• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 Rover runs away
 His tail is cut
 Father and mother
 Rover comes back
 Rover's story
 Rover grows fat
 Rover's games
 Tinker Tom comes back
 Rover learns to be useful
 Learning to keep sheep
 The lost sheep
 Rover is lost
 The sheep can not be found
 All come home safe
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Title: Rover and his friends
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086420/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rover and his friends
Physical Description: 55 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Carrington, Edith ( Adapter )
George Bell & Sons ( Publisher )
C. Whittingham and Co ( Printer )
Chiswick Press ( Printer )
Publisher: George Bell and Sons
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Chiswick Press ; Charles Whittingham and Co.
Publication Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sheep -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Shepherds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Summary: Rover runs away from a cruel master and is adopted by a humble shephard who is repayed for his kindness when Rover rescues sheep during a snowstorm.
Statement of Responsibility: adapted by Edith Carrington ; with pictures by Harrison Weir.
General Note: "This series is published by Messrs. Bell for the Humanitairan League"-verso of t.p. (No series title mentioned)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086420
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230583
notis - ALH0943
oclc - 244391297

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Half Title
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    List of Illustrations
        Page 6
    Rover runs away
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    His tail is cut
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Father and mother
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Rover comes back
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Rover's story
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Rover grows fat
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Rover's games
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Tinker Tom comes back
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Rover learns to be useful
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Learning to keep sheep
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The lost sheep
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Rover is lost
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The sheep can not be found
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    All come home safe
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Back Matter
        age 56
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



ti t
4Aovyvbm7; Y'Jc~~r





600


PI'P'I


















ROVER AND HIS FRIENDS

























































LOOKING FOR THE LOST SHEEP.






ROVER AND HIS

FRIENDS




ADAPTED BY
EDITH CARRINGTON
AUTHOR OF "MAN'S HELPERS," "NATURE'S WONDERS," "AGES AGO," ETC., ETC.






WITh PICTURES BY HARRISON WEIR






LONDON
GEORGE BELL AND SONS
YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN
1897





















This Series is published by Messrs. Bell for the
Humanitarian League.















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


LOOKING FOR THE LOST SHEEP F
A RUNAWAY. .
His MASTER'S BREAKFAST .
A NICE BONE .
So VERY THISTY .
A GAME AT BALL .
OFF TO THE WOOD
THE SHEPHERD'S FLOCK .
A WINTER EVENING .
ALONE WITH HIS FLOCK .


PAGE
rontispiece
9
13
19
S23
29
S33
39








ROVER AND HIS
FRIENDS.
ROVER RUNS AWAY.
AH, Rover, Rover, what will you
do now, I wonder ? You have
run away from your home, Rover,
and where will you find a new one ?
You have turned off your master,
and how will you now get an hon-
est living ? I should like to know
that, Rover.
Are you not full of shame, as
you run along the road in that way,
-with your little stumpy bit of
a tail curled down under you ?




Rover


Why is it not cocked up in the
air, as, in the very nature of things,
the tail of a dog ought to be ?
You seem half starved, poor
little Rover! You would be glad
if anyone would give you a good
dinner now, would you not ?
And how can you drink such
dirty water as that, out of such a
puddle of mud ? Are you very
thirsty, Rover ?
It is a hot day, to be sure, and it
is warm work, running so fast.
But why need you run at all, little
dog?
There is nobody behind you, to
drive you on. Why not walk, a
nice, easy, jogtrot pace now ? Tell
me that, Rover.





and his Friends.


Ah, well! Rover will not say a
word; so I must tell his story as
well as I can.


A RUNAWAY.
Rover had run away from his
master, because his master had
whipped him; and he did not like
being kicked.


\ 30
o
-L1
ts




Rover


His master was an old tinker
who used to travel about and never
stay long in one place.
He rather liked to travel; he
saw more of the world than dogs
who stayed at home.
But he could not stand being
beaten all day for nothing at all,
and never spoken kindly to.


HIS TAIL IS CUT.

WHEN Rover was quite a puppy,
his master had clipped off the
end of his tail with a pair of shears,
to make him a handsome dog, as
he said.
But it spoilt his look. If Rover





and his Friends.


had been asked first, he would have
said,-" Please to let my tail alone.
I like it best where it is."
But no one thinks it worth while
to talk to a dog on such a subject,
though he ought to be the best
judge. So the tail came off.
Rover did not like this a bit,
but he did not run away then. His
tail could not be cut off a second
time.
But he could be whipped again
and again, and he did not like being
whipped. So he ran away.
The tinker was poor, and some-
times had not enough to eat, and
then poor Rover fared badly you
may be sure. And that was how
he came to be whipped.




Rover and his Friends.


He ate up the breakfast of his
master one morning as well as his
own, and was hungry after that.
He did not mind being hungry
much, he was used to it, but he
did mind being beaten, so he ran
away from his master without say-
ing good-bye.
And so Rover ran on, and on,
and on, till he was out of sight,
and at last he saw a little cottage
with smoke coming out of the
chimney.
By the cottage door there was
a little boy, and his name was
Bonnie. He had a little sister, and
her name was Minnie.
Their .mother loved them very
dearly, and thought they were






i
> i


'-


HIS MASTER'S B3EA.FAST,




Rover


very good children. Their father,
too, was fond and proud of them.
He used to carry them on his
back and play at horses with them,
and a good many other games that
Bonnie and Minnie were fond of.


FATHER AND MOTHER.

BONNIE and Minnie, and their
mother and father, were very
happy in this little cottage, far
away from any town.
They were in a wild country,
with high hills all round, and a
great, thick, dark wood not far
off.
There were not many houses





and his Friends.


near, and sometimes they did not
see their nearest neighbour for
days and days.
Their father was not a rich man.
He had to work hard for a living.
Sometimes he went into the great
wood to cut faggots.
And sometimes he went on the
high hills to look after a small
flock of sheep, and lead them from
one feeding place to the other.
When he was caring for the
sheep, he often did not come home
to his cottage for many days.
This was his summer work. It
was in winter that he used to cut
faggots in the wood.
And then the sheep were put
into a fold near the cottage, and





Rover


fed with food which had been laid
up for them in autumn.
The sheep did not belong to him,
but to a person who lived a good
way off.
But though they were not his
own, he took great care of them,
and there was not a better shepherd
in that part of the country.
The mother of this little boy and
girl had enough to do, for when
'she was not at any other work, she
carded wool.
Then she spun it into threads to
be woven into cloth. Her spinning
wheel was never long at rest.
As she sat spinning she used to
teach Bonnie his letters and hear
him spell,





and his Friends.


Little Minnie was not old enough
for this, she could not speak plain,
but only lisped. So, she would
amuse herself with her playthings.



ROVER COMES BACK.
ONE evening in summer, Bonnie
and Minnie were eating their
supper of oatmeal cake outside the
cottage door.
Their father was a long way off
on the hills, and their mother was
spinning inside the cottage.
Bonnie and Minnie were so busy
eating that they did not look up to
see what was coming, till the little
B





Rover


girl felt something very cold rub-
bing against her hand.
Then she saw a dog close beside
her, with a little bit of a stump of
a tail wagging very fast, and his
eyes fixed in a loving way.upon her
supper.
"0 doggy, doggy, where do you
come from ?" lisped little Minnie,
not in the least afraid.
It is Rover That it is cried
out Bonnie, in great delight. It is
Rover, that belongs to old Tommy
Tinker.
"How do you come back here,
and where is your master, Rover?"
It was plain that Rover was not a
stranger to them.
No, he had been there only the





and his Friends.


week before, and while old Tinker
Tom was mending the kettle they
had made friends with Rover, and
he with them.


A NICE BONE.


The mother of Bonnie and Minnie
had found him a bone, for she had
felt pity for the poor, thin doggie,
whose master spoke to him so
gruffly.





Rover


And now Rover knew that he
would meet kind friends at the cot-
tage, for though people forget a
kindness, the poor dog never does.
He is always grateful.
But Rover could not answer the
question, "Where is your master?"
which Minnie had asked him.
All he could do was to look
pleased and wag his short tail
faster than ever, and smell at her
oatcake as if to say, Please give
me a bit."


20




and his Friends. 21

ROVER'S STORY.

BUT Rover could not speak. If
he could have spoken, he would
have said: I ran away from old
Tommy Tinker, because I do not
like being whipped.
"And I have been running,
running all day till I am very tired;
and I have had nothing to eat all
-day since breakfast.
And then I did not get enough,
and Tinker Tom is a great way off,
I hope, for I do not want ever to
see him again.
I came here because you were
kind to me when I was here before,
and I thought you would be kind
again.




Rover and his Friends.


"I knew you would give me
something to eat and drink, and
not beat me. And here I am, you
see; so pray give me some supper."
This would have been a long
speech for a dog to make; and
Rover did not make it in so many
words.
But he looked as much of it as
he could. And Bonnie was able to
see quite well what he meant.
"0 Rover Rover, you have run
away from your master, I suppose,
naughty dog!" said Bonnie.
And Rover left off wagging his
bit of a tail that very minute and
hung down his head. Then he
gazed at Bonnie in a pleading way.
You do not know how hard it

























SO VERY THIRSTY,


~j~





Rover


is to be beaten and kicked always
for no reason at all, and to have no
one to love you a bit."
His sad eyes seemed to say this,
and then the little boy saw how
thin the poor sides of the dog
looked.
You are hungry and thirsty and
tired, are you not ? said Bonnie.
And Rover whined, as much as to
say, To be sure I am."
"Rover, Rover, have some cake?"
said little Minnie, as plainly as she
could, and she held out a bit of her
supper to him.
It was soon down Rover's throat,
and he wagged his tail brisker than
ever, which meant, "Thank you,
Minnie," as plain as could be.


24





and his Friends.


ROVER GROWS FAT.

T HEN Bonnie and Minnie called
their mother; and she had pity
on poor Rover, and gave him a large
bowl of water.
This he lapped quite up, and had
something to eat as well. Then
she made a bed for poor Rover in
one corner of the fireplace.
She said, "Perhaps his master,
old Tinker Tom, is coming this way
again; and we will take care of
Rover till he comes."
Rover hoped that he was not
coming that way again. But he
could not say so. And he was glad
to curl himself up, and go to sleep.


25




Rover


Rover soon made himself quite
at home with Bonnie and Minnie.
He did not at all seem to wish to
run away from them.
And theyhad no wish to partwith
him. But, of course, the children
thought Tom was sure to ,come
some day to take away their pet.
But day after day went away, and
no Tinker Tom came. And each day
Rover was well fed, so that he began
to look quite sleek and pretty.
His curly coat shone like silk.
And to show how happy he was,
and how grateful to his new friends,
he became very playful.
Rover seemed to be growing back
again into a puppy, he was so full
of funny tricks.




and his Friends.


He was never tired of romping.
And he made up all the games him-
self without being taught.
They did not tease or worry
Rover to learn things which seem
like a hard lesson to a dog. But
they let him play in his own way,
and a very funny way it was.


ROVER'S GAMES.

SOMETIMES Bonnie said to
Rover, "Catch your tail, Rover!"
And then Rover would run round
and round, trying to catch the end
of his tail.
Of course it was of no use his
trying to do that, it had been cut off




Rover


so short, and was such a little bit
of a stump of a tail.
Then Bonnie taught him to know
what he said, by taking pains to
talk to him.
Dogs like that, and are quite
clever at learning words. Though
they cannot answer, they like to
know what we say.
Soon Rover knew what it meant
when Bonnie said, Let us go for
a walk," even when the door was
shut and Bonnie was sitting at the
table.
ButBonnie never said this unless
he meant to take Rover out, or the
dog would have learnt that he did
not mean what he said.
Then Rover learned to shake





and his Friends. 29
hands of his own accord, by putting
his paw on the knee of Minnie.
One of the things which Rover
liked best was to run after a great

* -







A GAME AT BALL.
ball of wool that Bonnie made on
purpose for a game.
Bonnie, Minnie, and Rover used
to go to the top of a hill, very near
the cottage.





Rover


With all his might, Bonnie threw
the ball down the hill for Rover to
run after.
Sometimes he was so eager to
catch the ball that he tumbled over
and over, and rolled head over heels
down to the bottom of the hill!
But he did not mind it a bit.
He thought it all fine fun, and
always got the ball at last, and ran
back with it in his mouth.
Sometimes Bonnie would say,
"Take it to Minnie;" and Rover
was so clever that he knew what
that meant.
He soon knew the names of each
person in the cottage, and would
go from one to the other when he
was sent.





and his Friends. 31

TINKER TOM COMES BACK.

BUT one day, a good while after
they had had the little dog, as
they were playing this game, Rover
did not come back with the ball.
Instead of that, when he got to
the bottom of the hill he looked
round, and then ran off as fast as
he could with his little bit of a tail
hanging down.
He had not stopped running
when Bonnie and Minnie lost sight
of him, and that was not till he
had run right into the great wood.
What now, Rover ? What now ?
Ah, your old sly trick again, Rover?
running away ? Why, you silly




Rover


old dog, do you not know when
you are well off?
Why, you have been well fed,
and have been able to play all day
long, and have had a nice warm
bed to sleep on at night.
And you have not been whipped,
Rover, but have been well treated.
What do you run away for ?
Ha, ha! Cunning Rover! Sharp-
eyed Rover! He knew what he
was about, old Rover did.
Look along that path, Bonnie,
quite the other way from the great
wood, and, a great way off yet,
who is it you see ?
Tinker Tom, to be sure! with
his pack on his back. Rover has
no mind to belong to Tinker Tom


32





and his Friends.


again, to
starved.


be whipped and half ,


R "


OFF TO THE WOOD.

So Rover stole himself away in
time, wise Rover! funny Rover!
Tinker Tom did not care.





Rover


He said he did not want Rover
back any more, when he heard
where he was. They might keep
Rover, he said.
But he himself was hungry, and
would be glad of a bit of bread.
If Bonnie's and Minnie's mother
would give him that, they might
keep Rover and welcome.



ROVER LEARNS TO BE
USEFUL.
S Tinker Tom got a good hot
dinner and then he went away
again with his pack on his back.
No trace of Rover was to be





and his Friends.


seen, he had not come out of the
thick wood.
Cunning Rover! When Tinker
Tom had been gone a good long
time, and it was getting dark, back
came Rover again.
I guess he had watched while he
was in the wood, and seen his old
master go away, and had given him
time to get ever so far, before he
came near the cottage again.
And when he did come in, he
looked so pleased and proud, and
he frisked about as if he had done
some mighty wise thing.
He said as plainly as he could
speak, "Do you not think your
Rover a clever dog now ?"
And Bonnie and Minnie were


35




Rover


glad, you may be sure, when they
knew that Rover was their very
own.
But, as he was to belong to very
poor people, the dog must try to be
useful. Rover would be glad enough
to do all he could" for them.
Rover must work now. When
the father of Bonnie and Minnie
came home one day from the hills,
he said,
We must not let Rover be idle
all his life. He must do something
to get an honest living.
I shall take him with me to
the hills in the morning, and teach
him to do what the dog of a shep-
herd ought.
"He will help me nicely if he


36




and his Friends.


will take to the trade, and I shall
be a gentle master to him."
So the next morning Rover went
off to the hills with Bonnie's father.
And if ever a dog looked proud and
pleased, it was he.
His master had a long crook in
his hand, but Rover knew that he
would not be hit with it.


LEARNING TO KEEP SHEEP.
AT first it was a good deal of
trouble to teach Rover to take
care of sheep in the right way.
It was good fun to be sure to
run after them and bark at their
heels in a pleasant, playful way.




Rover and his Friends.


But he did not know when to
bark and when to be quiet, and
though he tried ever so hard, he
could not find out all that his master
told him to do.
But he did better each day, and
when the shepherd went home
next, he said that Rover was a
good dog, and would be very useful
some day.
And, indeed, by the time that
the summer was over and the sheep
brought home, Rover had become
a first-rate sheep-dog.
Bonnie and Minnie were very
glad to hear this, and. they were
very glad, too, to have their old
friend Rover back again to play
with.



















































THE SHEPHERD'S FLOCK.




Rover


Rover was glad also; so they
were all glad and happy at the cot-
tage, though the weather was very
cold.
Snow had begun to fall, and it
was nice to sit by the wood fire
which crackled in the grate.
While Rover and his master had
been away, the mother of the
children had not been idle,'nor had
Bonnie.
She had spun a great deal of
wool and made it up into winter
clothes, and Bonnie had begun to
learn how to knit stockings.
He would soon be able, he thought,
to knit a pair for his father for his
birthday.
He had learned to read, too, as




and his Friends.


well as to spell, and he had taught
little Minnie her letters out of his
own book.
And so, all through the winter,
Rover's master made faggots in the
wood.
Sometimes Rover went with him
and sometimes he stopped at home,
but he was a very happy dog in
either place.


THE LOST SHEEP.

AT night they all sat round the
blazing logs and were as happy
as happy could be, though summer
was gone and there were no flowers
for Minnie to gather.





42 Rover
But one night the sheep were so
silly as to get out of the shed,
and when morning came not one
of them could be seen.
Poor things! They had got
tired of being shut up, and they
did not think how cold it was
outside.
There was great trouble then.
The shepherd went to the cottage
and said, "Rover, my boy, the
sheep are away! What shall we
do?"
"Ah, Rover, Rover, now is the
time for you to show your thanks
for a good home and a kind mas-
ter!
Jump up, Rover, and let us see
whether you are wise enough to





and his Friends. 43

help now." It was just as if Rover


A WINTER EVENING.
could tell each word and what it
meant!
Up he jumped and gave his coat




Rover


a shake, as if to say, I am ready,"
and ran out at the door.
First he began to run round and
round the shed and the fold, smell-
ing, with his moist black nose close
to the ground, and looking very
busy and knowing.
That was his way of asking the
question, "Now, where on earth
have these poor things gone ?"
After a few minutes spent in
sniffing, Rover trotted up to his
master, stared up into his face with
an earnest look, and gave a low
whine.
Next he ran a little way towards
the hills, and stood looking back at
him with one paw lifted up and the
rest on the ground.





and his Friends.


Rover, with his ears cocked and
his eyes bright, was trying to say
to his master,
These childish sheep have gone
astray to the hills. Are you coming
with me, or shall I go alone ?"


ROVER IS LOST.

THEN off he trotted towards the
hills, his master coming after;
but he could not walk fast enough
to please Rover.
There was no snow on the
ground when they set out, but
before noon it began to come down
very fast.
The mother of Bonnie and Minnie





Rover


was in great distress to think that
their father was out on the hills in
such weather.
She was afraid that he would
lose his way. Many people had
been lost on the hills in the snow.
And more than one had died from
cold and hunger among the snow-
drifts there in the valleys.
Bonnie and Minnie were quite
sad, for they could not help think-
ing of their loving father and his
faithful doggie out in such danger.
Night came on, and there was
no father yet. At last they heard
him coming; a footstep drew near
and a hand was heard lifting the
latch.
He set the door open and came





and his Friends. 47
in, shaking the snow from his
boots and taking off his great rough
coat.
Though he was all white with
snow, and chilled, and tired, and
was very hungry, and felt ready to
drop, this was not the reason why
he looked so grave.
He had lost his way more than
once on the hills, and had had
nothing to eat all day, his feet were
sore and half frozen; but that was
not the worst.
He had not found the sheep:
that was one thing. And he had
lost poor Rover! That was a sad,
sad thing.
He could not help a tear from
falling as he thought of it all.





Rover


" The poor foolish sheep will all
die from being frozen," he said.
"We shall be blamed for their
loss, and I shall have to give up
all I have in the world to pay for
them."



THE SHEEP CAN NOT BE
FOUND.
BONNIE and Minnie both began
to cry, and their mother could
not help crying too.
But she made some broth for her
poor tired husband, and begged him
to take it.
And little Minnie crept between




and his Friends.


the knees of her father and looked
up in his face rather as Rover
might have done.
She begged him in her baby talk
to eat up his nice supper. The
father did eat some, and he was all
the better for it.
But he could not help thinking
all the time of the poor sheep and
Rover, who had no supper that
night.
Next morning, long before it was
light, the shepherd went out again
to look for his sheep.
The next day after that he did
the same, spending the whole long
day on the cold hills, and he did it
again on the third day.
But they were days full of sor-





Rover


row. The sheep were nowhere to
be found, nor poor Rover either.
No person whom the shepherd
met had seen them or heard of
them, nor did he meet many people
on the hills.
One day he came home and said,
"It is of no use looking for the
sheep any more.
"They are all dead long before
now, I should think, and they lie
buried under the snowdrifts among
the hills.
"As for the faithful dog, he, of
course, stayed by them if he found
them, and if he could not find them
he would not come away without
them.
"In any case my poor Rover is





and his Friends.


dead by this time." And he turned
his back to hide his tears.
There is nothing now for me to
do, wife, but to go to the owner of the
sheep and tell him the truth about
how they got out of the shed.
"He is a hard man, and he will
turn us out- of the cottage. You
and the children will have to leave.
It was a bad night for us when the
sheep strayed !"


ALL COME HOME SAFE.

BUT while he was saying these
sadwords he heard a great noise
outside his cottage.
And Bonnie heard it, and Minnie




Rover and his Friends.


heard it, and their mother heard
it. They all ran out to the cottage
door.
"Baa-baa !" "Bow-wow-wow !"
"Baa-baa-baa!" "Bow-wow-wow!"
What could be the meaning of
those noises ?
It was very plain what the mean-
ing was.
"There is Rover come back,
father shouted Bonnie, before he
reached the door.
"Rover's come back !" cried out
little Minnie. "And the sheep are
come back! said their mother.
Yes, there the sheep were, every
one of them; and there was poor
Rover, as glad as any of his friends.
But, dear dear! so tired with


52





















































ALONE WITS HIS FLOCK,





Rover


running, and so hoarse with bark-
ing, and so hungry!
It would have made you sad to
see the plight he was in, and the
poor sheep too. They had paid
dearly for their wish to get out.
Poor things, they were thankful
enough to be put into their cosy
shed and get a nice meal of turnips.
And as for Rover, you may be
sure that he was served as if he
had been a prince that night, as
well he deserved.
For what prince could have done
as he did, or would have done it if
he could ?
It was a fine dish of food that
Rover got, and a grand bed that
was made up for him, and a nice





and his Friends. 55
long nap that he took by the fire
after his long toil.
But how far Rover had tramped
over the hills for them, or how he
had found them and driven that
lot of timid things safe home-ah !
nobody can know.
That was Rover's secret, and he
kept it to himself.
Good Rover! Clever, grateful,
faithful Rover!






























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