY.


" MAY I go to Miss Lilywhite's party?"
But Grandmama shook her head:
"When the birds go to rest,
I think it is best
For mine to go, too," she said.


" Can't I go to Miss Lilywhite's party?"
Still Grandmama shook her head:
Dear child, tell me how.
You 're half asleep now;
Don't ask such a thing," she said.


Then that little one's laughter grew hearty:
Why, Granny," she said,
" Going to Miss Lilywhite's party
Means going to bed!"
9








FERN-SEED.


IF you gather all the fern-seed,-
The little green fern-seed,-
And put it in your shoe, so they say,
You can see a thousand things,
You can fly, too, without wings,
And nobody can see you on your way.

So I hunted for the fern-seed,-
The little green fern-seed,-
And I filled up all the space in my shoe;
Then I hurried home to try
If they 'd know that it was I,
And the first thing mother said was
Here is Lou !"







DORA AND HER RING.

As little Dora was feeding some birds out of her window, a pretty ring
slipped from her finger and fell, and nobody could find it. She felt very sorry,
for the ring had been given to her by her grandmama. It was too large
for her and she put it on only once in a while, and then would lay
it away. Somebody said, How foolish for her to feed the birds!" One day,
three or four weeks after she lost the ring, Dora thought she would look for
it again, and she found in the bushes beneath her window a bird's nest, and,
peeping in, saw five little birds. The mother-bird flew around so wildly
that Dora thought she would wait till some other day to look at the little
baby-birds. But she got only a peep now and then, for the mother-bird
kept watching as if she feared somebody would rob her nest. But one
day in July, when all was still, Dora stood tip-toe and gazed into the
nest. The birds had all gone, but she saw something shining brightly at
the side of the nest where the birds had lived. It was her own precious
ring, which had fallen into the nest! She never lost it again, and she
was always glad that she fed the birds.





























































































"DEAR ME, LUCY ANN, IF YOU 'RE NOT MORE CAREFULLER OF YOURSELF, YOU 'LL NOT LAST TILL CHRISTMAS!



II






















A FALL to the knees,
A turn of the toes,
It takes all these just to
In the Japanese country,


A spread of the hands,
And a dip of the nose.
say, Good-day,"
far away.


ffii n rimy;nT i
fs.-1halhd obnm;,_ --<'
Bi0 ei ieryidg-od
Ti ~faIt~ihin~yoU
bd.'bout:,a
$_M Z. e, jic s-

iflr1Gog Brown- -
1I-lihath 0' oCrowat,<
r~Lr But he irked4 ~ t
U fWe do
~~Qa ~ l








































MY tiny daughter Dolly
Comes frowning- from her walk.
"My hat 's so dreffle big," she says,
"That I tan't see to talk!"




A POLITE OWL.


THE owl made a bow
As I passed where she sat,-
A very small owl,-
She bowed this way and that,
So I lifted my hat.


Did she just bob her head
When the sun hurt her eyes ?
So my grandfather said.
But she looked very wise
For an owl of her size.









WHAT PUSSY SAID.


BY SYDNEY DAYRE.

BESSIE with her kitten
Sitting on her knee-
"Pussy, dear, now won't you
Try to talk to me?
Yes, you pretty darling,
I am sure you could
Say a little something
If you only would.
Now, I '11 ask a question.
Answer, Pussy-do !
Whom do you love the very best?"
And Pussy said: "M-you."










"SUPPOSE!"


SUPPOSE--sup-p-o-s-e-
Well, just suppose
Some day my mother 'd say,
"You need n't go to school, my
dear,
Just stay at home and play.
And here 's a box of chocolate
creams "
(Or something quite as good).
Eat all you want! "-oh, just
suppose,
Suppose my mother should !








































"THE MOON MUST LOVE ME VERY MUCH, FOR, WHEN THE NIGHT IS FINE,
OF ALL THE WINDOWS IN THE WORLD, IT COMES AND SHINES THROUGH-MINE!"


THE LITTLE ELF.


BY JOHN KENDRICK BANGS.


I MET a little Elf-man, once,
Down where the lilies blow.
I asked him why he was so small
And why he did n't grow.

He slightly frowned, and with his eye
He looked me through and through.
"I 'm quite as big for me," said he,
"As you are big for you."
i5


VI-I


























By ELLA FOSTER CASE.

ONCE upon a time there was a very small mouse with a very, very large
opinion of himself. What he did n't know his own grandmother could n't
tell him.
You 'd better keep a bright eye in your head, these days," said she,
one chilly afternoon. "Your gran'ther has smelled a trap."
"Scat!" answered the small mouse;-"'s if I don't know a trap when
I see it!" And that was all the thanks she got for her good advice.
"Go your own way, for you will go no other," the wise old mouse
said to herself; and she scratched her nose slowly and sadly as she watched
her grandson scamper up the cellar stairs.
"Ah!" sniffed he, poking his whiskers into a crack of the dining-room
cupboard, "cheese-as I'm alive! Scuttle--scuttle. "I 'll be squizzled, if
it is n't in that cunning little house; I know what that is-a cheese-house, of


" 2


I~iuQ~~~d


OUT


~






course. What a very snug hall! That's the way with cheese-houses. I know,
'cause I 've heard the dairymaid talk about 'em. It must be rather incon-
venient, though, to carry milk up that step and through an iron door. I
know why it 's
so open -to let
in fresh air. I
tell you, that
cheese is good I
Kind of a re-
ception-room in
there-guess I
know a recep-
tion-room from
a hole in the
wall. No trouble
at all about getting in, either. Would n't grandmother open her eyes to
see me here! Guess I '11 take another nibble at that cheese, and go out.
What's that noise? What in squeaks is the matter with the door? This is
a cheese-house, I know it is,-but what if it should turn out to be a-
O-o-o-eeee!" And that 's just what it did turn out to be.

































By LAURA E. RICHARDS.


IT does n't pay to be cross -
It's not worth while to try it;
For Mammy's eyes so sharp
Are very sure to spy it;


A pinch on Billy's arm,
A snarl or a sullen gloom,
No longer we stay, but must up and away
To the Howlery Growlery room.








Chorus. Hi! the Howlery! ho! the Growlery!
Ha the Sniffery, Snarlery, Scowlery!
There we may stay,
If we choose, all day;
But it 's only a smile that can bring
us away.
If Mammy catches me
A-pitching into Billy;
If Billy breaks my whip,
Or scares my rabbit silly:
It's Make it up, boys, quick !
Or else you know your doom!"
We must kiss and be friends, or the squabble ends
In the Howlery Growlery room.
Chorus. Hi! the Howlery! ho! the Growlery!
Ha! the Sniffery, Snarlery, Scowlery!
There we may stay,


If we choose, all day;
But it 's only a smile that can bring
us away.
So it does n't pay to be bad;
There 's nothing to be won in it:
And when you come to think,
There 's really not much fun in it.
So, come! The sun is out,
The lilacs are all a-bloom.
Come out and play, and we'll keep away
From the Howlery Growlery room.
Chorus. Hi! the Howlery! ho! the Growlery!
Ha! the Sniffery, Snarlery, Scowlery!
There we may stay,
If we choose, all day;
But it 's only a smile that can bring
us away.


MUSIC FOR THE HOWLERY-GROWLERY ROOM.


























aree ponies in a row;
Q-M
ive frisky ponies waiting at the gate,
~hoe them, saddle them, and ride off in state.
0 ne pony for my little man
Two ponies make a span; @#t .
Three ponies in a row; s- i

,our ponies ready to go9 0;jf j
F ive ponies, glossy and bright

Up street, clown street,








And home again at night.
20






little boy
named Johnnry
StIhad a donkey
he called Ned,

Cho when e'er he
tried to ride him
,Always threw
him o'er his
head -


AN IMAGINARY CASE.
If one little boy-being
Healthy and strong-
Can keep a house merry
All the day long,


? Just think, if you can,
What a tempest of joys
There 'd be in a house
Holding nine little boys.
21







THE LITTLE PET PUG AT THE CIRCUS.


FOR a whole long week the little pet Pug was as good as he could be,
He did n't growl at the baby, nor spill his milk at tea;
And so, when the Circus came to town, they gave him a silver dime,
They put on his Sunday collar, and hoped he 'd have a good time.
He sat right next to the Lion (who had to have two seats),
And saw the clever animals perform their wonderful feats:
Two Poodles drew a Peacock in an elegant golden car,
While the Owl drove four sleek Rabbits-a livelier team by far;
Bruin balanced Reynard on a pole placed on his snout;
And the Hare danced a sailor's-hornpipe on a Pig that ran about;
Five Kittens rode in a basket on the back of a Dromedary;
While a Cat who walked on stilts was as graceful as a fairy;
A Rhinoceros played the organ-the tune was "Upidee."
But some of the jokes the Cat-clown made the pet Pug could n't see!

All this was in the nearest ring,-the other was lively, too:
To watch them both at once was all the little Pug could do,
While six performing Pussy cats were making a curious group,
At the very same time two Monkeys went diving through a hoop..
Two foreign birds were driven in harness by a Cat,
But a tiny Frog with a team of Chicks was a queerer sight than that!
Another Frog was a juggler and kept five balls in air,
Yet the Elephant balancing on a ball was the funniest creature there.
Above, near the top of the Circus tent, the Jocko Brothers bold
With their daring leaps from the high trapeze made the little Pug's blood
run cold!
Near them hung a Cockatoo, who swung in a lofty ring,
And who did n't have a thing to do, but laugh at everything.
At last the band played Home, Sweet Home," the animals all' filed out,
And the little Pug went trotting away with plenty to talk about.

MORAL.
So, Pugs, don't growl at the baby, though the baby should pull your ears,
And maybe you '/l go to the Circus when it comes to your town, my
dears!









'' l


7.


"HE SAT RIGHT NEXT TO THE LION (WHO HAD TO HAVE TWO SEATS),
AND SAW THE CLEVER ANIMALS PERFORM THEIR WONDERFUL FEATS."
(SEE NEXT PAGE.)


L~i


* :


9 \


i,:













gF A--


I',


I-
I-


WHICH of these little


boys lives in your house?
24

















A


WHICH of these little


girls lives in your house?
25


- -4 L








A WINTER DAY.


SNOW makes the fields and gardens white;
It lies upon the roofs and ground.
It fell so softly in the night,
When I was sleeping safe and sound.

I think I '11 go and get my sled,
The little gloves my Grandma knit,
My cap with tabs, my jacket red -
And try to coast a little bit.

" Go out before it melts away,"
My mother said. I hope she '11 stand
There in the window, while I play,
And smile and nod, and wave her hand.
































































"DON'T YOU THINK THAT WINTER 'S PLEASANTER THAN ALLP"-
27


~_- `


'"

.--Ii


J.'"
'-I-.
..--L-^-~






















r-.fS~ i_


-2 .-*-- -.~ *> -' -
----






























"BUT THEN, IN SUMMER, YOU CAN PLAY ON THE BEACH"
28
-:-,/







.= -- -- : _


















28






THE FROG'S FOURTH OF JULY.


HAPPY little Frog Of course he was going to see what
Bobby, and Nelly, and Mamie, and Lee, and Louis, B
and Edith, and Philip intended to do. Afraid of fire- i "
crackers?-who? he? No, indeed! So he did
not heed his mother's warning, but hopped off
to the lovely grove at Woodreve, the children's ? "
summer home.
The nurses Kate, and Annie, and Mary spread a nice luncheon of cake
and lemonade on the grass under the trees. It was very warm, and the
children played, and swung, and fired torpedoes, and set off fire-crackers.
They were getting restless and tired, when Bobby said: ." Let's fill a tomato-
can with fire-crackers, turn it bottom up, tilt it a little, and set fire to one of
the crackers with a match tied to a long pole." The plan was hailed with
delight. So they fixed it all, and then sat down to enjoy the great fright of
the nurses, who were sewing and knitting under a tree not very far from the
can, but with their backs to it.
The little frog had been hiding in the grass near by, and he did not un-
derstand at all why everything was suddenly quiet--so he hopped, and he
hopped, and he hopped, and at last he hopped up on the can, so that he might
see better. There he sat, puffed out with pride and staring all about, while
the children stared back at the foolish fellow,- when bang! bang went the
crackers,-up went the can,-and over went little Mr. Frog into a black-
berry bush! The nurses screamed, the little girls shrieked, the lemon-
ade was turned over, the cake upset, Edith's bottle of milk was
broken, and such a time! But
it did not last long, for fresh I
supplies came from the house. i- .'i
One of the ladies came out to
ask what was the matter; and
then all the children told the
story, and laughed and laughed,
at the fun. But the little frog
rubbed his legs and scratched
his head, wondering what had
happened, and then hopped
away to his home as fast as he
could go -the most surprised
little frog that ever saw a
Fourth of July. BANG! BANG










((twg


HIGHTY, tighty, grumpity man!
Finding fault since your life began!
Pity we have n't a giant or two
To carry off grumpities such as you!


MY CHOICE.

BY DELIA HART STONE.


IF Maude were a little lady,
Who did no work at all;
And if Kate were a little housemaid,
Who did the work for all;
And if my little lady
Were sad the livelong day;


And if the little housemaid
Were always glad and gay:
I 'd rather be the housemaid,
And do the work for all,
Than be the little lady,
And never work at all.







"WHEN WE HAVE TEA."


BY THOMAS TAPPER.


IN winter-time, when we have tea,
We have to light the lamp to see;
The days are cold, the winds blow
strong,
The sun's afraid to stay out long.


In summer-time, quite otherwise,
It seems he 's always in the skies;
The weather's warm, he likes to
stay,
And so we have our tea by day.


THE ELEPHANT AND THE GIRAFFE.


SAID the elephant to the giraffe,
" Your neck is too long by one half."
He replied, "Since your nose
Reaches down to your toes
At others you 'd better not laugh."
31






A TIRED LITTLE MOTHER.


By LAURA E. RICHARDS.

WHEN Nita heard her mother say, I am really overworked, and all
tired out!" she shook her curly head, and sighed, "Me, too, Mama!"
And no wonder! Her mother has only four children, while Nita has
sixteen. She looks very young, does she not, to have such a large family ?
for this is Nita, in the picture. She says she has to work "all day -
long!" There are Nita's six grown-up children, and then come Medora,
Selina Polly, Mungo Park (Papa named him), and the twins, Pinky and
Winky, and Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. (The last three are black,
and no one could tell one from the other, but it does n't matter.)
Then there are Seraphina, and Jim and Jam, another pair of twins,
and Mr. and Mrs. Wobblechin, and the Red Rover, and Bridget, the cook
doll, and Gwen, the Welsh dairywoman. There is the baby, too,-I forgot
her,-and that makes seventeen. And all these dolls have to be fed and
clothed, and put to bed, and taken up again. They are always put to bed;
but sometimes they don't get taken up for a good while but then-one can
always play they're sick, so that does n't count. Jim and Jam have had the
fever ten times, and once Jim had it so badly that his legs came off. Yes,
that was something like a fever. Papa is a doctor, and he said he never had
such a case as that in all his days.
Now, when this picture was taken, Nita had just been having a dreadful
time with Selina Polly. Selina had the "ammonia in the back of her head,"-
Mama thought it was a crack, caused by dropping her on the hearth, but
Nita said it was ammonia, and of course it must have been; and her neck
began to "get all wobbly," Nita said, and it was perfectly dreadful. Nita
had n't had a wink of sleep for three whole nights, and she had n't tasted a
morsel of food; for how could she eat when her child was in that state, with
her strength all wasting away, hour after hour. So, at last, after walking up
and down the nursery for about a week, or it might be a fortnight, Nita just
lay down for a minute on the cushion, one afternoon before she was made ready
for tea, because she thought the change might be good for Selina Polly. It was
a very hot day, but Nita was not sleepy-"not one single tiny bit of a scrap!"
she told nurse. So, then-nothing happened for a good while, and then
nurse said it was tea-time, and told Nita that she had had a good nap.
This shows how foolish even the best of nurses sometimes are; for how
could she really suppose that a mother would take naps, when her child's
head was in danger of falling off?






















































A TIRED LITTLE MOTHER.
A TIRED LITTLE MOTHER.




























HERE ARE TWENTY-SIX GOOD FRIENDS OF EVERY LITTLE GIRL AND BOY.
WHO CAN NAME THEM ALL?


THAT'S THE WAY!

BY ELLA WHEELER WILCOX.


JUST a little every day,
That 's the way
Seeds in darkness swell and grow,
Tiny blades push through the snow.
Never any flower of May
Leaps to blossom in a burst.
Slowly- slowly at the first.
That 's the way!
Just a little every day.


Just a little every day,
That's the way
Children learn to read and write,
Bit by bit, and mite by mite.
Never any one, I say,
Leaps to knowledge and its power.-
Slowly slowly hour by hour.
That's the way!
Just a little every day.











~t----;- -i~~ -- ~~~ --~--~--i~ ---'s----- --~
3. -i

'Arj4 1

-.- --,. .- L- J f l ~ C


24,


54,



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P'.

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A MAY-DAY PARTY IN CENTRAL PARK.


4.


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I'' T.~p;7~














SAghr 3. mYTll ER
little rabbit, one
went out in the
field to run,


little rabbits, two t
Said they did nf
know what to do.


little rabbits, three
5aid: Let us
climb a tree."

I little rabbits, four
SSaid: Lets swing
on the old barn dooF. _,






little rabbits, five
Said: We're glad|
just to be alive."'


little rabbits,
six


Said: We like


pick


up sticks.


little rabbits


seven -


Said: W
were


e wish


elev


we


en.


little rabbits.
eight


Said: Come let


us run


through the gate?


little rabbits,
nine


Said: Then
Form in


let us


ne.


little


rabbits,


ten


was n't


1i got in line -and Then-
it fu.n to see them run?


L-_


3 L







THREE KINDS OF SEE-SAW

See-saw I saw in the fields onE day;
A see-saw you 'll see when the children play;-
And oh! the very funniest way


To see a see-saw, I know you 'll say,
Is when at the biggest show in town,
The elephants see-saw, up and down:












'>\'









t-i-,


MARY ANN: "EDDY WHITE, IF YOU DARE TO JUMP OFF, I 'LL NEVER SPEAK TO YOU
AGAIN, THE LONGEST DAY THAT I LIVE! NEVER!"


TRAINED BABY ELEPHANTS PLAYING SEE-SAW.


kY(;'O~W ai~







THE FATE OF A GINGER-BREAD MAN.


HERE'S a nice brown ginger-bread man,
Freshly baked in the baker's pan,
Spiced and sugared, and spick and span;
Cloves for his eyes and paste for his tie-
Oh, what a nice sweet man to buy!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Looking in at the ginger-bread man
(Spiced and sugared, and spick and span,
Cloves for his eyes and paste for his tie),
Wondering whether the price is high.

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Going home with the ginger-bread man
That was baked in the baker's pan.
" Far too nice to be eaten," they said;
"Keep the man for a dolly, instead."

Here behold the ginger-bread man,
That was baked in the baker's pan,
In the doll-house of Mary Ann.
See him stand, with his round, fat face,
Among the dolls in silk and lace!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Sleeping sound as ever they can,
Dreaming about the ginger-bread man
Left in the doll-house, set away,
Till they wake in the morn to play.

See this rat; since the night began
He has prowled to get what he can.
Ah, he smells the ginger-bread man!
There's the doll-house under the shelf,
Just where the rat can climb himself!


I ITi






Every rat will get what he can.
Ah, the poor, sweet ginger-bread man!
Wake, 0 Felix and Mary Ann!
There 's a patter, a jump, a squeak-
Ah, if the ginger-bread man could speak!

See the rat, as quick as he can,
Climbing up for the ginger-bread man
In the doll-house of Mary Ann!
Ah, if the ginger-bread man could run!
Oh, to see what the rat has done!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Come to play with the ginger-bread man,
Spiced and sugared, and spick and span.
Ah, behold where he stood before,
Only crumbs on the doll-house floor!


A.


II








NAMING DOLLY.

MY darling Dolly is one week old;-
Her forehead is fair and creamy,
Her cheeks are pink and her hair is gold,
And her eyes are dark and dreamy.
She 's lovely and sweet as she can be;
She 's Santa Claus' own little daughter,
But she came to me on the Christmas Tree:-
How glad I am that he brought her !


A


}i/11


'I II't


7'ir~


I never am lonely since she came,
And the only trouble with me is
That I have n't been able to find a name
One half as pretty as she is.
Mama 's in favor of Isabel ";
And papa says "Betsy or Polly "
And I 've thought and thought and maybe-well,
I think I shall call her Dolly.


Y\ isI

~~\a,
~~~?








GOING VISITING WITH DOLLY.

I KEEP my Dolly so warm and nice
This cloudy, stormy weather.
My Dolly and I are quiet as mice
Whenever we play together.
And yet we have the pleasantest play-
Would you like to ask "What is it?"
Why, over and over, every day,
My Dolly and I "go visit."

Sometimes on "Towser" we like to call,
Or travel to see the Kitty;
'T is Grandpa's farm just out in the hall,
And the parlor is Boston City;
'T is mama's house in the corner there,
And then, when the lamps are lighted,
My papa 's at home in his easy-chair,
And Dolly and I are invited.







FIDDLE-DIDDLE-DEE!"

LITTLE DAVIE ran through the garden,-a great slice of bread and butter
in one hand, and his spelling-book in the other. He was going to study
his lesson for to-morrow.
You could not imagine a prettier spot than Davie's "study," as he called
it. It was under a great oak-tree, that
S/ stood at the edge of a small wood. The
:\.. 1 \\\\ little boy sat down on one of the roots
iC/ /and opened his book.
But first," thought he, I '1 finish
Bt my bread and butter."
SSo he let his book drop, and, as he
-.S ate, he began to sing a little song with
THIS IS THE LITTLE WREN.
which his mother sometimes put the
baby to sleep. This is the way the song began:

I bought a bird, and my bird pleased me;
I tied my bird behind a tree;
Bird said- "

Fiddle-diddle-dee !" sang something, or somebody, behind the oak.
Davie looked a little frightened, for that was just what he was about to
sing in his song. But he jumped up and ran around to the other side
of the tree. And there was a little brown wren, and it had a little golden
thread around its neck, and the thread was tied to a root of the big tree.
Hello !" said Davie, "was that you?"
Now, of course Davie had not expected the wren to answer him. But
the bird turned her head on one side, and, looking up at Davie, said:
"Yes, of course it was! Who else
did you suppose it could be? 1 i lII i
"Oh yes!" said Davie, very much 'I I [[
astonished. Oh yes, of course But ,
I thought you only did it in the song!" .
"Well," said the wren, were not you .,-
singing the song, and am not I in the .
song, and what else could I do?" 'THIS 5 N.
0 THIS IS THE HEN. 0"
"Yes, I suppose so," said Davie.
"Well, go on, then," said the wren, "and don't bother me."
Davie felt very queer. He stopped a moment, but soon thought that
44






he must do as he was bid, and he began
to sing again:

"I bought a hen, and my hen pleased me;
I tied my hen.behind a tree;
Hen said "

A Shinny-shack shinny-shack!" in-
"THE G- EA.& terrupted another voice, so loudly that
THIS IS THE GUINEA-HEN.
THIS IS THE GUINEADavie's heart gave a great thump, as he
turned around. There, behind the wren, stood a little Bantam hen, and
around her neck was a little golden cord that fastened her to the wren's leg.
"I suppose that was you?" said Davie.
Yes, indeed," replied the hen. "I know when my time comes in, in
a song. But it was provoking for you to call me away from my chicks."
I ?" cried Davie. I did n't call you "
Oh, indeed! said the Bantam. It was n't you, then, who were sing-
ing 'Tied my hen,' just now! Oh no, not you!"
"I 'm sorry," said Davie. I did n't mean to."
"Well, go on, then," said the little hen, "and don't bother."
Davie was so full of wonder that he did not know what to think of it
all. He went back to his seat, and sang again:

"I had a guinea, and my guinea pleased me;
I tied my guinea behind a tree "

But here he stopped, with his mouth wide open; for up a tiny brown
path that led into the wood, came a little
red man about a foot high, dressed in
green, and leading by a long yellow
string a plump, speckled guinea-hen! >-/.
The little old man came whistling along .
until he reached the Bantam, when he "
fastened the yellow string to her leg, .
and went back again down the path, THIS 15 THE DUCK."
and disappeared among the trees.
Davie looked and wondered. Presently, the guinea stretched out her
neck and called to him in a funny voice:
"Why in the world don't you go on? Do you think I want to wait
all day for my turn to come?"
Davie began to sing again: Guinea said "
Pot-rack pot-rack!" instantly squeaked the speckled guinea-hen.







Davie jumped up. He was fairly
frightened now. But his courage soon
came back. I 'm not afraid," he said
to himself; "I'll see what the end of -
this song will be "-and he began to
sing again: '
"I bought a duck, and my duck pleased me;
I tied my duck behind a tree;
Duck said "
"Quack! quack!" came from around the oak. But Davie went on:

"I bought a dog, and the dog pleased me;
I tied my dog behind a tree;
Dog said "

Bow-wow said a little curly dog, as Davie came around the spread-
ing roots of the tree. There stood a little short-legged duck-tied to the
guinea's leg, and to the duck's leg was fastened the wisest-looking Scotch
terrier, with spectacles on his nose and a walking-cane in his paw.
The whole group looked up at Davie, who now felt perfectly confident.
He sat down on a stone close by, and continued his song:

"I had a horse, and my horse pleased me;
I tied my horse behind a tree."

Davie stopped and looked down the little brown path. Then he clapped
his hands in great delight; for there came the little old man leading by a
golden bridle a snow-white pony, no bigger than Davie's Newfoundland dog.
"Sure enough, it is a boy!" said the pony, as the old man tied his
bridle to the dog's hind leg, and then hurried away. I thought so!
Boys are always bothering people."
"Who are you, and where did you
all come from ?" asked delighted Davie.
"Why," said the pony, "we belong
S to the court of Her Majesty the Queen
.. of the Fairies. But, of course, when
the song in which any of the court
L I"' ., voices are wanted, is sung, they all
have to go.
"I 'm sure I'm very sorry," said Davie. But why have n't I ever seen
you all before ? "
Because," said the pony, "you have never sung the song down here
46







before." And then he added: Don't you think, now that we are all here,
you'd better sing the song right end first, and be done with it ?"
Oh, certainly!" cried Davie, "certainly!" beginning to sing.
If you could but have heard that song! As Davie sang, each fowl
or animal took up its part, and sang it, with its own peculiar tone and
manner, until they all joined in.

I had a horse, and my horse pleased me;
I tied my horse behind a tree.
Horse said, Neigh neigh !'
Dog said, Bow-wow !'
Duck said, Quack quack !'
Guinea said, Pot-rack pot-rack !'
Hen said, 'Shinny-shack shinny-shack!'
Bird said,' Fiddle-diddle-dee !' "

Davie was overjoyed. He thought he would sing it all over again.
But just then he was sure that his mother called him.













"Wait a minute !" he said to his companions. "Wait a minute! I'm
coming back! Oh, it's just like a fairy-tale !." he cried to himself, as he
bounded up the garden-walk. I wonder what mother 'll think ?"
But his mother said she had not called him, and so he ran back as
fast as his legs would carry him.
But they were all gone. His speller lay on the ground, open at the
page of his lesson; a crumb or two of bread was scattered about; but
not a sign of the white pony and the rest of the singers.
Well," said Davie, as he picked up his book, "I guess I won't sing it
again, for I bothered them so. But I wish they had stayed a little longer."


47








*I-,


'III


A BOOK-LOVER.


"I DO love books!" said Marjorie,
One morning as she played.
And so she did, as you can see-
This clever little maid!


The dictionary was her chair;
The atlas big, her table;
The dolls sat up on other books
As straight as they were able.


And then they all partook of tea,
And did as they were bid.
"I do love books!" said Marjorie.
Now, don't you think she did?







ON THE FERRY.


MOONLIGHT, starlight--
How many lights there be!
Little swinging lanterns
On the ships at sea.
Green lights, yellow lights,
Crimson lights aglow-
I see them shine on winter nights
In mist and snow.


Big boats, little boats -
How many boats there be!
Little swinging life-boats
On the ships at sea.
I go on the ferry-boat,
Mother goes with me;
I wish some day that we would float
Far out to sea!


A FAMILY GROUP. OUR BOY, OUR GIRL, OUR BABY, AND OUR CAT.


















BY AGNES LEWIS MITCHILL.


I 'Il tell you a secret--I don't think you
know it!
The fairies were camping last night on the
lawn.
While you were all sleeping, outdoors softly
creeping,
I found their white tents, but the fairies
had gone.


They were in a great flurry, or why should they hurry?
To leave their white tents was a queer thing to do.
Perhaps they come only at night, when 't is lonely.
I guess they are sly gipsy fairies-Don't you?









WHERE'S MOTHER?


I EBFi,:HT curly he .i:l r:'[p in ill .
T.o aik, -. Is Mlothlr here ?"
The-n L ie ai n e.i er i;nr:ce
Sjr'' un'l,.
_I A\.n'd .tlYv d:i-appe tr.


She ought to wear a -ivkr bell,
W\\hce note. :,:, svneet anl]
cilejr,
Shoulil tinkle out a cheer\
sound,
Repeating, Mother 's near."


And thcn, if" :in\ little one .
Had :,:'merthing gld t tell. ,-
O1r iscrat,:he. bunmps., i.r te:.rs.
Or secret wi be li, .l.




s 8No need to l1 from room to: r,::m.
Put simply l*stcn %ell,
And, like the lh-ippy little l.im ,.
Just q f,:lldo "M ,lothcr's" bell.
,,..C, 1S B?,. 3.-- .


p I E -L X


-1w9


a-


Y







PUSSY AND HER ELEPHANT.


BY HANNAH MORE JOHNSON.

HAVE you heard of little Pussy, in that country o'er the sea,
How the dogs came out to chase her and she had to climb a tree?
You have n't? Then I '11 tell you how gentle Pussy Gray
Went climbing up, hand over hand, and safely got away.


But then the strangest trouble came! The tree began to shake!
A tremendous giant something took Pussy by the neck
And tossed her off! And there again among the dogs was she,
And what could frightened Pussy do, but climb the same old tree?


But then the strange thing came again, and, swinging high in air,
Pounced right on little Pussy, as she sat trembling there;
But when it touched her fur it stopped; as though its owner thought:
"It's nothing but a pussy-cat that trouble here has brought.
52







"I '11 let her make herself at home."-
And Pussy, safe once more,
S Folded her paws contentedly and
viewed the country o'er,
SAnd purred a meek apology: Excuse
me, friend, I see
; I've climbed a broad-backed elephant;
I meant to climb a tree!"

,'] i Whatever else she said or sung that
you would like to hear
"/ She must have whispered coaxingly
into the giant ear;
For often afterward, 't is said, Miss Pussy Gray was seen
To ride the broad-backed elephant as proud as any queen!





































WOJLN A-r LI 4ZE so
'iMtLL -.VERSED i ty HUNTERS. LORPF
THEii SFAKE HE TO THATL WELL READ BOY:
LWOIgtLsr iLIKE TO 70CEAR ME ROAR."


















JIj




.,, .....



Y E: C E:~c 1P.L E:-D T H.A.T F LUC 's 5. Y
%V4\c/ IWOOQL D H I z c, u
F-\ 'J T F ~r rS7IDT- KE:TO TF.Y T HIS TOY; -
I T...FM"
VY QVr J=i QG ~ gV~4


01-





I~ FL7ED TAT 'LlON Fk-11 7HE Ev,'
t ND -MTH) H DAY THAT L-LT LE EO
/ E:NJOYS HIS H-UNTSRS LORE.






A FOURTH OF JULY STORY.


1


I


WAS a wide-awake little boy
Who rose at the break of day;


were the minutes he took to dress,
Then he was off and away.


were his leaps when he cleared the stairs,
Although they were steep and high;


was the number which caused his haste,
Because it was Fourth of July!


were the pennies which went to buy
A package of crackers red;


THERE 'S NOTHING VERY IMPORTANT THE MATTER,-
I 'M ONLY THE ONLY SON OF A HATTER.
56


were the matches which touched them off,
And then-he was back in bed.


big plasters he had to wear
To cure his burs so sore;


were the visits the doctor made
Before he was whole once more.


were the tiresome days he spent
In sorrow and pain; but then,


are the seconds he '11 stop to think
Before he does it again.








A CUP OF TEA.


PHCEBE brings the tea-pot, the tea is all a-steam;
Dolly brings the pitcher filled with golden cream.
Rhoda has the dainty cups rimmed about with blue,
And Polly brings the pretty spoons shining bright as new.
The Baby trips along behind, looking very droll;
And she, the sweetest of them all, brings the sugar-bowl.


A PROBLEM IN THREES.


IF three little houses stood in a
row,
With never a fence to divide,
And if each little house had three
little maids
At play in the garden wide,
And if each little maid had three little
cats
(Three times three times three),
And if each little cat had three little
kits,
How many kits would there be ?


And if each little maid had three
little friends
With whom she loved to play,
And if each little friend had three
little dolls
In dresses and ribbons gay,
And if friends and dolls and cats
and kits
Were all invited to tea,
And if none of them all should send
regrets,
How many guests would there be?













BY JAMES HARVEY SMITH.


BINGO is thirty inches high,
And Buster thirty-two;
While Beau, who is n't quite so big,
SIs their loving friend and true.

Beau, the children's joy and pride,
Is a black Newfoundland dog,
Bingo and Buster ponies are
From the land of rain and fog.

No whip nor spur-the little chaps
Need when the children ride;
They prance and caper on the road,
While Beau runs by their side.

Two little steeds and one big dog
Make a fine sight to see;


Two little girls in a yellow cart--
And they all belong to me!

I think nobody has more fun
Or makes a braver show,
Than the little girls who ride behind
Bingo, Buster, and Beau.






HOW CURIOUS!

BY TUDOR JENKS.


SAID one little girl to another little girl
As proudly as could be,
" I '11 tell you something very nice
That my papa told me:
He said I was the sweetest girl
That ever there could be!"


Said the other little girl to that one little girl
"Why, now!-how can you be?
For that is just the very same thing
That my papa told me!"
(And neither was as sweet as my little girl-
As any one could see!)


BY LEE CARTER.


IN the empty room we three
Play the games we always like,
And count to see who "it" shall be -
Ana, nmana, mona, mike.
Round and round the rhyme will go
Ere the final word shall strike,
Counting fast or counting slow--
Barcelona, bona, strike.


What it all means no one knows,
Mixed up like a peddler's pack,
As from door to door he goes -
Hare, ware, frow, frack.

Now we guess and now we doubt,
Words enough or words we lack,
Till the rhyming brings about
Welcomed with a farewell shout-
Hallico, ballico, we-wi-wo-wack, You are OUT!
















j NE day while Johnny was out with his nurse, a
hand-organ on wheels standing in the street played
a very lively tune. "What is that tune?" asked
Johnny. I like it." So the nurse asked the organ-
grinder. "That-a tune-a he call 'Johnny, get your
gun,'" said the man.
3Johnny kept thinking "what a funny name for a
tune! And the next day he went into the room
S'"/ where his papa was painting a picture. After a
while papa left Johnny by himself, and-what do
'you suppose happened?
Everything was still,
and Johnny was won-
dering what he 'd do next, when in through
the open window came the sound of a street-
boy singing at the top of his voice.
Johnny knew the song at once. It was
"Johnny, get your gun, get your gun, get
your gun," and our Johnny thought to himself,
"I 'd like to get a gun. Where can I find
one?"
Looking about, Johnny saw, standing
against the wall on one side of the room,
seven guns -some very big and some not so
big. They belonged to his papa, and he used
them when he painted pictures of soldiers.
Johnny trotted over and picked out (as a
little boy always does) the biggest he could
find. It happened to be an old gun, one of
the kind that were used long ago, with a -
rusty lock and barrel.


5Y





None of the guns were loaded, so Johnny was
in no danger; but he never thought of danger.
Down from its place he lifted the gun and put it
on the floor, and pulled away at the ramrod, and at
last got it out. Then he tried to put it back in its
place, but it went into the barrel instead. Then he
tried the lock; but try as he might, it would n't
work. How do they shoot it?" he wondered.







This way, I guess," said he; but he could
S not lift the big gun up to his shoulder.
Just then the curtains of the door opened,
-"'- \and there stood his papa!
\ "Why, my boy, what are you doing?" he
S i asked. "You might drop that big gun on
Your toes. Why did you get that gun?"
\ "Why, papa, I heard somebody outside
Singing Johnny, get your gun,' and I did n't
have any; so I thought I 'd get one of yours.
S.- .... ../ This was the biggest I could find."
His father put the gun back in its
place, and told Johnny that he
___should have a gun of his very
own if he would promise not to touch the big ones again.
Johnny prom-
ised. So a new gun v,'e
was bought for -
him, a toy-gun that
just fitted his little
hands; and now
when Johnnyhears
the song, he says,
"I 'm a Johnny,
and I have a gun.
I'll go and get it!"















Little girl with golden hair
Was rocking in her grand-ma's chair,
'When in there walked a Stranger Cat_
(I'm sure there's nothing strange in that.)


jt was a Cat with kinky ears
And very aged for it's years.
The little girl remarked"O Scat!'
(I think there's nothing strange in that)


)ut presently with stealthy tread
The cat, which at her word had Fled,
Returned with cane, and boots and hat_
(I fear there's something strange in that.)






excuse me, and the cat bowed low,
"1 hate to trouble you, you know,
But tell me, have you seen a rat ?"
i(l know there's something strange in that)


e little girl was very shy.
Vell really 1 cafnt say that I
lave seen one lately, Mr Cat.


n that)


) have n't you?" the Cat replied;
"Thanks, I am deeply gratihed.
I really couldn't eat a rat.:
(We all know what to think of that.)


ind then the Cat with kinky ears
And so much wisdom for its years
Retired,with a soft pit-a-pat
i(And that was all there was of that).


N.P Babcock.















































































HO, FOR THE CHRISTMAS-TREE!
64









THE BROTHERS.


BY AGNES LEWIS MITCHILL.

I.
ONE little brother is short and slow;
The other is taller, and he can run,
For he takes twelve steps with his longer leg
While his brother is taking one.

II. '
One little brother a bell must ring,
With every step that he slowly makes.
But the other runs gaily from morn till night
Nor cares to notice the steps he takes.

He who loves riddles may guess me this one,-
Who are the brothers and where do they run ?








THE CLOSE OF THE DAY.


BY M. L. V.

WHAT is it comes at the close of the day,
When the old world 's tired and slowly swings?
Supper-time, bed-time, and nurse to say
"Put up the toys and the play-house things!"
And we watch the shadows that glide and fall
On the shining floor and the nursery wall.

-But that is n't all! Then we creep upstairs
And soon begins a great pillow-fight,
As we chase one another over the chairs.
Then we jump into bed, and we say Good-night!"
And the tired old world more slowly swings,
And Mother sits in the dark and sings.









FROM "FIDO."


A LETTER FROM A PET DOG.

SEE HERE! I am a pet dog. My name is Fido. I be-
Slong to a little girl whose name is Sally. She has
always been very good to me, and I never snap nor
"- growl at her, for I do not need to. But I have some
young puppies to bring up, and do not like the way she
treats them. I am too shy to speak to her about this; but, as she reads
Baby World, I have made up my mind to write you a letter so that you can
print it. Then she will read it, and it will make her stop doing the things
I do not like.
While puppies are small it is good for them to sleep nearly all the time.
Now, as soon as I have put mine to sleep, Sally is sure to come and take
one of them to play with. What would she think if I went up to the nursery
and took her baby sister out of the cradle to play with ?
One day she took "White Nose," my smallest puppy, and carried him into
the hall. Here she sat down in grandpa's big chair, took a lump of sugar
from the bowl, and tried to make White Nose eat it! Was n't she silly?
It made my mouth water to see her waste good sugar on a puppy that had
no teeth. I tried to show her that it was better for me to eat sugar than
to let White Nose have it. I even sat up and begged for it. White Nose
only kicked at it with his fat little legs, and was afraid the sugar would
bite him.
I hope Sally, after she reads my letter, will see that it is best to give
sugar to big dogs, and to let little puppies sleep until they have some teeth.
Your friend, FIDO.










66








































-I











'a






















----SHE TRIED TO MAKE WHITE NOSE EAT THE SUGAR"
"SHE TRIED TO MAKE WHITE NOSE EAT THE SUGAR."








LOST HOURS.


SBY SYDNEY DAYRE.

"I SAY good night and go up-stairs,
And then undress and say my prayers
Beside my bed, and then jump in it,
And then-the very nextest minute,
The morning sun comes in to peep
At me. I s'pose I 've been to sleep.
But seems to me," said little Ted,
"It 's not worth while to go to bed."






TH"E KrETTLU.
BY LAMMVR^ E.KChPA 0.

OH, I am a kettle! a kettle am I!

i.-."* There 's nothing about me that 's sneak-
ing or sly.
Whatever I say, I stand by it.
Bubble, I say! and hubble, I say!
Some folks may not like it, but that is
my way.
I mind my own business, and give no
trouble;
Bubble, hub-bubble, hub-bubble, hub-
bubble!

They say I am black; I admit it is true:
A good, honest tint, and I love it.
I never, no, never set out to be blue;
,4 hee.n As for yellow or red, I 'm above it.
Bubble, I say, and hubble, I say!
I 'm ready to talk any time of the day.
Heap on the coals, and my song I will double;
Bub-bub-bub-bubble, bub-bubble, bub-bubble!





















IN A BO
CLOSING OUTIRhYL/
JOB LOT



-2
or


A QUEER little man kept an alphabet
shop,
And out from his counter, hippity hop,
He danced until he was ready to drop,
Singing and shouting with never a stop:
Come in, little scholars,
With bright silver dollars,
Or if you 've not any
Then come with a penny.
I have bumble Bs
And marrowfat Ps,
Some Chinese Qs


And Japanese Ts,
A flock of Js
And lots of Es,
And perfectly beautiful dark-blue Cs.
This is the place to buy your
knowledge
At cheaper rates than are given at
college! "
Then he 'd draw a long breath and spin
like a top,
This queer little man in an alphabet
shop.


~~-4
__ I
69




69







LITTLE MISCHIEF.

ONCE there was a little boy named Leslie. He lived in New York,
quite near the Central Park. He would have been a good boy if he had not
been so full of mischief. One day at the breakfast table, he upset his bowl
of milk to make his papa laugh. And when his papa did not laugh, Leslie

!








-









Sbreakfast, and he thought he never
would upset his bowl again. On the next day his nurse was going to the
Central Park with him and a little boy named Vic, who was coming to
spend the afternoon with him, so Leslie soon became very happy, and he
talked a good deal about the Park, and all he was going to show Vic there.
I'11 show him the ammamuls," said Leslie (for he had not yet learned
to say animals plainly), "and the Olbisct that great high stone thing
with writing' on it; and I 'm goin' to take him to see the sheep and the lambs
all jumpin' and playing' like everything. Can't I, Mamma ? "
Oh, yes," said his mamma; but that high stone thing in the Park is
an Obelisk. Can't you say Obelisk ?"
Olbisct," said Leslie, with such a funny twinkle in his bright eyes that
his mamma thought he could say it better if he tried very hard.
Well, at last, it was nearly time for Vic to come. Nurse washed Leslie's
face and dressed him finely to go to the Park. Then she told him he could
go down-stairs and wait till she was ready. Leslie went straight to papa's
70





room, but papa had gone up the street. So the little boy threw his
pretty velvet hat on the table, and looked about for something to do.
And now something very bad happened. A pair of scissors lay on
papa's table, and Leslie was up to mischief at once. He took the scissors
and sat down on a bench close to some books and pictures that were lying
on a big chair and oh! what do you think he did? It was dreadful.
He cut two pages of one of the books; and he pulled the pictures to
the floor. Then he began to cut one of the fine pictures!


I


Just then papa came in. He shouted to Les-
then he said he must punish his little boy for
Leslie cried very hard, for he knew he had
as soon as he heard the door-bell ring, he stopped
71


lie to stop, and
such mischief.
done wrong, but
crying, and said:





"Oh, Papa! there's Vic! I must go now. We are going with nursey
to see the ammamuls and lambs in the Park! I '11 let you punish me
a little when we get back."
But his papa said: "No, sir, you can not go to the Park to-day. You
must GO RIGHT TO BED."
Leslie cried and cried and cried, but he had to go.
Papa felt very sad, but he told Victor that Leslie could not go out
at all. Then he took Victor to the Park, himself, and showed him the
Obelisk and the lambs, and the seals, and a good many things besides.
That same evening papa carried up Leslie's supper, and talked with him
a while. He told the little boy what harm he had done, and how very
naughty it was to injure books or pictures or anything of value, and
how he hoped that after this he always could trust his little son. Then
Leslie kissed him, and promised never, never to do such mischief again.




*A*

S..L Little 3ob cad. b6
*rJrive t r \olle ob CjM rol[ [J3ob
S't, y ounr R lly obby P,
-"AI J, it for a, ctive oane cda
A 5trange as it -tho scern
cy 4rove Six WBLIeS Tit Obqs^ k
r- -nr lh .jurt 1t4 tean *
I-i W K\ A






THE BOY AND THE TOOT.
BY M. S.


Tklere wa.; a small bo wi;th a.C toot ,
Vhohom the neighbor; caI1 zthraened to foot:
But{ ihe foot hk? nQ e cda,
"w7a; F-illed full of cla ,
s\ki'ch 5topp









BOB'S WAY.


BY TUDOR JENKS.


ST. NICHOLAS belongs to Bob,
Because our Uncle Jim
When he subscribed, last Christmas Day,
Had it addressed to him.

But when it comes, why, I can't wait -
To read it -till Bob 's through;
And Bob, who 's always good to me,
Found out a way to do.

So, while he 's reading on one page,
I 'm reading on another.
It 's just like Bob.-Whatever 's his
He shares it with his brother.


M e,.
l.o.frft"


~IC~L~ ---r~__

~.-r.nruwu,~
---
I..r--~-
~.---~-*; -... .:-

___;IC~-C-
;I

a






















































"THIS HAT IS GETTING TOO SMALL FOR US."







GOOD FRIENDS.

TABBY was a great traveler. She knew every spot about the house-
from attic to cellar-and just where everything that she liked was kept.
There was hardly a rat or a mouse on the place that could hide from
her. She crawled into every dark corner of the barn; could tell the num-
ber of eggs in each hen's nest; and often she took long walks through
the fields, creeping through every hole in the fence that was as big as
her body.
Besides all this, she rode about the farm-yard a great many times. She
had merry rides with little Harry in his baby-carriage, with Johnny and
Fred as horses; she had lain curled up on the great load of hay when
Mr. Dorr and the men drove in from the fields; and she had traveled
ever so many miles in the empty wagon, when the boys played it was a
train of cars. She liked this railroad journey best; but Fred always waked
her up at every station by his loud Too-oo-oo-t! At other times, she
did not know that they were moving, even when Fred said they were dash-
ing along at a terrible rate !
But such a ride as the one I shall tell about, she never had had before in
all her life! Indeed, she would never have taken it-but she could not
help it. Ponto made her go. You see, Ponto and Tabby were good
friends. They lived and ate together; they ran races and played all sorts
of nice games; and they liked each other very much. Sometimes they had
little quarrels; but they soon forgot their anger and were friends again.
Every evening, when Ponto came into the yard, the two friends would
run down one little hill from the house and up another little hill to the
barn where Mary was milking. Ponto would keep the pigs out of the
yard, and Tabby would watch every hole in the barn floor for a rat or a
mouse. Then, when Mary was done milking, she would pour some fresh
milk into a pan for Tabby to drink.
But, after a while, there came a long rain-storm. Ponto had to stay
in the yard for two or three days. Tabby did nothing but doze! It
seemed as if it never would stop raining! But it did at last; and when
Ponto and Tabby ran down the hill again, they saw at the bottom-a
pond deep enough to drown them both!
Tabby did not know what to do. In all her travels she had never
crossed a pond of water. She was frightened, and would have gone back
to the house, but she looked toward the barn, and saw Mary and the pan
of milk waiting for her beside the door.
76






Ponto did not care for the water, for he could swim. So when they
came to the edge of the pond, he plunged in and was soon across. Then
he looked back to see what had become of Tabby. He thought she would
be at his heels.
But no There she was on the bank where he had left her. Her
back was curled up till it looked as if it were broken, and her tail was


waving over it! What in the world was the matter? She never looked
so except when she was angry.
Now, Ponto thought Tabby was a wonderful cat. He had seen her
catch rats, and he knew that she could do some things that even he could
not. Surely she can cross that pond," thought he. He did not know
what to make of it.
He called to her, with a bark. to "Jump in and swim across." But she






only replied with a cross Meouw," which he did not hear. Then he said
again, "It's easy to swim across-come on!"
"As easy as for you to climb a tree," said Tabby, in an angry way.
This was too much for Ponto! He could not climb a tree, and Tabby
knew it. When he was too rough in his play, she would run up into the
apple-tree, and there she was safe. So this reply made him angry. Tabby
should not have said it-but then, she wanted the milk!
It is so easy that I can swim across and carry you, too," thought Ponto,
and then he plunged into the water again. When he reached the shore,
he seized Tabby by the back of the neck with his teeth, and rushed back
into the water. Poor Tabby! She thought she certainly would be drowned
But Ponto knew better. He held his head so high that the water hardly
touched her pretty little paws. So she kept quiet and did not struggle. It
was not so bad after all! And besides, there was the milk!
When they landed, Tabby had a stiff neck for a while, and Ponto had to
shake his great shaggy sides until they were dry. Then they ran up the
hill as fast as they could go, and into the barn,-and almost into the milk-
pail before they could stop.
Tabby was very thankful to Ponto for this ride. She said to herself
that she would help him to climb a tree the next time that he tried. But
as she drank her milk, she was glad that they both could follow Mary home
by the long path through the orchard.
Tabby did not forget her strange ride. But she has never taught Ponto
how to climb a tree She has not even helped him up to the lowest limb.
Do you think she ever will?





GOING TO THE MOON.


IT is very easy to go up a,big hill, but what would you think of any one
who proposed to go to the moon? Once there was a man who wished to
go, and he thought and thought and thought about it, till at last he dreamed
that he was going! His dream was very pleasant indeed, but just as he
was climbing up the long stairs of the moon-station with all the other
passengers, he woke up, and that was the end of his wonderful voyage.
78







































































"ALL ABOARD FOR THE MOON"
79








THE WINDMILL.


/ I, V

t'' In /


SAID a hazy little, mazy little, lazy little boy:
"To see the windmill working so must every one annoy;
It can be stopped, I 'm sure it can, and so I 'd like to know,
What in the world can ever make a windmill want to go?"


"~B~;A




























11IXi


SAID a quizzy little, frizzy little, busy little girl:
"What can be more delightful than to see a windmill whirl?
It loves to go, I 'm sure it does, and hates to hang ker-flop;
Now, what on earth can ever make a windmill want to stop?"
6 81







GRANDMA'S NAP.
By M. M. D.

ONE day, Grand-ma went to sleep in her chair, and it near-ly turned the
town up-side down. It was only a lit-tle bit of a nap, but oh how much
trou-ble it made!
You see, be-sides the nap, there was a lit-tle boy in the house. This
lit-tle boy's name was Rob, and Rob
was so hard to watch that when his
Mam-ma went out she used to say:
Grand-ma, do you think you can
watch Rob while I go to mar-ket?"
Then Grand-ma would give a lit-tie
jump and say:
"0 of course I can."
So this day Mam-ma went to mar-
ket, and Grand-ma watched Rob as
hard as she could till the NAP came !
As soon as Rob saw the nap, he knew he was free; and off he ran.
In a mo-ment Grand-ma woke up and
saw the emp-ty room.
"Sake's a-live !" she cried, as she ran
out in-to the hall. "Where is that child ?"
He was not in the hall, nor in the yard,
nor any-where a-bout the house. Oh !
oh oh where could he be!
The poor old la-dy was.sure she nev-er
would see the dear boy a-gain. In her
fright she looked
in the beds, un-der
the beds, in the pan-try, in the coal-scut-tle, in the
ice-pitch-er, and even in the crack-er-box. Then
she ran out to a po-lice-man, and told him all
a-bout it.
"Mad-am," said the po-lice-man, "it is not like-ly
he can be found. I think he is gone for good; but
we 'll send a cri-er all over the town."
So the cri-er went all over the town with a big
bell, scream-ing:
82




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