Tecumseh's young braves

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Material Information

Title:
Tecumseh's young braves a story of the Creek war
Series Title:
War of 1812 series
Physical Description:
1, 356, 8 p., 8 leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Tomlinson, Everett T ( Everett Titsworth ), 1859-1931
Lee and Shepard ( Publisher )
Rockwell and Churchill ( Printer )
Publisher:
Lee and Shepard Publishers
Place of Publication:
Boston
Manufacturer:
Rockwell and Churchil
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1896

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cruelty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Creek War, 1813-1814 -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Battles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Indians -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- War of 1812   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Everett T. Tomlinson.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002393446
notis - ALZ8348
oclc - 18217092
lccn - 08028253
System ID:
UF00086411:00001


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WAR OF 1812 SERIES
BY EVERETT T. TOMLINSON
Illustrated per volume $1.50


The Search for Andrew Field
The Boy Soldiers of 1812
The Boy Officers of 1812
Tecumseh's Young Braves
Other volumes in preparation
Sold separately
Catalogues of over one thousand volumes sent free
on application











































































'I /

-, -/ ----



"Horse and rider both left the bluff."
Page 217.









WAR OF 1812 SERIES


TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES



A STORY OF THE CREEK WAR




BY

EVERETT T. TOMLINSON
AUTHOR OF "THE SEARCH FOR ANDREW FIELD" THE BOY
SOLDIERS OF I812 "THE BOY OFFICERS OF 1812"
"THREE COLONIAL BOYS" "THREE YOUNG
CONTINENTALS ETC.











BOSTON
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
Io MILK STREET
1897

































COPYRIGHT, I896, BY LEE AND SHEPARD

All rights reserved

TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


























OnsttltnI tan (IrUA ill
BOSTON, U.S.A.
























to

THE SONS AND DAUGHTERS

OF THE.

SOCIETY OF THE WAR OF 1812













PREFACE


T HAT portion of the War of 1812--the struggle
with the hostile Creeks- which furnishes the
historical setting of this story, has been strangely
neglected by historians and story writers alike.
And yet few chapters in our national history have
furnished more examples of personal courage and
daring. The intelligence and tenacity of the war-
riors, the influence of the English and Spanish
plotters, the character of the leaders among the
Creeks and Americans, all combined to make this
struggle a memorable one. Heroic action, fiendish
cruelty, plot and counter-plot, were mingled more
after the style of romance than of actual events.
But many of the deeds which I have endeavored to
weave into this story are vouched for by the best
historians, and even in the most exciting portions of
this book I have kept within the limits of the records.
The visit of Tecumseh and his band from the
Northwest, the fight which Sam Dale had in the
large canoe, the leap of Weatherford and his horse
from the high bluff at the "holy ground," and even
the escape of a prisoner who remained under the








6 PREFACE

water, breathing through the long joint of a cane,
are dwelt upon in the early records, and many of the
deeds long remained as the themes of fireside stories
and border songs.
In the historical references I have drawn freely
from Lossing, Pickett, Drake, Jenkins, and Halbert
and Ball, and here wish to acknowledge my indebted-
ness to them.
EVERETT T. TOMLINSON.













CONTENTS


CHAPTER PAGE
I. LEAVING HOME .... .. 9
II. THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH .. .. 20
III. AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL .. 31
IV. A CHANGE IN THE PLAN. . 41
V. To THE FORT ... ........ 51
VI. LIFE AT FORT MIMS .. . 60
VII. IN THE WOODS AGAIN . 69
VIII. THE MASSACRE . ... .78
IX. THE RETURN . ... .88
X. THE SPEECH OF TECUMSEH'S YOUNG
BRAVE .. ... .97
XI. IN THE ALABAMA . .. 106
XII. SAM DALE'S ENCOUNTER . .. 114
XIII. ANDREW JACKSON . .. 122
XIV. TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES AGAIN 136
XV. THE SEARCH FOR JOSIAH ... .146
XVI. JOSIAH'S MESSAGE .... .155
XVII. JERRY DEPARTS .... . .164
XVIII. THE PIECE OF CANE .. 173
XIX. JOSIAH REAPPEARS . ... .182
XX. THE PLACE OF TORMENT ... 192
XXI. AT THE STAKE ... .201
XXII. ECONOCHACA . . .211
XXIII. AN INTERRUPTED PASSAGE ... .220









CONTENTS


CHAPTER
XXIV.
XXV.
XXVI.
XXVII.
XXVIII.
XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.
XXXIII.
XXXIV.
XXXV.


PAGE
230
241
252
263
272
282
292
301
313
323
334
. 345


FOLLOWED . .
EMUCFAU . .
THE WRESTLERS . .
THE CANE-COVERED CAVES
THE SOLITARY GUARD .
WHERE WERE THE BRAVES? .
JERRY'S VENTURE . .
A DISTURBED PARTY .
UP THE COOSA . .
HORSE SHOE BEND ..
THE SEARCH FOR NANCE .
CONCLUSION . .



















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS




Page
" HORSE AND RIDER BOTH LEFT THE BLUFF" Frontispiece
" THE HUNTER WAS LEADING THE WAY" .. 51
"HE DROVE HIS BAYONET INTO THE INDIAN'S HEART," 119
" THE SIGHT OF THE FIRE SEEMED TO INCREASE THE
FURY OF THE SPECTATORS" . ... 198
" HE WAS THROWN HEADLONG AND HARD UPON THE
GROUND". . . . 261
" JUST BEFORE THEM THEY COULD SEE THE CAMP" 309
"MAJOR MONTGOMERY WAS THE FIRST TO SPRING
UPON THE BREASTWORKS" . .. .329
"I AM IN YOUR POWER. DO WITH ME AS YOU
PLEASE" . . . 336














TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


CHAPTER I

LEAVING HOME

" USH her off, Tom. Let her go."
S"All right, Jerry, but it's hard to get this
strange-looking craft started."
At the words of his brother, Tom Curry pushed
the "strange-looking craft," as he called it, out from
the bank, and slowly it moved into the river. And
strange-looking, indeed, it was !
It was a crude craft in which the logs had been
fastened together with thongs of deer-hide, and over
which rough boards had been nailed to the logs
beneath. A rough bow had been fashioned, and near
the stern what might have been called a little house,
or cabin, had been erected. This, more properly still,
perhaps, might have been termed a shelter, as it was
enclosed on three sides, and was the only place which
had been provided within which the members of the
party could sleep.









TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


Long poles and rough-looking oars were on the
sides of the raft, and altogether the structure bore
more of a resemblance to some of the modern house-
boats than it did anything else, only a house-boat"
had never been heard of in those days. Perhaps
it might have been likened to some of the floating
homes that to-day are to be found on the lakes and
canals, providing at the same time a shelter, a home,
and a means of transportation from one place to
another.
Yet, strange as was the craft, far stranger were the
crew and the passengers. Over the rough boards
that covered the raft a few chickens were moving,
and a pig also could have -been seen there; but in
addition to the live-stock, there was among others the
young individual we have already heard addressed
as "Tom."
He was one of two boys, or young men, on board,
about seventeen years of age, who very strongly
resembled each other. In fact, it had been a stand-
ing joke with them for some time that each was con-
stantly liable to mistake himself for the other, and
that frequently in the morning when he awoke he
addressed himself as his brother.
They also declared that so many mistakes concern-
ing their identity had been made since their child-
hood, that the only thing each was certain of now
was that he must be the other one and not himself.








LEAVING HOME


The resemblance was not to be wondered at, for they
were twin brothers, and rejoiced in the names of Tom
and Jerry.
There was, however, nothing in their make-up to
remind one of that strange sign, Tom and Jerry,"
frequently seen in the streets of our cities to-day, and
the only account they had of the origin of their
names was the fondness of their father in the years
past for that much-advertised beverage.
Near these boys was standing a girl, perhaps a
year and a half younger than they, and yet she was
nearly as large; and from her features any one at
once would have perceived that she was a sister of
both. She was strong and fearless, and could wield
an oar with either of them, and more than once she
had carried a gun when the boys had started into
the forest to search for a bear which had carried off
some helpless grunterr."
This girl was frequently addressed as Nance," and
apparently the boys were depending upon her as one
of their aids in this expedition upon which they were
so strangely starting.
Two younger children also were on the raft, and a
woman who evidently was the mother of all the
young persons we have mentioned. She, however,
appeared to be the least interested member of the
party. She seemed to be worn and weary, and as she
held the younger children in her lap, frequently look-








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


ing back at the bank they were leaving, she uttered
many complaints, and in a fretful, scolding way
bewailed the misfortunes which had overtaken her.
But the girl was as cheery and brave as her mother
was fretful, and the younger children were more
interested in the departure than in the complaints
they heard, to which it was evident they long had
been accustomed.
The time when our story begins was on a bright
summer day in 1813. The broad river on which our
party had set sail was the Alabama. Along the shore,
which they were now leaving, grew rushes rank and
tall, while in places marshes and bogs could be seen,
and behind all stretched the woods, fading away in
the distance.
It was early in the morning, and even the slow-fly-
ing birds apparently had a little more life than usual.
The ever-present crow made all aware of his presence,
and with his hoarse calls followed our voyagers, either
from curiosity as to their movements or in the hope
that something would be left by them for him.
Although it was early in the morning the heat was
intense, and the yellow glare of the sun spread over
the river and the forests alike, and soon the members
of our party were sweltering beneath it. It was a
strange voyage which they had begun, but adventures
far more strange were before them.
The boat, propelled by the long oars, moved steadily








LEAVING HOME


onward. The boys had kept her all the time near the
shore, and even though they were going down stream
they had not dared to venture out into the channel.
A light wind was blowing, and they were talking of
taking advantage of it by rigging a small sail which
they had brought with them.
As the boys handled the oars, the girl, whom, as
we have said, they frequently addressed as "Nance,"
used a long pole, and with it not merely guided
the raft, but assisted in sending it forward.
Their streaming faces and panting breath soon com-
pelled them all to stop for a time, and the only force
that sent the strange craft onward was the little sail
near the bow which with much difficulty they at
last had succeeded in rigging.
"Why do you stop ?" asked the woman, in a com-
plaining tone. "We never ought to have begun at
all. It's all your fault, boys, for if you had followed
my advice we never should have left our home on
this wild-goose chase. Oh, dear! I don't believe
there ever was a woman who had such misfortunes
as I. It's nothing but bad luck and sorrow every
day."
Tom was silent while his mother spoke, but after a
moment's pause he cheerily replied, It's too hot for
such hard work, mother. We must save our strength,
for there is no knowing when we shall have to use it
all."








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


"But I've-no strength to save," replied the com-
plaining woman. "Nothing but bad luck has come
to us ever since your father fell under that tree. He
would drink so much, and that's what he got for it
all. I don't know but this is worse than the broken
leg he had, and the long fever through that winter
before he died. Oh, dear! He was too fond of Tom
and Jerry.'"
But you know we're doing the best we can now,"
replied Tom.
"I suppose you think you are," said his mother.
"If I was one that ever complained, I suppose I
should say something about the foolish way in which
we have left everything we owned behind us and
started out on this river. Nothing but bad luck,"
she added, moaning and shaking her head, "ever
since we came here. I don't know why we ever left
York State. We were well enough off there, and
in the place which we've just left the Injuns never
threatened us."
But you were poor, mother," replied Tom, who,
although he was accustomed to the constant com-
plainings of his mother, yet looked at her with a feel-
ing of compassion, for her lot had been a hard one,
and many trials and bitter experiences had come to
her during the ten years in which they had lived on
the little plot of land they had taken near the Ala-
bama river.








LEAVING HOME


"But we were poor," repeated Tom, "and father
thought there would be no chance for you at all there
in York State, and you know how he listened to the
stories they told of what could be done here. I've
heard him tell it from beginning to end, lots of
times."
"Yes, he was poor then, but he is dead now; and
here we are out on this river poorer than ever we
were. We've not even a home now, and everything
we own in the world we've left behind us." And
without a tear, but with a prolonged whine, she
turned and looked towards the place which she had
called home, and which still could be seen in the
distance.
The little hut, or house, of logs in which they had
lived for ten years was yet visible to all, standing out
as it did on the bluff behind them, and they stood for
a moment sadly looking back at the scene. The two
cows which they had owned, and the poor old horse
also, were within sight, and appeared to be watching
the departing party as if surprised that they should"
be left behind.
"They'll not go far away, mother," said Tom,
speaking aloud the thought that was in his own mind,
and which he suspected was in his mother's also.
"They'll not go far away. We've often turned them
out for five or six weeks at a time, and left them to
shirk for themselves. The creek is right above, and








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


just below our place is the best feed there is along
the river for miles."
But suppose they don't keep near the river," said
his mother.
Oh, but they will! replied Tom. "The feed is
better there, and besides they'll keep hear home, and
the alligators will stop them from swimming the
creek."
"Oh, but the Injuns may get them! again com-
plained the woman, as if determined to see nothing
but the dark side. Those awful Injuns though
to me they always seemed good enough. I never had
any trouble with them, and I don't believe half the
stories that are told about their cruelty. Ever since
we nursed Kanawlohalla through his long sickness
they've been the best neighbors we've ever had."
But Tom became silent again, and watched the
waters over which they were passing. He had
little hope that they would escape the notice of the
Indians on their voyage, and yet it was for that very
purpose that our party were embarked on their
strange craft, and were leaving behind them almost
all their possessions.
It was a heavy care for boys no older than they,
and yet they had kept from their mother the full
knowledge they had of the dangers to be feared from
the Indians of that region.
There are a couple of Indians down on the shore








LEAVING HOME


now," said Jerry to his brother as he approached.
"Do you see them? "
Yes; but what are we to do? We can't steer this
raft out into the river," replied Tom.
"No; the only thing we can do is to go on, and act
as though we were not afraid. If these two are all there
are, there won't be any trouble."
I know who they are," said Jerry, a moment later.
"It's Kanaw and Captain Jim, and yet it would be
hard work to recognize them if we didn't know them
pretty well."
The young Indians, who stood upon the shore in
their war-paint, and motionless as the trees, looked
the very personification of savage life. They were
both young, not much if any older than the boys
in our party. They waited until the raft came op-
posite, and then, with a wave of the hand down the
stream, as if indicating the necessity of haste, they
themselves quickly turned into the forest and dis-
appeared.
"Yes, they are Tecumseh's young braves, that's
sure," said Jerry, "though I didn't see where Con-
dawhaw was. He certainly wasn't with them."
"I don't care where he was," replied his brother.
"They wouldn't have come down to the bank and
waited for us to pass if there hadn't been some need
of it. It means that we've got to hurry, and it won't
do for us to crawl along with just this little breath of








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


wind." And both boys with new zeal and a deepen-
ing fear once more took up the long oars and began
to row.
Tom looked about to see if his mother had noticed
the hail they had received from the shore, but she
had gone inside of the rude shanty they had erected,
and taken the children; and as the need of greater haste
had not been discovered by her, Tom encouraged his
brother, and both began to exert all their strength
at the oars. The clumsy raft began to move more
rapidly, although to the eager boys it seemed as
though their speed had not perceptibly increased.
"What is it, Tom ?" asked Nance, as a few mo-
ments later she approached her brother.
Oh, nothing much, but we've got to jog on,"
replied Tom. "Don't be frightened, Nance; it's
nothing new, only the same reason that made us
leave home, makes us want to leave it farther and
faster behind us now."
"Nobody knows what the next few miles will
show," said Nance, "but you can't fool me, either
one of you. I know you've seen something that's
frightened you, and you're trying to go faster on that
account. What can I do to help?"
"Well, to be honest, Nance," replied her brother,
" I am in a hurry to get beyond that point yonder as
soon as I can, for there's no knowing what may hap-
pen to us there."








LEAVING HOME


I'll take the pole again," said the resolute girl;
" I know I can help some." And suiting the action
to her word, she began to work again with the long
and clumsy pole. They kept on in their course,
watchful of the shore and apparently forgetful of
the heat, which every moment became more and more
intense.
The "point to which Tom had referred was a
little peninsula jutting out into the river, and was
about a mile and a half farther down the stream. It
was covered with trees which would afford an excel-
lent hiding-place for any party that might wish to
attack them and yet remain concealed themselves.
The river was narrower there, and as the channel
made in nearer the shore, the danger would be greatly
increased. The warning signal of the young braves
added to the fear of the boys, and they knew that they
were approaching one of the perils of their voyage.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


CHAPTER II

THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH

N order to understand something of the meaning of
the incident related in the previous chapter, it is
necessary for us to describe some of the movements
of the nations which then were struggling in the
southern part of what is now the territory of the
United States.
Mississippi was already a Territory, having been
organized in 1798, and at this time had a regular
assembly and a full political organization.
By an act of Georgia, in the spring of 1802 about
a hundred thousand square miles, which now consti-
tute the State of Alabama, came into the possession
of the United States. It was very sparsely settled,
and the Indians were numerous and powerful. In the
east were the Creeks and Cherokees, and in the west
were the Choctaws and Chickasaws.
France had owned the vast and not very clearly
defined region of the valley of the Mississippi, and
the domain that was watered by its tributaries.
This region extended from the Gulf of Mexico to the








THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH


forty-ninth parallel of latitude, and westward to the
South Sea (Pacific Ocean). But in 1763, France,
after the European struggle in which she had not been
successful, ceded to England all of the region east of
the Mississippi except Florida, and to Spain all that
was west of the river.
In 1802, however, it was learned, to the great cha-
grin of the Americans, that Spain, by a secret treaty,
had given to France all of Louisiana that was in her
possession, and also east and west Florida. This
would give France, now powerful and ambitious, the
control of the navigation of the Mississippi, and would
be a perpetual menace to the United States.
Thomas Jefferson, clearly foreseeing all that this
would mean, at once entered into negotiations with
Mr. Livingston, then our ambassador to France, for
the purchase of New Orleans, at least.
By wise movements, and the secret threat of an alli-
ance with Great Britain, the Americans were surprised
as well as delighted when they found the French ready
to sell all they had of Louisiana, and for the sum of
fifteen million dollars the purchase was effected. It
was then that Bonaparte uttered that oft-quoted
sentiment: "This accession of territory strengthens
forever the power of the United States; and I have
just given to England a maritime rival that will
sooner or later humble her pride."
But all this was exceedingly distasteful to the








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


Spaniards. They were left in possession of the
Floridas, but began in a very treacherous manner to
act with the British, and many complications arose
about the time of the War of 1812. Movements had
been inaugurated previous to the war which finally
led to the possession of both Floridas by the United
States, and while Louisiana was admitted as a State
on the 8th of April, 1812, insurrection and constant
trouble followed. General Wilkinson had gained
Mobile, and the Spaniards had withdrawn to Pensa-
cola, where the British also were very active.
In the autumn of 1812, after Hull had surrendered
the Michigan territory, Tecumseh, who already had
been among the southern Indians, again went south.
With him went his brother, the Prophet," and about
thirty warriors. There can be little doubt that the
great Indian was a devoted patriot and lover of his
own kindred, and that his supreme desire was to
drive the white men from the country and restore the
land once more to his own people. But he was aided
by the British, and incited by them to do his utmost
to arouse in the Indians a spirit of revolt against the
Americans.
As the party passed on, the Choctaws and Chicka-
saws refused to listen to their words, but among the
Creeks and Seminoles they found many eager to join
them.
Tecumseh and his party journeyed on to Coosawda,








THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH


on the Alabama, and at the "Hickory Ground" he
addressed a great assembly of the Creeks. This was
late in October, 1812. His eloquence, zeal, and
burning enthusiasm, in addition to the fame he
already had won as a warrior, gained him many fol-
lowers.
He then crossed the Coosa and went on to Toocka-
batcha, the ancient capital of the Creeks. There
Colonel Hawkins, the United States Indian agent,
had called a great council, and five thousand Indians
had responded. In the assembly there were also
many negroes and white men.
Among the latter were our two boys, Tom and
Jerry Curry. Their home was not many miles dis-
tant from the meeting-place, and thither they had
come with three young Creek Indians who for years
had been their playmates and friends. These Indian
boys rejoiced in the names of Kanawlohalla (which
meant a head on a pole), Quilutimac, and Condawhaw;
but their white companions never called them by
their proper names, either because the names them-
selves were almost unpronounceable, or because the
custom of the times was to give the red men a
"white name. As a consequence the boys always
called Quilutimac "Captain Jim"--in honor of
Captain Jim Fife, a noted half-breed warrior.
Tom and Jerry long had been warm friends of
these Indian boys, and spoke their language almost








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


as well as the Indians did theirs, which is saying a
good deal. They had hunted and fished and camped
together, and at their -home Captain Jim had been
nursed through a long illness. Their kindness and
care seemed to have been appreciated by the young
Indians, and as we shall see farther on in our story
became the cause of many deeds that greatly aided
them, and perhaps saved the life of more than one.
The boys were seated on the ground with their
friends when the great Tecumseh approached the
assembly. He and his warriors had remained among
the outer spectators until the close of the first day's
address of the agent. Then at the head of his thirty
warriors, all naked except for their ornaments and flaps,
their heads adorned with eagles' feathers and their
faces painted black, with great dignity, they marched
into the centre of the square. Buffalo-tails dragged
behind them, suspended from their waists, and also
were hung from their arms.
Their appearance was hideous in the extreme, and
yet as they marched around and around in the square,
the boys noticed how attentive the Indian assembly
was, and how impressed their young friends were by
the appearance and movements of the great chief and
his party.
After they had gone around the square a number
of times they approached each chief and gave the
Indian salutation, which was a shake of the hand at








THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH


arm's length. Then they exchanged tobacco, which
was a token of enduring friendship.
"Captain Isaac doesn't seem to warm up to
Tecumseh very fast," said Jerry to Captain Jim,
who was seated next to him; but his friend made
no reply except to scowl as he listened to Captain
Isaac, one of the leading chiefs, who boldly declared
that Tecumseh was a bad man," and shook, with
great contempt, at the warrior the buffalo horns which
he wore on his head.
In this state Tecumseh appeared in the square
each day, and each day our boys returned to the
council, fascinated and yet fearful. But when Haw-
kins, the Indian agent, departed, the great chief kept
,silence no longer. That night there was a grand
council packed with eager and excited listeners.
The Indian boys had been silent during three days,
and Tom and Jerry were more and more fearful of
the influences at work upon them.
And yet the boys themselves were greatly moved
by the warrior from the Northwest as he spoke that
night. His words were as eloquent as they were
dangerous, and the speaker seemed to be almost on
fire. He pictured the condition of the Indians learning
to till the soil, with great contempt. The loom and the
ploughs were not the implements of Indian braves.
Squaws and white men only were fit for such work.
He told how grasping and cruel were the white men,








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


and as for the Indians, only slavery or extinction was
before them. The bow and the arrow, the club and
the scalping-knife, were the implements and weapons
of men, and he urged them not to forget how to use
them. As he drew his eloquent speech to a close, he
told them how he had come from the far-distant Great
Lakes, because their friends, the British, had urged
him to come and summon them to follow on the war-
path, and drive the white men either into the sea or
across it to the lands whence they had come.
It was a marvellous speech and marvellous in its
effect. The warriors were greatly excited, and the
feeling was becoming intense. But Tecumseh's wily
brother, the Prophet, whom the British had informed
that a comet was about to appear, declared to the
excited warriors that "they would see the arm of
Tecumseh like pale fire stretched out on the vault
of heaven at a certain time, and that thus they would
know by that sign when to begin war."
It was almost morning when the council broke up,
and already more than half of the assembled warriors
had promised to make war upon the Americans.
Tom and Jerry looked about for their Indian
friends, but they had suddenly and quietly disap-
peared. Stirred by the words of the warrior and the
Prophet, already, although our boys were not aware
of it, they were numbered among Tecumseh's Young
Braves.








THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH


Tecumseh now went on, visiting all the leading
Creek towns, and gaining friends and followers every
day. Among the greatest of these was Weather-
ford, a half-breed, as powerful as he was keen and
brave. But some withstood him, well aware what
the end of such a struggle as he proposed must be.
One of these was a noted chief named Tustinuggee-
Thlucco, whom Tecumseh was extremely desirous
of winning, but who remained the firm friend of the
United States to the end. Angered and chagrined
by his refusal, at last Tecumseh, pointing his finger
at his opponent's face, said: Tustinuggee-Thlucco,
your blood is white. You have taken my red sticks
and my talk, but you do not mean to fight. I know
the reason. You do not believe the Great Spirit has
sent me. You shall believe it. I will leave directly
and go straight to Detroit. When I get there I will
stamp my foot on the ground and shake down every
house in Toockabatcha."
His listener long thought over this speech, which
appears the more remarkable when it is recalled that
when the comet appeared, which had been foretold as
" the long arm of Tecumseh," it was accompanied by
an earthquake that made the houses at Toockabatcha
reel as if about to fall. The frightened Indians ran
out of their huts, shouting: "' Tecumseh is at Detroit !
Tecumseh is at Detroit! We feel the stamp of his
foot! "








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


But the "Big Warrior," though sadly troubled, did
not respond, and continued firm in his allegiance to
the United States.
Colonel Hawkins, the Indian agent we have men-
tioned, did not believe anything more serious than an
Indian revolt would result from Tecumseh's visit.
Tustinuggee-Thlucco was doing all in his power to
prevent an uprising, but a half-breed chief, named
Peter McQueen, was working hard on the other side.
The "war dance of the Lakes," which Tecumseh had
taught the Creeks, was often practised, and the war
feeling became more and more intense, although
many of the Creeks still opposed it, and indeed never
entered into it.
The few scattered white settlers were now in great
peril. They were liable to be cut off or massacred in
their own homes at any time. In July the battle of
Burnt Corn Creek was fought, the first engagement
of the Creek war, and the victory rested with the
Indians. The whites also were busy now, and the
British and Spaniards were doing all in their power
to increase the warlike feeling among the Indians.
Pensacola became their headquarters, and arms and
supplies were furnished the red men from that place.
A chain of rude forts or defences had been built
between the Tombigbee and the Alabama. The
leading place of refuge was within the strong stockade
which had been built around the house of Samuel








THE VISIT OF TECUMSEH


Mims, a short distance from the boat-yard on Tensaw
lake, about a mile east of the Alabama river, and
about ten miles distant from the place where it
joined the Tombigbee.
Families were now abandoning their homes and
fleeing for safety. It had been a long time since
our friends had seen Tecumseh's young braves.
Formerly, and at unexpected times, they had come
to their home, and often remained for several days,
only to disappear at last as suddenly as they had
arrived.
One night when Jerry was milking, as he arose
from his milking-stool he was startled to see Captain
Jim, in war-paint and feathers, standing behind him.
He declined the invitation to enter the house, and in
a few words indicated to his white friend the necessity
there was for them to abandon their home and seek
some place of safety at once.
The advice had been declined after a long talk by
the family, and several days passed, during which
rumors of fires and massacres frequently came. The
days were now passed in fear, no one venturing far
from home, and a careful watch was kept at all hours.
Just a week had gone, when, at precisely the same
time in the day as on his former visit, and in the same
manner, Captain Jim again appeared to Jerry.
Go! Go now! Heap hurry," said the laconic
Captain Jim.








30 TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES

"Why? What's the matter now?" asked Jerry.
"Anything new? "
"Heap Creeks, all here. Like leaves on trees.
Much burn and many scalps; and the young brave
pointed proudly to a trophy he himself was carrying.
Jerry shuddered; but the young Indian waited for
no further words, and turned and started towards the
forest. The young pioneer watched him as far as
he could see, and then turned and entered the house.
The result of his interview was more serious this
time, and the warning words were heeded. Hurriedly
the raft was built and equipped, and early the next
morning the little party started down the Alabama
in the manner we have described in the preceding
chapter.








AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL


CHAPTER III

AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL

THE clumsy raft was now moving steadily onward,
the boys remaining at their places at the oars,
and Nance working faithfully with the long pole.
Their faces soon were wet with perspiration, and
their arms began to ache under the strain; but they
were strong boys, and had been accustomed to swing
the axe all day long, and to use the harrow and
the plough in the newly broken ground around their
home, from early morning until late at night.
Their life had been a hard one thus far, but they
had not drawn back from its demands, and had been
able to do more than many men who were much
older. Their father had been a hard worker also,
and when he had been content to remain away from
the settlements, and to let "Tom and Jerry" alone,
had been considered a successful man, and certainly
he had trained his boys with great care.
As has been related, he had brought his little family
nearly ten years before this time from New York
State, led on by the inducements a friend had held








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


forth to him, and the promise of quick returns to be
found for his labor in this new and sparsely settled
region along the Alabama river.
But about twice each year he had insisted upon
visiting the settlements, and his family had come to
know what this meant for him and for them all.
Apparently he had been unable to decline the invita-
tions of his friends there to join them in their drink-
ing-bouts, or, at least, he did not decline; and for
days after his return from each visit he did little
work, and remained in a kind of a stupor, from which
he roused himself only to drink again from the demi-
john which he always brought home with him, and
which, so long as it contained anything, stood be-
tween him and his work on the little clearing.
About a year before the time of our story he had
returned from one of his periodic visits to the settle-
ments; but instead of falling into a stupor, as he
usually had, he had insisted upon resuming his work
of cutting down the trees, and the very first tree
which he had cut, as it fell, had dragged him under
it. His leg had been broken by the fall, and the
fever which followed, a result of his intemperate
habits and neglect of the laws of health, in a few
weeks had ended his life, and left the family in
the charge of these twin brothers, who were men in
size and almost in strength, but without experience,
and young in years.








AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL


Tom and Jerry had worked steadily and done the
best they could after their father's death, clearing the
forests and planting new fields, and were beginning
to think their troubles would soon be ended, when
the Indian uprising brought all their labors to a
standstill.
Hurriedly they had constructed this raft we have
described, and early in the morning they placed
all the family on board, and such things in addition
as would be necessary for them to have within the
next few weeks, and boldly started forth on their
voyage down the river.
As they worked at the oars they talked in low
tones, each trying to encourage the other, and speak-
ing far more bravely than he felt in his heart the
conditions of affairs would warrant.
"Do you suppose the Indians see us now?" asked
Jerry.
"Yes," replied Tom, "I've no doubt they've fol-
lowed us, or watched us all along the way. We
ought to be farther out in the stream. We'd be a
little safer from attacks from the shore there, but the
pole wouldn't be of much use, and that is the only
thing we've got to steer this old craft with, and I
thought it might be the smaller of two evils to keep
in near the shore."
"There's danger everywhere," replied his brother,
" and I confess I'm a good deal afraid; but all we can








TECUMSEH'S Yuj(JNG BRAVES


do is to do the best we can, and keep our eyes on the
bank as we go- along. I'm glad the children are in
the shanty with mother."
So am I. They'll help to keep her busy, and
maybe she can keep them quiet."
They continued on their voyage in this way for
some time, the boys resting occasionally now, and
stopping to eat the lunch they had brought with them.
A light wind had arisen, and they took advantage of
it by again raising the sail and resting from their
labor. The little boat they had in tow they fre-
quently looked after, as in it they had stored some of
their food, so that if it should become necessary for
them to leave the raft and escape to the shore they
would not be without some means of subsistence.
"What shall we do to-night ?" asked Tom as the
long day drew to a close, the "point" and several
other places where they feared that an attack might
be made having been safely passed. Shall we both
stay on guard? "
His brother hesitated a moment as he replied, "We
ought to reach Fort Mims some time to-morrow, or, at
least, we'll hope to get there; and to-night is going
to be the hardest part of our trip. I don't know but
we'd better both of us keep awake all the time."
"I think so, too," said his brother, "for a part of
the night, at least; but still if we can get a little rest
I think we'd better take it, because there's no know-








AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL


ing what we may have to do before we ever arrive at
our destination, if indeed we ever are fortunate
enough to get anywhere beyond the sight of these
redskins. Who would've thought that Captain Jim
would've dropped his friends, and been found among
Tecumseh's young braves?"
"I should have thought so, for one," said Jerry,
"for he's doing just exactly what you and I would
have done if we had been in his place. He thinks
that the white men have been trying to take his land
away from him, and while we've not done that our-
selves, I'm not sure, as a whole, there isn't too much
truth in what he says."
As the dusk came on, they guided the raft farther
out into the stream. Their progress necessarily would
be much slower now, and all they hoped for was to
come through the hours of darkness without attract-
ing the attention of any of the prowling or passing
Indians.
They had not a full sense of what the war with the
Creeks was, or was to be, but they knew that in all
probability they had lost their home, and very likely
were escaping for their lives. At any rate, they had
taken the warning of their Indian friend, and had
been duly impressed by his evident sincerity in bring-
ing the message he had given them.
It was true that the Indians were divided somewhat
in their feelings about the war, but many of them had








TMcUMSE!'S YOUNG BRAVES


been thoroughly aroused, and were eager to join in
the attempt which had been begun by Tecumseh to
drive the white men into the salt sea, or across its
waters to the place whence they had come.
Tecumseh's visit in the end proved to be a sad one,
and the passions he aroused and the zeal for war which
he inspired brought consequences no one could have
foreseen, and dangers and sorrows of which even the
great Prophet himself could not have dreamed.
For a long time our two boys remained at the helm,
if such the long oar which they had succeeded in rig-
ging at the stern of the raft could be called, convers-
ing only in whispers, and watching the dim outlines
of both shores as they passed.
Every bush might conceal a foe, and behind every
tree there might be some lurking enemy who would
not hesitate to grasp the opportunity of ridding his
land of one more of the hated pale-faces. The dusk
deepened, and, at last, the darkness came and spread
over all things.
There's no need of your staying here any longer.
Go in and lie down awhile, and I'll manage this
rudder, or long oar, or whatever you call it. I'll call
you in a few hours and let you have your spell then,"
said Tom.
"All right," replied his brother, as he disappeared
within the rude shanty.
No fire had been made on the raft at night by which








AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL


to cook their supper, as the warning the young brave
had given them they knew must be heeded, and even
the smoke from so small a fire as they would kindle
would be likely to attract the attention of any prowl-
ing Indian, and might bring on an attack which they
would not be able to meet.
Nance, meanwhile, had heeded the request of her
brother, and had sought the shelter of the shanty
early in the evening, and left the boys alone to look
after the raft.
When Tom disappeared, Jerry's feeling of loneliness
increased. The stillness became almost oppressive, and
the voyage of the raft seemed to be almost uncanny,
as it moved steadily on in the darkness. Jerry
could see only for a short distance before him, and
he was compelled to trust to his general knowledge
of the river in a large measure for his directions.
Captain Jim and his companion had been the only
Indians they had seen, but their signal of warning
was not to be received lightly. Several hours had
passed since their appearance, and the night had
brought its own shelter.
In spite of the darkness, however, he could not rid
himself of the feeling that eyes were watching him,
and that every movement he made was observed by
men whom he could not see. He tried to shake off
his fears and to assure himself that there was no
immediate cause for alarm, and yet, somehow, in








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


spite of his efforts, the sense of some approaching
danger became keener every moment. Several times
he was tempted to go to the shanty and call his
brother, but each time he had gone back to his rudder
again, trying to convince himself that his fears were
groundless, and that it was better for him to let Tom
sleep, if he could, for a time, as he knew all the
strength he could gain would be needed before
they arrived at the end of their voyage.
An hour or more passed in this manner, and then
the young watcher was startled as he saw some one
come from the shanty and approach him. At first he
could not determine whether it was his sister or
brother, but in a moment he recognized Tom's voice,
when in a low tone he said, I couldn't sleep, Jerry.
Somehow I felt that we were in greater danger than
we've ever been. I know it's probably foolish, but
I thought I'd come out and take my stand along with
you, for, to be honest, I felt just a little bit afraid."
"I know how you felt," said Jerry, "and we'll
both of us keep awake, for a while, anyway. I've
been feeling a good deal as I do sometimes when I
have had a nightmare, and I was trying to get away
from something and couldn't move hand or foot."
Tom took his place beside his brother, and, seated
upon the raft, they began to talk in low whispers, all
the time keeping such watch as they could on either
side in the darkness.








AN UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL


Somehow the long night passed, and just as the
first light of the dawn appeared, Tom laid his hand
upon his brother's shoulder and said, "Jerry, look
over there to the left. There's a canoe coming out
from the shore. Can you make out what it is or how
many there are in it?"
"It's too dark. I can't tell yet," replied his brother,
looking in the direction in which Tom had pointed,
and both boys became silent as they watched the frail
little craft make its way over the river. It came on
almost as still as the shadows, but they soon were
enabled to see that it had only one occupant, and yet
they were not very much reassured when they saw
that his evident purpose was to make for the raft.
The boys crouched low and kept out of sight be-
hind the shanty as they watched the approach of this
new-comer. The sail flapped against its rude mast,
and as the light from the rising sun soon became
stronger their courage returned.
Get your gun, Tom," said Jerry. We'll be all
ready for him if he wants to make trouble."
There's only one man in the canoe," said Tom.
"We can handle him without much work. Let's
wait a bit, though, before we do anything. It may be
some one who wants to see us, and we don't want to
stir up any trouble if we can help it."
Meanwhile the canoe came nearer and nearer, and
the man who was paddling with so much strength and








40 TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES

dexterity, without any doubt now, was making for the
raft.
He's coming for us," whispered Jerry, "there's no
mistake about that. Be all ready for him, only don't
shoot until we find out who he is, or what he wants."
The canoe was now within a few yards of them,
and the occupant soon ran it in close by the raft.
Without a word the solitary visitor stepped out,
drawing the canoe after him. As he turned towards
the shanty, both boys, grasping their guns, advanced
to meet him and to demand the purpose of his coming.








A CHANGE IN THE PLAN


CHAPTER IV

A CHANGE IN THE PLAN

AS the boys approached the stranger, they held
their guns in readiness, prepared to meet any
show of violence that might be made; but their fears
were at once relieved when the visitor called out to
them, Go slow, boys, don't shoot your best friend.
Not that you would be likely to hit anything much if
you did shoot, but it is just as well not to use your
pop-guns too freely in times like these. There's no
knowing what redskin might pop up out of the water
right alongside of your your I don't know what
to call this craft. What is it, anyway?"
It's Josiah! Hunter Josiah! said Tom joyfully,
as he recognized the voice of the new-comer, and
their fears of an immediate attack were relieved.
"Yes, that's just who it is," said the man whom
they had addressed as Josiah. Now, don't waste
any of your time talking about him or talking to him.
There's too much business on hand just now, and I
propose to have a share in it, too."
The new-comer had for a long time been a friend








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


of the father of our boys. He was a man in middle
life, of a strong and vigorous physique, and evidently
was familiar with the customs of pioneer life, and the
dangers to be encountered in the forests. His roving
disposition had prevented him from settling upon
any plantation or developing any clearing. He was,
consequently, more of a shiftless, happy hunter than
anything else, who wandered about from place to
place, making his home for a time with some friend,
and then remaining for weeks in the forest, apart
from all mankind.
He was a very strong friend whenever his heart
went out towards any man, and though he never
could be persuaded to remain long in one place, his
friendship was as enduring as his life was restless.
He followed the boys as they returned to the stern,
and seated himself as Tom resumed his place at the
rudder. He listened to the story they had to tell
him of the causes that led to their departure, and the
experiences they had thus far had on their voyage.
He indicated his pleasure or dissent by an occasional
exclamation, but did not interrupt them until their
story had been finished, and he had heard all they had
to say.
"The trouble's mostly among the Creeks, boys,"
said the hunter, when at last their story was finished.
"The Choctaws are not very much stirred up as yet,
and I don't think we shall have very much to be








A CHANGE IN THE PLAN


afraid of from the Cherokees. There's no love
lost betwixt them, and all this is in our favor. I don't
believe we'd have had much trouble, anyway, if it
hadn't been for that pesky Tecumseh and his buffalo-
tailed brother. Were you boys at the council when
they danced around there in the square, dragging
those long buffalo-tails behind them?"
"Yes," replied Tom, "we were there, and I don't
think I ever heard such a speech in my life as
Tecumseh and his brother made."
"Stuff and nonsense! 'Twas all stuff and non-
sense," replied the hunter somewhat angrily. Noth-
ing but a cat's-paw of the British. He himself was
made a fool of by them, and so he thought he would
come down here, more than a thousand miles away
from his own happy hunting-grounds, and make fools
of the rest of the redskins. Not but what the most
of them were fools enough already. But where are
you going?"
"We are going to try to make our way to Fort
Mims. That's where Captain Jim told us the whites
were gathering," replied Jerry.
"That's the best place there is, no doubt about
that," replied the hunter; "but you can't go clear
down. I saw Captain Jim myself, and the little
whiffet, all painted and daubed up, was feeling as
smart as a rattler with a new skin. At first he
wanted to take my scalp, but I would not listen to








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


any such nonsense as that, and so I had a little con-
versation with him myself. He was pretty decent
then, for I reckon he has not forgotten all about old
times yet, and I picked it out of him that some of the
pesky redskins were down the river lying in wait for
just such parties as you, who are on their way to Fort
Mims."
What are we to do, then? asked Tom anxiously.
"You know we have got mother and the children
along with us, to say nothing of Nance, though I will
risk her most anywhere."
"You ought to have gone a long time ago," said
the hunter.
"That's all true enough," replied Tom, "but we
didn't know what was going on until day before
yesterday, and shouldn't have known then if Quiluti-
mac hadn't come and told us."
"What! Have you not heard anything about
Jackson's treatment by the government?"
"No, not a word," replied Tom.
"Well, this is no time to tell you of it, but it's
about the rankest piece of work I ever heard tell of.
Some of the other leaders were not treated very well
either, for all they have done their best to protect the
country, though perhaps some of them have made it
up of a coloring to suit themselves. Some time I'll
tell you about it, but there's too much business on
hand now, and that's not the least of the causes that








A CHANGE IN THE PLAN


led to this bad business, anyway. I've seen too many
signs of Indians around here for me to stop and
waste any more time talking to you."
"Well, what do you think is the best thing to be
done, Josiah?" said Jerry. Tom and I don't care
so much about ourselves, for we're used to Indians'
ways, and not much afraid of them anyhow; but we've
got mother and the children along with us, and what
in the world we're going to do with them I can't
tell."
"I know," replied the hunter. "Don't be afraid,
Tommy; I was not your father's friend for nothing,
and I am not going to leave his youngsters in the
lurch, though he himself pulled out and left them.
The Indians are pretty thick around here, and you
may need more than your father's friend to help you
before you've got this party safely through."
"I presume some of them have been watching us
all the while, ever since we started," said Jerry.
"I reckon you didn't escape the notice of them
altogether. An Injun is not blind, and some of them
can smell farther than they can see. I think we'll
find some way to get your party over to Fort Mims,
though," replied Josiah.
Do you know how things are there?" asked Tom
anxiously.
Yes," replied the hunter, "I was there a few days
ago. Fort Mims is pretty full. What with the women








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES-


and the children and the darkies that have crowded in
there (for the darkies are scared the worst of all),
it is pretty well filled up, but I reckon we'll find a
place for you. At any rate, if we can't find any, we'll
make one, for that is what a good share of the settlers
have had to do who have gone in there, just build
their own lodgings inside the stockade."
But the conversation was interrupted by the sound
of a gun fired on their right, and the whistle and thud
of a bullet as it passed over their heads and buried it-
self in one of the posts of the shanty.
"Well, now, that's pretty cool," said the hunter;
" and that were a white man, too, though I'd be ashamed
to make a shot like that. I reckon you had better go
inside, boys, and let me steer this craft awhile."
"No," said Jerry, "we've provided for this very
thing." And he brought from the shanty a stand com-
posed of four or five thick planks, and three or four
feet long, which they had made for this very purpose.
Placing one of these on either side of them, they could
see plainly in front, and felt safe from any attack on
either side.
"You see I am right," said the hunter, a moment
later, as he called their attention to a man standing on
the shore and waving his hand. He is a Spaniard,
too. I thought something would account for the poor
shot. A Britisher would not have done that. We'll
go a piece farther away down the river, and stop our








A CHANGE IN THE PLAN


talking for awhile, and then we'll see what we can do.
He's on the wrong side of the river, though, and all he
can do is to drive us to the shelter of this bank."
The sun had not yet risen above the tops of the
trees, and although it was light enough for them to
discern the objects upon the shore, they did not sum-
mon the other members of the family from the shanty;
and, indeed, if any of them had appeared, they would
at once have told them to return, as the shot which had
been fired had warned them of danger near.
I think we'll have to stop pretty soon," said the
hunter, "and land, and strike out across the country.
I didn't see very many signs of Injuns over that way,
and Fort Mims can't be more than five miles away."
I don't know whether the children can make five
miles or not," said Jerry dubiously.
"They have got to. That's all there is to be done.
We can carry them on our backs, can't we? said the
hunter.
"Yes, we can do that," replied Jerry; "but that
won't leave us free to use our guns if we have to."
"I tell you we won't have to," said the hunter.
"Either they are lying very low, or else the Injuns have
cleared out for a while from that region, and gone
farther down the river. Do you know, I have a kind
of dim suspicion that while they are going to pick off
such parties as they can without too much trouble,
they have no particular objection to letting Fort Mims








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


fill up. I suspect they think that's pie for them, and
that they will fall on the fort some dark night, and
take the scalps of every one inside. Kind of a man-
trap, you see."
His words were not entirely reassuring, and yet
his experience had been so much greater than that of
the boys, and as they knew how shrewd and keen his
judgment was, they decided to follow his advice.
What are we going to do with this stuff we have
brought with us ?" asked Jerry.
Leave it on board," said the hunter gruffly, "and
turn the live-stock loose in the woods."
"But we brought the pig and the chickens along
because we thought we'd be likely to stay some time
inside the stockade of Fort Mims, and we would
have to have something to eat there."
That will be your greatest trouble at Fort Mims,
but you will have to turn the pig and chickens loose
here, though. A man's life is worth more than a
pig's, and a dozen hens' into the bargain. I suppose
you brought your guns," he added, "as a kind of a
protection. Oh, well, they are better than nothing.
They are not of much account alongside of mine,
though."
The boys flushed a little as he spoke of their guns,
for they were accustomed to pride themselves some-
what on their prowess as hunters, and yet they knew
that their companion was not inclined to belittle their








A CHANGE IN THE PLAN


ability, save as he compared it with his own, which
was well known to be far superior to that of any one
in the entire region.
"We'll land here," said the hunter, as they came
near a little cove. "You had better get your family
together, and be ready to start right off."
"Oh, why didn't we stay at home!" said Mrs.
Curry complainingly, when Tom entered the shanty.
"I know that would have been a good deal better
than this tramping off through the country."
"But you know what Tecumseh's young brave
said, don't you? And beside, Hunter Josiah is here
now, and he's even stronger in his words than the
Indians were. He says he knows there's danger and
lots of it, and it is not going to be safe for us to go
farther down the river."
"I suppose I shall have to go, then," replied his
mother; "I always do. That's been my fortune in
life always to follow up somebody that was starting
from a good place to go out into nowhere."
Her complaints were redoubled when she saw the
pig and the chickens turned loose in the woods, but
the former was not inclined to be left behind, and,
with a grunt, he started after the party when they
prepared to enter the forest.
"Let him come. Let him come," said Hunter
Josiah, with his quiet laugh; "he had better come to
a good end than a bad one, and pork may be in








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


demand at Fort Mims before winter yet. Are you
all ready?"
"All ready," replied the boys.
"Then we'll start off on our trail. I don't know
what there is before us, and we'll be lucky if we get
to the fort without meeting any redskins, but I want
ye all to keep as still as you can while we're on the
march, and we'll make the best time we can. Come
on now," he added, as he picked up one of the
children and placed him on his back, an example
which Tom quickly followed, and the entire party,
with many forebodings, started into the dense forest
to try and make their way to the shelter of Fort
Mims. None of the party, except the hunter, had
ever been in the place they were seeking, and they
knew of its strength only by common report. As
they were, however, compelled to seek the shelter
of some stockade, they had chosen Fort Mims as the
most accessible, but they never had planned to go to
it by the route which the hunter was indicating.











e 'v.-, --,v ?


" The hunter was leading the way."
Page 51.


j '


_i


I CA


^.








TO THE FORT


CHAPTER V

TO THE FORT

T was a strange appearance our little party of
fugitives presented as they started into the forest.
The hunter, with his gun grasped in one hand and
one of the children clinging to his back, was lead-
ing the way. Behind him followed Jerry similarly
equipped. The mother and Nance came behind him,
while Tom was serving as the rear guard and was
watchful of all sides.
The pig, which had followed them when they had
first started, for some unaccountable reason began to
emit some ear-piercing squeals, and there was nothing
for Tom to do but to stop and drive him back.
Whether these had been given as a challenge, or
because he was as suspicious of the perils surround-
ing them as were his human companions, could not be
known; but after gazing for a moment in stupid sur-
prise at Tom, who struck him several blows with the
butt of his gun, he disappeared and left the party free
from the danger which his squealings might bring
upon them.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


We can't go as slow as this," said Hunter Josiah,
stopping for a moment to talk with Jerry, who was
close behind. "I don't know what we shall meet and
what dangers we may have to face, but I do know one
thing, and that is, that the sooner we bring our party
to Fort Mims the better it will be for all concerned."
"I am going to carry that boy on my back," said
Nance, coming up just in time to hear the last words
of the hunter. That will leave you free to keep a
sharper lookout, and warn us if you find any danger
in front."
This proposal was quickly adopted, and the little
party started on once more. Frequent stops for rest
were made, and the hunter and one of the boys, leav-
ing the party, occasionally would start off on different
paths for a short distance to see if any signs of danger
were to be found. Even the mother had no time for
complaining now in the midst of such trials and
dangers, and yet both boys noticed as they went on
that her face was becoming more and more flushed,
and that it would be soon a question whether she
would be able to keep up with the others in the
rapid march which they were making.
"I think we have gone about half way, now," said
Josiah, as the party stopped on one of its frequent
halts.
"Do you think half our danger is over, then?"
asked Nance.








TO THE FORT


"I am inclined to think so," replied the hunter,
"for I very much doubt whether the redskins would
want to run the chance of making an attack on a party,
even as defenceless as we are, when it was within
hearing of the fort. Still, you never know what a red-
skin will do, and I don't think we shall be safe until
we are inside the stockade."
Are the Indians pretty thick around here ? asked
Jerry.
The hunter smiled significantly as he replied,
"Well, there are several of them, I make no doubt
of that."
"What kind of a place is it we've started for?"
asked Tom.
"Oh, I can't describe it to you, now," said the
hunter. You will see when once we get there; that
is, if we're ever lucky enough to make it. But come
on, now, we must start on again. Every minute of
time, and every step of the way, count for a good
deal more now than they are likely to again in a good
while."
The party resumed their march, but moved in
silence now. All of them were beginning to feel the
fatigue of the journey, and as they came nearer to the
fort they began to increase the vigilance which they
had used all the way.
They had gone on for a half-hour more in this
way when the hunter suddenly stopped, and, raising







TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


his hand in warning, began to listen intently. The
entire party were startled, as they all knew the hun-
ter had heard or seen something of more than
ordinary importance. One of the children, already
over-tired, here began to cry, and Hunter Josiah,
kind-hearted and gentle as he was, turned quickly
and placed his hand over the little mouth some-
what roughly.
The mother began to cry, and said, "You never
were so rough to any of my children before, Josiah,
and I don't see why you should treat any of them in
that way now."
But a sharp word from the hunter brought silence
again, as they all were convinced that he was alarmed
at some danger he suspected to be near them.
"Some one's coming," he whispered to the boys,
"and he's coming right towards us, too."
At his words the suspense became more and more
intense. But soon the others heard the sound which
had caught the attention of the sharp-eared hunter,
and it was evident that he had not been deceived.
Breathless with fear, they waited for several mo-
ments, and soon the form of some one was seen dodg-
ing from tree to tree not far away.
The hunter had taken his gun, and motioned to the
boys to do the same, and they made ready for any
attack that might be made. Tom noticed, as he
glanced about the party, that the faces of all but the








TO THE FORT


children were very pale, and even the little ones were
silent now, catching something of the fear which
impending ill often gives, long before it can be seen
or known.
The unknown man soon stepped out into a little.
clearing. They waited to see whether he was alone or
not, as he stopped and began to whistle. Soon they
were more than relieved when they saw that he evi-
dently was alone, and as they perceived his dark face
and short, heavy frame, their fears at once disap-
peared. An exclamation of disgust from the hunter
was followed by his call, as he said, "Here, you
black nigger, what are you doing out here in the
woods all alone ? Don't you know there's an Injun
a hiding behind every tree ready to scalp you? "
The startled negro rolled his eyes, and tried to
stammer forth some words in acknowledgment of the
hunter's salute. "Yes, sah; yes, sah; I's all alone."
Tom laughed as he saw how much more the black
man was frightened than were any of those who had
been so startled by the sound of his approaching foot-
steps.
"How far are we from Fort Mims?" asked the
hunter, as the negro joined the party.
"'Bout a mile an' a half," was the reply.
"I suppose you belong there, don't you, Sambo ? "
"Yes, sah, and my name's not Sambo, sah, but
Cesar, sah."








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


"All right, Caesar," replied the hunter, speaking
cheerfully, now that the immediate cause of fear had
been removed. How many people are there in the
fort now?"
Oh, a whole city full," was the reply; men and
women, and boys and girls, and little children, sah.
Some of them not so big as dese, sah." And he
pointed to the children, who were clinging to their
mother.
Tom and Jerry were both curious, and would have
asked many questions of the negro, who now had
recovered from his fear, and felt something of his own
importance as the only one who could impart much
information concerning Fort Mims and the people
gathered there.
"We must start on again," said the hunter, and
we'll have to be more careful now than ever. While
I don't think there'll be much danger of an attack
now, since the fort is so near, at the same time it
would be a very easy thing for some rascally Creek
to throw his tomahawk or shoot an arrow at some one
of us, and it would not make very much noise,
either." And as he led the way he became silent
again, and his anxiety was shared now by every one
in the party.
Occasionally the hunter turned to whisper to his
companions and tell of something he had seen, or some
sign that had appeared of the presence of hidden foes.








TO THE FORT


These became more frequent as they came nearer the
fort, and when they halted again for a brief rest, in a
low voice Jerry said, I don't like the looks of things
at all. I've seen more signs of Indians within the last
half-hour than I've seen in three weeks before."
"Do you suppose any of them have been follow-
ing us ?" asked Tom.
"No doubt, no doubt," replied Josh, "and it's
more'n likely some of 'em are watching us at this
very minute. Still, I hardly think they'll touch us,
but from these signs I've seen it won't be long
before the Indians will be heard from, and I hope
Fort Mims has got some defences that will be strong
enough to stand against the mob that will be thrown
against it. But it is not well for us to take any
chances, and we'll start on again right away."
The mother, almost worn out, now was beginning
to complain again, and to declare that it was impossi-
ble for her to advance another step, but a sharp word
from the leader silenced her words, and although
almost too weary to move, she arose and resumed the
march with the others.
On and on they went, now not even stopping for a
rest, as the hunter was afraid that if any break oc-
curred, the resumption of the march would be more
difficult, and as they drew nearer the fort he became
more and more anxious.
So on and on the little party trudged, stumbling








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


over roots and falling over dead branches, their faces
streaming with perspiration, and some of them ap-
pearing as if it would be impossible for them to go
any farther.
"It is the longest mile and a half I ever knew,"
said Tom as he advanced to the side of the leader.
Never mind," said Josh, we're almost there now,
.and when we're once inside, we'll forget all this hard
work, and how tired we were. Here, you, Caesar," he
said to the negro, who also had advanced, "you didn't
show us the short way at all. I don't believe ye knew
the way."
But Caesar only grinned and shook his head without
making any reply to the hunter's words.
At last the leader stopped, and turning to the others
said, "We've reached our journey's end now, for I can
see the stockade ahead of us."
Where? Where?" eagerly called out the boys,
who were unable to see anything in the spot which the
hunter indicated; but in a few moments a strange-
looking place appeared not far in advance of them,
and the hunter triumphantly said, "You can see it
now, can't you? That's Fort Mims, and we've cov-
ered the distance between the river and the stockade
in a good deal less time than I thought we could; and
you stood the journey better than I feared," he added,
turning to the mother; but she made no reply except
to shake her head and sigh.








TO THE FORT


"This is a funny fort," said Nance. "I don't be-
lieve it's much of a protection against Indians. I de-
clare I believe I would rather have stayed on our raft
and trusted that when it was anchored in the river,
than to put the children behind such a flimsy, good-
for-nothing protection as that ahead of us."
"There's nothing else to do now, though," said
Tom, and we'll have to make the best of it. I don't
think it's very promising-looking myself, but, at any
rate, we'll not be alone here, and there'll be some pro-
tection in numbers, anyway."
"The gates are open," said the hunter, "and we'll
go in at once."
And acting upon his words they entered within the
wide-open gates, and curiously looked about them at
the strangely enclosed spot which had been given the
name of Fort Mims by the owner of the place.









TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


CHAPTER VI

LIFE AT FORT MIMS

A STRANGE sight was that which our party looked
upon when once they were inside the gates of
Fort Mims. The place appeared to be crowded with
people. The soldiers were mingling with the citizens,
and women and children formed a large part of the
assembly. Many negroes were there, and a few
Indians also were to be seen, who were in as great
fear of the hostile savages as the whites themselves
were.
The new arrivals hardly knew where to go, or whom
to seek at first; but their uncertainty was relieved
when Hunter Josiah Fletcher hailed a man who was
a stranger to the others, but whom he evidently knew
well.
"Why, Martin Rigdon, I didn't know you were
here. How long has it been since you have been
seeking shelter from the redskins at Fort Mims?"
asked Josiah.
The man whom he thus addressed laughed as he
replied, "I am not seeking shelter for myself, Josiah,







LIFE AT FORT MIMS


but I've been detailed here to help look after these
refugees. What's this party you've brought in? "
Oh, some friends of mine," said Josiah, who
want to stay here for awhile. They have left their
home up on the river, as some of their Injun friends
were kind enough to give them the warning word,
and I want to find a place for them inside the fort
here for a time."
Martin shrugged his shoulders as he said, A place
inside the fort is a little difficult to find just at
present. Every spot seems to be in demand; but
come with me and I'll help you to find out what can
be done."
Josiah followed his friend, and in the course of a
half-hour returned with the information that the
women and children could be accommodated in one of
the little cabins, but that the boys and men would
have to find their resting-places within one of the
many board shelters that had been erected.
"This is a great place," said Josiah, "and there
have been a great many changes since I was here a
few days ago."
"Yes," replied Martin, "and things are not in the
best shape, either. I suppose you know something,
about General Claiborne ?"
"Yes," replied Josiah, "I've heard of him. I
remember hearing how, when he was a young fellow
not yet twenty years old, they made an ensign of him








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


in Wayne's army, and what a fight he made in the
battle of Fallen Timber, at the Rapids on the Mau-
mee, in 1794."
"He fought like mad there," replied Martin, so
they tell me, and in 1799 they made him a captain;
but the best luck he ever had was last March,
when they made a brigadier-general of volunteers of
him, and he has been at work ever since. The first
thing he did this summer was to try to give some
protection to the people who were so frightened about
the Indians in this part of the country. He wanted
to take all the soldiers he had right into the Creek
country up around the Coosa and Tallapoosa, but
General Flournoy would not allow it. He said he
had had no orders from the War Department for -any
invasions, and was allowed to go on the defensive
only; but he's been strengthening all the block-houses
and defences, and has sent some of his men off into
the border land and along the Chocktaw frontier.
He's been here, too, and if it hadn't been for him
Fort Mims would have been no better than a rat-hole.
Not that it's very much better yet, but it's a good deal
better than it would have been if Claiborne hadn't
been here and straightened out some things."
As soon as Tom and Jerry had completed the
arrangements for their family, they wandered about
the enclosure, curiously examining the defences and
observing the motley crowd.








LIFE AT FORT MIMS


Before Claiborne had gone to Fort Mims, many
of the wealthy half-blood families, as well as the
whites, led on by their fears, had gone down the
Alabama in boats and canoes, somewhat after the
manner in which our friends had started. Many of
these had hidden themselves in the thick swamps
around Tensaw lake. After a time they had joined
the white refugees in constructing a strong stockade
around the house of Samuel Mims, who was an old
and wealthy inhabitant of that region.
His house, one story high, was built of wood and
quite large. Strong pickets had been driven around
it, and fence rails placed between them. Port-holes
about three feet and a half from the ground, to the
number of five hundred, also had been made. About
an acre was enclosed by these pickets, and there were
two more gates made in the stockade, one on the
western and the other on the eastern side.
Quite a number of other houses had been erected
within the pickets, and as the number of refugees
increased, cabins and board shelters, like those our
friends were to occupy, had been built.
At the south-west corner of the stockade there was
a block-house which, through some strange neglect,
was only partially finished at the time when our
friends arrived.
The days passed monotonously now. The stockade
was enlarged and two new houses were built. Major








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


Beasley, who was in command of Fort Mims, issued
rations, and received all who could assist in the
defence or needed protection. Expeditions were
sent forth, and drafts frequently were made upon the
soldiers at the fort, until their number was greatly re-
duced; but the major, either because of his ignorance
and inexperience, or because of some strange infatua-
tion, declared that he could protect the place with
even the small number of soldiers he had, and pre-
tended to laugh at the fright of the refugees, who
daily came and brought alarming reports of the move-
ments of the Indians.
Occasionally, also, word was brought from some of
the other stations, and there was a report that about
four hundred of the Creek warriors were preparing to
fall upon Fort Easley, which was about sixty miles
distant from Fort Minis and nearer the enemy.
Major Beasley, finding the number of refugees in-
creasing very rapidly within the post of which he had
charge, commenced to enlarge it. A new row of
pickets was driven about sixty feet beyond the east-
ern end. Tom and Jerry had their share in this
work, but it was carried on so slowly and carelessly,
that their own fears increased with every passing
day.
Again and again the whole place would be thrown
into confusion by the reports that the Indians were
approaching, but as these were found to be only false








LIFE AT FORT MIMS


rumors, the carelessness of the leaders increased, and
most of the men were inclined more and more to
belittle the fears of an Indian attack.
"It's like that old story in our reading-book," said
Josiah one day. "It told about a boy who was a
shepherd lad, and every day went home saying that a
wolf had come down upon his sheep, and the men
went out to help him; but at last when they found
that he was lying to them all the while, they got so
they didn't pay any attention to his words, and finally
when the wolf really did come they left the boy all
alone to fight him. The fight didn't last very long,
for the wolf soon had the boy and the sheep too."
In the early evening the young people often assem-
bled in some one of the houses and played games and
danced, so careless had they become, and so secure
did they feel, under the bold words of their leaders,
against any attack by their Indian foes. Some of the
negroes, who were slaves of some of the refugees,
furnished the music and added to the sport.
Tom and Jerry with their sister entered somewhat
into these games, but the boys were not entirely with-
out fear, so strong and so constant had been the
warnings which their hunter friend had given.
One morning, which was the twenty-ninth of Au-
gust, two negroes, one of whom was the Caesar they
had met when they first came to Fort Mims, came
running into the fort. Their faces were livid with








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


fear, and they were so frightened they scarcely could
talk. At last, after much labor, their story was drawn
from them, and they declared that when they had
been down near one of the swamps looking after some
of the beef cattle, they had been startled and fright-
ened almost out of their senses by the sight of
twenty-four Indians, hideous in their war-paint, and
evidently prowling around the fort with no good
intent.
The major at once sent Captain Middleton with
a couple of mounted men to reconnoitre. They
remained outside until near sunset, and when they re-
turned to the fort they declared that not a trace of an
Indian could they find. Major Beasley became very
angry at the negroes then, and charged them with
lying. The more they protested their innocence and
the truthfulness of their message, the more angry the
major became, and finally he ordered both of them to
be flogged for raising a false alarm.
Casar, who was the slave of John Randon, was the
first one to have his back bared and receive the lashes.
Hunter Josiah and our two boys were very indignant
at tlis flogging, and together with Mr. Fletcher, who
owned the other negro, tried to persuade the major to
give up the punishment, but they only added to his
anger.
Turning upon Fletcher he declared that if his
negro was not punished, he and his family would








LIFF AT FORT MIMS


have to leave the fort by ten o'clock the next day.
Mr. Fletcher's family was a large one, and rather
than have them lose the protection, weak as it was,
which Fort Mims afforded, he consented to the
flogging.
As Josiah returned to their rough board shelter,
after witnessing the punishment which had been in-
flicted, he said to the boys, This is a great place,
this is. Just see how many of the people here
are sick. This malaria from these Alabama swamps
is enough to kill a dead man; but that is not the
worst of it. I tell you those niggers were right, and
the Injuns are prowling around here. I don't believe
this fort is safe for a minute. The Injuns have got
all this crowd shut in here like rats in a hole, and
there'll be an awful time, and right away, too, in my
opinion."
"What do you think we had better do?" asked
Tom.
The hunter hesitated as he replied, "There's dan-
ger inside, and there's danger outside. I don't know
where there's more of it. There are a few soldiers
here, it is true, but they can't do much work against
the crowd which the redskins will send here if they
decide to attack the fort, and the most of those who
are here can't carry a ramrod, to say nothing of a gun.
I'll think it over and see you in a little while; but I
don't like the looks of things at all, not even a little








68 TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES

bit. There's trouble ahead; I'm sure of it. I don't
like the looks of things."
The hunter left them sadly perplexed, while he
went to seek his friend Martin and confer with him
as to the best plans to be made for the safety of the /
party he had brought to the fort.








IN THE WOPDS AGAIN


CHAPTER VII

IN THE WOODS AGAIN

THE remarks of the hunter in our last chapter need
a little further explanation.
Josiah Fletcher had not done much to assist in the
building enterprises of Fort Mims, but every day he
had been out on a scouting tour, and had himself
seen many signs of Indians, and brought back
his reports to Major Beasley. He had told him of
his fears, and the major ought to have had confidence
enough in such a thorough woodsman as Josiah to
have trusted somewhat to his words, especially since
he was not the only one who had been frightened and
brought alarming reports; but Major Beasley evi-
dently was confident of his own ability, and, rash
even in his weakness, would listen to no words; and
as the scouts became more anxious, as though to defy
them and express his confidence in his own prowess,
he daily became more and more careless.
The gates of the stockade were left wide open, and
often with an insufficient guard, and indeed at times
with almost no guard at all. The work of enlarging








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


the stockade was pushed on so slowly and negli-
gently, that a sudden attack by the Indians would
have found the people of the fort unprepared, and
unable to make a strong resistance.
The whipping of the two negroes also had in-
creased the hunter's disgust, and added to his fear.
For himself he felt no alarm. He had no one depen-
dent upon him, and felt abundantly able to care for
himself, even in the midst of such wily foes as he
well knew the hostile Creeks to be.
He left the boys after the interview we have
recorded, and went to talk with his friend Martin.
For an hour or more the old comrades talked over
the situation, with many a shake of the head and
foreboding word. At last Josiah returned to the
place where he had left the boys, and the look of
determination which they saw upon his face, at once
informed them that he had arrived at some conclu-
sion, and was ready for action.
I don't know but I'm doing a foolish thing, boys,
but I can't help it. Martin agrees with me, and the
thing I want you to do is this: I want you to take
your mother and Nance and the children, and get out
of the fort right away."
"Get out of the fort! said Jerry. "Why, if the
Indians are as thick around here as you think they
are, it will be like jumping out of the frying-pan into
the fire."








IN THE WOODS AGAIN


"It's warm enough in either place," replied the
hunter dryly, "and I don't know that your scalp will
be any tighter on your head than it would be in the
fort, if you were outside, but something's got to be
done. I know this place is not safe, and I'm satisfied
the Injuns have got designs against it, and they're
going to act pretty sudden, too."
"Do you want us to go right away? "
"Yes, right off. I don't want you to waste five
minutes."
But where are we to go? asked Tom aghast.
"Go to Fort Pierce. It's not far from here. It's not
over three or four miles away at the farthest, and I
don't believe the Injuns think the place is worth attack-
ing at least, not for a while; but I tell you Fort Mims
is going to catch it, and there won't be many of the five
hundred and fifty-three people here now left, I am
afraid. But if they do attack this place, as I'm sure
they will, it may arouse the government to do some-
thing, and little insignificant Fort Pierce, along with
a good many others of the posts, will be looked after,
then. Besides, there's a lot of new whiskey just
arrived, and between ourselves Major Beasley is too
drunk most of the time to look after this place as he
ought to. Think of it, the commander of Fort Mims
about two-thirds drunk every day! But don't stop
to talk here. I'll give you the directions; at least,
I'll give them to Tom, and, Jerry, you go and get








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


your folks and be ready to start as soon as Tom
comes for you."
Aren't you going with us? asked Jerry.
"Not a foot," said Josiah; "I've got to stay here.
I'm appointed to stay in this place, and it won't do
for me to leave. If a lot of Injuns fall on you I
couldn't protect you, and if they don't, you will be
just as safe without me as you would be with me, so
I'll stay here and fight it out. I'll take my chances
with the five hundred and fifty-three, and you'll have
to take your chances out in the woods."
The protests of his mother and the surprise of
Nance did not prevent Jerry from insisting upon their
making preparations to start at once.
"That's always the way, that's always the way,"
said his mother. "I'm never allowed to rest on this
earth. First, it's moving from York State, and then
it's nursing your father after the tree fell on him.
Oh, dear! I wish he hadn't been so fond of 'Tom
and Jerry.' Then it's nursing an Indian, and then it's
leaving your home and starting out on a raft; then it's
leaving the raft and tramping through the woods till
you're almost dead, and then it's moving on from
where you're safe, for Major Beasley says it's safe
here, and then it's starting out again for another fort.
Oh, dear I wonder when the end will come. I wish
my end was here. I'd about as soon be scalped by the








IN THE WOODS AGAIN


Indians, as drop dead from being so tired I couldn't
breathe."
Jerry listened to what his mother had to say, but
without expressing any sympathy, or offering any
further explanation, he insisted that they should go
with him.
They did not stop even to say good-by to the major,
but, joined by Tom, started once more out into the
forest. This, the boys knew, was peopled with savages,
who were filled with hate and rage, and who would
slay any of the whites if they fell into their power.
They felt their responsibility, and their hearts were
heavy as they departed. They were the only ones
to leave the fort, so far as they could see, and the
fear which they had felt inside the stockade was
not lessened when they began their new march
through the forest.
Slowly and carefully they made their way onward,
Jerry leading the procession, and Tom serving as the
rear guard, and holding his gun in constant readiness.
They were not able to make very rapid progress, as
the children could not be carried now, except for
short distances, and they frequently were compelled
to stop for rest. The boys were glad that their
mother had ceased her complaining, and, although
she declared the expedition to be worse than foolish,
she had apparently acquiesced, and was doing much
better than they had expected.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


About half the distance to Fort Pierce had been
covered when they stopped once more to rest. The
entire party was silent, oppressed with fear, and yet
rejoicing that no signs of their foes had yet been seen.
Suddenly one of the children called out, "Black
man, -I see a black man."
The boys at once arose, and, holding their guns,
peered out into the forest. Charlie was right,"
said Jerry, "there is some one following us." And
all turned to watch the woods behind them.
The boys were frightened, and yet they grasped
their guns, determined to do their best if they should
be compelled to defend the party.
Soon, out from the midst of the trees they saw three
Indians coming. They marched in single file, glanc-
ing neither to the right nor left, and following the trail
which evidently was very clear to their eyes. Their
faces were painted, and the appearance they presented
was savage and warlike.
The mother began to cry softly, and Jerry noticed
how pale his sister's face was when he glanced at her
for a moment.
It's Tecumseh's young braves," said Tom in a low
voice a moment later, and with a feeling of great
relief, as he recognized the young Indians.
He waited for them to approach, and as they stopped
in front of the party, a brief and hurried conversation
followed.








IN THE WOODS AGAIN


Where go ?" asked the young brave whom the
boys called Captain Jim.
Fort Pierce," replied Tom.
Ugh Not much talk, much hurry," replied the
Indian.
"What do you mean?" asked Tom. "Is there
danger?"
No pale-face left soon," replied the Indian laconi-
cally. "All killed."
"What will become of us, then?" said Jerry.
"No kill," replied the Indian. Much go, heap
quick."
The further conversation revealed to the boys the
fact of some great danger which lay behind them, and
into explanations of which the young Indian braves
evidently were not inclined to enter; but it was
clear that their warning was given because of their
desire for the safety of their friends.
The young pioneers appreciated the motive, and
made no further attempts to learn what the danger
was, although they both were satisfied that some move-
ment against Fort Mims was being planned, and the
young braves were urging them to leave the region as
rapidly as they could for the sake of their own safety.
The short conversation finished, without a word
the young Indians turned and soon disappeared in
the forest. So quickly did they go, that the boys
scarcely realized they were left alone.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


"I wonder if it's all true," said Tom.
"It's trueenough," replied Jerry; and it's just as
true, too, that we've got to hurry on," and the march
was at once resumed.
But a slight accident occurred soon, for the direc-
tions which Josiah had given Tom were forgotten, and
in their haste they mistook their way, and soon came
to the banks of Pine Log creek.
"I thought Fort Pierce was this side of the creek,"
said Jerry.
"So did I," replied Tom, but I've forgotten every
word Hunter Josiah has given me, and I don't know
where the place is. But I'll tell you what to do. You
stay here quietly on the bank, and I'll cross over the
creek and explore a little. If I don't find anything,
we'll keep on up the creek and see what we can do.
I don't see how I ever could have made such a
blunder, but that's just the condition of affairs, and
there's nothing else to be done."
The party seated themselves on the bank, concealed
as much as possible by the bushes that grew near the
water, and watched Tom as he waded and swam
across the creek and disappeared in the woods on
the other side. The alligators were numerous at this
time of the year, and their fear of them was almost as
great as of the Indians themselves; but Tom made
his crossing safely and waved his hand as he started
into the forest.








IN THE WOODS AGAIN 77

For an hour they waited on the bank in silence,
keeping careful watch in every direction, alike afraid
of some sudden attack upon themselves, and of some
danger befalling the brother in the woods across the
creek.
In the course of two hours Tom returned, declar-
ing that he could find no signs of Fort Pierce. "I'm
completely puzzled," he said, "and I don't know
what to say or where to turn, but the only thing we
can do is to keep on up the creek, and see what we
can find."
Greatly dejected, the party resumed their march,
and filled with sad forebodings againstarted on their
search for Fort Pierce.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


CHAPTER VIII

THE MASSACRE

THE fugitives were nearer Fort Pierce than they
knew, for but a few moments had elapsed before
they saw the walls of the strange-looking place rising
before them.
An entrance was obtained, and, although the number
of refugees here was far less than at Fort Mims, and
the defence much weaker, they soon entered into the
life of the place, and the boys took their part in the
work of the garrison.
Two days filled with anxiety passed, and they were
becoming somewhat accustomed to the monotony of
the life there.
It was the afternoon watch, and both our boys were
on guard at one of the gates. Suddenly their atten-
tion was arrested by the sight of two men approaching.
As they came nearer they were impressed by their
worn and weary appearance, and the evidence of some
struggle through which they hed passed.
"It's Hunter Josiah," said Tom excitedly. "It's
Josiah Fletcher;" and he hailed his former companion
and welcomed him within the fort.








THE MASSACRE


The appearance of the two men was such as to in-
dicate the suffering and excitement which recently
had been theirs. For some time Josiah was unable to
speak, but at last, when he had been served with food
and rested a little, he began his story.
It's all up with Fort Mims," said the hunter, "and
there's hardly a soul left to tell the story. Only about
a dozen have escaped with their lives."
"What! Out of the whole number? said Jerry,
aghast. There must have been five hundred and
fifty there when we left."
"So there were," replied the hunter, "but a dozen
people are all that's got away, and one of those is
Hester, a negro woman, and another is Socca, a friendly
Indian. But if you'll be quiet I'll tell you the whole
story. You know that Peter McQueen, after the battle
of Burnt Corn creek, went down to Pensacola with all
his followers. There the British stocked them up
again, and I'm told offered as much as five dollars for
every white man's scalp they would bring in. They
were to do all the damage they could everywhere, and
if they should happen to be defeated, they were to
send their women and children down to Pensacola.
Then, if the Americans should prove too much for
them all, they explained to Peter how they had ves-
sels enough there to carry them all to Havana.
"Well, McQueen started out with his followers,
along with Josiah Francis and William Weatherford,








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


both of them half-breeds, you know, though I'll say
for Weatherford that he's the best one I ever saw, if
he did lead the attack against Fort Mims. He's a
magnificent-looking man. He's tall and strong, and
as decent as it's possible for such a man to be.
Well, they had a great gathering of the Injuns up
at Toockabatcha, and there they got ready to start
out. You see the Spaniards wanted the trouble made
up there, to draw off our men from Mobile."
"Why?" asked Jerry.
"Oh, the Spaniards have felt all along as if Mobile
belonged to them, and they have wanted to take it
again; but late in August, Weatherford had his men
at the plantation of Zachariah McGirth. There he
was lucky enough or unlucky, if you look at it from
our side- to seize some darkies, and from them he
learned all about the state of things at Fort Minis.
One of the darkies, by the way, escaped and came
down to our fort, but Beasley wouldn't listen to him,
and had him flogged just as he had the others."
Josiah stopped for a moment as if the story he was
telling was almost too much for his feelings, rough
hunter though he was. But in a moment he resumed
and said, "The morning of the last of August was
a day I shall always remember. It was hot and
clear. The people inside the fort felt all right then,
and Beasley even had sent a messenger to General
Claiborne to give him word that he could hold the fort








TIlE MASSACRE


against any number of Injuns; but Beasley was too
drunk to know much, and that explains much of the
trouble, after all.
"I can see the women now as they were getting
dinner ready. Some of the soldiers were hanging
around doing nothing, or else playing cards, and
some of them, I remember, were fast asleep on the
ground. I should think there were a hundred
youngsters, too, playing and dodging around among
the cabins and tents, and some of the young fellows
and the girls were dancing.
"I remember, too, how that poor negro stood there
tied to the stake, with his back all bare for the
flogging. The people, of course, didn't know it,
but it was the most awful moment in their lives.
You remember that ravine out beyond the eastern
gate?"
The one all covered over with trees, and in which
everything grew so rank ?" asked Jerry.
"Yes," replied Josiah. "Well, right there, there
were a thousand Creek warriors hidden, and all
ready to spring on the fort. They were nearly naked,
and I never saw men so painted as they were. You
see, they had some of the prophets along with them,
and one or two of them I was lucky enough to pick
off myself a little later. They had their faces all
painted black, and their rods and medicine-bags were
by their sides.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


"Pretty quick the drum began to beat for dinner.
I had noticed, just a little while before that, that the
eastern gate was wide open, and that a whole lot of
sand had drifted against it. It was so deep that the
gate could not be shut, and I was just going to work
to shovel it away myself, when I heard the drum
beat for dinner.
"The Injuns knew something of the habits of the
people at the fort; at least, I think they must have
known, for they acted just as if the first tap was the
signal they were waiting for. The first thing we
knew there was the most awful yell you ever heard,
and the whole gang of them came running through
that open gate.
"Beasley was a fool, but I'll say for him he was
not a coward, and the first thing he did was to run
for the gate and try to close it. Some of his soldiers
were quick-witted enough to rush to the port-holes,
but I'll never forget to my dying day the sight of the
women and children, and the men who didn't have
any guns, as they all tried to crowd into the houses
and cabins.
"The major was not quick enough. Before he
could dig out the sand and shut the gate, the Injuns
were at him. They used their clubs and tomahawks
first, and dropped him, and then they rushed over his
body into the new enclosure. Beasley had life enough
left in him to crawl behind the gate, and though he








THE MASSACRE


didn't live but a few minutes, as long as he could
breathe he called out to his men to fight.
The Injuns soon filled up the outer enclosure,
and in the field beyond there was a great crowd of
yelling savages. I remember noticing how the
prophets began their dances; but one or two of them
won't dance any more, that I'm sure of," and Josiah
tapped his gun significantly.
Five of their prophets dropped pretty quick, and
the Injuns stopped for a moment and made as if they
were going to clear out, but others crowded in, and
with such yells and howls as you never heard, they
began to fire through the port-holes.
"I remember that poor negro tied out there wait-
ing for the lash that never was to fall on him, and for
doing what would have been the best deed the fort
ever had done for it; but he was shot among the very
first. Captain Middleton had charge of the eastern
side, but it didn't seem a minute before he was dead,
and every man with him. Captain Jack, off on the
south side, and his rifle company were fighting like
demons. Lieutenant Randon was fighting from the
port-holes on the west, and Captain Bailey, who had
general charge after Beasley was killed, seemed to be
everywhere at once. It was great work he did.
"But it was the toughest time I ever saw. You
remember there were two enclosures, and how they
were separated by a row of log pickets with port-








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


holes and an open gate. On one side were the women
and the children, and a few soldiers and men who
hadn't any guns; and on the other were those yelling
savages.
The only thing for the people inside the fort to do
was to kill the savages or be killed by them, and
pretty quick they got their second wind and their
courage came back. They fired through the port-
holes, and I tell you they made some pretty big holes
among the savages; but it didn't seem to do much
good, for others rushed in and took their places, and
there were so many of them that a few losses didn't
count.
Even the boys and the old men were fighting, and
I saw some women too who handled the guns like
heroes. Bailey kept telling the people to hold on a
little longer, and that the Injuns never fought very
long at a time, and he tried to get some to go with
him, and make a dash against them, but nobody
seemed to want to follow him.
"The fight went on for three hours, and then just as
Bailey had said, the Injuns began to get tired. They
didn't howl as they had been doing, and were not fir-
ing as they had been before. The people shut up in
the main fort began to think the end was coming, but
they never were more mistaken in their lives.
"Weatherford, who knew pretty well the condition
of things, was riding on one of the handsomest gray








THE MASSACRE


horses I ever saw, and he took after the Injuns, who
were beginning to move away, and pretty soon got
them back again. At least I think it was Weather-
ford, though some said it wasn't; but everybody was
excited, and couldn't tell very well just what was go-
ing on. The Injuns came back and went to fight-
ing again, anyway. They yelled like demons as they
came on together, and filled up the outer enclosure.
Captain Bailey had some pretty good sharpshooters
with him, and they kept them back a little, and I
know I shot a good many of them myself; but Weath-
erford was watching everything, and pretty soon he
got some of his men to begin to shoot burning arrows,
and in a little while the fort was on fire, and some of
the people started for some of the other buildings,
but a good many stayed behind and were roasted
right there.
"The fire rapidly spread to the other buildings, and
I never shall forget the sight, when in a few minutes
almost everything was roaring and crackling in the
flames. You could hear the shrieks of the women
and children, and that of course made matters a good
deal worse.
"There was only one place left now, and that was
Patrick's loom-house. You remember that was on
the northern side and had been enclosed with extra
strong pickets. There Bailey, and those who were
left alive of his company, took their stand, and kept








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


shooting at the savages. These were now in the main
fort, and everybody was trying to get to the loom-
house; but lots of them were killed by the Injuns as
they ran, and the children and the old people were
trampled to death.
I saw old Samuel Mims, while he was trying to
run for this place, shot down, and while he was yet
alive, an Injun, all covered with blood, cut off his
scalp, and with a yell waved it in the air.
The fire and the Injuns both together went at the
loom-house then. They broke down the pickets and
began to torture those who were inside. They took
the little tots by their feet and knocked their brains
out against the pickets. They ripped open lots of
the people who were killed, and you could have seen
them waving the scalps they had cut from the women,
holding them up by their long hair.
"You see the women's scalps are worth five dollars
apiece just as the men's are. The sight was too much
for Weatherford. He tried to call off his men, and
begged them to spare the women and the children,
but they turned and began to shake their clubs at him,
and I didn't know for a minute but it was all up with
him; but he couldn't hold his men, and they soon left
him, and the butchery went on.
Four hundred out of the five hundred refugees
at Fort Mims were dead by sunset. There was not
a white woman or child that escaped. They had








THE MASSACRE


blocked up every way out of the fort, and yet a dozen
of us managed to cut our way through. Captain
Bailey was with us, but he died out here by the
swamp. That negro woman, Hester, though she had
a ball in her breast, managed to get away, and I don't
know what's become of her, though I think she has
gone down the river. The Injuns didn't kill many
of the darkies, for they kept them to be their slaves."
How many of the Indians were killed?" asked
Tom in a low voice.
Four hundred, anyway, and I know that crowds
were back in the morning trying to carry off their
dead. Oh, it was a fearful sight, and while a good
many of them have gone down to Pensacola or
farther up the country, there are a lot hanging
around here yet, and Fort Pierce will be the next
spot attacked."
"Come on, then, Josiah," said Tom, "let's talk it
over with the captain." And as a result of their
interview, that very day all the inmates of the fort
were packed into canoes and started down the river
towards Mobile.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


CHAPTER IX

THE RETURN

THE trip to Mobile was safely made in spite of the
wily Indians, whose presence they more than
once detected on their voyage. Here, however, there
was great fear, and the news of the fearful massacre
at Fort Mims spread dismay throughout that portion
of the country. Many of the pioneers flocked to the
various settlements, and left their families under the
protection of the soldiers there, while they them-
selves took their guns and started forth for the field
of action.
As soon as Tom and Jerry had seen that their
family was comfortably settled, they, with Josiah and
Martin, who also was among the dozen that had suc-
ceeded in making their escape from the fort, started
once more for the scene of the massacre.
The cry for help went northward as well as else-
where, and although the people in New York did not
hear of the massacre until thirty-one days had passed,
the sensation it produced there was not as marked as
it ought to have been, because the recent victory of
Perry on Lake Erie had produced a feeling of joy








THE RETURN


throughout the nation, and the thoughts of all the
people were turned with intense interest to the move-
ments of General Harrison, who was then just about
to enter Canada, and who soon retrieved the national
misfortunes and disgraces of the preceding year at
Detroit.
It was ten days after the massacre before our boys
arrived at Fort Mims with Major Kennedy, who had
been sent by General Claiborne to bury the dead.
As they approached the place, it was a sad and
horrible spectacle that presented itself. The air was
filled with the buzzards who had come from miles
around to feast on the bodies of the dead. Along
with these there were many dogs who were not
merely fighting among themselves, but contending
with the buzzards for the foul banquet. The spec-
tacle was almost too much even for those hardy
soldiers to endure. Many of them were made sick
by the sight, and a fearful cry for vengeance was
raised by them all.
Not many of the bodies could be recognized, and
they found none that had not been scalped. At
once the brave men prepared for action, and soon
two large pits were dug, into which they were to
cast the bodies of the slain. Separate burial was impos-
sible, and as very few of the bodies could be recog-
nized, it was impossible to mark even the names of
the slain upon a head-stone.








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


Thirteen people only, it had been learned, had
made their way through the enemy's lines, and now
the soldiers were prepared to cover the remains of
those who had been slain. Mutilated white men and
women, along with the bodies of little children and
those of Indians and negroes as well, were lying in
one promiscuous mass. Some had been butchered
in a manner that language cannot describe.
But after a time, even that sad labor was ended,
and the ruins of the buildings and stockade were all
that were left to show that there ever had been such
a place as Fort Mims. The main buildings had been
burned to ashes, and these were almost filled with
bones. The plains and the adjoining woods were
thickly strewn with the bodies of the dead. Every
wooden building had been consumed except the
block-house and a part of the pickets. It was a far
different sight from the merry scene which greeted
the boys on their first visit to the fort, when the
inmates in their fancied security had been passing
the time as if they were engaged in a picnic, or were
on some expedition of pleasure.
When the work at last had been completed, and all
the bones and bodies had been buried in the two
pits which the men had dug, the desire for ven-
geance was intensified. The most intense excitement
and alarm had spread now throughout all the south-
west, and the powerful Indian prophet Francis was








THE RETURN


especially busy in increasing the fear, and in inciting
the victorious Indians to spread destruction throughout
the region that lay between the Alabama and the
Tombigbee rivers.
Every little stockade now was filled with the
frightened refugees, and sickness and death carried
off more than even the savage Indians themselves.
The distress can scarcely be imagined. General
Jackson, as we shall soon see, was now, as he had
been for some time, busliy engaged in his efforts to
overcome the wily and treacherous Indians, and pro-
tect the scattered people from attacks. Settlers
living far from the homes of others were first
sought out by the savages, and many of them were
slain long before the news had reached them of the
massacre of Fort Mims, or they had been made aware
that the Indian uprising had become anything like
as general as it was afterward known to be.
Our boys, with Josiah, now planned to push their
way northward to Fort Madison. There was nothing
for them to do at home, and as they had provided for
the safety of the family, they all three resolved that
they would have a share in the efforts of the country
to subdue the Indians, and overcome the British and
the Spaniards, who were even more active, though less
open, in their movements than the Creeks.
Under the direct influence of Weatherford, helped
on by these British and Spanish officers, the Indians








TECUMSEI'S YOUNG BRAVES


had become so active in that region, that General
Flournoy, who, up to this time, had not allowed
General Claiborne to act except on the defensive,
soon was aroused to a sense of the necessity of some
offensive measures, and not many days had passed
before he ordered General Claiborne to take his
army, and advance into the heart of the Creek
country.
They were to defend the settlers, some of whom
were trying to gather the crops that were yet in the
field, and "to drive the enemy from the frontiers; to
follow them up to their contiguous boundaries, and
to kill, burn, and destroy all their negroes, houses, and
cattle and other property that could not be conven-
iently brought to the depots."
This order, which was regarded at the time by many,
especially by those in the North, as being unnecessarily
cruel and blood-thirsty, the Georgia general justified
by the conduct of Great Britain and the cruel deeds
of her Indian allies.
General Claiborne at once acted, and, crossing the
Tombigbee, began to scour the country on its eastern
side; but although he met and scattered some of the
Indian bands, it was impossible to bring them to an
open battle anywhere.
Josiah Fletcher and the boys, as we have said, now
began to push their way northward. Again and again
they passed some home which had been burned to the







THE RETURN


ground, and frequently found the bones of the women
and children who had been massacred. Day after day
they advanced, their food being scanty, and constantly
seeing signs of their Indian enemies.
At last, one day as they were making their way
through a thick forest, Josiah turned to the boys with
his quiet word of warning, and at his gesture they
quickly stepped behind the large trees among which
they were passing.
There's somebody coming," said Josiah, and I've
a dim suspicion that it's a body of Indians."
How do you know ?" asked Tom.
"I'm not sure," replied Josiah. "And I haven't
time to explain to you now what it is that makes me
suspicious. We shall soon see or hear some one, I'm
positive. Yes, they're coming," repeated Josiah, in a
whisper. Keep out of sight, and it's possible that
they may not strike our trail right away."
Yes, there they were in plain sight now, and Josiah's
words were true. As the boys peered through the
bushes they counted a party of ten Indians marching
in single file after their custom, hideously painted, and
evidently bent on no good errand. As they passed,
the boys glanced at each other quickly when they
recognized the young Indians, who brought up the
rear of the procession, as Tecumseh's young braves.
As soon as they had passed out of sight, Josiah
called the boys, and with all the speed they could








TECUMSEH'S YOUNG BRAVES


make, and yet as quietly as possible, they started on
in the direction from which the Indians had come.
They had little expectation that their own trail
would escape the notice of these warriors, but their
only hope in any event lay in their ability to put as
great a distance as possible between them and this
party.
For an hour they passed on as rapidly as they could
go and then stopped for a brief rest.
There are no signs of them yet, are there, Josiah ?"
said Tom; but the hunter only shook his head in reply.
I'm going to double on our trail, now," said he,
"and we'll start right back in the way we came. It's
going to be dark pretty soon, and our only chance of
escaping these fiends will be to double on our tracks
and try to throw them off the scent. I don't know
that we can do it, but I'm so confident that they'll find
us, or at least that they'll strike our trail, that the only
thing that I want to do now is to get out of their way.
It is not a very pleasant feeling to know that any mo-
ment you may be shot down, and that when you're
least suspecting it a bullet, or some Injun arrow or
tomahawk, may come flying through the air and take
you off before you know it."
The dusk soon deepened into darkness. Our little
party of three did not dare to kindle a fire, as this
would bnly increase the certainty and the zeal of their
Indian pursuers. Josiah constantly spoke of them as