• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 A little poetry, a little mathematics,...
 In which the Milwaukee College...
 In which it is shown that the game...
 The home of Harry Archer
 Show how a want of ready money...
 In which mathematicians are given...
 In which it is shown that football...
 In which new troubles visit the...
 In which Harry begins to suspect...
 In which Harry and Claude take...
 In which the morning of Thanksgiving...
 In which Mr. Keenan faces an indignant...
 On the way to the football...
 In which Mandolin Merry and Mary...
 In which the Milwaukees play the...
 In which Ernest Snowden surprises...
 In which Harry learns that he cannot...
 In which it is shown that doctors...
 In which the prospects for the...
 In which everybody is happy and...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: That football game : and what came of it
Title: That football game
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086402/00001
 Material Information
Title: That football game and what came of it
Physical Description: 256, 11, 1 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Finn, Francis James, 1859-1928
Benziger Brothers
Publisher: Benziger Brothers
Place of Publication: New York ;
Cincinnati ;
Chicago
Publication Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Students -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Football -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Awards -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Truthfulness and falsehood -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Priests -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Francis J. Finn.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in sepia.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086402
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002398768
notis - AMA3688
oclc - 07592504
lccn - 04016135

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    A little poetry, a little mathematics, with the prospects of a great deal about football
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    In which the Milwaukee College eleven begin to feel the iron hand of discipline
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    In which it is shown that the game of football, with its severe preparatory work, has many points in its favor
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The home of Harry Archer
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Show how a want of ready money is not always a thing to be deplored
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    In which mathematicians are given their due
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    In which it is shown that football may be a help both to study and to devotion
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    In which new troubles visit the Archer family
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    In which Harry begins to suspect that he is burning the candle at both ends
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    In which Harry and Claude take a drive
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    In which the morning of Thanksgiving day reveals serious internal dissensions in the football team
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
    In which Mr. Keenan faces an indignant mother and is more frightened than he ever was since he came to the use of reason
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    On the way to the football field
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
    In which Mandolin Merry and Mary Dale learn something of the great game
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
    In which the Milwaukees play the first half under great difficulties
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
    In which Ernest Snowden surprises everybody, and the great football game comes to an end
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    In which Harry learns that he cannot compete in the mathematical contest
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
    In which it is shown that doctors may compare favorably with even the best of mathematicians
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
    In which the prospects for the Archer family grow brighter
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
    In which everybody is happy and the curtain falls
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
    Advertising
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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To the spectators it seemed as though Harry Archer were carrying the opposing eleven on his back.
He shook off one, then another."-Page 206.







THAT FOOTBALL GAME

AND WHAT CAME OF IT


BY
FRANCIS J. FINN, S.J.
Author of "Percy Wynn," "Tom Playfair,"
"Harry Dee," etc.


NEW YORK, CINCINNATI, CHICAGO

BENZIGER BROTHERS
PUBLISHERS OF BENZIGER'S MAGAZINE



































CopyRimTn. 1897. sy BuyzIO3i BROmHgRS













CONTENTS.

-urysM PAGI
I. A Little Poetry, a Little of Mathematics,
with the Prospects of a Great Deal
about Football, .
II. In which the Milwaukee College Eleven
Begin to Feel the Iron Hand of Dis-
cipline, 20
III. In which it is shown that the Game of
Football, with its Severe Preparatory
Work, has Many Points in Its Favor, 31
IV. The Home of Harry Archer, 44
V. Showing How a Want of Ready Money is
Not Always a Thing to be Deplored, 53
VI. In which Mathematicians are Given Their
Due, .. 6S
VII. -In which it is shown that Football May be
a Help both to Study and to Devotion, 74
VIII. In which New Troubles Visit the Archer
Family, 83
IX. In which Harry Begins to Suspect that He
is Burning the Candle at Both Ends, 97
X. In which Harry and Claude Take a Drive, xI1








CONTENTS.


CHAPTER PAGS
XI. In which the Morning of Thanksgiving Day
Reveals Serious Internal Dissensions in
the Football Team, 27
XII. In which Mr. Keenan Faces an Indignant
Mother and is More Frightened than He
ever was Since He Came to the Use of
Reason, 138
XIII. On the way to the Football Field, 152
XIV. In which Mandolin Merry and Mary Dale
Learn Something of the Great Game, 159
XV. In which the Milwaukees Play the First
Half under Great Difficulties, 176
XVI. In which Ernest Snowden Surprises Every-
body, and the Great Football Game
Comes to an End, 208
XVII. In which Harry Learns that He Cannot
Compete in the Mathematical Contest, 228
XVIII. In which it is shown that Doctors May
Compare Favorably with Even the Best
of Mathematicians, 236
XIX. In which the Prospects for the Archer
Family Grow Brighter, 245
XX. In which Everybody is Happy and the Cur-
tain Falls, .. 250












THAT FOOTBALL GAME: AND WHAT
CAME OF IT.




CHAPTER I.
A LITTLE OF POETRY, A LITTLE OF MATHEMATICS, WITh
THE PROSPECT OF A GREA T DEAL ABOUT FOOTBALL.

MR. GEORGE KEENAN, Professor of Poetry
Class, having heard the recitation in Rhetoric, and
given a new lesson and an English theme for the
following day, took up a bundle of papers from his
desk.
There was a slight stir in the class indicative of
awakening interest. Mr. Keenan had the gift of
arousing enthusiasm in regard to English writing,
and, in consequence, his scholars were ever ready
to listen with eager interest to his comments on
their attempts, whether in verse or in prose.
I have examined this set of verses," began the
professor, with much interest and pleasure. Out
of eighteen exercises, twelve are very creditable.
For imagination Claude Lightfoot's is far the best;
while for finish of versification Dan Dockery's is
5


<<,E
4' *







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


admirable. I shall read these presently and
also three or four others-Stein's, Pearson's,
O'Rourke's, and Desmond's. But business before
pleasure. I have here a set of verses, which, while
they would not be particularly discreditable to a
student in Humanities, are not all that one expects
from a member of Poetry class. Here we expect
something more than verse and rhymes, which are
merely the dry bones of poetry; every English ex.
ercise given you in this class, unless it is expressly
stated otherwise, is supposed to have some touch
of passion, in the rhetorical sense of that word.
Now listen to this:
A POEM ON NIGHT.
The sun has slowly gone to rest
Behind the mountains in the west.
It gets a good deal darker now,
The bird stops singing on the bough;
The stars come out and at us peep,
And little children go to sleep,
And chickens, too, go off to roost.
"By the way," interpolated Mr. Keenan, "are
we to infer that children go to roost, too ? "
And watch-dogs from their chains are loosed,
The stars come out, the moon shines, too,
Although a cloud, hides it from view.
The crickets chirp, the bull-frog croaks,
And many a man goes off and smokes.
The reading was here' interrupted by an out-
break of laughs and giggles. Mr. Keenan held up
his hand.







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


Here, now," he said, you have an example of
how not to write poetry. The boy who composed
this never for one moment during the composition
Sof his doggerel placed before his imagination one
Concrete picture of night. He simply took nights
in general, and looked at them piecemeal. Hence,
There is no order, no unity, no choice of details,
nothing that would give an idea to the listener of
any particular night from the beginning of Spring
to the end of Autumn. The composer's imagina-
tion is as dry as a stick. I dare say he hasn't
read three good books during the entire vacation
just passed. Any one reading these verses can
see that in writing them he was 'most unusual
calm.' "
Just at this point a hand went up. It was Harry
Archer's.
"Well, Harry ?" said Mr. Keenan, returning a
smile for the grin on the student's face.
I wasn't most unusual calm,' sir, when I wrote
those verses."
"Ah, you have told on yourself, Harry," said
Mr. Keenan, as several of the boys turned their
merry eyes on Archer with new interest.
Oh, they all know the way I write from last
year, sir; and it doesn't matter, anyhow.. But so
far from being 'most unusual calm,' I was almost
tearing my hair out after I got to the seventh line







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


in one hour, and stuck there for almost another,
trying to get a rhyme for roost. By the time I
loosed those dogs on the scene, I was so mad that
I could have done something desperate."
Mr. Keenan laughed.
"Why, Harry, your own confession shows that
you need not despair. Put your passion into your
verse instead of pulling at your hair, and then who
knows but you will turn out a poet."
Mr. Keenan was about to read Claude Light-
foot's verse on the same subject, when the door of
the class-room opened, and Father Hogan, vice-
president of the college, entered, followed by a
young gentleman of sixteen.
The newcomer was attired in the extreme of
fashion-his suit was of the lightest color, his
trousers, below the knees, were of the widest; his
hair was very long, parted in the middle, and
plastered down on either side of the parting, so as
to allow only a small triangular portion of his fore-'
head to be seen. For the rest, he was stout,
cherry-cheeked, pretty, and, aside from the evi-
dence of scented handkerchief and many jewels,
decidedly effeminate. The newcomer was smiling
recognition to nearly everybody in the room. He
kissed his hand to Claude Lightfoot.
Mr. Keenan," said the vice-president, I bring
you a new member for your class-Willie Hardy,






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


who for the past two years has been attending
classes as a boarder at St. Maure's College."
You are welcome," said Mr. Keenan, taking
the boy's hand in his.
Willie Hardy advanced his right foot, drew
back his left, and bowed so low that the professor
was able to trace the parting of his hair as far as
the nape of his neck, where, for obvious reasons,
it ended.
"It is not necessary, Mr. Keenan," proceeded
the vice-president, for me to introduce Willie
Hardy to the students of this class. Willie has
told me that he was with them in Second Aca-
demic, and I am sure.they all remember him very
well."
I know I do," said Claude Lightfoot, with the
sunny smile which he had carried undimmed up
and on through the lower classes; whereat all the
listeners, morally speaking, broke into a roar of
laughter.
Mr. Keenan and the vice-president were puzzled
by this outburst of merriment. They were both
unacquainted with Willie Hardy personally, and,.
luckily for that smiling youth, knew nothing of
his record at Milwaukee College ; and, as Willie
joined in with the laughing quite heartily, they
were not moved to inquire further into the matter.
The vice-president withdrew ; Willie was as-







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


signed a seat next to Claude Lightfoot, and Mr.
Keenan was about to resume class-work, when the
bell rang for the end of class.
By the way," said Mr. Keenan, don't forget
about the meeting in the gymnasium of the mem-
bers of the football team."
Then he said prayers with the class, and dis-
missed them. As Willie Hardy was going out,
he motioned him to remain.
Willie stood smiling and radiant while the stu-
dents marched out two by two into the corridor.
One other boy, however, remained. It was Harry
Archer. He was very red in the face, and very
nervous.
What's the matter, Harry ? inquired the pro.
fessor kindly.
I-I've come to tell you, sir, that I can't pla)
football this year."
Mr. Keenan had considerable command over
his feelings; but I am bound to say that at this an-
nouncement his jaw dropped.
Why, Harry," he exclaimed, "you're not in
earnest, are you ? We can't get along without
our quarter-back."
Oh, you will find plenty of good material, I
hope, sir. I am awfully sorry, for I love the game,
and I want to see Milwaukee College head and






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


shoulders over every team in the city, but I can't
play this year."
"I doubt very much," Mr. Keenan made an-
swer, "whether we have plenty of good material;
but even granting this, there is no one in the
college, in fact I believe, from what I have heard,
there is no one in the city, who can at all compare
with you as quarter-back. Are you quite serious
in your resolution ? "
Indeed, I am, Mr. Keenan. I have been think-
ing about the matter ever since the middle of last
August ; and since the opening of classes last
week, I have been thinking of it harder than ever.
The fact is, I have been trying to find some excuse
to play, but I really can't. I am convinced that it
is my duty to keep out of the game for this
season."
I think I could play quarter-back," said Willie
Hardy, who had been listening thus far with no
attempt to conceal his interest.
I hope, Harry," Mr. Keenan went on, taking
no notice, under stress of his disappointment, of
Willie-" I hope that my reading of your verses
and my comments on them have had nothing to
do with your decision."
Oh! indeed, no, Mr. Keenan," protested Harry
with much earnestness. "I know that my verses






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


are bad, and the few words you said have con-
vinced me that I ought to do a little reading, but
I spend so much time at studying that I find none
for books."
How much time do you give to your studies ?"
From three to five hours, sir."
Here Willie, who was now standing behind Mr.
Keenan, thrust his tongue into his cheek, and
winked at Harry. The object of these polite at-
tentions, however, failed to acknowledge the sig-
nals. Willie felt sure that Harry was lying, and
had thrown out these familiar signs to signify in
the most friendly manner possible his opinion to
that effect.
"Well," said Mr. Keenan, I would advise you
to throw off an hour from your studies, and give it
to reading."
But, sir, I am working for that eighty-dollar
prize for the best examination in Geometry."
Even so, Harry, that work need not engross
your time; as a mathematician you are far and
away the best in the class. Claude Lightfoot, ex-
cellent as he is, can't come near you."
Yes, but that's because I study at it three or
four times as long as Claude. If I were to let
down in my work, Claude would run away from
me in Mathematics in a week."
That may be so, Harry; but meantime you are






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


giving so much time to Mathematics and so little
to English that you are in danger of injuring your
literary gifts. If you were to pay more attention
to each, you would secure a much better mental
development. Mathematics and literary studies
correct each other. An excess of Mathematics
narrows or even dries up the imagination, while an
excess in the study of literature develops loose-
ness, vagueness, and inaccuracy. You must try to
balance yourself."
That is true, sir; but I have made up my mind
to get that eighty-dollar prize, if it is possible; and
in the mean time I must let literature, outside of
regular class-work, go. After Thanksgiving day
I hope that I shall be able to do better."
"I shall be delighted, Harry, if you secure the
prize. It will be an honor to our class and to our
college."
"A good many high-school boys and private
students under eighteen are working for it, and
some of them have hired special coaches."
Is any one helping you ? "
No, sir; I am working pretty much by myself.
Mr. Lawrence, who taught us Geometry in Hu-
manities, gave me a splendid start, and I find that
under you I am learning, if anything, faster than
ever."
Here Willie Hardy interposed.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


I thay," he said with a pronounced lisp, what
ith thith thing all about ? Whothe going to give
a prithe of eighty dollarth ? "
Didn't you hear about it yet ? cried Archer.
" Have you been away from Milwaukee this sum-
mer ?"
Yeth," said Willie sweetly ; I wath thpend-
ing my time out at a lake where there wath nobody
to dithturb me. I gave nine hourth a day to read-
ing poetry."
Mr. Keenan, who knew nothing of Willie, was
impressed with this statement. Archer was im-
pressed, too; but for a different reason. That
richness of fancy, which had made Willie notorious
in former years at Milwaukee College, had not de-
serted the pretty youth. He still lied with ele-
gance and ease.
"Well, Willie," said the professor, "on the
tenth of August last, the 'Evening Wisconsin'
offered a prize of eighty dollars to any boy or girl
under the age of nineteen who should make the
best examination in Geometry. It is open to any
young person in Milwaukee who, on the thirtieth
of November next, shall present himself or herself
at the Public Library Reading-Room with one hun-
dred coupons cut out from the issues of the 'Even,
ing Wisconsin.' Those who are to compete must
come to the reading-room with no paper of any






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


kind save the one hundred coupons, which are to
serve as tickets of admission. Paper, pens, and
ink are to be provided by the proprietors of the
paper. Sharp at nine o'clock on the morning of
November the thirtieth, every competitor will be
handed a slip containing some fifteen or twenty
propositions and problems in Geometry. These
propositions and problems are to be made out by
the city editor of the 'Wisconsin,' who is an able
Mathematician; and as he is one of the projectors
of the enterprise and a man of the most scrupulous
honor, you see that there is little or no danger of
unfairness. Now, Harry," continued Mr. Keenan,
turning his eyes upon the young mathematician,
" I think I see a chance to get you some extra help.
How would you like to have a coach, who would
do his work for you as a labor of love ?"
Harry's eyes danced.
Oh I should be infinitely obliged to you," he
said.
"I should be glad to coach you myself, were it
not for two reasons. First, I have to give most of
my time outside of class-work and preparation for
it, to keeping athletics going among the boys..
[This, it may be said in parenthesis, was quite true.1
Secondly, even if I were free, I don't think that I
should be of any assistance to you, as I am but a
poor mathematician."







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


In giving the second reason, Mr. Keenan al-
lowed his modesty to get the better of his judg-
ment.
"I wouldn't think of letting you help me, sir,"
put in Harry, "because I know you have more
than enough to do."
Not more than enough, Harry. We never
have too much to do, so long as we love our work
and are able to do it. But there is a young father
in the college who has given all his free time for
the last ten years to mathematics. He is now en-
gaged in writing a book on Calculus, and some
time ago offered to help me in any way he could.
I think that if I mention your case to him he
will gladly give you a few hours a week. I have
met many mathematicians, but no one who at all
approaches him. If he find that you have the
ability, he will give you a training such as no boy
in Milwaukee is likely to get."
My cried Archer, wouldn't that be fine "
"There wath a profether at Thaint Maureth
who could square the thircle," put in Willie.
Taking no notice of the remark, Mr. Keenan
went on.
Now, Harry, in case I get Father Trainer to
help you, I want you to promise in return that
once the contest is over, you will give yourself with







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


energy-and I know you have plenty of it-to
your English."
I promise right here and now, Mr. Keenan;
and honestly, I feel as though you were heaping
coals of fire upon my head. Here I come
and disappoint you very much, as I can see, by re-
fusing to play in the college eleven; and in return,
you try to help'me as though I were your best
friend. Oh I should like to play; it makes me
feel so mean to refuse; but I can't, sir. One rea-
son is that I wish to give extra time to study; but
that's only a small part. I should like to tell you
the other reason, but I can't do it yet. Later on,
sir, I hope to be able to tell you."
"Very good, Harry; I am convinced that you
are acting under a sense of duty; and, while I am
sorry to lose you, I would rather have no eleven
at all than have a single boy on it who was playing
to the detriment of higher and more important in-
terests."
"Thank you, Mr. Keenan. I hope to be able
to do something for you and for the college in the
way of athletics next Spring. Good-afternoon,
sir."
"Good-afternoon, Harry ; and be careful, my
boy, not to study too much. Keep your health
and strength. Even during these first ten or






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


twelve days of class, I have noticed that your color
is not so good as it was when I first met you last
August, and there is the least little sign of a black
circle under your eyes."
Oh, I'm pretty strong, sir; but I'll try to look
out."
"Now, Willie," said Mr. Keenan, as Harry left
the room, perhaps you can be of some use to me.
Are you a football player ?"
"That ith my favorite game."
"Were you on the first eleven of St. Maure's ?"
"No, their; but I wath to play on it thith year.
I wath to be either tackle or quarter-back. Latht
year I wath a thubthitoot."
Oh indeed; that means a good deal, if the
St. Maure's team is all that it is cracked up to be.
I am surprised that you did not go back to St.
Maure's to share in the glory of the team."
"I would go back, their, only I want more time
and thecluthion for thtudieth."
Mr. Keenan was edified. As he had been at
Milwaukee for only four weeks, it is not surprising
that he had as yet learned nothing of Willie Hardy,
who had not returned to St. Maure's because he
had been "requested" by the vice-president to
stay at home.
Well," said the prefect, we might try you for
our football eleven. The withdrawal of Archer






AND WHAT CAME OF IT. I1

leaves us short of a man, and perhaps we could
play you in the line. The boys attending here of
sufficient weight for the line of rushers are all of
them either already engaged on the team, or fcr
one reason or another cannot play."
"Couldn't I play quarter-back ?"
"We will see about that. Ah there goes
the bell for the football meeting. Come along
with me, Willie." Mr. Keenan added, speaking
rather to himself, I expect to encounter a storm
or two before we adjourn."







THAT FOOTBALL GAMEs


CHAPTER II.
IN WHICH THE MILWAUKEE COLLEGE ELEVEN BEGIN TO
FEEL THE IRON HAND OF DISCIPLINE.

NEARLY a score of boys were seated on the
benches which lined the gymnasium. Facing
them stood Mr. Keenan, in his hand a little note-
book.
"Young gentlemen," he began, I find that of
last year's team, six are still attending college,
namely, Harry Archer, quarter-back; Claude
Lightfoot, full-back; Walter Collins, left end;
Andrew O'Neil, right end; John Drew, right
guard ; and Ernest Snowden, right half-back. I
regret to say that Harry Archer does not intend to
play football this year."
Something very like a groan came from the
listeners.
"We might as well give up, then," said O'Neil
ruefully.
"And then, again," laughed Mr. Keenan, "we
mightn't. In the bright lexicon of football there's
no such expression as 'give up.' Now, the new
S players suggested by a board of three college stu-
dents, members of last year's team, are Charlie
Pierson, of poetry, as centre-rush ; Gerald






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


O'Rourke, of poetry, as right tackle; Dan Dock-
ery, of the same class, as left half-back; Frank
Stein, of poetry, as left guard; and Maurice Des-
mond, of poetry, as left tackle. As you see, we
now have no one for quarter-back. Has any one
any suggestions to offer ? "
"It seems to me, Mr. Keenan," said Gerald
O'Rourke, "that Desmond might be trained for
quarter-back. He is very quick, and rather light
for the line. He is a good runner, and last year he
played quarter for the second eleven."
Second the motion said Pierson.
It's the best we can do, I think," added an-
other, while all the boys except Desmond and
Willie Hardy nodded their heads in assent.
"Very good," Mr. Keenan said, as he made a
note. Now the next question is, whom shall- we
take for left tackle ? Willie Hardy informs me
that he was to have played on the celebrated St.
Maure's team, had he returned. Certainly, he ap-
pears to be heavy enough."
Many of the boys looked at Willie doubtfully.
There was a slight pause. Good-natured Claude
came to the rescue.
I think, sir," he said, that Willie might make
a good tackle. When he was here before, he was
one of our best runners, and he's pretty strong,
too."






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


It wouldn't do any harm to give him a trial,"
added O'Neil, especially as we have so few to
choose from. This year we have no good ball-
players to fall back on except three or four in the
second team, who are all very light; and, as it is,
our rush-line will be under one hundred and forty-
five pounds, and the lightest in the city."
"I weigh about one hundred and ninety-five
poundth," put in Willie, with his ingenuous smile.
"I suppose you would weigh that, if you were
dressed in a couple of feather-beds with dumb-bell
attachments," laughed Gerald O'Rourke. "At
any rate, you are over one hundred and fifty, I
believe, and if you're not afraid, doubtless you'll
do very well."
Willie looked injured.
"A thudent from Thaint Maureth," he cried,
glancing out of the corner of his eye at Mr.
Keenan, who had attended that seat of learning in
his youth, earth nothing."
The listeners applauded this remark lustily; and
half in joke, half in earnest, they agreed to allow
Willie the position of left tackle.
So now we have fixed our team conditionally.
However, as we are not going to take up football
in exactly the same way as last year, it will be well
for each one of you to know what he is expected to
do and what not to do. In the first place, there is to






AND WHAT CAME OF IT. 23

be practice regularly every afternoon, rain or shine;
after class, on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays, for
half an hour; on Wednesdays and Saturdays for
at least one hour; or, in place of that, a practice
game. Again, every Thursday afternoon, which is
your holiday, each one of you must report here at
three o'clock for an hour or two of hard practice."
I don't think I can come on Thursdays," said
Snowden.
Indeed I am very sorry ; but if you can't
come, let me know to-morrow. We must have
an eleven made up of players who practise to-
gether every day in the week, except Sunday.
Last year, I am told, you didn't have your full
team practising together more than one time out
of five. As a result, you were beaten badly on
one occasion by the Centrals, a team which was, in
material, by no means superior to your eleven.
They had discipline and team-work on their side,
however."
I guess I can manage to come," said Snowden,
in a sulky voice.
Is there any one else who can't come ? con-
tinued Mr. Keenan.
The young man who had to attend to piano les-
sons twice a week, and that other who took private
instruction in German, and who, in consequence,
had found it impossible to practise regularly with






r THAT FOOTBALL GAME.-

the team the preceding season, then and there con-
cluded to do the impossible. The pianist, Rob
collins, however, resolved to speak.
"I have music-lessons tvice a week, just after
class," he said.
"Indeed Do you pay the teacher, or does he
pay you ? "
"I pay him."
"Well, I think he will be willing to change his
hour for you, if you insist upon it. Of course,
if he can't, we shall have to let you go."
"Oh, he'll change the .time, if I put it in that
way to him."
The boys were now looking at each other with
eyes and mouths of astonishment. That Mr.
Keenan should without a tremor give two of the
oldest players the alternative of regular practice
or leaving the football team was to their minds a
bold proceeding. But there were further surprises
in store for them.
"Another point I understand, boys, that last i
year several members of the team were hard
smokers."
"None of the fellowth on the team at 'Thaint
Maureth ever thmoked," interpolated Willie.
"I smoke," said Snowden sulkily, .and it
doesn't hurt my playing."
So do I," said Drew.





AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


"And I," said Collins.
All of them spoke boldly.
"Is there any other smoker?" asked the pre-
fect mildly.
"I 'hit' a pipe now and then," said Pierson.
But I am perfectly willing to stop, if you wish."
"I can't stop," cried Collins.
"I won't," muttered Ernest Snowden. It was
a whisper which reached the ear for which it was
obviously intended.
Well, young gentlemen, you have to do one of
two things-stop smoking within a week, or leave-
the football team. Of course, nearly every boy
who smokes will claim that it doesn't hurt him.
Now, I am not prepared to say that every growing
young man who smokes very moderately is in-
juring himself, but I am quite sure that the vast
majority are the worse for their smoking. While
I should regret to give up having a football eleven
to represent our college, I should much prefer that
course than to have an eleven without discipline.
,I regard football as the greatest of all games, prin-
cipally for the reason that it schools a boy to al,
most heroic self-restraint both on and off the field.
But when there .is no discipline, there is no re-
straint-at least there is none off the field, and so.
one-half of the good that should be obtained from
the game is lost; and when there is wo discipline,






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


there is likely to be no team-work on the field
itself; and, again, instead of having head-work in
the game, we have guess-work; and instead of
team-play, we have horse-play. Rather than allow
such a state of things to go on, I will either aban-
don the idea of having a college eleven, or I will
fill up the vacancies with boys of the lower classes.
This last course will ruin our prospect of victory
for the present year, but in the following season,
we should have a team worthy of the college.
Now, what have the smokers to say ? "
"I'll stop," said Walter Collins cheerfully.
Drew and Snowden were whispering together.
"Well, Drew ? "
Drew was about to speak, when Snowden
touched him on the arm.
If you please," said Snowden, Drew and I
would like to think about it before we give any
answer."
There was a touch of rebellion in the boy's man-
ner.
Well, in this case," said Mr. Keenan, the boy
who hesitates is lost. If you don't care about put-
ting that much restraint on yourselves, you are
either inveterate smokers, and then we don't want
you; or you are too indifferent to the good of the
eleven to make a sacrifice. In either case, I
don't want you."






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


"I'll stop," said Drew.
"And I won't," muttered Snowden.
"Then, Mr. Snowden, you are excused from
further attendance at this meeting."
Snowden put his hands in his pockets and
walked out.
The boys looked very gloomy. Snowden had
been one of the best players 'on the preceding
year's team.
I am very sorry, boys," said Mr. Keenan, to
have begun the season with so much unpleasant-
ness, but I made up my mind before coming
here to have a disciplined team or none at all.
Some of you may think that I am too exacting;
but you will learn in the long run, I think, that I
am looking to your good and the good name and
honor of the college.
I am told that last year even the old boys, that
is, our former students, were disgusted with the
loose playing of the college eleven. While your
opponents during the halves of the game gathered
together comparing notes and planning for the
last half, five or six of your players were hidden in
various corners or behind fences, smoking the
deadly cigarette or pulling at a pipe. The players
you went against did none of these things for the
simple reason that their paid coach wouldn't hear
of such irregularities. They were paying him a






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


hundred dollars or so monthly to forbid them ju;st
such things. Now, you boys have no paid coach;
but I'm going to do for nothing what a coach
would do for a good salary."
"That's right," said Dockery. Even the small
boys noticed how much more other teams sacri-
ficed than our boys for the sake of the game."
Don't you think, Mr. Keenan," inquired Pier-
son, "that we could get one or two of the old
players to help us out ? "
No," said Mr. Keenan emphatically. I don't
want -. single player who is not a bona fide student
of Milwaukee College. My first reason is that, as
a rule, such a player cannot attend regular practice;
again, we cannot be quite so sure that he keeps in
regular training; in the third place, he is not under
the discipline of the college, and he may play a
style of game which the authorities do not approve
of. Finally, he is not a college student, and foot-
ball, as it is now played, is a game for college stu-
dents. Hence, we shall play no game with
athletic associations, no game with outside teams
which are not under the direct sanction and control
of some responsible school or college. Football
is essentially a young gentlemen's game. It is
quite feasible, at times, to play a game of base-ball
with rough characters; but in football, you must
play only with gentlemen--otherwise the game






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


becomes a slugging match, and a question as to
which is the better or worse set of rowdies. Now
the next point is the election of captain. We
need no formalities. Dan Dockery will pass
around the slips of paper which I have provided
him with, and each one of you will write the name
of him whom you wish to be captain."
According to the votes," announced Dockery
a few minutes later, Claude Lightfoot has eight,
Dan Dockery one, and Ernest Snowden one."
"Therefore," added Mr. Keenan, "Claude
Lightfoot is Captain."
Mr. Keenan was guilty of a rash judgment on
this occasion. He concluded that Drew had cast
his vote for Snowden; but the voter in question
was none other than Willie Hardy.
Is there any further business, boys ? "
Claude arose.
"I want to thank the fellows, Mr. Keenan, for
electing me. I don't think I am particularly fitted
to be captain, but I'll do my best; and I think, too,
that even if our team is weaker individually than
last year's, we will play a much better game, pro-
vided we follow your instructions."
The boys applauded Claude, as, covered with
blushes, he seated himself.
Mr. Keenan," said Dockery, what about our
diet ?"






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


The prefect smiled.
I had intended," he said, "to lay down a few
rules; but you boys have taken my remarks about
smoking and regular practice so hard, that I am
afraid to say anything more."
"We're all converted," said Walter Collins.
" Please give us a few instructions."
Yes."-" That's right."-" Go on, sir."
In some inexplicable way, the boys had changed
from shadow to sunshine. Mr. Keenan, who in the
first ten minutes of the meeting had aroused little
but opposition, had, since the withdrawal of Snow-
den, secured their full confidence.
"Well, I'll give you a very simple regulation.
Eat three hearty meals a day, eat nothing between
meals, avoid ice-cream and cakes. For the rest
stay at home of nights, and go to bed before ten."
Every one looked pleased.
Shall we promise to do it, boys ? inquired
Claude.
I promith," cried Willie Hardy.
Then each and every boy followed Willie's ex-
ample, and each and every one with the exception
of Willie meant what he said.
Meeting adjourned.







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


CHAPTER III.
IN WHICH IT IS SHOWN THAT THE GAME OF FOOTBALL,
WITH ITS SEVERE PREPARATORY WORK, HAS MANY
POINTS IN ITS FAVOR.

MILWAUKEE COLLEGE, like all Gaul, is divided
into three parts : the college building itself, on
Tenth, and facing State, Street; the play-ground
proper, very large, very bare, destitute of grass ;
and, separated from the college by a strip of land
and a plank walk, "the college green," the third
part, a sacred place which no student may set foot
upon without express permission. It is the one
ambition of John, the faithful college janitor, to
keep this green true to its name; and it is the
ever-present disappointment of his life that he
meets with but partial success; for in the football
season, the eleven use it for their practice-ground,
and in spring the fielders of the base-ball nine in-
vade it; while the small boy, who hopes in later
years to be himself a player, stands without the
boundary mark, and looks wistful; or, mayhap,
should the prefect disappear, desecrates the reserve
with his unhallowed foot.
After the football meeting, the ten players,
throwing aside their coats, entered the green,"







THAT FOOTBALL GAME.:


and were about to tackle and run in the usual
violent fashion, when Mr. Keenan interposed.
Hold on, boys," he said: this won't do at all.
Some of you are utterly out of training; probably
not more than two of your number are in any kind
,of condition for such work as hard tackling and
running. You must begin gently, or some one
-may be hurt. Even supposing none of you were
hurt, there would be several of you too stiff and
sore to practise to-morrow. Suppose you form a
ring, standing three yards apart from each other."
Mr. Keenan was pleased with their alacrity in
falling into the position suggested. It was evident
to him that he had gained the boys' confidence.
Now, Lightfoot, begin by passing the ball to
your neighbor, and throw it slowly."
Lightfoot, holding the ball in his hand with the
long axis resting upon his forearm, passed it to the
player at his right, by swinging the full length of
his arm, inclined a little from the level of the
shoulder. Pierson caught the oval, and passed it
with both hands to his neighbor, who in turn
passed it, until, finally, the ball was returned to
Claude.
It won't do," said Mr. Keenan.
"I thought tho," Willie remarked to Gerald
O'Rourke.
"What's wrong, sir ? asked Claude.






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


"In passing the ball, Claude, where do you
want the runner to receive it ? "
"Anywhere he can catch it, I suppose."
But is there a best place ? "
"Why, now that I come to think of it, I should
suppose that the one who passes the ball ought to
aim at the waist of the fellow who is to catch it."
"Exactly. Suppose a half-back is running up
against the line ; he should be advancing head
down. If you aim at his waist, he gets the ball ex-
actly where it is easiest to catch it without losing.
speed or changing position. Now, try again, and
use both hands and one arm in passing, as that is
the best and quickest way for short passes."
That's a new point for me," said O'Neil in a
whisper to O'Rourke.
"For me, too; Mr. Keenan must have been a
football player in his day."
This time, although the boys were more careful
in passing the ball, several of them were slow and
awkward.
Now throw the ball harder," said Mr. Keenan,
as presently in the course of their practice they
showed more ease in their movements. Any one
who misses must fall on the ball."
Willie Hardy and Charlie Pierson were obliged
to fall on the ball in this round to the great amuse-
ment of the small boys standing outside the for-






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


bidden ground, and gazing on the scene with open
mouths and rounded eyes. Looking at the play-
ers, one would think that their holding the ball was
a matter of life or death. Andrew O'Neil, at the
beginning of the practice, had remarked that he
did not believe in "baby work." He was now
perspiring, partly from the exercise, partly from
fear of a false throw or a muff. Even the little
things of football are to be done carefully.
When about seven or eight minutes had been
spent in this exercise, Mr. Keenan called a halt.
"Where are you going, Pierson ?" he asked,
as the future centre-rush made at a trot towards
the college building.
To get a drink, sir."
"I think you can afford to wait: no drinking
during practice."
What does he take us for ? inquired Stein of
Maurice Desmond.
"For a lot of geese," answered Maurice, with a
grin. And he's about right."
Yes," assented Collins. "And I'm glad he's
coming down on us. Last year we all felt that
more discipline was needed, and yet we wouldn't
submit to it unless it was forced upon us. It's
about time for us to go to work and saw wood."
As Pierson returned somewhat shame-faced,
Mr. Keenan whispered to him:






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


That is all right, Charlie-offer it up."
Charlie, who was the best-natured boy in the
college, broke into a smile. His good-humor wac
at once restored.
Now, boys, we must begin to get ready for
running. There's no need of practising on the
green for this particular exercise. Range your-
selves in single file beside the parallel bars, and trot
slowly along the fence all the way around. Claude
you take the lead; and be careful not to go
fast."
They had no sooner started than, with refresh-
ing alacrity, every small boy in the yard fell into
line, with the result that the file of runners was
fully fifty yards in length, and, owing to the hilar-
ious cries and motions of the knickerbockered
tribe, formed a very inspiring scene to the prefect
and the various knots of spectators without and
within the college enclosure.
While Mr. Keenan, thus rapt in pleasant con-
templation, was standing beside the parallel bars,
Snowden, who had been a gloomy witness thus far
of the first practice, advanced and touched his cap.
" Mr. Keenan," he said, "I'd like to apologize.
I was out of humor this afternoon and made a fool
of myself. If you'll overlook what has happened,
I'll promise not to smoke any more."
The runners were nearing the two. Pierson,






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


who was fat, was blowing heavily, and pretty Willie
Hardy had lost his smile.
Halt," cried the prefect. "Well, Snowden,
you may fall into line. Once more, Claude, but
even a little slower and stop half-way, that is when
you come opposite home-base. I notice that a
couple of your men are almost winded. When
you reach the base, walk back here."
His directions were followed to the letter.
To-morrow, boys," announced Mr. Keenan on
their return, "I shall put you directly under
charge of your captain, Claude. Lightfoot. He
and I shall have a talk together now, and arrange
upon what is best to be done. Those who wish to
play on our eleven must obey him in what regards
football on and off the field."
Claude and the prefect held a long conference;
and the boy, with whom athletics were almost a
second nature, seemed to catch by intuition the
general plan of campaign which Mr. Keenan was
outlining.
I think, sir," he said, that we can make it go.
There will be no trouble with the new players, and
none with Collins and O'Neill. They are all willing *
to learn. The only fellows who may growl are
Ernest Snowden and Drew. Both of them be-
longed to a crowd in last year's team who thought
that all they had to do in football was to go in and






AND WHAT CAME OF 17T.


win. They were great big fellows, and because
they could block their opponents easily and do a
few things which depend more on strength and
weight than anything else they thought that they
were fine football players."
Whereas," supplemented Mr. Keenan, "they
were merely fine material."
Yes; they were that sure," assented Claude.
That's a point which shows how young football
really is in the West, Claude; it is quite possible
for a boy to play three or four years in a college
team, and think himself a fine player, without his
really knowing the rudiments of the game."
I'm beginning to think, sir, after what you've
said, that none of us here know the rudiments. If
I try to follow your directions, the boys will have
to practise a great deal of real self-denial."
It will do them good."
Mr. Keenan," said Claude with a laugh, "I've
often been amused by the way boys make sacri-
fices for the sake of a field-day or a football game.
Now, last year the boys of the Central High School
Eleven who beat us so badly, dieted severely, went
to bed early, gave up smoking, ate and drank
nothing between meals, got up early, and gave up
lots of delicacies in the eating and drinking line.
The day before they played us, several of them
were going to a party, and when their captain sent






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


them word that they could not go, they gave it
up. They were awfully afraid of our team, and
our team wasn't a bit afraid of them. You've
heard, of course, how they beat us twenty-six to
nothing. Well here's the thing that amused me.
Those fellows for the sake of winning a game prac-
tised mortification and self-denial enough almost
to make them saints. If they had done all that for
the love of God it would raise them, I reckon, to a
high degree of holiness."
Mr. Keenan laughed.
"Well, Claude, I am glad you spoke of that.
Didn't it ever occur to you that you could com-
bine the two things ? All the sacrifices you make
for the sake of a football game may count in the
supernatural order too."
Claude opened his eyes to their widest.
I don't quite see," he remarked.
Don't you belong to the League of the Sacred
Heart ?"
"Yes, sir; I think every boy in the college is a
member. This year I have been appointed a
Promoter, and have charge of a band of fifteen, all
in the Poetry class. All the football players of my
class are in my band."
Splendid !" cried Mr. Keenan with enthusi-
asm. Now, Claude, as you are a Promoter, and
have half, or more than half, of the football team






AND WHA T CAME OF IT.


under your care, you can do ever so much to make
the League devotion practical."
"I'd be very glad to do anything I could, sir.
But I don't understand yet."
"Well, you know the Morning Offering, don't
you ? "
"Yes, sir. Every morning we offer all our
thoughts, words, and actions of the day in union
with the interests of the Sacred Heart."
"Just so; now how many kinds of actions are
there ?"
"Three, sir: good actions, bad actions, and in-
different actions."
"What is a good action ?"
"An action, sir, that by its very nature pleases
God, as, for instance, to pray, to do a kind act for
the love of God, to resist a temptation."
And what is a bad action ? "
"An action, sir, which by its very nature is of-
fensive to God, as to steal, to blaspheme, to lie."
Now what is an indifferent action ? "
"An action which in itself is neither bad nor
good; as to eat dinner, to walk, to run, to read,
or to stand on your head."
I congratulate you on your knowledge of the
catechism, Claude. What kind of an action is
football ? "
It is a bully action, sir." said Claude, with a







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


laugh. But looking at it from the way we study
our catechism, I should say that it is neither bad
nor good in itself; and, consequently, indifferent."
"So, then, football playing is neither bad nor
good."
"I guess not, sir; it's good," said Claude fer-
vently.
Then it's not indifferent."
No, sir."
"Aren't you getting confused, Claude ? "
"Well," returned the captain of the eleven, it's
this way. If a boy plays football for a good end,
it's a good action. If he plays for a bad end, it's a
bad action."
But," argued Mr. Keenan, football is a bad
action, and I'll prove it. A game where there is
slugging and ill-temper and revenge is made up of
bad actions. But in football we have slugging
and ill-temper and revenge. Therefore football
is made up of bad actions."
Claude was not a philosopher, so he failed to an-
swer this objection in form."
"What you say does not seem to be true, Mr.
Keenan. Slugging is positively forbidden in foot-
ball, and revenge has nothing to do with any game.
As regards ill-temper, it is the same in football as
in any other game: the boy who loses his temper
plays all the worse as a rule. So, you see, those






AND WHA F CAME OF IT.


things you speak of are an abuse, and don't belong
to the game at all."
Right again, Claude: football, so far from
being a game for the promotion of rowdiness, is
a game where a player is schooled to control his
passions under the utmost provocation. It is hard
to say whether, if rightly played, football does
more for one's bravery than for one's endurance.
The people who cry out against football as being
a game for the promotion of savagery are simply
confounding the game itself with some abuses
which threaten to creep in. We are both satisfied,
then, that the game is indifferent. Now the next
question is, how can it be made bad ? "
I suppose, sir, it would be made bad for an in-
dividual player if he were to play for some bad
end; for instance to show off, or to revenge him-
self on some one else."
And how could it be made good ? "
"Easily, sir. If a boy were to exclude all bad
motives and were to offer it up with his other ac-
tions of the day, it would become a good act."
Hence it is quite possible for a boy to play a
hard football game, to enjoy himself immensely,
and, at the same time, to please and honor the
Sacred Heart very much."
Good gracious !" said Claude. "Then I've
been having a lot of fun in football, and at the same







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


time, have been doing good for my soul. It seems
so funny, sir; I can't imagine it."
I thought you would say something like that,
Claude. It does look strange on the face of it.
But I think that I can make the matter clearer for
you. Suppose, a man were to come to our water-
faucet outside, and take a drink of water. There
would be no harm and no good in the action of
drinking-would there ?"
No, sir."
But suppose that before drinking, he should
propose to signify by that action his hatred of
God, wouldn't that intention make it a bad act ? "
Of course it would. I think, sir, that he would
sin mortally."
"So do I. Now God is more willing to be
pleased than to be displeased; quicker to reward
than to punish. Hence, if he were to offer up the
action of drinking the water to show his love for
God, it would follow that his action would be a
good one, and one for which he would get a re-
ward."
"That's a consoling doctrine, sir."
Indeed it is; and a very practical one, too. So
if you boys submit to hard training and discipline,
you can offer every one of those acts each day to
the Sacred Heart, and the harder the discipline
and training come on your natural inclinations, the






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


more merit will you gain, the better boys will you
become."
"That's fine !" cried Claude, jumping to his
feet. Just think Every bump I get can be of-
fered up for my sins. I'm going to talk this over
with the Poetry boys on my team, and I'll get
Harry Collins to attend to it with the other fel-
lows, and I'm sure they'll all be delighted to join
football training and devotion to the Sacred Heart
together."
"I believe so, too, Claude, and the better you
practise devotion to the Sacred Heart, the better
you will play football. Halloa it is nearly five
o'clock. Go home to your studies, young man,
and when you're working at them, remember that
they too can be rendered very meritorious by the
Morning Offering."
And Claude literally skipped home. Doubtless
he skipped with a good intention too.







THAT FOOTBALL GAME


CHAPTER IV.
THE HOME OF HARRY ARCHER.

WHILE the boys in single file, and to the admira-
tion of all beholders, were trotting leisurely around
the college ground, Harry Archer was making his
way westward on Fond du Lac Avenue to his
home. It was a walk of over two miles; but
Harry, on this occasion at least, took no note of
its length, for he was busy with his thoughts.
It was a bitter, bitter thing to give up playing
on the football team, and now that the sacrifice
had been made, he would have felt utterly miser-
able, were it not for the hope that Mr. Keenan
had held out to him of having a great mathe-
matician to assist him in preparing for the Even-
ing Wisconsin" Mathematical Contest. When
Harry first read the announcement concerning this
contest, in the preceding month of August, he had
at once resolved to take part in it. On the same
day, he took out of the bookcase Wentworth's
" Geometry" and set to work at reviewing the-
books which he had already seen in class,
Within a week, a strange thing, as Harry re-
garded, it, came to pass. He discovered that a


44






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


strong liking for mathematics had supplanted his
former passive indifference. During his year in
the class of Humanities, he had studied moder-
ately, had taken but little interest in the problems,
and yet at the end of the season had passed a cred-
itable examination, but far inferior to Claude
Lightfoot's, and a little below the work of
O'Rourke and Desmond. But now he loved
the study ; and the preparation for the contest
which he had entered into without much thought
of winning or losing had quickly ceased to be a
task and developed into an enthusiasm. He began
to feel his power; and with the prospect of an ex-
pert's help, the future, despite his abandonment of
football, became bright. Oh, if he could but gain
the prize Aside from the honor to himself and to
his college, there were the eighty dollars It was
the money chiefly that Harry was looking for.
And yet, as we shall presently see, he was anything
but of a mercenary disposition.
Harry entered his home, then, by no means de-
spondent. He tripped lightly up the stairs into the
living-room, where he stopped suddenly, while his
face took on an expression of dismay.
A woman clothed in black was seated at a table
on which were paper and other writing materials.
Her face was bent down upon the table, her hands
were clasped over her head, and her whole form







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


was quivering. There was no need of surmise to
know that she was in a passion of grief, for her
sobs left no doubt.
"Why, mother !" exclaimed Harry.
Mrs. Archer raised her face wet with tears, and
looked quite alarmed. She had been taken by
surprise.
Before she could say a word Harry bent over
and kissed her with unusual tenderness in his man-
ner and unusual sympathy upon his honest face.
Have you been thinking of father ?" he in-
quired.
"Yes, Harry; but I am resigned to his loss. I
have also been thinking of you and your sister
Alice and little Paul, and I am afraid I lost courage
for the moment. But I didn't want you to know
anything about it, my dear."
Something has happened, then. You must
tell me, mother. After all," Harry added with a
smile, I'm the man of the family. Has anything
gone wrong to-day ? "
"Yes, Harry. I thought we had fairly cleared
off all our debts, when a new bill came in to-day.
It's for eighty-five dollars, and had to be paid."
"And didn't you have the money ? "
"Yes; I had been saving up to pay the one hun-
dred and five dollars' interest on our mortgage
which falls due in early December; and I had







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


already laid by ninety dollars, now there are but
five dollars left, and I see no way of getting the
money together between this time and Decem-
ber. And so, Harry, I fear-we shall be compelled
to lose our home."
Isn't there any way out at all, mother ?"
"No, dear; unless we sell the piano. But
I can hardly bring myself to think of taking it from
Alice. It's the one possession of hers in the house
which she really loves. Besides, she needs it to
keep up her practice, and for giving her music-les-
sons."
There's no question about it," said Harry, with
the air of a man. "The piano shall not be sold.
I'll go to work first. Don't you think, mother,
that I ought to give up school at once ? "
If it were not for our hopes in the silver mine
stock, Harry, I should be forced to take you away.
Indeed, my boy, were it not for the chance that
our shares would be of some value, I do not see
how in conscience I could have allowed you to re-
turn to college at all. But since the opening of
school, the most discouraging reports have reached
me. At present, our shares are not worth much
inore than the paper used for them, and the hope
of their rising in value is growing fainter and
fainter. And now this sudden call on me for so
large a sum of money, makes me wonder whether
I






THA T FOOTBALL GAME -


I can keep you at college. You know, my dear,
how eager your father was for you to complete
the classical course, and how I share that eager-
ness. I cannot bring myself to think of your leav-
ing college, and yet I'm afraid, Harry, that unless
God comes to our help, we shall have to take you
away. In the mean time, though, keep on. There
is no reason for leaving before you have made sure
of a position. Besides, your schooling until
January has been paid for in advance, and who
knows but that in some way or other things may
grow brighter. I may get more copying to do,
and Alice may find a few more pupils. Let us
keep on praying."
That's right, mother. And please don't cry
any more. By the way, after this I am going to
earn a dollar and a half a week."
Mrs. Archer looked at her boy in surprise.
I'm going to carry the 'Evening Wisconsin,'
mother. 'And I have a fine route. It is practi-
cally on my way home, and won't interfere with my
college work at all. You see, right after school,
'beginning to-morrow, I shall run down to the
office, get my pack of papers, and deliver them on
my way here, so that I'll be back by half-past four,
or, at the very latest, five. It will give me just
enough exercise to keep me going."
But, Harry, what about your football ?"






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


I'm not going to play this year, mother."
Harry said this with an attempt at indifference;
but his mother, who knew how her boy loved the
game, who had heard him talk about it and seen
him even study it, understood what a sacrifice he
had made. There was a tear in her eye again ;
but it was a tear of gratitude. Poverty for the
moment lost its blackness, care its heaviness, the
future its gloom in the presence of her son's sacri-
fice of love. Upon my word, if boys knew what
their affection and duty to their parents could
bring about, there would be a wondrous change
for the better in this world. The generations
would become longer-lived, the face of many a
mother, now drawn with grief and aged with care,
would grow bright and cheerful, while the heart
within would be strong to bear the bitterest trials
in the strength of the son's dutiful love.
Harry," said the mother, rising and laying her
hand as though in benediction upon her boy's
head, I should never have asked you to make the
sacrifice. May God reward you, my darling boy."
And Harry, who, like most boys of seventeen,
hated anything like the display of the more tender
emotions, simply bowed his head, and hurried from
the room.
Under the stairway on the first'floor was a small
apartment for odds and ends. Harry opened the
I






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


door, and brought out into the hallway, his bicycle,
bought for him by his father just three months
ago.
He gazed at it mournfully.
"So I shall have to let you go, too. It's too
bad," he soliloquized.
And again he gazed upon his beloved bicycle
mournfully. Poor Harry, having sacrificed his
football, had counted upon taking his pleasure and
exercise upon the wheel. Naturally good at
athletics, he had hoped to take a high place among
the bicyclists of Milwaukee College at the field-day
in the ensuing spring. But now the bright visions
which he had conjured up were rudely but volun-
tarily dispelled. It was a question of sacrificing
Alice's piano or his wheel. It is true, the piano
would bring in a larger sum and enable Mrs.
Archer to pay the interest on the mortgage with-
out difficulty, but Harry was resolved that the
piano should be kept, so long as there was the
slightest hope of meeting their obligations other-
wise.
Well," he reflected, I suppose I can stand it,
for the sake of Alice and my mother. But I am
awfully sorry for Paul. He expects me to teach
him this week."
"Are you going out for a ride, Harry ? cried
Paul, a chubby boy of eight, as he came tripping






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


into the hallway with a large bundle done up in
brown paper under his arm.
No, Paul; but I was thinking of teaching you
how to ride."
Paul made a plunge into the air, then darted to-
ward the kitchen with a whoop of joy.
He came back at a gallop, and the two with the
bicycle between them repaired to the yard.
For half an hour, Harry continued to teach his
brother. The wheel was somewhat too large for
the little fellow, but notwithstanding this disad-
vantage, he succeeded eventually in going five or
six yards unaided.
First-rate, Paul. In one more lesson you will
be a graduate. All you will need after that will be
a little practice."
"And you'll let me practise on your wheel,
won't you, Harry, whenever you're not using it
yourself ? "
I'm afraid not, Paul. I think I shall sell my
wheel."
Paul gazed at his brother with great eyes.
"Well, then you'll buy me a wheel for myself,
won't you, Harry ? You told me you would try to
do everything for me that papa would do, if he
were alive; and I know papa would buy me a
wheel."
Yes; but papa knew how to make money for






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


you, Paul, and I don't. But just wait for a little
while, and I'll get you a nice wheel, too, as soon as
I can afford it."
Will it be long, Harry ? "
I hope not; but it will be good to wait for a
while. If you were to get one now, you would
grow so fast in a year that you would need another
one very soon. I think we had better wait till you
grow a little."
"Yes," assented Paul brightly, and I'll save
up in my bank, and help you pay. I say, Harry,
we ought to change our grocer."
"Why ? "
He doesn't give me cakes or candy any more,
when I go to buy things there for mamma. And
then he used to smile, and make me laugh, and
now he looks as cross as you do when you play
football."
Harry smiled at the comparison, but he felt
once more the sting of poverty. The grocer had
altered since the death of his father. Soon it would
be the same with the butcher and the baker.
Harry looked upon these changes as misfortunes.
He was mistaken. As far as he was concerned,
the change from comparative wealth to compara-
tive poverty was a blessing.






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


CHAPTER V.
SHOWING HOWA WANT OF READY MONEY IS NOT ALWAYS
A THING TO BE DEPLORED.

HARRY, it was said in the last chapter, was mis-
taken in looking upon the change from compara-
tive wealth to comparative poverty as a misfortune.
To make this statement intelligible to the reader,
it is necessary to go back to a somewhat earlier
period of his life.
Four months before, that is in May of the pre-
ceding school-year, Harry Archer was a student
of Humanities and the captain and catcher of the
college base-ball club. As a captain he was quite
good; as a catcher he was considered one of the
best among the amateurs of the city; as a student
of Humanities he was slightly below the average.
And yet it was patent to all that Harry was a boy
of more than ordinary intellectual ability. His
teacher knew this from the intelligent questions
which Harry often put to him; his prefects knew
it from the quickness and head-work which he dis-
played in all athletic contests; his companions
knew it from the skill with which he directed them
in plays where brain counted for more than brawn.
How was it then that Harry held so poor a place






THAT FOOTBALL GAME.-


in the class-room ? There were various answers.
Certain members of the college faculty attributed
his poor record to a want of imagination. There
was no originality in his work. But they failed to
distinguish between a want of imagination and a
dormant imagination. Harry's reading was con-
fined almost entirely to the athletic columns of the
daily paper. He knew the records of all the great
bicycle riders, the weight, height, and abilities of
most of the leading football players in the great
eastern colleges and in the local elevens; he was
perfectly acquainted with the relative standing of
the professional base-ball teams in four different
leagues. In a word, his readings, though, viewed
from the standpoint of morality, of the most inno-
cent order, were such as did nothing to develop
his literary gifts, while, at the same time, they en-
riched or rather pauperized him with a vocabulary
which goes very well in an ordinary newspaper,
but which is, by its very nature, positively harmful
to the development of a fine imagination and a
good style. Whether or not, therefore, Harry was
lacking in fancy, was a question which could not be
answered. A beautiful imagination may be a
sleeping beauty.
Other members of the college faculty, accord-
ingly, who knew the scope and substance of
Harry's reading, accounted for his poor class stand-






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


ing in a different way. His teacher in the class of
Humanities attributed it to his love of athletic
sports. "When a boy gives all his energies to
athletics," he had once said, "you can hardly ex-
pect him to have anything left for studies."
The teacher, in making this statement, was per-
fectly correct. But his suppressed minor was
wrong. He implied that Harry gave all his en-
ergy to athletics. As a matter of fact, Harry
returned to his home every afternoon in the year
quite fresh and full of animal spirits. After supper
-a very hearty one invariably-he went out four
or five times in the week to visit his friends. When
he did not go out himself, he stayed at home to
receive."
They were lively boys, these friends of Harry's,
neither particularly bad nor particularly good.
Most of them, as it happened, were non-Catholics,
and most of them, as was the case with Harry, had
as yet no object in life. Now any one who is at all
acquainted with the methods of teaching which
obtain in our Catholic colleges must.know that the
boy who plays after school and goes out visiting
his friends at nightfall cannot possibly do justice
to his studies. He might as well try to burn a
candle at three ends. Hence those who with'the
teacher attributed Harry's ill-success to athletics
ignored an important factor of that ill-success.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


Harry's prefect of the preceding year had hit
upon what I consider the true solution. On one
occasion he said to the boy:
"I would advise you to stay at home every
night. Give at least one hour and a half to your
studies, an hour to the reading of good books, and
then you will hold a place in the class very near if
not equal to Claude Lightfoot's."
Harry on the spot resolved to turn over a new
leaf. But, I am sorry to say, he was too weak to
adhere to his resolution. His mother, it is true,
endeavored to persuade him to remain at home;
but he was under a divided allegiance. Mr.
Archer was a doting father. He loved his boy
foolishly. Rather than cause Harry the least dis-
appointment, he would allow him anything that
was not forbidden by the moral law. Moreover,
as Mr. Archer was making a comfortable living,
it was in his power to gratify Harry even to the
point of extravagance. He would not allow his
children to do any work about the house. They
were to run no messages, to do no chores, to have
no responsibility of any kind. In a word, Harry's
training, so far as his father was concerned in it,
should have made the boy utterly selfish, effemi-
nate, and self-willed. These effects, however, were
partially counteracted by the mother's influence,
partially by athletics.







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


It was upon the diamond and upon the gridiron
that Harry was taught the bitter-sweet lesson of
self-control, of yielding to the judgment of others,
of effacing for the time being his own personality
and of identifying himself with the interests of all;.
of restraining his temper when the game went
against him, and, not unfrequently, of facing pains
and hurts with cheerful courage. If Harry did
possess some traits of manliness, it was in spite of
his father.
But after everything has been said, the fact re-
mains that he was very selfish; that he looked
upon every day of his life as consisting of twenty-
four hours which were, each of them, to be killed;
that lessons were enemies to be avoided; that the
present day, and the present day only, was to be
considered. There was but little promise, four
months ago, in the future that lay before him.
He needed an awakening; and the awakening
came.
In the beginning of June his father died, after
an illness of nine days. Mr. Archer had lived up
to his income, and, though a fair business man,
had been strangely improvident. One week
before his final sickness, to give an instance, his
insurance policy for ten thousand dollars had run
out, and he had neglected to renew it.
After his death, it was discovered that his affairs






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


were in a very involved condition; and when the
lawyers had done their work and pocketed their
fees, Mrs. Archer found herself facing the world
with a few dollars, and a home straddled by a
heavy mortgage.
Harry loved his mother tenderly. On learning
of their altered condition, a change came over him
at once. He felt that it was his duty to take
charge of the family. He forgot himself. The
friends whom formerly he could not be persuaded
to abandon, he now gave up of his own accord.
To go with them meant to spend money; and
Harry now had no money.
During the preceding vacation he worked as
clerk in a wholesale hardware house at a salary of
six dollars a week. His sister Alice, who had just
graduated at the Academy of the Holy Angels,
succeeded in securing two pupils on the piano.
Mrs. Archer having dismissed the two servants,
took charge of the house herself, and, at odd times,
did some copying for a lawyer, who was an old
friend of the family.
On returning to college in September, Harry
was resolved to make the most of what would prob-
ably be his last session at school. He looked
back with regret upon the years which he had
wasted, and was determined to make up for lost
time as far as was in his power. And from the







AND WHA T CAME OF IT. 59

very first day of class, it became evident to him
that the coming year was to be a year of sacrifice.
If he wished to study faithfully and to help his
mother, he must abandon athletics. Besides, to
take part in athletics involved the paying out now
and then of small sums of money.
So Harry, after a cruel struggle, made his reso-
lution. To clinch that resolution, to burn, as it
were, his bridges after him, he secured a carrier's
route on the "Evening Wisconsin"; and, finally, as
we saw in the last chapter, he resolved to make the
last sacrifice-the sacrifice of his bicycle.
There was a boy in the neighborhood who for
five months had been saving with the intention of
buying a good wheel. Harry went to him and
without the least difficulty secured forty dollars in
cash for the bicycle, which but a few months before
had been bought for seventy-five dollars.
Then Harry brought the money to his mother.
Before Mrs. Archer could speak, he left the room.
While the mother's eyes filled with tears of tender-
ness, Harry in his own room threw himself upon
his bed utterly miserable.
He had made his sacrifice with the buoyant and
noble enthusiasm of youth. But now the revul-
sion of feeling had come; and for the time being
he was very unhappy. Doubtless this feeling of
bitterness and misery was a blessing to the boy.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


Sacrifice ennobles and purifies the soul just in so
far as it goes against our irrational feelings and
vicious inclinations.
Is that you, Harry ? cried Alice, looking into
the room.
Harry sprang up, and with averted head, bade
his sister come in.
"What is the matter, Harry? You needn't
turn your face away ; I can see that you are put
out about something."
I'm put out about almost everything," an-
swered Harry, turning towards Alice with a smile
which came with difficulty, and looked rather dis-
concerted after it arrived, as though it felt out of
place.
"Well, here's one thing you can't be put out
about," said Alice, taking her brother's hand and
smoothing it. "I received a new pupil to-day,
and that makes three; and she's a nice little girl,
and if I can succeed in getting three more, I shall
be making a dollar and a half a day; and I am quite
sure that I shall get three more. There, Harry,
are you put out about that ? "
"Alice, you're worth a dozen like me. Your
good-humor and courage alone are far more than
a dollar a day to all of us. If it had not been for
you, I think that we should all have fallen into
despair long ago. Take the present moment:






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


just before you entered I was thinking of nothing
but the dark side of things, and just as soon as you
began telling me your good news, I almost forgot
everything unpleasant, and suddenly remembered
what was cheerful. First of all, I'm going to earn
one dollar and a half every week for carrying the
'Evening Wisconsin.' This isn't much, but at
least it will keep me in clothes. Secondly--"
Alice interrupted him with a laugh.
What are you laughing at now ? cried Harry,
forcing a frown.
Keep you in clothes cried Alice. In shoes
and stockings, you mean. Young athletes like
that brother of mine can't play football, and- "
Hold on But I'm not going to play foot-
ball."
Alice sat down upon the bed.
"Well I never!" she exclaimed, raising her
hands. Harry, I'll never go to a game again."
Oh, yes, you will. You will go with me to the
game on Thanksgiving day, and I'll show you how
to root for our college in the proper way. You
girls sit around and smile when we win, or look
distressed when we lose. That's not the way."
I suppose, young gentleman, you want us con-
vent girls to get up and yell your barbarous col-
lege yells. You want us to shout out Hiki, hiki,
hai. kai-Muki mori, hai yai.' "






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


"No, I don't; and none of the college fellows
expect you to do that sort of thing. We want the
boys to attend to that part of the programme them-
selves. Of course, we may be wrong about it, but
we expect a certain amount of maidenly reserve
from young ladies, even in the excitement of a
football game, and- "
Exactly," broke in Alice, secretly pleased with
her brother's views. All you mean to say is that
you want to show-me the way I ought to-to--"
Root, Alice."
"Thank you, to root in case I were a boy; and
I do most solemnly wish I were a boy. Then I'd
be head of this family, and would support it, and
I'd buy little Paul a bicycle."
I've just sold mine, and given the money to
mother."
Alice, who had arisen, sat down again.
Laws !" she exclaimed. No, I don't wish
I was a boy "-and she caught Harry's hand, and
squeezed it with a grip which should have made
him wince-" if I were, I wouldn't at all compare
with you, you dear old fellow."
Don't get sentimental, Alice," said Harry, re-
turning the squeeze, whereat Alice gave a shriek,
which showed that she had a very powerful alto
voice, and aimed a playful blow at her brother's
ear, which the sturdy young fellow dodged very
easily.






AND WHAT CAME OF IT-


Then both broke into a hearty laugh, in the ring
of which there was neither hint nor shadow of
trouble or of care.
While they were still laughing, Mrs. Archer
entered the room.
"I like that kind of music," she said with a
smile. Has Harry told you all the wonderful
things he has done to-day, Alice ? "
He is a hero to-day," said Alice, "and would
be worth putting into a book if it weren't for his
freckles and his sandy hair. Mother, I've a new
pupil, and I'm just as happy as can be."
"The prettiest thing in nature," observed
Harry, is a sunbeam."
That settles it if you say so," cried Alice ban-
teringly.
"Why, Harry ? asked the mother.
"I found it out just now. I was feeling blue
just a minute ago, when Alice came in and jollied
me----"
"I beg your pardon," cried Alice putting her
hand to her ear.
I mean, jollied me up- "
Won't you translate ?" persisted Alice.
Oh, pshaw Alice came in and began telling
the good news and grinning- "
Grinning, indeed !" muttered Alice.
"And now I feel as though a sunbeam had shot







C34 THAT FOOTBALL GAME:

through my brain, and am as jolly.as can be. Alice
is a sunbeam and-"
"I thank you, kind sir," cried Miss Alice, with
the sort of a bow which only convent graduates
dare venture upon.
At this point of the conversation Paul came in
contentedly eating bread and butter. Seeing
every one smiling, he broke into a laugh.
There's the best sunbeam in Milwaukee," cried
Alice, as she kissed the little man out of hand.






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


CHAPTER VI.
IN WHICH MA THEM TICIANS ARE GIVEN THEIR DUB.

HEY, there, Harry hold on for a moment,"
bawled Claude Lightfoot on the corner of Thir-
teenth and State streets at Harry Archer, who was
within a few yards of Twelfth. Claude, as he was
speaking, broke into a run, and was upon Harry
in a trice.
"I see you're in condition already," said
Harry, with a smile.
I'm always in condition for a run," laughed
Claude. I say, Harry, you're not going to give
up football ?"
I've got to. You needn't look so bad about it.
I feel it worse than you can. Besides, you have
plenty of good material."
Not among the College boys, and no outsiders
are allowed to join; and what's more, even if we
had a choice of material, we have no one who can
take your place as quarter-back. You remember
that trick play we were practising last year where
you were to get the ball and go down the field with
no one else around ?"
"You mean the one we didn't have the chance
to play, the one where you pass the ball on a long







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


pass for over ten yards ? It is a pity we had no
chance to use it."
I think," said Claude, that if you were in the
game, we would make a touch-down on it sure.
But we can't do it without you. Then, again,
we'll have to let all the plays go where the quarter-
back throws the ball to the runner-at least the
long-distance plays. Even if we succeed in train-
ing Maurice Desmond to throw the ball accurately,
we can't count on his doing it in his first games.
He's a young player, and very nervous. Harry,
you'll have to play quarter-back."
"That's what I say," cried Gerald O'Rourke,
catching Claude's last remark as he came up with
his two friends and classmates. "We can't do
anything without you and with Willie Hardy. I
passed him on Eleventh Street just now. He was
in the candy store puffing at a cigarette. Come
on, Harry, and join us, and then we'll drop Hardy
like a hot cake."
It's impossible, Gerald. You know I'd do
anything for you or Claude----"
"That's right," put in Claude cheerily.
"But I can't play this year, and I wish you
would ask the other fellows not to bother me about
it. Here comes Hardy now."
"Helloa, fellowth !" cried Willie, while the
others waited at the College gate.







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


Helloa, yourself," answered Claude. "I hope
you have made up your mind to go into training."
I am in training," said Willie. I have been
preparing thith long time. I can run a hundred
yardth in ten theconds."
Oh, stuff !" said Claude.
"You mean you can tell a hundred lies in ten
seconds," said Gerald, with refreshing frankness.
"If you are in training, you shouldn't smoke."
I don't," cried Willie earnestly.
Then the cigarette does," retorted Gerald.
"Thigarette !" cried Willie, with fine disdain
upon his mobile face, I wouldn't touch a thigar-
ette with a ten-foot pole. The fellowth in Thaint
Maureth never touch thigaretteth, and their
team could play againtht your team here without
the three backth and the quarter-back, and beat
you thixty to nothing."
"If you're a specimen of St. Maure's, I don't
want to go there," Gerald remarked.
"You wouldn't be able to thtand it," retorted
Willie.
"All the same, Willie Hardy," said Claude,
catching the boy's arm in a grasp which made
Willie wince, you must stop your cigarette smok-
ing at once. As for training, your arm is as soft
as a baby's, and you can't stand an ordinary
grip."






THAT FOOTBALL dAME


"When I wath at Thaint Maureth," returned
Willie, I had muthleth of brath."
He means cheeks of brass," explained Gerald.
The party entered the college building in silence,
Willie and Claude in the advance, while Gerald
and Harry in their wake exchanged glances of
mingled amusement and disgust.
Mr. Keenan was, standing in the passage-way.
}Ie beckoned to Harry.
It's all arranged, Harry," he said. "I saw
Father Trainer yesterday, and he expressed him-
self as being delighted to help a boy who is really
in earnet about his mathematics."
"Thank you, Mr. Keenan. When shall I have
a chance to see him ? "
There is a quarter of an hour yet before Mass.
You might go up to him now. You will find his
room on the third floor. Itr is the last but one to
the left as you go down the corridor. Go to him
at once; he wants to see you as soon as possible."
Harry ran up-stairs two steps at a time, and Mr.
Keenan turned away his head, so as to escape see-
ing this breach of college discipline. The eager
student reached the room somewhat out of breath,
and knocked timidly.
Come in," said a strong, hearty voice.
Harry entered with alacrity, then paused and
put on the face (-f astonishment.






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


There is a prejudice in the world at large to the
effect that eminent scholars and eminent literary
men are thin, bespectacled, and venerable. Harry
shared in this prejudice. On entering the room,
this illusion received a shock.
The great mathematician was seated in a rock-
ing-chair; on his knees was a paper pad, in his
hand a pencil, in his mouth a pipe at which he was
pulling with no perceptible results. Though quite
bald, he was not at all venerable. He was a stout,
middle-sized man, with a round, ruddy, kindly face,
upon which there was an expression of charming
simplicity. There were no spectacles upon his
nose, and his eyes, though they had just the least
touch of introspection, were clear and bright. Had
Harry met him on the street, it would never have
occurred to him that he was passing an eminent
thinker and a profound scholar.
Good-morning, sir," said Harry, recovering
from his astonishment.
Good-morning," returned the professor, rising
with a smile, laying aside his pipe, and, for some
reason inscrutable to Harry, gazing at it mourn-
fully. Are you Harry Archer ? "
Yes, sir," said Harry, noticing as he spoke that
the room was singularily destitute of books.
Father Trainer took up his pipe again.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


I'm glad to see you," he said. By the way,
you haven't a match about you, have you ? "
No, sir."
My pipe is out. It is hard to get matches in
this world."
Excuse me one moment," said Harry, tripping
from the room.
He returned very quickly with a handful of
matches.
Thank you very much."
Then the mathematician lighted his pipe.
Well, Harry," he said with a smile, which was,
as Harry styled it, jolly," are you really anxious
to master geometry ? "
Indeed I am, sir. I am willing to let my sleep
go, if necessary."
Take a seat, Harry."
Harry took the only chair available in the room,
for although there were two in addition to the
rocking-chair occupied by Father Trainer, one of
these was heaped up with papers.
"What do you understand by an angle ?" en-
quired Father Trainer.
Harry answered correctly.
The next question was an innocent one in all
seeming, and bore closely upon the definition of an
Single. But before Harry had explained his an-
swer he found that he had practically gone through






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


more than half of the first book in Wentworth's
" Geometry." On answering fully the third leading
question, he discovered that he had finished the
book. He was done with the entire second book
within seven minutes from his entrance; and before
the bell rang for Mass, Father Trainer had let his
pipe go out several times, and Harry had to his
own amazement told practically almost everything
that he knew about geometry.
Do you see any tobacco in the room ? asked
the mathematician, when the boy had answered his
last question.
"There it is behind you, sir," and Harry, as he
spoke, arose, secured the box, and handed it to
Father Trainer.
" Ah, thank you I had forgotten where I put
it. That was the bell for class, was it ? Well,
Harry, I am more than pleased; I am delighted.
You have talent for mathematics far above the or-
dinary. You may come to me for instructions any
time from two to six on Thursdays, and at six on
Tuesday and Saturdays. I haven't the least
doubt but that you will make wonderful strides,
for you have the mathematical turn of mind."
Harry, when he stepped out into the corridor,
was blushing like a rose in June.
Say," he said to Claude Lightfoot, as he took
his place beside him in the ranks, I have just met






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


the greatest mathematician alive; and he's just as
warm-hearted as if he didn't know any mathe-
matics at all."
You mean Father Trainer ? asked Claude.
"Yes."
"He doesn't look one bit like a mathematician
-at least like the professors of science we read of
in books," asserted Claude.
"That's so," said Harry heartily. "The only
thing in him that reminds one of the scientific
fellows in the story-books is that he's a little ab-
sent-minded. He couldn't find his tobacco, al-
though it was almost under his nose; and then he
wanted matches, and when I got them I noticed
a whole box of matches at the corner of his table
under a sheet of paper. But just think He's a
warm-hearted man. Why, while I was answering
his questions in mathematics, he was just beaming
on me. And his voice was very kind and sym-
pathetic."
"What was he asking you about mathematics
for ?" asked Claude.
Harry explained.
Good luck to you, old boy, I was thinking of
going in for that prize myself; but you will repre-
sent the College better than I could. And besides
as I'm captain of the eleven and want to try hard at
verse-writing, I'll have to let something go. I'll






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


tell you what, Harry; I'll write to my sister at the
Visitation Convent in St. Louis, and get her to
pray for you. She's just a stunner at praying,
Kate is; and if you don't win that eighty dollars,
it's because the Lord intended to give you some-
thing better."
Claude paused a moment.
Is he really a good mathematician ?" he said
at length.
Wonderful answered Harry. I thought I
knew something about mathematics; but he
turned me inside out in ten minutes. And what
is more, I learned from his questions."
"That's funny," said Claude. "I thought all
great mathematicians were cross and dried up."
So did I till just now, too," said Harry.
They then proceeded towards the College chapel,
both of them, let us hope, relieved of one of the
prejudices which nearly all the fiction of the day
touching on the subject of savants has most in-
dustriously fostered.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


CHAPTER VII.

iN WHICH IT IS SHOWN THAT FOOTBALL MAY BE A HELP
BOTH TO STUDY AND TO DEVOTION.

"Loox here, Claude," said Harry, taking the
captain of the football team aside, "why couldn't
you play quarter-back yourself ? You can make
a long pass as well as any player I ever saw."
"I learned it from you last year," said Claude.
' If I felt quite sure that there was no hope of hav-
ing you, I think I should take the position. Des-
mond is a good tackler and a fair kicker, and he
might be put at full-back."
Yes; he's not quite fast enough for a quarter;
whereas you can manage to be in pretty much
every play, if you take the position."
"And besides," added Claude, "the quarter-
back's position is a good place for calling out the
signals; and so if I were there I should be in a
better position to captain the eleven than if I were
playing full-back. I think I will follow your ad,
vice."
The classes had been dismissed just a few min-
utes before, and the football eleven were hard at it
passing the ball.
That will do." cried Claude to the team. We






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


shall now practise at passing the ball to the men
when they are on the run. I shall act as quarter-
back. Maurice Desmond for the present, at least,
may practise for full-back. Now, give me the
ball, and get back from me about five yards and
two yards to my left. Each one of you will catch
the ball as you are running at your full speed; the
backs first, and the rushers beginning with the
right and left end next. As each one catches the
ball, he will return it to me on the run."
In the first trial eight of the ten players dropped
the ball, and five started too slowly. In the second
trial, the result was more successful. For fifteen
minutes did Claude keep them at this work, and
when he called time every player except Hardy
had shown marked improvement.
In the next exercise, one player as before started
at full speed and caught the ball from Claude,
while two others ran closely behind. If the runner
failed to catch it, it was the duty of one or the other
who followed to fall upon it. In case the runner
held the ball, the two were to follow him up, until,
at some point within his own discretion, he was to
let it slip from his grasp, whereupon the follower
nearest the fallen ball was to secure it at once.
There were more failures in this than in the pre-
ceding exercise ; and it was continued for ten
minutes.







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


"We shall have to practise that again," said
Claude. "There seem to be only two players in
the team who know how to fall upon the ball."
Falling on the ball is not quite so easy as
falling off a log," observed Gerald O'Rourke de-
murely.
"When I wath at Thaint Maureth," Willie re-
marked, "there wathn't a thingle player who
couldn't do it every time; and we never lotht a
ball on a fumble the whole time I wath there."
"Why didn't some of those famous St. Maure's
players fall on Willie ?" whispered Gerald to
Maurice.
"There are but five minutes left, boys," con-
tinued the captain. "And we might as well take
them out on an easy run around the yard. Line
up quick."
On this their second run they took a somewhat
speedier gait than on the first occasion, and made
the rounds of the yard twice. Willie Hardy was
puffing very hard at the end, and two or three
others were slightly winded. Claude, neverthe-
less, was quite satisfied.
After practice, he called together the team in the
gymnasium.
"This isn't exactly a football meeting," he be-
gan. "You know, boys, I am a Promoter of the-
League of the Sacred Heart, and all you fellows of






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


poetry class happen to be in my band. Now I
think we might make work for the League and
work for the eleven go together."
"That's right," said good-natured Charlie Pier-
Son.
"They do something like that at Holy Cross
College at Worcester, I believe," put in Gerald
O'Rourke. "I have been told that the boys en-
gaged or interested in athletics there have given a
fine statue of the Sacred Heart to the College, and
all through the season keep a light burning con-
stantly before it. Shall we do something in that
style ? I'm sure we are all willing to chip in."
"When I wath at Thaint Maureth," put in
Willie, just as Claude was about to speak, "the
boyth uthed to play while wearing the badge of
the League on their breathts."
Didn't they wear their scapulars over their
football suits, and carry their beads in their
hands ?" asked Dockery.
Willie was about to lie again, when Claude in-
terposed.
"Score another for St. Maure's," he said.
SWell, boys, what I want to suggest is something
which Mr. Keenan put into my head yesterday,
and I think it a splendid idea."
Claude in his own way repeated the substance of
his conversation with the prefect; and ended by







THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


proposing that each player, besides making the
usual morning offering, should also dedicate in a
special manner the trials of training, the sacrifices,
the hurts, and the labors connected with football to
the Sacred Heart.
"That's a first-rate idea," said Drew. I'm
sure if I keep it in mind, it will help me to do bet-
ter than I would otherwise."
Why, it will help any fellow," added Stein. "If
we all of us keep from smoking and eating be-
tween meals, and drinking water whenever we feel
like it, we shall be living a pretty strict life."
And you forgot about going to bed early, and
rising in good time," added Pierson. "I know,
speaking for myself, that I hate to go to bed, and
won't go to bed till I have to, and that once I'm
there, it's just the other way-I hate to get up,
and won't get up till I have to. I'm going to make
a regular martyr of myself."
"And I say, Pierson," said Desmond with a
grin, "how about your going out visiting one
night, and to the theatre another, and so forth ? "
Pierson blushed as the whole crowd turned upon
him their laughing eyes.
I move," cried Dockery, rising, that Pierson
be forced to pledge himself not to go out to parties,
visits, shows, and the like from now till Thanksgiv-
ing,"






AND WHAT CAME OF IT. 79

"Oh, I say cried Pierson, if you fellows will
all agree to stay at home nights, I'll agree, too.
That will be a new sacrifice; and while we're going
about it, we might as well do the thing brown."
I'll agree," said Willie, "and to-day I gave a
five pound bockth of candy to our thervant-girl."
It's a wonder you didn't give her your cigar-
ettes, too," said Dockery ; and he added gravely,
" In fact, I think I have hit upon the right way of
solving the servant-girl question. Give her the
deadly cigarette, and soon there will be no ques-
tion, because there will be no girl. But excuse me,
I digress. Gentlemen, I agree with Hardy and
Pierson. From now till December, any person
who calls at my house any time after seven o'clock
in the evening will find me at home and attending
strictly to business."
In brief, all agreed to this proposal with the
single exception of Ernest Snowden.
Willie Hardy, the first to promise, went out that
very night, and satisfied himself by close examina-
tion that Lightfoot, O'Rourke, and Desmond were
staying within doors. Time and distance did not
allow him to make a similar personal examination
into the affairs of the other players. Let us hope
that Willie returned to his home with strengthened
confidence in boy nature.
On the same afternoon, as Mr. Keenan entered






THAT FOOTBALL GAME--


the College chapel to make a visit, he noticed the
brother sacristan, standing before the League In-
tention sheet, with no little perplexity on his hon-
est face.
Look at this," whispered the brother, "some
light-headed youngster has been marking acts of
self-denial and mortification right and left. I
should like to catch him." And he pointed to that
part of the large blank sheet under the captions,
"Acts of Self-Denial" and "Acts of Mortifica-
tion."
Mr. Keenan looked, and saw the following:

Self-denial, 1, I, 3, 5, 3, 8, 7, 9, 3, 6, 8, 7, 6, 5, 7.
Mortifications, x. I, 1, 2, 2, 3, I, 4, 3, 5. 4, 3, 2, 6, 3.

"That's absurd," said the brother.
"No; I think it's all right. Those numbers in
lead pencil are made by different hands, and what's
more, I think I know whose hands they are."
And Mr. Keenan knelt down to pray with some-
thing like a smile on his face; for the League and
the eleven were both flourishing.
While Mr. Keenan was thus praying, Harry
Archer was going his rounds for the first time. A
skinny little boy, with very long legs and very
short knee-breeches, was guiding him.
Truth compels me to say that Harry looked
shame-faced. Six months before, he had been






AND WHAT CAME Of IT.


something of an aristocrat. He had dressed
stylishly, and was even given to parting his hair in
the middle on special occasions. And now with a
large bundle of papers he was walking up the
avenue in all humility where he had not unfre-
quently paraded in youthful pride.
He glanced at the people he met on the avenue
nervously, and wondered whether they were look-
ing at him in scorn. At Sixteenth Street and
Fond du Lac Avenue he came upon Lambert
Whistler, one of his former cronies.
Whistler stared at him in undisguised astonish-
ment, and planting himself squarely in Harry's
path, allowed a smile of scorn to mar the regularity
of his soft, chubby features. Harry's blood boiled
with shame and anger. Without asking an ex-
planation of his whilom friend, he took Whistler's
arm in a vice-like grip, and with one strong jerk
sent him reeling into the gutter. Then Harry,
who had acted on impulse, recovered himself.
I beg your pardon," he said, turning to the as-
tonished Whistler.
Whistler took one look at the robust young
paper-carrier, and concluded, very wisely, not to
resent the indignity in kind. He bobbed his head
in silence and went on.
There's another friend gone," thought poor
Harry. I'll try to behave better after this." And







82 THAT FOOTBALL GAME:

so for the rest of the route he was more hum1be
and more manly.
Harry was now learning lessons of patience and
self-control of a nature which could not be learned
even on the football field.







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


CHAPTER VIII.
IN WHICH NEW TROUBLES VISIT THE ARCHER FAMILY.

O MOTHER cried Harry one week later, I
can just tell you, I'm learning geometry. Father
Trainer is something extraordinary. He simply
gobbles up mathematics."
Mrs. Archer, who had been making a copy of a
document, laid down her pen.
What do you mean by his gobbling up mathe-
matics, my dear ? "
"Why, he takes up a book on Calculus or
Quaternions, and reads it through the same way
as another man would a novel. He got a book of-
Clerk-Maxwell's, I think it was-yesterday, and he
stayed up last night till twelve, he told me.
Though he went through it twice already when he
was at his studies, he can hardly lay it down. This
afternoon he put me through a whole book of
geometry, one of the last in Wentworth's, and he
made it as plain as daylight. Most of the book I
had never studied before. And whenever I see a
hard point, he looks so happy and pleased, and lets
his pipe go out, and loses his matches. He's the
most affectionate man I ever met. And mother.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


I've got to like him so well that to-day I told him
our story. He's the first man I've had the courage
to tell it to; and he was so interested. He got
very excited when I told him I was working for
that eighty-dollar prize because we needed the
money, and said that if I didn't win it, he'd give up
the study of mathematics for the rest of his life.
Why, he's just sure that I'll win."
"Perhaps he talks in that strain to give you
courage, Harry," suggested the mother.
No; I think not. I don't know why it is, but
he really has the greatest confidence in me, and
when a man likes me and has confidence in me, it
puts me on my mettle and makes me work. Now
I really think that if I were to lose the prize I
should feel as bad about Father Trainer's disap-
pointment as about losing the honor and the
money."
"And that's why you stay up at your books
every night till I force you to bed ?" said Mrs.
Archer with a smile.
"It's one reason, mother ; but besides, I natu-
rally love mathematics, and the more I study it, the
more I love it ; and then Father Trainer has got
something of his own enthusiasm into me."
And how about your other studies, my dear ?"
Oh, I give them enough time to. keep up with
the other fellows- I'm no good at all in verse and







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


English composition. That, I suppose, is because
I have no imagination. At least I thought so till
lately. But Father Trainer says that any boy with
a really good head for mathematics has generally
a good imagination, too, if he only knew how to
wake it up."
"I say, Harry," cried Paul, bursting into the
room like a small cyclone, and almost upsetting
his mother by the affectionate dash which he made
at her, I say, mamma, I've got a job, too."
Harry reached over a powerful hand, caught his.
brother by the collar, and lifted him wriggling into
the air.
"Well, youngster, if you promise to be quiet,.
and to tell us about your job, I'll let you down."
Master Paul, who had great respect for the vice-.
like grip of his brother, promised readily.
I'm a carrier for the 'Evening Journal,' and I
got the position all by myself, and it's one dollar
and a quarter a week. Harry, I'm going to buy
you a bicycle the first thing, then next I'll buy
Alice one, or maybe I'll buy one for myself before
I get Alice hers. Girls don't need bicycles any-
how."
Here's Alice now," said the mother.
A light step upon the stairway, and a sweet alto
voice caroling forth a cheerful air were heard, and
with a smile which simply radiated good-humor,






THA7 FOOTBALL GAME:


Alice entered. She kissed her mother and Paul,
gave Harry a saucy slap, and said:
I really do love to go out and give lessons be-
cause it's such a pleasure to get home again.
With one mother and two brothers to cheer me up,
I forget all my cares."
Whereat Paul and Harry and Mrs. Archer
laughed heartily, for if Alice ever had experienced
a care, she had kept it very successfully to herself.
In appearance, Alice was very like Harry. She
was of somewhat darker complexion, and of regu-
lar features. Although, as was not the case with
her brother, she was rather slender, the graceful-
ness and quickness of her movements, the bright,
merry flash of her eye, the animation which she
displayed in conversation evinced that she shared
with him his splendid health.
Say, Alice, do you want a bike ? cried Paul.
Not now, Paul. Have you one to sell ? "
I'm in business now," answered the little man.
And if you need anything just let me know."
Think of it," cried Harry, this young gentle-
man of eight-"
It's eight and a half," interpolated Paul.
"This young gentleman of eight and a half is
actually engaged in commercial pursuits which
bring him in the munificent income of one dollar
and twenty-five cents a week."






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


"You don't say," cried Alice, while little Paul
swelled up with importance. "We'll have to get
a carriage and four horses; and I might as well
give up teaching little girls with flaxen curls to
play on the piano. By the way, I lost one of my
little white-headed darlings to-day."
Mrs. Archer's hands trembled, and one of them
went up nervously to her mouth.
Then you have only two left," she said, despite
herself, betraying her anxiety. "Whom did you
lose, my dear ? "
Nellie Perkins, if you please. Oh, you should
have seen the scene ; it was as good as a play."
Alice threw herself upon a chair, rested her hands
upon her knees, and leaned over, after the manner
of a story-teller who has come to the part where
he narrates with perfect zest. You see, mother,
when Mrs. Perkins engaged me for little Nellie,
she thought we were fairly well off, and treated
my offering to teach Nellie almost as a personal
favor. She told me not to bother about terms ;
that there would be no trouble about them what-
ever, and said she considered it an honor to have
me teach her da-a-a-rling-that's the way she
drew the word out."
"I suppose she thought you were teaching
Nellie the piano for your health," observed Harry.
"Well, when I reached the house to-day, Mrs.






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


Perkins walked into the parlor in this style.'
Here Alice stepped lightly over to the piano, and
played a few bars from Chopin's funeral march.
"And her face," continued Alice serenely, "was
like this." Alice produced a tuneful crescendo
movement on the lower keys with here and there a
tiny burst of sound from the treble.
Hurrah cried Paul, I see the point. She
looked stormy-thunder and lightning."
Exactly," cried Alice, allowing the rumbling
to die away. "And then I knew that she had
found me out, and I remembered that it was no
harm to be poor unless one was discovered in the
act, and so I became desperate, and carried myself
thus "-Alice's nimble fingers executed one of
Mozart's stately minuets, while Paul, puffing out
his breast and his cheeks, marched sedate and
stately about the parlor with his thumbs stuck
through an imaginary pair of suspenders. Mrs.
Perkins wanted to know my terms, as she desired, 1
so she said, to conduct matters with me on strict
business principles; and I said twelve dollars a
quarter, with ten weeks to the quarter. And be-
coming just the least little bit sarcastic when I saw
this look on her face "-here Alice's hand came
down in a crashing discord-" I added that my
terms were strictly in advance, but that knowing
her high business integrity I was willing to waive






AND WHA T CAME OF IT.


a point and trust her until the quarter was expired,
Then Mrs. Perkins said that she could not possibly
pay me such an extravagant sum, when she could
easily get a man teacher for the same rates. No.
wonder," continued Alice, going off into a minor
key, and putting something of a wail into her
voice," no wonder that we women have no chance
compared with men, when the Mrs. Perkinses of
the world act thus. Such things as this tempt me
to become a new woman, and I should yield, too,
were it not for the fact that most of the new wo-
men of my acquaintance happen to be old women,.
too."
"That's right," said Harry cheerfully. "But
tell us what you did."
"I'm afraid I lost something of that gravity
which I was resolved to keep. In fact I talked this
way." Alice was now performing an Irish jig.
"And it all ended with my getting six dollars for
five weeks' lessons. I am afraid that my pride got
the better of me, too, for on receiving the money,
I said that I was thinking of asking her for a
'character.' And then you should have seen her face.
i couldn't play anything like it on the piano. Would
you really believe it, she was about to refuse me
a 'character,' when I interrupted her with, 'But,
Mrs. Perkins, I fear that my short apprenticeship
at teaching your child will hardly justify me in ask-






THAT FOOTBALL GAME.:


ing you so great a favor. Good day.' Of course
Mrs. Perkins, who is almost absolutely insensible
to sarcasm, tried to look intelligent ; and you
know how people look when they try to look in-
telligent, and don't know what they're expected to
be intelligent about. I left her that way and de-
parted at a "-Alice's fingers supplied the word
gallop.
My child," said Mrs. Archer, I'm afraid you
were a little impudent. Remember that Mrs. Per-
kins is a lady."
"At least there's a popular prejudice to that
effect," supplemented Harry.
And besides," added the mother, gently, she
is your senior. We must all of us be respectful to
our elders."
"You are right, you dear mamma. I preach
that kind of doctrine myself, and I try to practise
it. But you see, I'm not used to being poor, and
I get taken unawares in my poverty. But really
I am sorry for that speech about 'character,' and
for admitting that I was willing to trust her, but,
mamma, she was really so aggravating. And be-
sides," added Alice with a laugh, she is not quite
sure whether I was serious or not, so if I were to
apologize, she would then know for certain that
I had been facetious at her expense."







AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


"I say, Alice, where's that money?" asked
Paul.
"Here, little candy-destroyer, in my pocket.
And as you're such a delightfully good little boy,
I'll give you ten cents of it, and the rest goes to
your poor mamma."
Paul vanished. Whenever this young gentle-
man came upon a nickel or a dime, he invariably
disappeared from the house, and, having graced
the neighboring candy-shop with his presence,
would return after a reasonable interval with
fingers that were sticky, and manifest anxiety
about the time of the next meal.
Harry then narrated for the first time how his
pride had got the better of him in the encounter
with young Whistler.
"You were worse than I, Harry," laughed
Alice.
"Yes ; but I recovered myself at once, and
apologized."
Both of you, my dears," said the good mother,
whose face had lost its sadness, as the brother and
sister were thus turning their little trials into
comedy, "both of you are learning the lesson
which every American boy and girl ought to learn,
that there's nothing to be ashamed of in honest
poverty. If you were not ashamed, you would
both have restrained yourselves better."






92 THAT FOOTBALL GAME:

"That's right, mother," said Harry. "And
now I'm going off to my mathematics."
Mrs. Archer and Alice then fell into a discussion
of ways and means. If anything, the future had
grown darker since the opening of our story. The
water-rates man had come, and the taxes had been
met; and now there were but fifteen of Harry's
forty dollars left. While they were speaking, there
was a ring at the door-bell.
Mrs. Archer started.
It's a collector, Alice," she exclaimed with a
sad smile. I know it is; I can tell by the way he
rings; and of course, it's some bill that we know
nothing about. Your poor father used to settle
these things himself, and, so far as can be found
out, kept no record of trifling bills."
Let me go down, mother," said Alice. You
have to face that kind of trouble enough when I
am out."
With a gesture, Mrs. Archer restrained Alice,
and hurried down the stairs. She looked very
timid indeed, as she threw open the door to a small
young man with a fierce mustache and a bilious
complexion. The stranger noticed her timidity,
and looked fiercer than ever. He was one of
nature's bullies.
"This Mrs. Archer's house ?"
Yes; please step into the parlor."






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


The man followed Mrs. Archer, who carefully
closed the door. She did not wish her children to
hear the dialogue; for, good mother that she was,
she chose to suffer alone.
I have come," said he of the fierce mustache in
a loud, harsh voice, "about this here bill of four-
teen dollars,, from the firm of Haberdasher &
Crash, and I'd like to get the money at once. It's
due for four months."
"Please to talk in a lower tone, sir," said Mrs.
Archer. There are others in the house."
The little collector drew himself up till he must
have fancied himself six feet in height, while Mrs.
Archer read the itemized bill.
"Well," she said at length, I must say that I
knew nothing about this debt till just now."
Oh of course," said the man mockingly.
And I should prefer examining into the matter
before paying, to see that there is no mistake."
Look here, madam," cried the collector in a
hard, dictatorial voice, "I want you to under-
stand that our firm isn't in the habit- "
Not so loud, please."
Isn't in the habit of making mistakes." His
voice, despite the warning and Mrs. Archer's piti-
ful face of appeal, grew louder. "And besides,
madam, we are not in the habit of waiting from
four to five months for our payments. We pay






THAT FOOTBALL GAME:


promptly and we expect our customers to do the
same. You talk calmly of making us wait a little
longer till you have the leisure to examine into
that there bill. You have had four months to
look into that little matter; and I want you to
understand, madam, that that kind of an excuse
don't go down with a man of my experience. I
reckon I know the time of day and I'm too old a
bird to be caught with that sort of chaff. The fact
of the matter is that you want to dodge paying this
bill, and-"
Excuse me, mother," came a voice from the
hall, as the parlor door was thrown open. But
has that man come about a bill against my
father ?"
Harry was standing in the door-way, and his
mother could see that, despite his apparent calm,
he was holding himself in by heroic efforts.
Yes, Harry."
"Will you please step out here, sir," he said with
an air of authority. Mother, kindly wait where
you are for a moment."
The collector had no sooner come into the hall-
way than Harry closed the door tight, and caught
his arm in a grip which caused-the fierce young
man to shrivel up. As Harry would say, he had
not played football for nothing." On clasping
the arm, he flashed such a look into the man's






AND WHAT CAME OF IT.


face that the fierce mustache actually seemed to
droop.
See here," said Harry in a low whisper; "the
lady you spoke to just now is my mother. As she
is a lady, she is accustomed to deal with gentle-
men. I am sure that you didn't realize that fact
just now. Suppose now, you step back into the "
parlor, and tell her that you are sorry for your
rudeness."
The man hesitated; he ended his hesitation with
a groan; for Harry's fingers had closed upon his
puny arm with terrific force.
"Madam," he said as he was ushered into the
parlor under the same grip, "I take back what I
said. I am sorry."
Harry then led him to the door.
"Are there any other collectors for your firm ? '
No."
"That's too bad. Anyhow, it won't do for you
to come back here. If the bill is all right, we shall
call and pay it within a week. But if your firm in-
sists on sending a collector here, let them send
some one else. For if you dare to show your face
here again, I shall help you out of this hallway and
down these steps on sight."
Then Harry shut the door in the bully's face.
"Well, mother, I think I was right this time,
No man shall talk that way to my mother or sister,







19& THAT FOOTBALL GAME.

if I can help it.-But I'm mighty glad I didn't
strike him."
He brightened as he added, But I'll wager
anything that he'll have a beautiful blue mark
Around his arm for the next ten days."
Mrs. Archer kissed her boy.
Indeed, Harry, you are the man of the family."
Alice joined them, and after going over the oc-
currence, it was'decided at the earnest instance of
Alice and Harry that henceforth all collectors with
their bills should be referred to the man of the
family.







AND WHAT CAME OF, IT


CHAPTER IX.

rW WHICH HARRY BEGINS TC SUSPECT THAT HE IS BUrRA
ING THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS.

ON the second day of November, the students
of Milwaukee College assembled in their hall to
attend to what is called the reading of notes.:
After the leaders of the various classes had been
publicly announced by the vice-president, and
badges given to those who excelled in the several
branches, the members of each division returned to
their proper room, to receive from the hands of
their teachers testimonials of excellent deport-
ment.
Mr. Keenan as he faced his pupils was evidently
in great good-humor.
Boys," he said, "I congratulate you on your
splendid record. You are all on the good conduct
list, and with one exception, all of you have made
over eighty-five merit marks out of a possible hun-
dred in your competitions."
Willie Hardy, it may be observed, was the one
shining exception. He was credited with but
sixty-nine merit marks, several of which he had




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