• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 L'Envoi
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Just a little boy
 The day Willie fell
 Willie's little cake
 The cat and the cream
 How Willie helped Mary
 How Willie cut his finger
 About the kitten
 How Willie drove the horse
 How Willie and Mary went for a...
 Jack and Willie
 How the bird got out
 How Mary and Willie played...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Just a little boy : stories about Willie
Title: Just a little boy
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086391/00001
 Material Information
Title: Just a little boy : stories about Willie
Physical Description: 50 p., 5 leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ashworth, Alice ( Author, Primary )
Zeigler, Lee Woodward, 1868-1952 ( Illustrator )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Mershon Company Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
London
Manufacturer: Mershon Company Press
Publication Date: c1897
 Subjects
Subject: Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Nannies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1897   ( local )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
United States -- New Jersey -- Rahway
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Alice Ashworth ; with illustrations by Lee Woodward Zeigler.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086391
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221347
notis - ALG1569
oclc - 18843538

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    L'Envoi
        Poem
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    List of Illustrations
        List of Illustrations
    Just a little boy
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 4a
    The day Willie fell
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Willie's little cake
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The cat and the cream
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    How Willie helped Mary
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 20a
        Page 21
        Page 22
    How Willie cut his finger
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    About the kitten
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
    How Willie drove the horse
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    How Willie and Mary went for a walk
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Jack and Willie
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    How the bird got out
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    How Mary and Willie played visitor
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 48a
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text










































































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The Baldwin Library

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JUST A LITTLE BOY

















































HIS MOTHER WAS SUCH A PRETTY MOTHER.-Page I.








JUST A LITTLE BOY




STORIES ABOUT WILLIE




BY
ALICE ASHWORTH


With Illustrations by
LEE WOODWARD ZEIGLER














NEW YORK
FREDERICK WARNE & CO.
AND LONDON






































COPYRIGHT, i897,

By FREDERICK WARNE & CO.





All rights reserved.


THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J.















L'ENVOI.


No giants are bursting the covers apart,
No fairies peep out from the page,
No meaningless jingle of verse will be found-
Alike senseless to youth and to age.

There's nothing to make him awake in the night
With his curls standing up on his head,
Nor dread the "big dark," nor hold tight to your hand,
Nor be frightened to go to his bed.

There's never a whisper of innocent babes
Done to death in lone, shadowy wood,
Nor of Blue Beards, nor bears, nor fierce terrible wolves,
Like the escort of Red Riding-hood.

What does sweet little four-year-old know of such things ?
Why pour in his listening ears
Tales of battle, and murder, and violent deeds
Handed down from uncivilized years ?

So my hero is only an everyday boy,
His adventures are only the kind
That would interest hold for a like little man,
And appeal to his simple wee mind.




















CONTENTS.


PAGE
ABOUT WILLIE AND HIS HOME, I
THE DAY WILLIE FELL, .
WILLIE'S LITTLE CAKE, 10
THE CAT AND THE CREAM, 14
How WILLIE HELPED MARY, 19
How WILLIE CUT HIS FINGER, 23
ABOUT THE KITTEN, 27
HOw WILLIE DROVE THE HORSE, 31
HOW WILLIE AND MARY WENT FOR A WALK, 35
JACK AND WILLIE, 39
HOW THE BIRD GOT OUT, 43
How WILLIE AND MARY PLAYED VISITOR, 47

























LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


HIS MOTHER WAS SUCH A PRETTY MOTHER !
SOMETIMES HE WOULD SHOW WILLIE HIS WATCH,
THEY BOTH SET TO WORK,
IT WAS A LITTLE WEE, WEE KITTEN,
" How Do You Do, MR. SMITH? "


Frontispiece
Facing p. 4
S 20

30
48










JUST A LITTLE BOY.

ABOUT WILLIE AND HIS HOME.
W ILLIE was a little boy three
and a half years old. His eyes
were blue and his hair curly. He had
little fat legs, and usually wore a dress
with a sailor collar.
His mother was such a pretty mother !
He often told her, when he put his arms
round her neck and hugged and kissed
her, that she was the very nicest and
prettiest mother any little boy ever had.
I think that perhaps every little boy
thinks his own mother the nicest mother
there is-at any rate, Willie did.





2 ABOUT WILLIE AND HIS HOME.
His father was a tall man with a
mustache. Willie used to run to meet
him when he came home, and often
there was something in his pocket for a
good boy. He would lift Willie up and
carry him on his shoulders, or give him
a ride on his foot-and sometimes he
would show Willie the inside of his
watch, the little wheels that go round
and make the watch say Tick, tick."
Sometimes Willie would hide behind
the front door when his father was
coming in, and while his father was
wondering wherever he could be, and
looking under the hat rack, and all over
for him, he would shout: "Boo! boo!"
and jump out and frighten him. His
father would say "Oh, my!" and run
into the dining room and pretend to be





ABOUT WILLIE AND HIS HOME. 3
so frightened, and Willie would chase
him all over till he caught him. Oh,
they had lots of fun!
Mary used to get the dinner and
sweep and dust. She nearly always
wore a clean white apron and a nice
pink dress. She let Willie be where
she was, except when she was very busy,
and then she told him she couldn't be
bothered with him; he'd better run-
away to his mother. Sometimes Willie
didn't want to run away, and he told his
mother that Mary was a "nasty, cross
girl"; but generally he liked her very
very much, and Mary liked Willie,
because, she said, he was a good boy
and minded what she said to him.
The house they lived in had an
upstairs and a downstairs. When the





4 ABOUT WILLIE AND HIS HOME.
upstairs windows were open, his mother
told Willie not to go near them for fear
he might fall out. There was a cupboard
where his toys were kept when he had
done playing with them. He slept in a
little bed in his mother's room. And
now I think I have told you pretty
much all about him.
















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SOMETIMES HE WOULD SHOW WILLIE HIS WATCH.-Page 2.


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THE DAY WILLIE FELL.

O NE day Willie was a naughty
boy. He wouldn't eat his por-
ridge for breakfast. He said he
wanted an egg-a whole egg-and he
would have it!
His mother told him that if he would
take some of his porridge first, she
would give him part of her egg; but she
thought porridge was the best thing for
little boys. Willie wouldn't do that-
wouldn't even taste his nice porridge or
drink his milk. He said he wanted
coffee, and toast, and eggs, like papa
had ; and didn't like nasty porridge, and
wasn't going to eat it. "So there,
5





6 -T THE DAY WILLIE FELL.
now !" All this time shouting louder
and louder.
Oh, he was such a naughty boy!
He cried and cried-perfectly roared.
He kicked the table, and hammered his
spoon on his little tray until .his father
said that a good whipping was what he
would have to have given him if he
didn't behave better very soon. But
still he cried Boo-hoo, boo-hoo "-and
you know he hadn't a thing, really, to
cry about, for the porridge was the very
nicest kind of porridge, and he had
sugar and cream on it,-only he was a
naughty, cross boy.
His little doggie came and looked at
him and said Bow-wow! bow-wow!"
as if he wondered what was the matter;
and the kitten said "Meow! meow!"






THE DAY WILLIE FELL.


and ran away to her mother under the
kitchen stove, she was so frightened. But
Willie didn't care. He was naughtier
than ever, and made such a noise that
his mother thought the neighbors would
be in to see what it was all about.
I didn't think my little boy could be
such a bad boy," she said. This must
be a little boy from the bush. Let me
look at him. Why, I believe it is a boy
from the bush! Here Mary, take-him
away-I don't want any little wild
boy-and send him back to the bush,
and see if you can find my dear little
Willie."
Willie didn't like to hear his mother
saying that, and began to think he had
better-stop crying and be a good boy.
But he thought he would first give the






8 THE DAY WILLIE FELL.
table one more good kick before he
-stopped. So he pushed himself back in
his chair to do it-and what do you
think happened ? His chair fell back-
ward, and down he went. His heels
flew up, and his head bumped on the
wall; his back was hurt, and his nose
began to bleed. Oh! he thought he
was killed. And, indeed, he might
have been killed, though, as it happened,
he was not very badly hurt. But, dear
me! he was frightened. "Oh mother,
mother, mother !" he cried when he felt
himself going over, and his mother ran
and picked him up and felt him all over
to see if any of his bones were broken.
However, nothing was broken but the
leg of the chair, and they could buy a
new leg for that-only ifWillie's leg had





THE DAY WILLIE FELL. 9
been broken off, how could they have got
a new leg for him ?
Poor Willie cried a good deal after he
fell, but his mother said that they all
knew now what he was crying about, so
she nursed him and made him better.
They had the chair mended, and for
a long time after that Willie ate his
breakfast like a good boy.











WILLIE'S LITTLE CAKE.

M ARY was making a cake one day,
and said that if Willie promised'
to be a very good boy and not touch
anything, he might watch her.
So Willie promised that he wouldn't
touch a single thing, and Mary put his
high chair at the end of the kitchen
table, where he might see everything
she did. She gave him a few currants
and two or three raisins and a piece of
lemon peel, and told him that he'd better
eat them slowly, for she couldn't give
him any more; the rest were for the
cake.
Mary did make such beautiful cakes
IO0





WILLIE'S LITTLE CAKE.


and pies, and you never saw such
pancakes! In fact, she was altogether
such a nice girl that Willie often thought
that when he grew big enough he would
marry her.
Well, Willie had watched Mary beat
the eggs, and mix the butter and sugar
and flour; had asked her all about why
she'did everything, and finished eating
his currants and raisins, when the door
bell rang, and Mary had to leave the
room for a few minutes. She had not
yet put the raisins in the cake; they
were still in a yellow bowl, and looked
most tempting. Willie-glanced at them,
and then looked the other way, as he
said to himself : "No; I promised Mary
I wouldn't touch anything."
But the raisins did look so good!






12 WILLIE'S LITTLE CAKE.
Willie thought, Mary will never miss
just one. She'll not know, if I hurry up
and eat it before she comes back ;" and
he put out his little hand to take one,
when something seemed to say to him:
" Willie, Willie, are you going to be
such a naughty boy, when Mary trusted
you ?"
Perhaps it was only Willie's own
mind that said that to him, but anyway,
he laid the raisin down quickly and sat
up straight, like a good, honest boy.
Just then Mary came back, and when
she said Now I hope you didn't take
any raisins ?" Willie felt so glad to be
able to say : No, Mary, I didn't eat
one.
Mary gave him a kiss and said:
Well, now, that's a real good boy. I





WILLIE'S LITTLE CAKE. 13
thought I could trust you. Here are
two or three more for being such a good
child."
You may be sure Willie enjoyed the
raisins a great deal more than if he had
been so naughty as to take them while
Mary was gone.
When the cake was all mixed, Mary
put some in a little round pan to bake
for Willie, so that he had a cake of his
own, besides the big one that was for
tea.









THE CAT AND THE CREAM.


AT Willie's house they had a cat. She
was black all over and had nice soft
fur. When Willie stroked her the, right
way she said "Pur-r-r, pur-r-r"-which
meant "Ah, that's nice! I like that"-
and lay quite still. If he stroked her
the other way she didn't like it at all,
and would put her back up, say Meow,
meow!" crossly, and run away from
him. Mary used to feed her under the
kitchen table, and she had a basket to
sleep in behind the stove. She generally
was a good cat and didn't get into
mischief; but I must tell you what she
did one evening.
Mary had laid the table for tea. and
14





THE CAT AND THE CREAM.


put on some cream in a little jug. Now
pussy cats are very fond of cream, and
when Mary went upstairs and left her
alone in the dining room, pussy jumped
up on the table just to see what they
were going to have for tea. Of course,
she soon saw the cream, and it looked so
nice, she thought: My, I'd like some
of that!"
Now, she ought to have jumped right
down when she felt tempted, for she
knew well enough that the cream was
not intended for her, and that Mary
would soon chase her away if she found
her there. But she was a naughty,
greedy cat that day, and didn't. She
smelt the cream and licked her lips, and
thought to herself: That's pretty nice
cream; I'll just take a wee drop out of






THE CAT AND THE CREAM.


the jug; they'll never know the difference;
besides, there's too much for them there;
it might make them sick !"
So she put her little red tongue into
the jug (if Mary had only seen her!) and
tasted it. Oh, it was delicious! She
couldn't bear to leave it then; and though
the top of the jug was rather small, she
squeezed her head in, and never stopped
drinking until she had finished every
drop.
Then she thought she'd better get
away before Mary came, but found, to
her dismay, that she couldn't get her
head out of the jug. She tried to shake
it off, to pull it off with her paws, to rub
it off, but she couldn't. It was such a
tight fit that it stuck fast, like a big cap
pulled down over her head.





THE CAT AND THE CREAM. 17
"Oh, dear! oh, dear! what shall I
do?" she thought. "How I wish I
had never touched that cream !" Then
she bumped up and down, breaking the
cups and saucers-for she couldn't see-
till she rolled off the table. The jug did
not break because it was silver, and the
cat went bumping and clattering around
the room, knocking against everything,
till Mary and Willie came running to
see what kind of a wild animal it was
downstairs.
When Mary found wGhat pussy had
been doing she was very angry. Willie
and she pulled her head out of the jug,
and Mary would have given her a
whipping, only she ran under the kitchen
stove so quickly that you could scarcely
see her tail fly by; for she knew what






i8 THE CAT AND THE CREAM.
a bad cat she had been, and was
ashamed.
"Oh, you naughty, naughty cat !"
cried Mary; I've a good mind to turn
; you out of the house altogether "
But Willie laughed so much, when he
remembered how funny the cat looked
with the jug on her head, that Mary had
to laugh too, and forgive her this time.









HOW WILLIE HELPED MARY.


W ILLIE'S mother went out one
afternoon. He wanted to go -L
with her, but she said she could not take
him this time; he must stay with Mary.
"But I'll bring home something nice for
a good boy. Mary, when I come home,
you tell me if Willie has been a good
boy," and his mother kissed him good-by,
and Willie watched her go down the
street till she passed Mr. Brown's house
and he couldn't see her any more. He
sat quietly in the big chair by the window
for a while, watching things on the
street; then he heard Mary calling:
Willie, Willie, where are you ?'"
Upstairs," said Willie.






HOW WILLIE HELPED MARY.


And what are you doing ?"
Nothing."
"Oh! well, then," said Mary, I
think perhaps you had better come down
and help me."
When he went he found that Mary
was polishing the silver, and she had so
much work to do that she didn't know if
she could get it all done that afternoon or
not. Willie said he'd help her-polish-
ing the silver didn't look hard; you had
only to put that white stuff on and rub
it off again. Mary was very glad to
have his help, so she got one of her big
aprons and tied the strings round his
neck so that it covered him nearly all
over, and they both set to work. Mary
gave him his own mug to polish, and he
rubbed away with the cloth she gave














/ ,, //


THEY BOTH SET TO WORK.-Page 20.





HOW WILLIE HELPED MARY. 21
him till his arms almost ached. He
thought it was finished a long time
before Mary did, and kept asking her if
she didn't think it was bright enough
now; but she always said she thought it
needed just a little more rubbing.
At last Mary had all the other things
done. Then she took his mug and just
gave it a little touch with her cloth, and
said it was lovely and bright-she really
thought it was shining more than the
things she had polished herself.
Willie felt very happy to know that
he had been such a help. Afterwards
he helped her make toast and lay the
table for tea. In fact, he was such a
useful boy that Mary told him she really
didn't know what she would have done
without him.






HOW WILLIE HELPED MARY.


Just when tea was ready his mother
came in, and he ran to meet her.
"Well, have you been a good boy?"
she asked as she kissed him.
"Indeed, then, he has, ma'am," said
Mary. "You'll soon be able to do
without me entirely, he's such a good
worker!"
Willie felt so pleased when he heard
Mary praising him that he almost forgot
to ask his mother what she had brought
him. But she didn't forget, and showed
him an orange and some chocolate drops
that were for him after he had taken
his tea.
He gave Mary some of the chocolate
drops, for he was not greedy, and knew
that things always taste much nicer
when you share them with someone else.










HOW WILLIE CUT HIS FINGER.
M ARY always told Willie that he
must not touch the knives when he
was playing in the kitchen, for fear he
might cut himself. He used to watch
her peel potatoes and apples, and cut up
things, and she never seemed to get
hurt; so -he thought she must be mis-
taken, and often told her that he was sure
he could peel a potato, for he knew just
how she held the knife, and would hold
it the very same way if she would let
him try. But Mary always said she
was afraid he might cut his fingers.
One morning Mary was cutting up
vegetables for soup and Willie was






24 HOW WILLIE CUT HIS FINGER.
watching her, when his mother called,to
her to come upstairs for a few minutes,
and she laid down her knife and went.
Now Willie looked at the turnip
Mary had been slicing, and saw the
sharp knife lying beside it on the table;
and a naughty thought came into his
head, that he would take the knife and
finish cutting the turnip. But. it was
harder than he expected, and it wouldn't
stay still like it did when Mary was
holding it, but kept rolling around when
he tried to get the knife in, and presently,
do you know what happened? The
turnip slipped away and rolled to the
floor, and the knife came whack down
on poor Willie's finger, and cut it.
Oh, you should have heard Willie
scream when he saw what he had done!





HOW WILLIE CUT HIS FINGER. 25
"Mother! mother! Mary! Come here
quick! Oh! oh!"-and Willie slid off
the chair and lay on the floor crying as
hard as he could.
Of course, his mother and Mary came
running to see what had happened him,
and when they saw him lying there, and
great big drops of blood all over his
pinafore, they were dreadfully frightened.
"Oh, my child! whatever have you
done to yourself now ?" asked his mother
in a fright. Oh, Mary! see the blood!
He must be dreadfully hurt! Run and
get the doctor!"
Let me see how much you are
hurt," said Mary, as she picked him up
and tried to look at his hand-which he
was holding tightly wrapped up in his
pinafore.






26 HOW WILLIE CUT HIS FINGER.
"Sure, ma'am, it's not very bad at
all; don't be so frightened. He's not
killed this time; he's only cut his finger."
Willie's mother was very glad to think
it was no worse, and so was Willie; for
he thought he must have nearly cut his
hand off when he saw all the blood.
His mother tied the finger up in a
piece of white cotton, and by and by,
when it wasn't aching so badly, Willie
was able to tell them how it happened.
His mother said she was sorry her
little boy was hurt; but it almost served
him right, for being so disobedient.










ABOUT THE KITTEN.
WHEN Willie was being dressed
one morning he didn't want to
have his face washed; said the water was
too cold, and the towel rough, and he
knew the soap would get into his eyes.
"I wish I was a cat or a dog; they
.don't have to get their faces. washed, and
their clothes are on all the time," he said
very crossly.
And would you like to eat under the
kitchen table, and only be able to say
' Bow-wow' or Meow, meow'? asked
his mother; "I don't think that would
be very pleasant."
When he came to think it out, Willie






ABOUT THE KITTEN


concluded he perhaps might not like it
very well, for then he would have to
sleep under the kitchen stove or in the
woodshed-and his own little bed was a
good deal nicer than that would be.
Besides," said his mother, "you are
quite mistaken if you think cats don't
wash their faces-only they don't use a
sponge, and have no towel to dry
themselves with. Do you know," she
went on, Mary has something down-
stairs to show you? Something nice;
so hurry up."
"What is it? What is it?" asked
Willie.
Oh, that's a secret!" said his mother.
"So wait till you get dressed."
Willie let himself be dressed as quickly
as possible and ran downstairs.





ABOUT THE KITTEN. 29
"What is it, Mary? Mother says
you've something for me," he cried as he
ran into the kitchen.
And what do you think it was?
Why, a little wee, wee kitten. The old
cat was minding it in her basket by the
stove.
Well, Willie was surprised. He
wanted to take it out and nurse it at
once, but Mary said it was such a little
baby kitten that he had better wait for
a day or two till it grew just a little
bigger, for fear he might hurt it.
It had such a funny, squeaky way of
saying "Meow, meow" to the old cat,
that Willie laughed when he heard it.
And do you know, while he was watch-
ing them, the mother cat washed the
kitten's face with her tongue, and Mary






30 ABOUT THE KITTEN.
said: "Now, Willie, how would you like
to have your face washed that way ?"
Why, he was just telling me upstairs
that he wished he could be a kitten,"
said his mother, and she and Mary both
laughed.
The kitten seemed not to mind having
its face washed like that, but Willie
told his mother that he thought, after
all, he would rather be a little boy, and
have his face washed with water and
dried with a towel.
The kitten was the dearest little thing
you ever saw, and, when it was a
little older, Willie used to play with it
nearly all day; and it didn't scratch him,
because he was a kind boy and never
hurt or teased it.


















































IT WAS A LITTLE WEE, WEE KITTEN.-Page 29.









HOW WILLIE DROVE THE HORSE.
WILLIE'S father sometimes took
Willie and his mother out- for a
drive. They had a gray horse called
Bob-such a nice horse! When Willie's
father said, "Get up, sir! Clk, clk!" Bob
used to hold up his head and go so fast
it nearly took your breath away, and if
his father said, "Whoa! whoa, there,
now!" he went slower, and when you
pulled the reins and said, "Whoa, Bob!"
he would stand quite still.
Willie usually sat on his mother's
knee when they were out, but one day
his father said, Well, Willie; would
you like to sit on my knee and drive ?"






32 HOW WILLIE DROVE THE HORSE.
Willie was delighted when his father
let him hold the reins himself-of course,
his father had hold of them a little, too,
because Willie's hands were not very
big and strong-but Willie said, "Hi,
there get up, sir go on!" in a loud
voice, just like a man, and the horse
must have thought it was a man talking,
for he went on as fast as anything.
How Willie laughed and shook the
rein, and cried, "Clk! clk!" till Bob
began to gallop so fast that his father
had to say, Whoa, there! Steady,
steady for fear he would run away.
Willie thought it was the greatest fun
he'd ever had, and felt pretty proud of
himself sitting up there driving like a
man. He wanted the whip; but his
mother said she thought Bob was going





HOW WILLIE DROVE THE HORSE.


quickly enough, and it would be cruel
to whip him when he was doing his
best. You know," she said, it's only
when a horse is lazy or bad-tempered
that anyone should use a whip: You
wouldn't like someone to strike you for
nothing, would you ?" and Willie thought
his mother was right, and didn't ask for
the whip any more.
When they came near home, there was
Mary at the window watching for them.
Mary! Mary !" called Willie as they
were coming up. "Do you see me
driving ? "
Yes, indeed I do," said Mary. I
could hardly believe my eyes!"
And I drove nearly all the way, too,
didn't I, father ?-and when I'm big
enough to wear trousers I'm going to






34 HOW WILLIE DROVE THE HORSE.
have a pony of my own, father says!"-
and Willie was so excited he could
hardly eat anything-until his mother
told him he would never grow big at all
if he didn't eat something. So then he
stopped talking, and took a good tea of
bread and butter and stewed apples.










HOW WILLIE AND MARY WENT FOR
A WALK.

S OMETIMES in the summer after-
noons, when Mary had her work
done, she took Willie out for a walk.
Gyp always went with them, and as
he could go ever so much faster than
they could, he would run on in front till
you could scarcely see him. Then he
would come running back, and bark, and
wag his tail, and catch Willie's clothes
in his mouth and pull them, or pretend
to bite his legs. Oh, they had such
fun And Gyp was such a good dog he
never hurt Willie, though sometimes he
would lick his face-which Willie didn't






36 WILLIE AND MARY WENT FOR A WALK.
like very much. However, Gyp only
did that because it was his way of saying
he loved Willie, and he didn't under-
stand that Willie didn't like it. So
when Willie happened to fall down
when he was playing, he had to cover
his face tight with his hands, and then
Gyp couldn't lick it.
Sometimes Mary would buy things in
a shop and let Willie carry a parcel
home. One day Willie's mother told
her to get a pound of crackers, and when
she had bought them Willie wanted to
carry the parcel. Mary told him she
was afraid he might let it fall and
spoil them, and she'd rather carry it
herself this time. Willie was a cross
boy that day, and said he would hold
the parcel, and began to cry and make





WILLIE AND MARY WENT FOR A WALK. 37
such a fuss that Mary was ashamed -of
him, so she said that if he'd stop crying,
and be very careful of it, he might carry
the parcel.
Well, he carried it safely until they
got nearly home, and then, all at once,
he tripped, and the crackers went flying
out of the paper bag. Some of them
fell in the mud, and Gyp ran after them
and began to eat one. He thought it
was fun.
"There, now, you naughty boy!
what did I tell you?" cried Mary.
"Next time, perhaps, you'll do as I
want you to."
Willie cried so hard when he fell
down, and saw that the crackers were
all spilt, that his mother heard him and
came running out to see what was the





38 WILLIE AND MARY WENT FOR A WALK.
matter. She picked him up and kissed
him and forgave him this time; but
told him that if he didn't do just as
Mary said always, she wouldn't let him
go for a walk with her ever again.
A good many of the. crackers were
spoiled, but there were enough left to do
for tea.
Willie told Mary he was sorry he had
been so naughty, and promised to be a
good boy next time she took him out.
And so he was.











JACK AND WILLIE.

A LITTLE boy named Jack-from
the house next door-came to play
with Willie one day.
Before he came Willie's mother said,
"Now, Willie, you must be a good,
polite boy, and let Jack play with your
toys as much as he likes, and not quarrel
with him, because he's your visitor, and
I want my little boy to be a little gen-
tleman, and not to be selfish about
things."
Willie said, "Oh, yes, he'd be good,
and he was quite sure he and Jack
wouldn't quarrel, for Jack was such a






JACK AND WILLIE.


nice little boy; and besides, there were
plenty of toys for both of them."
When Jack came, he and Willie
played for ever so long with Willie's
marbles and balls and picture books.
Then they played horse, with the reins
his auntie had given him at Christmas-
only Jack wanted Willie to be horse all
the time, and Willie didn't want to be
horse when it was his turn to drive, so
his mother said that perhaps they had
better build a house with the blocks
now, for a change.
Well, Willie wanted to build a square
house with a chimney at each end, and
Jack said the kind he always made was
different, and he wanted to make it his
way, and began to cry because Willie
wouldn't let him.





JACK AND WILLIE. 41
Then Willie got very angry and
knocked the house all down, and
shouted: "These blocks are mine, and
I won't let you play with them at all! "
and was going to hit poor little Jack if
his mother had not just then come back
into the room.
"Why, Willie !" said she, "what do
you mean behaving in that unkind way
to your little friend? Didn't you
promise me you would be good and
let Jack play with your things all he
wanted ?"
Willie was a good deal ashamed of
himself when he saw how sorry his
mother was to see him acting so selfishly,
and after that they built another house
a new way altogether-and didn't fight
a bit over it.






42 JACK AND WILLIE.
Then each had a sweet apple and
some crackers, and when Jack's mother
came for him he and Willie were such
good friends that you couldn't have
believed it possible for them to quarrel.










HOW THE BIRD GOT OUT.


WILLIE'S mother had a little
yellow canary bird in a cage in
the sitting room. There was a little
glass dish with water in at one side of
the cage, and one filled with seed at the
other side. In the cage were perches,
and the bird used to hop about from one
to the other, and twitter and sing all
day. Its name was Dick, and when
you said, "Well, Dickie, Dickie! it
would put its head on one side and say
"Tweet! tweet!" and when Willie's
mother put her finger between the bars
Dick would perch on it. Sometimes
they gave it a piece of sponge cake, or
43






44 HOW THE BIRD GOT OUT.
white sugar; and it liked a leaf of lettuce
or a sprig of mignonette.
It was very fond of taking a bath, and
every morning when the sun was shining
brightly, Willie's mother put a small
dish of water for it to take a dip in. It
was great fun to see it taking its bath,
and then shaking itself and drying its
feathers in the sun. The cage had a
little door, and his mother told Willie
never to open it for fear Dick might get
out and fly away, or the cat kill him.
Willie was a good boy generally, and
did as his mother told him, but one
morning, when she was out, he opened
that little door to put something in-and
forgot to shut it.
Dickie saw it open, and thought to
himself: "Aha! the door's open. I





HOW THE BIRD GOT OUT. 45
think I'll just step out and take a
walk!" So out he flew, and hopped on
the table. Willie remembered just then,
and came back to fasten the door. When
he saw the bird out of the cage he was
very frightened, and tried to catch it
to put it back again; but Dick said
"Tweet! tweet!" and flew up near the
ceiling. He was having a fine time,
and didn't intend going into his house
yet awhile.
Oh, what shall I do ? I can't catch
it, and the cat will come and kill it.
Mary! Mary! oh, come quick! The
bird's out !"
When Mary heard Willie calling, she
ran to the sitting room as fast as ever
she could.
You naughty boy! Whatever will






46 HOW THE BIRD GOT OUT.
the mistress say? The bird will be
lost!"
Mary shut the door of the room tight,
so that the cat couldn't come in, and by
and by she was able to coax Dickie back
to his cage.
Willie was glad when he saw the bird
safe in its cage once more; and he
promised Mary that he never, never
would meddle with it again.










HOW MARY AND WILLIE PLAYED
VISITOR.

ONE afternoon Willie and Mary
were having some fun playing
visitor.
Willie would put on an old hat of his
father's, and a coat-the coat was pretty
long for him; it hung down on the floor
behind, and the sleeves covered his
hands, but Willie didn't mind that.
Then he would go and knock at the
door between the dining room and
kitchen, and Mary would pretend that
he was Mr. Smith, come to see her.
When he knocked she would open
the door and say, Oh, how do you do,
47






48 MARY AND WILLIE PLAYED VISITOR.
Mr. Smith? I'm surprised to see you.
Come in! How is Mrs. Smith?"
She's quite well, thank you, Mrs.
Jones," Willie would say, taking off his
hat and sitting down on a chair.
And how are all the children to-day,
Mr. Smith? Is the baby better?"
"Yes, thank you, Mrs. Jones. He
has two teeth now."
"Has he really? Well, well; he
must be a fine child."
Then Willie would say, I think I
must be going now. Good-by, Mrs.
Jones."
Good-by, Mr. Smith," Mary would
say. "Come and see me soon again."
Then in a few minutes Willie would
knock at the door again, and Mary
would say:
















IiI~' r -


I _


iR/ I1


"HOW DO YOU DO, MR. SMITH ? "-Page 47.





MARY AND WILLIE PLAYED VISITOR. 49
"Why, how do you do, Mr. Brown ?
Come right in and sit down. Mr.
Smith called to see me just a little
while ago. Dear me! I'm glad to see
you, too. How is Mrs. Brown ?"
And perhaps Willie would say, "Oh,
she's very sick; I have to go and get a
bottle of medicine for her."
"Well, well, that is too bad!" Mary
would say. What's the matter with
her?"-and Willie and Mary would
talk, all the time pretending it was Mrs.
Jones and Mr. Brown, you know. Oh,
it was great fun !
This afternoon Willie's father came
home rather early, and, when he heard
two people talking, he wondered who in
the world Mr. Brown and Mrs. Jones
could be. So he peeped into the





50 MARY AND WILLIE PLAYED VISITOR.
kitchen, and when he saw Willie
dressed up and talking to Mary, he
laughed and laughed; for you know
at first he really thought it was some
strange gentleman in the house when he
heard Willie talking.




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