• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The lonely camp-fire
 Planning the trip
 Across the Pacific
 Lost on the ocean
 A long night
 The strange landing
 A novel bill of fare
 A startling discovery
 Two wretched nights
 In camp again
 Uninvited guests
 Captured by head-hunters
 Looking backward
 A lofty prison
 The valley of gold
 A Papuan war-party
 Deserted
 Conclusion
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Great island, or, Cast away in Papua
Title: The great island, or, Cast away in Papua by Willis Boyd Allen
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086390/00001
 Material Information
Title: The great island, or, Cast away in Papua by Willis Boyd Allen
Series Title: Camp and tramp series
Alternate Title: Cast away in Papua
Physical Description: 176 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Allen, Willis Boyd, 1855-1938
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
C.J. Peters & Son ( Typographer )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: C.J. Peters & Son
Publication Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Discoveries in geography -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Explorers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Camping -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Outdoor life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Ships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Storms -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Papuans -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Compassion -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile fiction -- Papua New Guinea   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Papua New Guinea   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Photograps -- 1897   ( gmgpc )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Photograps   ( gmgpc )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations are either drawings or photographs.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086390
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002373890
notis - ALX8587
oclc - 36971358

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Advertising
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
    List of Illustrations
        Page 8
    The lonely camp-fire
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Planning the trip
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Across the Pacific
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Lost on the ocean
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    A long night
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The strange landing
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 56a
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    A novel bill of fare
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    A startling discovery
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Two wretched nights
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    In camp again
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Uninvited guests
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 108a
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Captured by head-hunters
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Looking backward
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    A lofty prison
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 134a
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    The valley of gold
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 146a
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    A Papuan war-party
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 152a
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Deserted
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
    Conclusion
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
    Back Matter
        Page 177
    Back Cover
        Page 178
        Page 179
    Spine
        Page 180
Full Text







PRESENTED BY
Mr. JAMES V. LOTT,












L14




BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
41-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.












The Baldwin Library
-SH da


I



















Tamp arnfd txamv "evits.
By WILLIS BOYD ALLEN.

I. LOST ON UMBAGOG.
II. THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS.
III. THE GREAT ISLAND.
IV. (In preparation.)

LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON,




















r f














0"
1



\i\





























TilE LOFTY PRISrn',.
It w as built twe ilty feset abiovea the groundd"
(See P'age 119.)








THE GREAT ISLAND

OR


CAST AWAY IN PAPUA






BY
WILLIS BOYD ALLEN
AUTHOR OF
"LOST ON UMBAGOG," THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS," "PINE CONE
STORIES," JOHN BROWNLOW'S FOLKS," "THE
LION CITY OF AFRICA," ETC.


BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.





BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY
1897

































COPYRIGHT, 1897,

BY

LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.



All rights reserved.























C. J. PETERS & SON, TYPOGRAPHERS.
BOSTON.













CONTENTS.


CHAPTER
I.

II.

III.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

X.

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIV.

XV.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.


THE LONELY CAMP-FIRE .

PLANNING THE TRIP .

ACROSS THE PACIFIC .

LOST ON THE OCEAN .

A LONG NIGHT . .

THE STRANGE LANDING .

A NOVEL BILL OF FARE .

A STARTLING DISCOVERY .

Two WRETCHED NIGHTS .

IN CAMP AGAIN . .

UNINVITED GUESTS .

CAPTURED BY HEAD-HUNTERS

LOOKING BACKWARD .

A LOFTY PRISON . .

THE VALLEY OF GOLD .

A PAPUAN WAR-PARTY .

DESERTED . .

CONCLUSION . .


PAGE
9
. 9

. 14

. 26

. 35

. 46

. 53

. 64

. 71

. 83

. 91

. 98

113

. 122

. 131

S. 142

. 150

. 162

. 169













LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE LOFTY PRISON . FRONTISPIECE.
It was built twenty feet above the ground."
PAGE
THE STRANGE LANDING ... .facing page 56
Thump! went the bows against the half-submerged
roots."

CAPTURED BY HEAD-HUNTERS. facing page 108
"A sharp whish came past my ear, and an arrow
quivered in the trunk of a tree."

IN THE VILLAGE OF WOLU .. facing page 134
"Pigs were family pets, and swine were at a pre-
mium."

IN THE VALLEY OF GOLD .. .. facing page 146
"We had discovered the well-kept secret of the wealth
of Wolu."

NATIVE PAPUANS. . facing page 152
Scene in the vicinity of Port Moresby.


7
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.












THE GREAT ISLAND.


CHAPTER I.

THE LONELY CAMP-FIRE.

ARE you willing to take a long tramp with
A me this time, my boy reader? And to
camp no longer on wind-swept, frozen Um-
bagog or the dreary tundras of Alaska, but
in the Tropics, where our rest may be broken
by a hurricane, our skins punctured by the
stings of myriads of insects, nay, worse
dangers threatened by poisonous serpents, by
huge crocodiles, and, worst of all, by a race of
natives who have never before seen a white
man, and whose delight is to kill and slay ?
Yes, you say, you are quite ready for all
this on paper, at any rate Good Come
9






THE GREAT ISLAND.


with me, then, to one of the Pacific islands,
five times as large as all the rest put to-
gether; the largest island in the world, if we
promote Australia to the rank of a continent,
and leave Greenland's coast-line to be settled
by Lieutenant Peary or some other intrepid
Arctic explorer.
Have you guessed the name of our island ?
It is practically unexplored to-day, save a nar-
row strip along some parts of its coast, and
the tracks of half a dozen travellers who
have pierced its mighty forests at as many
points. Those same forests are partly known,
partly guessed, to be the home, not only of
the savages referred to above, but of some of
the loveliest of God's creatures so beautiful
in their glossy plumage, gleaming among the
dark foliage of palm and mangrove and teak,
that men long ago named them "birds of
Paradise."
Now, have I given you a sufficient hint ?
Right: it is the huge body of land washed
by the waves of the Pacific, and lying just







THE LONELY CAMP-FIRE.


north of Australia; it is none other than New
Guinea, or Papuia as the natives call it. We
shall learn more about it, I can promise you,
before we reach home again.

It was on a calm August evening not many
years ago that a little group of three persons
gathered about a camp-fire near the shore of
one of the loneliest portions of southern Papua.
They all were boys; and though they busied
themselves cheerfully about their encampment,
an onlooker must have seen that at least two
of the party were down-hearted. The third
had a good-natured, freckled face, a snub nose,
and a broad brogue which stamped him at once
a native of Ireland.
"What'll I do now ?" said he, addressing the
taller of the two youths, as he flung down an
armful of sticks near the fire. "Shure, it's me-
self don't know whether this haythin wood'll
burn at all; but there's enough of it, anyway."
That'll do for now, Teddy," replied the boy
addressed. "Just open a can of beef, will






THE GREAT ISLAND.


you? What do you say, Nat, shall we have
supper ?"
"I suppose we may as well," said Nat dis-
consolately; "though I can't say I've much
appetite, Will. Do you think the yams are
done?"
"Soon find out. Here, Ted, give us a stick.
Now, then" and he scraped away a pile of
glowing ashes from a corner of the fire, disclos-
ing what looked like several scorched bunches
of leaves. "Look out! they're hot as pepper !
Ah-h-h how's that, my boy!"
Will had poked out the wads of leaves, and
now extracted from their midst several long,
blackened vegetables not unlike sweet potatoes
in appearance.
Nat took one up, and scraping off the burned
portion with the blade of his jack-knife, tasted
the big tuber rather dubiously.
"Needs salt."
The seasoning applied, all three castaways -
for such they seemed to be- ate their novel
supper with much apparent relish. Teddy,







THE LONELY CAMP-FIRE.


who appeared to be a sort of half servant, half
companion, to the others, received his share of
both yams and beef, and did full justice to
them.
That we may understand who the three boys
were, and how they came to be in camp in one
of the least-known portions of the habitable
globe, it will be best for me to yield the pen
to one who can tell you the story much more
accurately and vividly than I could; one who
had good reason to know all the details of the
trip, or expedition, or shipwreck, or whatever
it was, that was accountable for their presence
on this inhospitable shore; none other than one
of the boys themselves, Nat Dutton.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


CHAPTER II.

PLANNING THE TRIP.

THE fellows have made up their minds that
I, Nathaniel P. Dutton, must write out the
story of our latest tramp, and our astonish-
ing adventures in a land which, but for our
expedition, would remain to-day practically un-
plored. I say "latest," because some of us
have been together before, and we all belong
to a sort of society which we call the Camp
and Tramp Club." It was organized about
two years ago by Rod Bigelow and three other
fellows, who spent a week or two in the Maine
woods in the winter time, near the Rangeley dis-
trict. Perhaps you have read Will Martin's ac-
count of it? He called it "Lost on Umbagog."
Then Rodney got two chums of his, namely,
Malcolm MacDonald and myself, -being new






PLANNING THE TRIP.


members of the aforesaid club, -to join him
in a much longer and even more exciting trip
to Alaska, on what most people would call a
wild-goose chase. Mac was appointed historian,
and wrote up the affair in good style, naming
the book "The Mammoth Hunters." I told
him people would think it was about hunters
of mammoth size; but he liked the title, and
said if a boy could not understand that he
meant we were hunting for mammoths (as
"Lion Hunters" meant hunting for lions), he
wouldn't know enough to read a book any-
way. Rod, by the way, figured in that book
as Winter." His whole name is Rodney Win-
ter Bigelow; so you can bear in mind, please,
that he is the same Rodney who was "lost on
Umbagog." It was a notion of his to use
his middle name in Will's Umbagog story.
Well, it takes me a long time to get started,
doesn't it? You see, it's my first attempt at
writing a book; and you must put up with
a good many shortcomings, if you are good-
natured enough to follow me through all these
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG. MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
.16-420 GATES AVENUE.
BROOKLYN, N. Y.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


pages while I fight my battles over again. Ad-
ventures enough I can promise you, some of
them funny, and some of them far too serious
for laughter. When I think of that terrible
night--but no, I'll not begin like that, right
in the middle of my story.
The first time we ever thought of going
to Australia was a few weeks after our return
from Alaska. The club had met informally
at my house (we had moved to Boston, from
Sheldon, soon after the "Red Mountain" trip
which some of you have read about), and
were having a jolly evening of it. Mabel
Armstrong was with us, visiting my sister
Flossie. Even Rob and Hugh were on hand,
being at home for the Thanksgiving recess.
They are my brothers, you know; one was
then in the senior class at Harvard, and the
other was a sophomore. I hope to enter the
freshman class myself next fall.
Well, we were sitting around a blazing fire
in the sitting-room, laughing and talking, when
Mr. Bigelow was announced.






PLANNING THE TRIP.


"A regular camp-fire, isn't it, Nat?" said
he, as he joined us. "What are you doing?
telling stories ? "
"Oh! talking over old times, sir" -
Here our guest broke in with another laugh.
"Hear him!" said he to my father, who was
enjoying his after-dinner cigar in his easy-
chair. "What do they know about 'old
times' "
"Now, Mr. Bigelow," put in Floss, "you
mustn't think we are infants. Mabel and I
were both seventeen last month -"
Sure, that's eight-and-a-half apace," mur-
mured Teddy Ryan as he brought in an arm-
ful of wood; but nobody paid any attention
to him. We must break that boy of the
habit of interrupting. He's more like one of
the family than a servant now.
"And Rodney is almost nineteen!"
Whew whistled Mr. Bigelow, with a
very pleasant glance at the girls, but especi-
ally at Mabel, I thought, "I really had for-
gotten your gray hairs, my dears. As for







THE GREAT ISLAND.


Rod, I wish ah, there he is now!" and
our fellow "Vagabond" came forward into
the firelight, and shook hands all round.
"Rod," continued his father, I haven't
got to my errand yet, so you can explain it
yourself."
"Why," said Rodney, flinging himself down
on a big grizzly-bear rug in front of the fire,
"I've been thinking of taking another little
trip -
Not this winter! exclaimed Mabel.
"Well, not before March or April, anyway.
I'm going to put in four or five months' hard
study, and then, if father is willing, I want
to travel a little."
Rodney looked over at us, and, I regret to
say, winked. It's a bad habit he has.
I understood him in a twinkling. There
was another scheme on foot for the "Camp
and Tramp Club" !
I was on my feet in a moment; and so were
Will and Ned Martin, who were spending the
evening with us.







PLANNING THE TRIP.


Where?" we shouted in one breath.
"Oh! I don't know," said Rod carelessly;
" somewhere where it's warm. I've got enough,
for one, of camping within the Arctic circle."
"But we must have some useful object,"
put in Ned. "That's Rule III. of the club,
you know."
"I declare, it reminds me of getting up
tableaux or a fair," exclaimed Miss Flossie
indignantly. "Those crazy boys are wild to
sail off on some expedition or other, and the
only trouble is to to -
"Ballast it?" suggested Rodney calmly.
"Yes, with a Useful Object," concluded my
sister. As if they couldn't find useful objects
enough in Boston !"
"Oh! Boston's all right," sang out Will.
"She doesn't need anything."
"Perhaps you think the club conferred a
lasting benefit on Alaska last summer!" re-
torted Floss.
"Well, we relieved the natives of that old
scarecrow of a mammoth, anyway," chuckled






THE GREAT ISLAND.


Malcolm, the sixth member of our club pres-
ent.
"If the boys work hard this winter," re-
marked father soberly, "I don't know that I
should object to their spending their summer
in camp. It's wholesome amusement for the
lads; and we can afford it, eh, Bigelow?"
The other gentleman smiled and nodded, and
we fellows wisely let the conversation drift into
other channels.
A week later we met in Rod's cosey room,
and discussed the details of the new expedition.
It was Rodney himself who made the sugges-
tion which was to mould our plans for the
coming trip.
"You will remember, fellows," he said, "that
last winter we looked up all the large un-
explored tracts of the earth. Among others,
Australia was mentioned."
"You let that go without a word," I inter-
rupted, "because you knew the doctors had
ordered me north. It was too bad to have the
plans of the whole club broken up by the poor






PLANNING THE TRIP.


health of one member. Australia's an awfully
interesting country."
"You're all right now, aren't you, Nat?"
queried Rod.
"Indeed I am, and ready to go anywhere
between the Poles."
"Very well. What I propose is, that we
make for Australia!"
For a moment we all sat silent at the mag-
nitude of the conception. Then came a volley
of eager questions.
"How do we get there ?"
"Is there any big game?"
"What's the 'useful object'?"
Our leader answered the last question first.
"The useful objects of the Australian expe-
dition- if we take it are .two. First, to
carry a new line of exploration across a coun-
try which, while it is highly civilized in por-
tions, is in others one of the least-known
portions of the earth's surface. Second -
gold! "
"Gold! Why, what's the use" -
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.







THE GREAT ISLAND.


"I know others have been before us," said
Rodney calmly, answering the objection before
it was fairly made. Gold has been washed
-or 'hydraulicked,' as the practical miners
call it nowadays -for years, perhaps centu-
ries, in Australia. I see no reason, however,
why we should not find new deposits in the
interior; why, indeed, we might not be the
discoverers of the headquarters, the treasury,
from which these gold-bearing streams flow.
Who knows that we shall not discover a hith-
erto unknown range of mountains, another
'Cloud King,' as Stanley called Ruwenzori,
the big African peak."
His enthusiasm was contagious.
"Hurrah for the Cloud King!" we shouted.
"Australia forever! "
Plans were now eagerly discussed, and the
wildest possibilities mentioned. I do not think
any of us who, as it turned out, actually par-
ticipated in the expedition, thought much about
the wealth we might amass. It was the spirit
of adventure and discovery that moved us, as






PLANNING THE TRIP.


it stirs the hearts of older men to pierce the
secrets of the lonely Arctic wastes year after
year. People say they are heroes, sacrificing
themselves for the good of humankind. But
it's pretty hard, I notice, to point out any great
benefit which has arisen, or which seems likely
to arise, from Arctic exploration. The real
incitement, I believe, is the boyish love of
adventure and peril which must lie in the
hearts of such men as Greely and Peary and
Nansen, just as it does in ours.
At any rate, there was not a doubt as to
the state of our feelings. We were wild to
start; and meeting after meeting of the club
was held, to arrange details, and talk of our
coming voyage.
As our fathers made the trip conditional
on our studiousness during the winter, we
worked over our books as never before; not
omitting, you may be sure, an exhaustive pe-
rusal of every authority we could find on
Australia, -its fauna, flora, geography, topog-
raphy, and history.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


I well remember how sheepishly Will Mar-
tin, having been deputed to study up the
river-systems of Australia and report on them
(that was our regular method), confessed that
he had taken home the N volume of the En-
cyclopaedia by mistake, instead of the A, and
having become interested in the island of
New Guinea, had sat up reading till after
eleven o'clock. Lucky for us it was, -no, I
will not say "lucky," -it was a kind and
overruling Providence that directed our com-
rade's hand to the wrong volume that day,
and stored in his memory a host of facts
about the strange land that so nearly joins
the great Australian continent on the north!
Will was the botanist of all our expedi-
tions; and it was the account of the flora of
Papua that had particularly interested him, he
said. He would have given us a lecture then
and there; but we suppressed him, after the
custom of the club whenever irrelevant matter
was introduced by a member, and clamored for
more Australia.






PLANNING THE TRIP. 25

So the days flew by; wintry storms came
and went; snow-drifts lay deep on the streets,
and slowly melted before the gathering strength
of the sun as he climbed northward. At
length the day set for our departure was at
hand.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


CHAPTER III.

ACROSS THE PACIFIC.

T was a lovely day in April when we
started from New York for San Fran-
cisco. The party consisted of Will Martin,
Rod Bigelow, and myself, as well as my
father and mother, who, together with Flossie,
and by special invitation Mabel Armstrong,
had decided to accompany us as far as Syd-
ney, and then keep on, through India and the
Suez Canal, around the world. Teddy, too,
was taken along as man-of-all-work." We
all expected to meet at home some time in
November. Quite a long stay was to be
made at Hawaii on the way out; so that,
taking into account also a necessary delay in
San Francisco, we did not expect to reach
Australia much before July.







ACROSS THE PACIFIC.


You can guess that we had a jolly time
crossing our own continent. At first we didn't
much like the idea of the girls going along,
but before we reached the prairies we were
glad enough that they had come. Why, they
were just the life of the crowd, I can tell you.
Floss has a fine voice; and with Mabel's alto,
and the rest of us coming in pretty much
anywhere on the chorus, we made the old
"Pennsylvania" (that was the name of our
car) ring with our college songs. Sunday
evening we had hymns, and a lot of folks
came from the other cars to listen and join
in. Mother said it was like a good old Shel-
don prayer-meeting; and all the while we
were thundering along, over desolate tracts
of sage-brush, among prairie-dog settlements,
and past Indian encampments, at the rate of
thirty odd miles an hour!
We reached San Francisco on time, and
sailed in the Empire of Japan a few days
later. I won't linger over the voyage, though
I might fill a good many pages with descrip-







THE GREAT ISLAND.


tions of the Pacific, and the steamer life, the
fun we had on deck, and the stories that
were told every night, when we all gathered
in some sheltered corner, and father was ap-
pointed chief story-teller.
We had a smooth passage to Honolulu; and,
right there, a change was made in our plans
which threatened to spoil the whole expedi-
tion. Father found that the life at sea, the
salt breezes and the perfect rest, agreed so well
with both him and mother, that he decided to
let the steamer go on without us, and take
passage in a sailing-vessel, the Southern Cross,
that was billed to start for Sydney a few days
later. I have already said that we meant to
stop a week or two at Honolulu; but this new
plan would bring us to Australia too late for
any extended trip inland. Of course we felt
badly, and father offered to let Rod and me go
on without the others, by steam; but we felt
that this would be deserting the party, and de-
cided to wait and go with the rest. We agreed
to give up the idea we had at the outset Uf






ACROSS THE PACIFIC.


exploring an unknown country, and content
ourselves with one or two excursions inland,
just to see how it looked, and hunt a little.
We had rifles, shotguns, plenty of ammunition,
and a regular camp outfit with us, all of which
could be used in the shorter trips, just as well
as in the more ambitious journey we had first
planned.
It was about the middle of May when we
went on board the bark Southern Cross, and
set sail for Sydney, a little over five thousand
miles distant. I don't know much about ships,
so I can't give you the regular nautical terms
for the rigging of the Southern Cross, the va-
rious evolutions of the sailors, or the details
of the voyage. You must go to Clark Russell
for that, you know.
We laid our course a little west of south,
and for several days hummed along merrily
enough, right before the "north-east trades."
Then the wind died away, or only came in
little puffs, as we neared the equator, until
we woke one morning to find the bark per-







THE GREAT ISLAND.


fectly motionless, except for the long, lazy
swing of the everlasting Pacific swell. It was
a dead calm, sure enough. I dropped a lead
pencil overboard in the forenoon, and at sun-
set I happened to look over the side, and
there it was, not having moved an inch.
Oh, how hot it was! Awnings were rigged
on the quarter-deck for us passengers; and we
lay there gasping, in our thinnest clothes, long-
ing for a breath of wind. I saw a black
thing sticking up out of the water near the
ship; and the boatswain, a fine old fellow
named Snaggs, told me it was the back fin of
a shark. There was some talk of getting out
a hook and trying to catch him; but either
we were too lazy to take the trouble, or the
captain disliked to have his nice white decks
mussed, up; at any rate, the scheme fell through,
and "John Sharkee," as the sailors called him,
was left alone.
Slowly but surely we crept southward, tak-
ing advantage of every ripple on the water
to gain a few miles, until we had crossed the






ACROSS THE PACIFIC.


equator, and were fairly in Southern latitudes.
I expected to see a great jollification when we
"crossed the line;" but the old customs have
died out, and there was no visit of Neptune
or other celebration of the day.
We passed just west of the Phoenix islands;
and as we left the latitudes of the Feejees about
fifty miles away, the weather grew worse.
Will, who had read up the whole business,
told us that we were now in the range of the
south-east trade-winds, but that the thing to
be feared was a real, first-class monsoon.
Shure, pwhat's a monsoon, thin?" asked
Ted, with open mouth and eyes.
"Oh! it's a special kind of wind they cul-
tivate in these regions, my boy," explained
Will. The great trouble with them is, you
never know just which way they're coming.
At this season of the year we'd be more apt
to get them from the east, I guess."
Teddy, who seemed to have fancied the un-
known enemy to be a sort of sea-monster,
went away only half satisfied with the expla-






THE GREAT ISLAND.


nation. As for the rest of us, we were too
eager in discussing our plans to dwell on the
possible dangers of contrary winds. Within
twenty-four hours everybody on board knew
pretty well what a monsoon was, though. It
struck us that very night.
We were wakened a little after midnight
by the sound of creaking timbers, of waves
thundering against the sides of the ship, of
crockery smashing about in the pantry, of
coils of rope flung down on the deck over
our heads, of hoarse voices shouting orders,
of women screaming with fright. I jumped
into my clothes, and rushed for the deck. It
was pitch dark as I made my way up the
companion stairs, clinging to the hand-rail,
toward the wild commotion above; but before
I could reach the deck I was met by a deluge
of water, which poured down into the cabin,
and flooded the staterooms three inches deep.
That was enough for me, and I turned
back to the small saloon where we usually
took our meals. Some one had lighted one






ACROSS THE PACIFIC.


of the lamps, which swung fearfully, lighting
up the pale faces of the men and women
who were gathering there, half-dressed, and
wholly out of their wits.
By the time I reached the foot of the
stairs I heard the door above come to with
a bang, so we were relieved from the fear of
another flood. But what a night it was!
Nobody dared to go to bed again. We all
sat there in the dimly lighted saloon, our si-
lence only broken by an occasional scream
from some woman or girl as a big wave
would crash against the side of the ship,
which would tip over until it seemed as if
it could never come up straight again. Poor
mother was white as a sheet, but was plucky
too, and never said a word, except to encour-
age Floss and Mabel, who clung to her, too
frightened even to scream. Will Martin did
us all good; for he managed to find a man
who had been on deck and seen the captain.
There was no danger, he said. There was
a stiff gale blowing from the east; but the






THE GREAT ISLAND.


ship was running before it, and behaving well.
If the wind kept on from the same quarter,
and the sea got up, we should heave to in
the morning; for the present he had plenty
of sea-room, and should let her drive.
All this Will reported. in a cheerful sort of
a way that heartened us up. Some one
found a steward who managed to pass round
refreshments, including hot tea for all of us.
I shall never forget how good that tea
tasted !
Toward morning word came that the wind
was letting up a little, and we could feel
that the motion of the vessel was less. Most
of us took courage to go to bed, though we
were tossed about so that we didn't get much
sleep.







LOST ON THE OCEAN.


CHAPTER IV.

LOST ON THE OCEAN.

WE thought the storm was over, but we
didn't know a monsoon then as well
as we do now. All that day the sky was
gray, and the wind blew steadily, though not
fiercely, from the south-east. The ship had
been brought to her course again, and with
about a third of her sails set, staggered ahead
toward Australia. One sail, we found, had
been blown away by the first violence of the
gale. The men were sent aloft to rig a new
one in its place, and we crushed along on our
voyage at a terrific pace.
I managed to get a word with old Snaggs,
and asked him what he thought of the weather.
The boatswain shook his head, and cocked
his bleary old eyes up toward the eastern sky.







THE GREAT ISLAND.


Thar's goin' to be more afore thar's less,"
said he at length; and without another word,
having finished the job on which he had come
aft, he lurched away forward.
This was not cheering, but it was a true
prophecy; for before supper-time the gale in-
creased in force, and we were nearly as badly
off as on the preceding night. The ship was
hove-to just before dark; and there we lay
all night, our bows meeting the huge waves,
which beat like pile-drivers on the deck, our
saloon lamp swinging wildly, and everything
in an uproar. Of course we understood that
although we were no longer being swept from
our course as we had been when the ship was
before the wind, still we must be drifting
rapidly in a north-westerly direction, and far
away from the port for which we were aim-
ing.
The storm increased as the night wore on,
and again most of us were too frightened to
sleep. It was, I guess, about four o'clock in
the Imoring,ll when a wave, bigger than any






LOST ON THE OCEAN.


that had come before, caught the ship and
threw her swiftly up. We held our breath
as she settled over slantwise into the trough.
It was fearful! It seemed impossible that she
could right herself again. Two or three of
the passengers on the upper side of the sa-
loon, who were drowsy from sheer exhaustion,
lost their hold on the settees, and came rolling
down upon us, shouting wildly that we were
going to the bottom. This set all the women
screaming, when, in the midst of the cries and
confusion, there came an awful crash, and the
ship slowly recovered herself.
"A mast has gone!" cried some one; and
then, "There goes another!" and "Hark!
they're at the pumps !"
Well, I won't stop any longer to describe
that terrible night. None of us expected to
see morning, but the gray light did come
creeping in at last. The vessel rolled much
less violently, and we were cheering one an-
other up with hopes of a speedy and happy
conclusion of our voyage, even in a ship so






38 THE GREAT ISLAND.

crippled, when the door of the saloon was
flung open, and the captain entered. His face
was white as a sheet, and he was dripping
from head to foot.
I shall never forget the speech he made.
It was short and to the point.
"Ladies and gentlemen," he said, "the bark
has sprung a leak, and is taking in water fast.
God knows how long we can keep her afloat,
but there's time for ye all to get some break-
fast."
A dozen voices, shrill and eager, rose at
once.
"What then, Captain? What then?"
"Then, passengers all, we must take to the
boats," replied the captain grimly. Steward,
set the table, and look sharp! "
Before any more questions could be asked,
he had left the cabin.
We had hardly looked one another in the
face, when a cry arose on deck. It seemed to
have a new tone, -an accent of hope and
cheer. I rushed up the steps, and gaining the






LOST ON THE OCEAN.


deck, saw a clump of sailors gathered at the
rail, pointing and gesticulating.
"What is it?" I asked the man at the
wheel; for the fog and drizzling rain were
so thick that I could see nothing.
"Steamer alongside," said the sailor tersely,
nodding in the direction indicated by the ges-
tures of the men.
I listened a moment until I heard the hoarse
escape of steam from her pipes, and then ran
below to tell the good news. Everybody was
heartened by it. Some difference between set-
ting off in an open boat on that gray waste
of waters, and being placed on board a stout
vessel, no matter where she was bound!
To make a long story short, we all gathered
on deck as soon as we had eaten a bit of
breakfast; and you may believe everybody
was eager to leave. Our own ship was a dis-
mal sight. Two out of the three masts were
gone, leaving the splintered ends sticking up,
one at about the height of a man's head from
the deck, the other a little higher. The deck






THE GREAT ISLAND.


was littered with coils of rope, broken pieces
of spars, and loose casks. Worst of all, the
water outside looked dreadfully near; for we
had settled down two or three feet already.
The pumps were going all the time, clang-
clang.
The first officer of the strange vessel had
come on board from the Petrel, for that was
her name. She was a small steamer, brig-
rigged, bound round the Horn to Montevideo;
but there was no help for it. Our own ship
seemed to be sinking fast, and any port in
a storm" was the word now.
After a consultation, however, between our
captain and the mate of the Petrel, and a
careful examination of the depth of water in
the hold of the Southern Cross, it was agreed
that the Petrel should lend us four men, whom
they could well spare, and whom we needed
badly, our sailors being almost exhausted, and
two hands having been lost overboard (that
was the first we heard of it) during the night.
Our captain believed that he could then work






LOST ON THE OCEAN.


the Southern Cross to the nearest port; the
weather giving good promise, and the leakage
not so fast but that it could be kept under
by relief gangs of men at the pumps. The
passenger-s were all to be transshipped at once,
as they would not risk their lives on his dis-
abled ship, and they would only be in the
way, and require attention which could not be
given. If he succeeded in navigating the
Southern Cross safely to port, he said he would
store our goods, and communicate with us at
once at Montevideo.
There was of course a great deal of confu-
sion in the cabin, and rummaging for valuables.
We were allowed to take small hand-bags and
boxes, but no large baggage. The weather
began to look uncertain again, and the offi-
cers hurried us up on deck and into the boats.
There were only fifteen passengers in all; and
two trips had been taken, the women going
first. Each boat carried six; and it happened
that Will, Teddy, and I, being strong young
fellows, were left to the last. Yes, I suppose







THE GREAT ISLAND.


we did hang back a little to let the others go
first; why shouldn't we?
There were only two sailors in the boat
when she came back for her last trip, to take
us three boys, and a few odds and ends that
the other passengers had forgotten.
I staggered up the staircase with a heavy
box, which, with one that Will carried, had
been stowed in our cabins, having been taken
on board at Honolulu after the trunks had
gone into the hold. Teddy had Will's shot-
gun and bag, and we tumbled down into the
boat, which was rising and falling by the ship's
side at a rate to make a landsman's hair stand
on end. One of the sailors had gone on board
for a minute-to get some tobacco of one of
our foremast hands, I suspect.
Now, I've got to go back for my bag and
Ted's," said I, looking dubiously at the roll-
ing ship and the swaying ladder over the side.
"Whar is it? I'll get it," said the good-
natured sailor who remained in the boat.
I told him, and put a shilling in his hand,







LOST ON THE OCEAN.


which increased his good-humored smile to a
broad grin, as he sprang nimbly up the lad-
der, and disappeared over the bulwarks.
How it happened I never can tell, but with-
in half a minute after the sailor left us we
were adrift.
Teddy saw it first, and fairly shrieked,
"Look, look! Sure, the ship's sailin' away
from us!"
Help, help!" we shouted, springing to our
feet, and waving our hats frantically. No one
saw or heard us. When a man's head finally
appeared at the head of the ladder we were
a hundred feet away, driven by a furious
squall, which came down upon us without
warning, and whitened the water all about.
We seized the heavy oars, and threw them
over the gunwales, but we might as well have
tried to fly as make headway against the
wind. In less time than it has taken to tell
it both ship and brig were lost to sight in
the driving rain.
And now a new peril beset us. We wene






THE GREAT ISLAND.


not only adrift, and every moment hurrying
away from our friends, but the boat got in
the trough of the sea, and we began to roll
terribly, the water coming in at every dip.
Who will say that light reading isn't use-
ful ? I remembered, all of a sudden, reading
in one of Clark Russell's sea-stories that a party
adrift in an open boat kept themselves from
capsizing by throwing out the oars, tied to-
gether as a drag, and thus keeping the boat's
head to the waves.
I shouted my idea to Will; and we pulled
in the painter, which was trailing from the
bows, and managed to lash the oars together
in a bungling fashion, and get them overboard.
The advantage of this move was seen in a
minute, and I have no doubt it saved our
lives. Held back by the heavy drag, our bows
came up into the wind, and we were no longer
in danger of capsizing. The water, however,
continued to break into the boat, though in
quantities that we could easily manage, if we
could only throw out the six or seven inches of






LOST ON THE OCEAN.


it that already threatened our safety. Luck-
ily the Petrel's men had taken a large tin
can with them when they crossed in the rough
sea; and Will now went to work manfully
with this, while Teddy and I helped with our
caps.
Every capful counts panted Will,
as he saw us ladling out the water. "Don't
- fall overboard you fellows This ship
can't spare a man "
We all three worked with such a good will
that we soon cleared the boat of most of the
water that had come in; and then we faced
the situation.
Where were we? What was to be done ?
What were our chances of life?






THE GREAT ISLAND


CHAPTER V.

A LONG NIGHT.

W ILL Martin was the only one of us
three whose opinion as to our where-
abouts was worth having. He had made a
special study in advance of our trip, and
could at least give a reasonable guess in the
premises.
"As nearly as I can recollect," said Will
slowly, "we were in the vicinity of the New
Hebrides when the hurricane struck us. Of
course I don't know how much to allow for
our drift, nor for the currents in this part of
the ocean; but I don't believe we can be far
from the coast of Queensland, somewhere be-
tween Brisbane and Cape Melville."
"How much range does that give us be-
tween your two limits ? I asked.






A LONG NIGHT.


"Something over a thousand miles," re-
plied Will calmly.
"And how near is the most favorable of
the two to Sydney?"
"Brisbane ? Not far from half that dis-
tance."
Whew!" I whistled. "A pretty poor
out-look for reaching port "
"Indade, we'd better have stayed on the
would ship," groaned Ted. How do you think
we're goin' to walk all those miles at all ? "
"It can't be done," said Will. "We must
first think of getting ashore. Then take ad-
vantage of every good spell of weather to
row southward along the coast, till we strike
a settlement."
An' what'll we be after atin' ? inquired
poor Ted, who was sitting in a pool of sea-
water in the bottom of the pitching boat,
and whose spirits were at the lowest ebb.
"Well, we've one good shotgun, and that
farther box has ammunition in it, judging
from the weight."






THE GREAT ISLAND.


"That's so!" I cried, with new courage.
"I just grabbed what came to hand first;
but I remember now that it was awful heavy,
and it must be those shells loaded with buck-
shot and duck that we bought in Honolulu
just before sailing. There are two hundred
of them."
"Hurrah!" shouted Will, waving his wet
cap. "Once let us get ashore in Australia,
and we'll give you all you want to eat,
Teddy, I can promise you. What's in that
other box, Nat ? "
Smoked beef in cans, and a few other small
things we stuffed in at the last minute."
"Let's have some now!" said Ted, look-
ing interested.
"Wait," said Will soberly. "What shall
we have to drink with it ?"
Our faces fell. In a twinkling we were all
dreadfully thirsty, at the very thought of be-
ing deprived of water.
"Spread your handkerchiefs, and wring them
when they've got wet," suggested Will.







A LONG NIGHT.


It was raining, a fine, steady drizzle, for
which we could not be too thankful, though a
moment before we had been grumbling at the
discomfort of sitting in wet clothes.
Following Will's plan, we soon assuaged the
first pangs of thirst; and then all of us wrung
out our handkerchiefs, over and over again,
into the bailer, until it was nearly full.
Be careful not to tip that over," cautioned
Will, placing the precious can under a thwart
where the spray could not dash into it. "Our
lives may depend upon those two or three
quarts of .fresh water to-morrow, if the weather
clears."
We drifted slowly for hours, when the sea
fell so perceptibly that we pulled in our drag,
and having pried open our box enough to ex-
tract a small can of beef, made a hearty meal,
refreshing ourselves from our improvised rain-
collectors without disturbing our reserve supply
in the can.
Will and Ted, who were the strongest, now
shipped the oars, and pulled away steadily be-






THE GREAT ISLAND.


fore the wind, as we judged that course would
take us directly toward the land we longed so
to see. The fog and rain were still so thick
that we could make out nothing beyond two
or three hundred feet from the boat. I forgot
to say that from the time of our loss of the
ship we had at intervals shouted all together
and with all our might, in the vain hope that
one of the two vessels might be cruising about
for us and hear our cries.
Night came on at last, and a long and dreary
night it was too. We threw out the drag
again, and curling up in the bottom of the
boat, tried to rest. We all got some sleep, I
suppose; but for my part I was so cold and
wet and hungry, and worried over our future,
that it seemed as if I hardly closed my eyes
throughout those dreary, dreary hours of dark-
ness. I was afraid, too, of our being run down
by the steamer, which I was sure was looking
for us; or, worse still, of her passing us within
hail and unseen. Every time a wave broke
near us or ran with a rush and roar along







A LONG NIGHT.


our sides, I started up, with eyes strained to
see a glimmer of light through the blackness
that fairly made them ache.
Morning came at last, and a sorry trio it
disclosed. I was awake first (granting that I
had been asleep), and saw Will begin to stir
uneasily, and at last open his eyes with a be-
wildered look about him. I shall never for-
get his face when he realized where we were,
and how little real hope there was of our ever
reaching home again.
Then Ted, with a sort of groan, started
wide awake all at once, as if from a bad dream.
Before I could stop him he threw out legs and
arms widely, stretching himself and yawning.
His right foot just reached the bailing-can, and
in a second the precious contents were a part
of the salt bilge-water slopping about in the
bottom of the boat.
At the same instant a pink flush appeared
in the eastern sky. Will pointed to it. The
weather has cleared," he said simply. In
these latitudes there are only short storms at







52 THE GREAT ISLAND.

this time of the year. There will be no more
rain for days, perhaps weeks."
"Then unless" I managed to stammer;
I could get no farther. My tongue seemed
already glued to the roof of my mouth with
thirst.
Unless," said Will, concluding my sentence
for me, "we reach land or are picked up to-
day, we are lost."






THE STRANGE LANDING.


CHAPTER VI.

THE STRANGE LANDING.

W ILL had hardly ceased speaking when
Teddy, who had been aghast at the
mischief he had done, jumped on a thwart
with a wild cry, pointing directly over the
stern of the boat in the direction in which
we were drifting, our bows being still held
up to the light wind by the drag.
Look at that! shrieked the young Irish-
man. "Land Land! Hooray fer Australy !"
We had thought ourselves a moment before
too stiff and cramped to move; but we forgot
all our pains and aches, and even our empty
stomachs and the overturned cistern, in our
excitement, as we, too, sprang up, and gazed
in the direction indicated.
Sure enough, that long, cloudy line could be






THE GREAT ISLAND.


nothing but land. In came the oars, not
wearily and slowly this time, but hand over
fist. They rattled down between the thole-
pins on the gunwales in quick time; and the
two rowers, turning the boat with a couple
of powerful strokes, pulled for the shore with
all their might.
Before long, I having "spelled" Will for
a while, we all had to rest. We ventured to
eat a little of the beef, though it made us
dreadfully thirsty; but we felt sure we should
find fresh water on shore. After this hasty
breakfast, we buckled to our work once more,
making the heavy ship's boat fairly boil
through the water.
The sun came out, and did us good service
in drying our clothes; but oh, how hot it was!
However, the land kept climbing into the sky,
until we could distinguish the shapes of a
range of lofty mountains far inland, while the
shore appeared low and heavily wooded right
down to the water's edge.
By noon we calculated that we were within






THE STRANGE LANDING.


two miles of land, which lay directly north of
us, judging from the sun's position. This
puzzled us a little; but Will explained it by
the surmise that we were in some sort of large
bay on the east coast of Australia, shut in by
a long peninsula.
We stopped rowing, and ate a little more
beef; though we were by this time so parched
with thirst that we could scarcely swallow. It
was plain that we must obtain water soon or
perish.
Taking to the heavy oars again, we once
more moved forward, stopping every few min-
utes to scan the coast-line for any sign of
human life, savage or civilized. Not a curl of
smoke or glimpse of habitation of any sort
rewarded our search; and half relieved, half
apprehensive, at the solitary character of the
wilderness before us, we pushed in boldly
toward the shore, frantic with thirst as the
prospect of quenching it increased.
Thump! went the bows against the half-
submerged root of an enormous tree.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


"Well," remarked Ted, looking around him,
"if I wasn't jist crazed fer weather, sure I'd
go to say agin. It's a haythin country we've
got to this time "
Ted wasn't far out of the way, for a gloomier
bit of shore I never saw.
Directly in front of us, and both east and
west as far as the eye could reach, the sea
was bordered with a dense growth of huge
trees of some kind, the roots of which grew
half in the air. The trunks, big and black,
towered crookedly upward till they were lost
in a mass of heavy foliage. Many of them
had fallen, and lay rotting in the mud; and
the odor of decaying vegetation was almost
overpowering.
"What kind of ornamental shrubbery is
this, Will ?" I sang out, resolved to make the
best of things.
They're mangroves," said our naturalist-
geographer, surveying with interest the repul-
sive growth. "I've read lots about them."
"Well, they may be all right on paper,"




















































iTHEii STRAgN(IE. LANDIlNG.
' Thlumpll went the bows against the half-sltubllllrged roots."


;F






THE STRANGE LANDING.


said Ted, clambering out over the boughs, and
stepping gingerly on one of the great slimy
roots; "but owch !" and down he went into
the mud.
We had our laugh; but time was flying,
and we knew we must strike, inland if we
wanted to find higher ground and the pre-
cious liquid that meant life and strength to
us.
Making fast the painter to the trunk of the
nearest tree, we clambered out of the boat,
taking the gun, the bag, and our two boxes.
These last were sure to prove a dreadful bother,
especially the case of ammunition, which must
have weighed over twenty pounds; but fear
of natives forbade our leaving anything be-
hind. Will had spent some time that morn-
ing, while I had his oar, in drying and rubbing
up his shotgun; and before starting, he un-
screwed the lid of the box with his jackknife,
and took out a dozen cartridges, charged with
large shot and small. He was requested to
take the lead, carrying the gun and his bag.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


I came next with the provision box; and
Teddy brought up the rear, grumbling over
the weight of the ammunition.
We made slow enough progress, and after
a few minutes' hard work we had to stop to
rest. All around us were the mangrove-trees,
over and among the slippery roots of which
we scrambled, slid, and tumbled. Once we
had heard a sudden squattering" in the mud
just in front of us, and were startled by the
sight of a huge crocodile, just disappearing in
an oozy creek close by. The mud was every-
where black and soft, and at times we sank
into it up to our knees. There was not a
breath of air stirring. The heat was intense,
and the odors of all sorts of decaying sub-
stances simply indescribable. Although the
sun was still high in the heavens, we were
in the gloomiest of shadows, so that it seemed
like advancing through a nightmare forest as
we plunged on once more.
Overhead the boughs at times resounded
with a hideous, cackling cry.






THE STRANGE LANDING.


"What in the world is that ?" I asked, as
these strange noises were redoubled.
"It's a kind of kingfisher," panted Will.
"A near relation of the 'laughing jackass'
you've read about."
"Sure, he's well named," said Ted wrath-
fully, "if he lives in this baste of a wood."
A moment later the boy gave a wild howl
of dismay. We turned back, and didn't blame
him when we saw him staring at a huge
snake, coiled around a limb of a tree just
over his head. It was of a bluish lead-color
above, and lemon-yellow beneath.
"It's only a python," said Will. "He isn't
poisonous, and won't touch you if you don't
meddle with him. Come on, Ted; and don't
drop that box for your life!"
For two hours longer we struggled on,
noting with satisfaction that the soil was be-
coming firmer beneath our feet, and the for-
est a little more open.
"Hurrah, boys!" shouted Will, "I see the
sunshine ahead. We'll soon strike the hills,






THE GREAT ISLAND.


and there's sure to be running water there
somewhere !"
Five minutes more brought us to a little
grassy glade, beyond which the land rose in
a steady slope. We pushed forward eagerly.
Mangroves had now given place to a tall,
straight kind of tree, which Will told us was
the famous eucalyptus. Tall grass waved in
the sunshine wherever there was an open
space; and ghoulish kingfishers, with their
horrid laughter, gave place to hundreds of coo-
ing pigeons. Will was some distance ahead
of us when he gave a shout of delight, and,
running off a little to the right, dropped on
his knees. When we reached his side we
found him drinking from a little stream which
rippled merrily downward toward the sea.
We all threw ourselves down on the grass,
and drank till we could drink no more. Then
rolling over on our backs with long sighs of
relief, we lay there for a good half-hour, too
tired, and filled with too grateful a sense of
refreshment, to care to stir.







THE STRANGE LANDING.


Will was the first to raise himself on his
elbow and propose a move.
"There couldn't be a better place to camp
in," said he, "than right where we are."
"I'd rather spend the night here than lie
on the soft side of a board in that old boat,"
1 agreed; "and to-morrow we can stock up
on provisions and water, and start down the
coast."
"There's one sure thing," exclaimed Will,
jumping smartly to his feet; "we must take a
look at the boat, and make sure that she's se-
cure. We forgot something when we moored
her."
"What's that?"
"The tide! It must rise and fall several
feet here; and the old craft might work loose,
sliding about on those mangrove roots. At
any rate, I'm going to have one more look at
her before the sun sets. You and Ted knock
up some kind of shelter, and gather firewood
for the night. I'll be back inside of two
hours at the utmost."






THE GREAT ISLAND.


"Don't you want the gun ? "
"No; I'm going to travel light this time.
Good-by." And he was gone.
I knew Will was a good woodsman, so I
didn't worry about him, but set at work at
once preparing for the night.
With the small camp-hatchet that I had
fortunately buckled around my waist when I
left the ship, I soon cut down enough small
trees to make a rude shelter tent, the front
being framed by two crotched uprights and a
crosspiece.
Ted found a grove of young cocoa-palms
growing near the camp, and two or three arm-
fuls of these thatched the roof nicely. I should
have liked some good fir boughs, such as we
had in Alaska, for our bed; but of course this
was out of the question in the tropics.
By sunset Ted had gathered a big pile of
dry wood; and the camp was finished, with
a bright fire blazing cheerfully in front of it.
Five minutes later Will appeared, making his
way slowly up to us from the low ground.






THE STRANGE LANDING.


I saw from his face in a moment that some-
thing was wrong.
"Will, old fellow, what's the matter?" I
inquired anxiously.
"Matter enough," said Will, throwing him-
self down wearily before the fire.
"You haven't been bitten by a snake or
anything, have you ? "
"I wish that were all! said Will. "No,
there's no danger of snakes at present; but
there may be worse enemies than that about
us.
"Shall we take to the boat, then ?"
"We can't. The boat is gone!"







THE GREAT ISLAND.


CHAPTER VII.

A NOVEL BILL OF FARE.

W E gazed at Will blankly. No boat! Then
how were we ever to escape ? Hun-
dreds of miles, through a country infested by
savages, and possibly by gangs of escaped con-
victs, the dreaded bushrangers," lay be-
tween us and the nearest civilized port. We
could not remain by the shore in that unclean
forest of mangroves, watching for rescuers;
even I knew enough of the tropics to realize
that we were liable, one and all, to be taken
down with fever if we lingered near the swamps
with their deadly exhalations. Besides, it was
possible that other and more imminent dan-
gers were lurking about us. How were we
to account- for the disappearance of the boat?
We questioned Will eagerly.






A NOVEL BILL OF FARE.


Will said that he could see no traces of
human agency in the matter. The tide, he
declared, had fallen two feet or more; and it
was possible that the painter had worked loose
with the natural movements of the boat, and
drifted out with the ebb. The wind still
blew, though mildly, and off shore.
Well, there was nothing for it but to eat our
supper, and spend the night where we were.
After the first yielding to discouragement
and fatigue, Will sprang up, and began look-
ing about carefully, as if for something he had
lost on the ground.
"This place looks to me," he mused aloud,
"like an old native plantation, neglected and
gone to waste. I shouldn't wonder ah,
there it is! And dropping down, he began
to dig and pull at some broad-leaved plants
among the grass.
A moment later he held something aloft
with a shout of triumph. It was a cluster of
two or three big, ungainly roots, or rather
"tubers," of a dirty yellow color.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


What have you got there ? I called out,
hurrying up.
"Swate potatoes !" cried Ted in rapture.
"Not quite that, but something just as
good, or better."
"What, then?"
"Yams "
I looked curiously at the vegetable of
which I had so often heard and read. "How
do you cook them, Will? Can't eat them
raw, I suppose! "
"Not much! Got a good fire there?"
"Tip-top."
"Well, clear away the sticks where there's
a good bed of ashes, and I'll have these fel-
lows ready for the oven in a twinkling."
While Ted and I followed directions, Will
washed the big tubers in the brook, and
wrapped them carefully in two or three
layers of their own leaves. He then buried
them in the hot ashes, and raked the burn-
ing coals and brands over them once more.
"Now let's keep a good fire going, and in






A NOVEL BILL OF FARE.


something over half an hour supper will be
ready," announced the cook.
We gathered a lot more firewood, and
then sat down in front of our camp, which
appeared every moment more cosey and home-
like as the sunset light faded from the west-
ern sky and the shadows began to deepen.
With nightfall came thoughts of the dear
ones we had left at sea; and we spoke of
each one separately, and how they must be
worrying or mourning over us.
"I know your father will charter a vessel
and hunt for us," remarked Will; "but what
good will that do? We can't live on the
shore, keeping up signals; for a night or two
down there would be the death of us."
"Besides," I added, how does he know
where we are? The wind may have baffled
round half a dozen times that first day, when
we had no sun to go by. He may spend
weeks or months searching the coast a thou-
sand miles from here."
"I wish we knew exactly where we are,"






THE GREAT ISLAND.


said Will. "Somehow I can't get 'the lay of
the land.' It has seemed all day as if the
sun rose in the north and set in the south,
instead of travelling from east to west in a
civilized fashion."
Maybe that's the way it goes, thin, in this
haythin country," growled Ted, throwing a
dry eucalyptus branch on the fire. It's me-
self that's turned round entirely."
"Well, we can make some definite plan by
and by, and to-morrow we'll take a fresh start
for somewhere," said Will. "By that time
perhaps I can get my bearings. Pull out a
can of beef, will you, Nat?"
I did so, and at the same time made an
important discovery; namely, a small tin box
of salt, which for some reason had been packed
with the beef. We could have dispensed with
such a luxury, of course; but it proved a great
comfort, and rendered our meals palatable as
well as nutritious. We had evidence of this
when we came to eat our yams, which were
delicious. To be sure, they were not exactly







A NOVEL BILL OF FARE.


"done to a turn," being rather scorchy out-
side, and raw in the middle; but we were
hungry, and supper tasted good, washed down,
as Teddy gravely remarked "wid smoked
bafe."
That night we took an inventory of our
possessions, the list being as follows:-

1 shotgun.
100 central-fire shells, buck-shot.
100 central-fire shells, duck-shot.
8 two-pound cans smoked beef.
1 half-pound can salt.
6 small bottles quinine pills.
20 boxes safety-matches.

Besides the above articles, we found in Will's
bag, which he had filled during the voyage
with a variety of little things needed in camp-
life, a package of fishlines and hooks, needles
and thread, twine, buttons, pins, a small roll
of cotton cloth, and a number of other odds
and ends, which, trifling in themselves, bade
fair to prove of inestimable value in the long
tramp which lay before us.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


We talked long and earnestly of our pros-
pects, but could arrive at no definite conclu-
sion beyond the necessity of immediate action
on the morrow; in other words, a start toward
the south, or in the nearest approach to that
direction which the singular and perplexing
configuration of the east-to-west coast would
allow.
Not feeling safe from the incursions of un-
friendly natives, we divided the night into
three watches, of which the first was given
to Teddy, the second to Will (from midnight
to three), and the third to myself.
Leaving the Irish boy, therefore, to keep
the fire going and himself awake, Will and
I turned in, and were soon sound asleep.






A STARTLING DISCOVERY.


CHAPTER VIII.

A STARTLING DISCOVERY.

ATILL called me promptly at three, accor-
Sding to our agreement; and rubbing my
eyes open savagely, I crawled out to the fire,
which I could see had just been freshly built up.
The stars were shining; and the great cross,
so strange to northerners, gleamed brightly
in the southern sky.
There had been no disturbance of any kind,
so far as I knew, during the night; and for
this I was very thankful, feeling sure that if
natives were about us, they would have mani-
fested their presence in some way before now.
Soon the east began to pale, and then grow
rosy. As soon as it was fairly daylight, I
took up the gun, loaded it with the larger
shot, and started off to see if I could make
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.






THE GREAT ISLAND


an addition to our rather scanty larder. The
forest was full of birds, strange, lovely
creatures I had never before seen; some of
them with long, glossy tail-feathers trailing
after them as they flew from bough to bough,
some with breasts of iridescent green gleam-
ing in the morning sunlight. I knew they
must be birds-of-paradise, although I was ig-
norant of their names.
Before long I came upon a large track, sev-
eral inches long, having three front toes and
one in the rear, like the footprint of a huge
hen. No big game appeared in sight, how-
ever; and I crept cautiously on, glancing to
right and left.
I had not gone a hundred feet farther, when
I caught sight of a curious little animal,
about the size of a large cat, crouching on a
horizontal bough some ten or fifteen feet from
the ground. Its fur was a dingy white, spotted
with brown; and it had a long, yellowish tail,
the end of which was tightly curled around
a smaller branch, as if to steady its owner.






A STARTLING DISCOVERY.


I had never seen such a beast before; but
I took the chance of its being edible, and,
taking careful aim, fired.
Down came the clumsy creature; and run-
ning up, I found it quite dead. I knew the
fellows would be roused and startled by the
report of the gun near camp; so back I went,
dragging my odd game by the tail, which I
found to be unpleasantly bare, like a rat's.
SHello, Nat, what on earth why! -
A queer look came into Will's face as he
hurried to meet me, and surveyed the odd
little animal I had shot.
"That's what I want you to tell me, Will,"
I laughed, throwing down my booty. "' What
on earth' is it?"
Will stooped, and turned the animal over.
"It can't be-yes, there's the bare, pre-
hensile tail and the blotches of brown fur "-
"Well?"
"If that's the animal I think it is and,
yes, it must be there's no mistake" He
paused again.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


"Well," I repeated, rather impatiently,
"what is the beast ? and what does he in-
dicate ? Don't be mysterious, Will!"
"There's no doubt that he's a cuscus macu-
latus."
Teddy, who had joined us, broke down in
the middle of a terrific yawn, and stared at
our young naturalist with eyes, like the dog
in the fairy, tale, "as big as saucers."
"And his presence here," continued Will,
unmoved; "proves, my hearers, that we have
made a little mistake. We are not in Aus-
tralia at all."
"His being here proves that we are not
here! What are you talking about, Will ?
Wake up, old fellow! You're half asleep yet."
"I didn't say we were not here," laughed
Will. "I merely remarked that we were not
in Australia. The spotted cuscus lives only in
the Spice Islands and New Guinea.' Now,
we can't be in any of the Spice Islands, which
1 NOTE. -Will was right in his conclusions, though not strictly
accurate in his premises. The cuscus maculatus is sometimes
found in Australia. W. B. A.






A STARTLING DISCOVERY.


are hundreds of miles to the west of any pos-
sible course we may have been driven over,
with lots of islands between."
"It follows then that"--
"We are in New Guinea!"
This was, sure enough, an astounding, not
to say an appalling, piece of news. The cus-
cus lay forgotten on the ground, and we looked
at one another with faces from ,which the
mirth died out rapidly as we recognized the
full significance of the information the ani-
mal had unwittingly given us.
New Guinea Papua! I remembered it
vaguely as a big, oddly shaped island north
of Australia, peopled by little-known and sav-
age tribes, and possessing but few, if any, white
settlements.
Ted and I opened upon Will with broad-
sides of questions as soon as we could find
tongue to speak.
How large was the island upon which we
had been so strangely cast? Where were the
settlements, if any? Were the savages dan-






THE GREAT ISLAND.


gerous? How about noxious beasts and rep-
tiles ? These and many other questions Will
answered with a readiness that showed how
thoroughly he had studied this strange island,
as well as the adjacent continent.
He told us, in brief, that Papua was about
fourteen hundred miles long, and in its widest
spot perhaps half as many from north to south;
that there were a few settlements only, scat-
tered along its inhospitable coast, especially
at the eastern and western extremities.
"What nation does Papua belong to?" we
interrupted at this point.
"Oh! said Will, "various countries claim
portions of it. The Dutch have the best hold,
perhaps, along the coast; though the French
and Great Britain control portions toward the
west. Where we are at this present minute,
the land is populated I can't say governed'
- by natives alone."
"And how about the interior?"
"Nobody knows."
"What! this big island unexplored?"







A STARTLING DISCOVERY.


"A good deal of it, yes. An Italian named
D'Albertis spent some time a hundred miles
or so from where we probably are, and forced
his way up the Fly River. One or two others
have done as much in other parts of the
island, and that's about all the exploration
on record."
"Where do you make it out we are, then,
old fellow?"
"We must be somewhere near the head of
the Gulf of Papua," answered Will. "I see
now that the wind drove us right up through
the Coral Sea, in a westerly direction. Then
it veered to the south, and blew us in a
northerly direction, till we struck the main-
land. If we had gone west, young man, to
any great extent, we should have landed among
the islands in Torres Strait, a good deal
worse off than we are now, in my humble
opinion. We are in a country full of game,
with plenty of ammunition for the present,
and health and strength enough to get to the
nearest settlements toward the east, say two






THE GREAT ISLAND.


or three hundred miles from here. There are
no big beasts to fear, and the only danger is
from the natives."
"Here goes, then," I shouted; "come on,
you fellows! Every foot toward the east is
clear gain!" And off we went, Indian file,
toward the rising sun.
For two days we made our way steadily
eastward. Most of our walking was done in
the early forenoon ahd late afternoon; for it
was very hot in the middle of the day. We
no longer took the trouble to build a camp
at night, but lay down beside our fire in the
softest spot we could find. We did not mind
the heat; for so long as the sun shone we
could find our way without a compass. Our
one thought was eastward ho! to some port
where we could obtain conveyance to Australia,
and, by means of mail and telegraph, relieve
the terrible anxiety we knew must be felt by
our dear ones.
The third day was one to be remembered.
We had not been on our feet long before we






A STARTLING DISCOVERY.


found it was the hottest morning we had yet
experienced.
Whew!" whistled Teddy at ten o'clock
or thereabouts. "It's meself that's meltin'
entirely. Can't we shtop a while to cool
off?"
Will and I were only too willing to drop
our loads, and fling ourselves down in the
shade of a tree, which was one of the ad-
vance guard of a much heavier growth than
had yet been in our path. Will said they
were mostly teak-wood.
We had some debate whether to try to
make a detour inland around this forest; but
as we could see no limits to it, north or
south, we concluded to make the best of it,
and push on, hoping to emerge on the other
side before nightfall.
At three o'clock we started ahead, and
plunged into the shadows of the wood.
Then it was that we found what travelling
in the unexplored tropics means. Hitherto
our course had led us across grassy uplands,






THE GREAT ISLAND.


cheered by the sunshine and the songs of birds,
and meeting with little difficulty in moving
ahead at a good pace. We must have cov-
ered nearly twenty miles each day.
But now we were enveloped in the half
twilight of the deep forest. Only occasional
glimpses of the sun enabled us to hold a
true course. Moreover, we were impeded at
every step by tough vegetable creepers which
lay in wait for our stumbling feet, so that
we went down again and again.
Just after one of these falls poor Teddy
began to thrash the air wildly, and run,
shouting for help.
"What is it, Ted? What's the matter?"
we both cried at once.
"Ow! Ow!" howled Teddy. "The bees
are shtinging me to death. Murther! Take
'em off!" and he thrashed more wildly than
ever.
At first both Will and I went off into
peals of laughter; but, as our afflicted com-
rade drew near, our tone changed, and we too






A STARTLING DISCOVERY.


plunged ahead, screaming, through the under-
growth.
Fortunately we soon came to a muddy lit-
tle brook, where we got rid of the last of
the little winged pests whose nest Teddy had
unwittingly struck. They were wasps, and
the ugliest ones I ever saw. All of us
were smarting from their stings, and poor
Ted's face was already swollen terribly.
We hardly felt like going farther, but picked
up our loads again, and were ready to start,
when Will sung out, -
"Hold on a minute! Which way are we
to go? Where's the sun?"
Not a sign of it! One part of the sky was
like another, as we saw it through the tree-
tops. We now noticed how rapidly it had
grown dark while we were bathing our faces.
"Sure, it's not sunset yet," groaned poor
Ted, trying to cool his smarting face and
neck.
No, it was several hours before the time
for the sun's legitimate disappearance. There






82 THE GREAT ISLAND.

was only one explanation for the suddenly
approaching darkness.
"There's a storm coming, and a big one,"
said Will briefly. "Hurry and make ready
for it!"






TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.


CHAPTER IX.

TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.

THERE was not much that we could do in
the way of preparation, after all. Will
put his jacket over the ammunition-box, which
was placed, moreover, beneath all the other
baggage, with Teddy sitting on top of that.
It was of no use to go farther, so we waited.
It grew darker and darker.
No use to light a fire," said Will, for the
rain will put it out. Here it comes now!"
A big drop, down through the trees an-
other and another. Then a blinding flash of
lightning, without any thunder! There was
something awful about this solemn, silent ap-
proach of the storm; and I own I was more
scared than at any time since we were swept
away from the ship.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


We had not long to wait, however. A
weary, listless breeze swept through the tree-
tops. The rain began to fall faster. A rum-
ble of thunder followed another vivid flash.
Then we heard a dull roar, like the sea, in-
creasing every moment, until it struck the
forest. The trees all around us writhed and
groaned, and one not far away fell with a
crash. Down came the rain in sheets, while
the dazzling lightning and deafening thunder
glittered and roared almost incessantly.
It was a wretched, wretched night. We
were absolutely unprotected from the storm,
and could simply crouch together, striving to
keep our possessions from being soaked, while
we ourselves were drenched with the driving
rain, which poured steadily even after, at
about midnight, the violence of the thunder
and lightning had passed.
Morning found us almost too stiff, cold,
and wet to move. The rain had ceased at
last, but a thick white mist rose from the
swampy ground all about us. The brook was







TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.


a small river, and foamed over the spot where
we had first halted. The wasp-stings still
plagued us, and altogether we were an un-
happy crowd.
"Get a can of beef open," said Will. "There
are two more left, and we can't get a fire go-
ing, to cook anything. As soon as we have
eaten some breakfast we must start on, for
this place would mean death if we stayed here
long."
We managed to force down a few mouth-
fuls of smoked beef, fortunately the brook-
water, though turbid, was still drinkable, and
resumed our march. The sun was not out,
but lighted up the eastern sky sufficiently for
us to guess at our bearings. Anything was
better, as Will said, than staying where we
were.
We soon struck the worst piece of woods we
had yet found, sago, Will said it was; and
I never want a plate of sago pudding again.
The thorns of last year's growth lay on the
ground, and stabbed through our well-worn







THE GREAT ISLAND.


shoes, which were "squeechin'" wet, as Teddy
put it. Then, too, there was a kind of rattan
underbrush through which it was almost im-
possible to make any progress. The long, tough
stems tripped us up; we often went up to our
knees in black mud, and our hands and faces
were scratched and torn and bruised until we
agreed that we would rather tackle another
wasps' nest in open growth than have an
additional half-day of such travelling.
After a while the sun came out, and the for-
est was filled with the cries of cockatoos, the
cooing of great pigeons, and the songs of birds-
of-paradise. We were cheered by the bright
rays; but the air remained very sultry, and
by three o'clock the clouds closed in again,
putting a stop to our march.
Then followed a repetition of our experiences
of the previous night. It rained heavily; and
though the storm was not as severe as the last,
it was quite as effective in wetting us through,
and rendering us thoroughly miserable. I got
asleep in my wet clothes toward morning, but






TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.


had only troubled dreams, and woke with a
raging headache.
Will felt my pulse and looked serious. None
of us had ever seen jungle fever; but my
symptoms corresponded exactly with our gen-
eral idea of it, and the accounts we had read
in books, Stanley's and others.
"You'd better take a big dose of quinine,
and then do your best to keep on your feet,"
said Will with a world of anxiety in his tone.
"We surely shall reach open and higher ground
before night, and then we can build a decent
camp, and rest a day or two."
It was hard work, but I managed to stumble
ahead five or six hours that day. The air
was cooler, we could catch glimpses of blue
sky through the tops of the palms; and this
gave me courage to push on, though I was
shivery and weak, and my head felt as though
it were burning up. To our great joy the
trees became more scattered in the afternoon;
and long before sunset we found ourselves in
the bright sunshine once more, on a slope that






THE GREAT ISLAND.


seemed to extend inland, mounting steadily
until the highest ground was lost in the dis-
tance.
I could go no farther; and we decided to
camp on a little knoll about fifty feet from
a clear stream that came leaping down from
the heights like our dear old New England
brooks, which I then feared I might never live
to see. Will and Teddy would not let me
do any real work; though I staggered about,
gathering a little firewood, and trying to be-
lieve I was helping.
Will took the gun, and in half an hour came
back with a real prize, a wild pig, which insured
us food for the morrow at least. As for me,
I cared little about the state of the larder, for
not a bit could I touch when the boys brought
me a nice bit of roast pig for my supper.
Teddy then boiled some of the meat, using
our old bailer, which we had thus far carried
throughout our weary march, and made me
some soup. I forced down a little, took some
more quinine, and turned in early.






TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.


The next day I woke up feeling very weak,
but better. It was useless to think of march-
ing, so we prepared for a day of rest. After
breakfast Will strolled off to find game; Teddy
undertook to enact the part of washerwoman
for the crowd; and I occupied my time in writ-
ing up these notes, using a pencil and a small
blank book which had formed a part of Will's
camp outfit.
I had said but little heretofore about the
strange things we met with in our tramp. This
day gave me a chance to describe a little of
the animal and vegetable life in the midst of
which we had found ourselves since landing on
the great island. Will had kept us informed,
so far as he was able, as to the names and
habits of the fauna of New Guinea which we
had thus far run across.

In making up this narrative, I have recast
and rewritten most of the brief notes I made
on the spot; but perhaps it will give a clearer
idea of our surroundings if I copy the account






90 THE GREAT ISLAND.

of this special day directly from my diary,
merely filling out and completing abbreviated
words and sentences.
The account is long enough, I guess, to de-
serve a separate chapter.






IN CAMP AGAIN.


CHAPTER X.

IN CAMP AGAIN.

THIS morning we had yams, bananas, and
roast pig for breakfast. I ate a little of
the fruit; and Ted made me some pig-broth,
which tasted good. We have only two more
cans of beef left. The salt holds out well,
for we are very sparing in our use of it.
Asked Will how far he thought we were
from settlements, and he said he reckoned not
more than one hundred and fifty miles. This
is encouraging; though I can see he is mak-
ing our prospects as bright as possible, to
cheer me up. He has taken the gun, and
gone up the hill to take a look for game, but
will keep near the camp. We have seen no
sign of natives yet, beyond one or two ancient
plantations of yams, sago, and bananas, all






THlE GREAT ISLAND.


overgrown and run out. Still, we feel that
we must keep on the watch.
As I sit in the door of our little camp,
which is thatched with the long, broad leaves
of the banana-trees, I hear the birds-of-para-
dise whistling in the woods near by. Teddy,
too, is whistling at his work, as he washes our
clothes in the brook. That boy is a treasure.
I have just heard the report of a gun.
Here comes Will with something dangling
from his right hand. The left, with the shot-
gun in it, he waves to us.
Will's game turns out to be a huge pigeon,
the biggest I ever saw. It is called a "goura,"
he says, and lives only in this island, Java,
and the. Moluccas. This is the bird, it seems,
which we have heard several times on our
march. Its cry is something between a turkey's
gobble and a low note on a trombone. It is
of a bluish, slaty color, with a patch of white
on each wing. The head is the queerest part,
being surmounted by a high crest of feathers.
The bird Will shot is as large as a fair-






IN CAMP AGAIN.


sized turkey, and promises us high living, for
the flesh is said to be delicious. Ted says
we'll have a regular Thanksgiving dinner. I
am afraid I sha'n't do much justice to it;
though I don't say much about my feelings,
for fear of discouraging the boys.
Eleven o'clock. -Teddy has hung out his
wash to dry, and is fishing in the stream, with
good luck I should judge from his frequent
cries of "Hurrah!" "I've got ye then!"
"That's a good wan!" Yes, here he comes
with as fine a string of little fellows as if
he had been fishing in a New Hampshire
brook. I don't in the least know what they
are, but no doubt they are good to eat. No
danger of starving here. Oh, my head!
Later. Will has got back from another
tramp in the woods. He is a restless fellow,
and can't remain quietly in camp. He says
he narrowly escaped a strange accident which
might have proved fatal; in which case a thou-
sand guesses from our friends at home would
hardly have hit on the cause of his death.






THE GREAT ISLAND.


He was making his way through a thick
piece of woods when he caught sight of a
big hornbill a bird with a huge beak in
the topmost boughs of a very high tree. He
could not resist the temptation of firing.
Down dropped the heavy bird, beak first.
Will saw him coming, and tried to get out of
the way, but tripped in a vine, and as he
went sprawling the tremendous beak whizzed
past, just grazing his arm, where he has a
pretty deep cut to show for his adventure.
If the bird had struck his head--!
Teddy managed to climb a palm-tree, after
his piscatory success, and dislodged a dozen
good-sized cocoanuts, which came bouncing
down on the ground like so many cannon-
balls. The milk is just beginning to harden;
and they are delicious, as we soon found, even
I relishing the sweet white paste. How little
we know about real cocoanuts at home! I
got Will to give me the names of some of
the trees hereabouts. They are Greek to me,
most of them; but I can look them up in the






IN CAMP AGAIN.


encyclopedia if we ever get home. Here they
are: Besides the nutmeg, sago, banana, palm,
and mangrove (all of which I now know well
enough by sight), we have in our immediate
neighborhood the eucalyptus, teak, myristica,
canarium, casuarina, and mango and nipa.
This last grows in wet places, along the banks
of streams; and the long leaves have bothered
us a good deal. I'm too tired and sick to
write any more of the hard names.
Later.-The afternoon has passed slowly.
I am not feeling so well. The fever seems to
be returning, my head prickles" with heat,
and my limbs are much swollen -a new
symptom. I'm going to keep on writing as
long as I can, to take up my mind, if noth-
ing more.
Teddy got another snake-fright soon after
dinner. One of the enormous bluish-backed
fellows, a python, took it into his head to in-
vestigate our camp. The Irish boy was just
returning from the brook, when he caught
sight of the serpent slowly moving right






THE GREAT ISLAND.


across his path. I never heard such a yell,
even when Ted collided with the wasps' nest
the other day. The snake made off in one
direction and he in another. I didn't know
what was the matter till Ted came creeping
back on the other side of the camp. Truly,
this is not the pleasantest country for an
afternoon stroll!
Will reports some huge tracks in the mud,
not far up-stream. Either a giant cassowary
has been near us within twenty-four hours, or
some great creature unknown to naturalists.
Will says that such tracks have been seen
before in New Guinea; and some people think
there are a few animals or saurians still alive
in the unexplored interior of the island, though
generally believed extinct centuries ago. This
sounds like the talk about "mammoths" in
Alaska. I shall not soon forget my ride on
one! The fellow that illustrated that book of
our adventures hasn't half done justice to the
big beast, as he appeared emerging from the
river.






IN CAMP AGAIN.


There are kangaroos near here, beyond a
doubt. Their tracks are thick, Will says, with-
in ten minutes' walk of our camp. He wanted
to get a shot at one, but hasn't succeeded yet.
Oh, dear! I don't care what he shoots -if
only my head would stop aching! How I
wish Flossie was here; and mother! I can
just feel her hand on my hot forehead -
Well, I mustn't give up to it. What was
I writing about? Oh! kangaroos. Teddy
caught sight of one yesterday, and has been
giving an exhibition of how he jumped.
The sun is going down, and I must stop
writing. It seems as if my head would split.
The boys are getting ready for supper. Teddy
has built a fire, and is making some more
broth for me. Will says we can stay here
another day as well as not. I'm glad of that.
If I don't get better to-morrow I don't know-


(Nat's Journal breaks off here.)






THE GREAT ISLAND.


CHAPTER XI.

UNINVITED GUESTS.

FIVE minutes after poor Nat left off writing1
in his diary he was delirious. I picked
up the little book in which he had kept a
faithful record of our adventures, even through-
out the day when his fever was increasing and
he was suffering terribly, as we afterward
knew, until the pen dropped from his hands.
For several days that followed I kept the
"log" up, though I knew how much better
Nat would have done it.
Ted and I tried to make the poor fellow as
comfortable as possible; but he was out of
SNOTE.--The different handwriting in Nat's diary, from
which this account is mainly compiled, shows where his com-
panion began to record the trying events which succeeded that
unhappy day. Will's notes are harder to read, and require
much more "editing" than those of his predecessor, who wrote
in a neat, firm hand, and abbreviated but little. W. B. A.




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