• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Playtime pictures and stories
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Playtime pictures and stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086080/00001
 Material Information
Title: Playtime pictures and stories
Physical Description: vi, 2, 94 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Uncle Harry
Copping, Harold, 1863-1932 ( Illustrator )
Lydon, A. F ( Alexander Francis ) ( Illustrator )
Scannell, Edith ( Illustrator )
Butterworth and Heath ( Illustrator )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Hazell, Watson & Viney ( Printer )
Publisher: S.W. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Hazell, Watson & Viney
Publication Date: [1897?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Games -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
Children's stories
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Aylesbury
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Uncle Harry.
General Note: Pictorial front cover.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on endpapers.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Some illustrations by A.F. Lydon, E. Scannell, Butterworth & Heath, and Harold Copping.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086080
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239090
notis - ALH9615
oclc - 243613237

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Playtime pictures and stories
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
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        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
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        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Advertising
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
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\hhli'iSTRA^OTED \IRFR\ MO61
FOR 1890.
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With Cplendid Pictlean and ae- Printed in Large Type, and
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LONDON: S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO., 9, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.






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PLAYTIME PICTURES AND STORIES.












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BUILDING CAMPS AND CASTLES."





















S. BY \

UNCLE HARRY,
Au-thor of "JHoliday Hours in Animal-Land."


LONDON: .
S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO.,
9, PATERNOSTER ROW.


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Printed by RAZELL, WAT803, & VnYr, Ld., London and Aylesbury.


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CONTENTS;


PLAYTIME
OUR FIRST CRICKET MATCH.
BATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK
THE DONKEY RACE
THE YOUNG BUILDERS
A MUSICAL EVENING
BLIND MAN'S BUFF
WILLIAM GLADSTONE AT MARBLES
FRANK AND HIS WHISTLE .
THE BATTLE. .
JACK'S BOAT. .
OUR FOUR-IN-HAND
BUILDING HOUSES.
HALF HOLIDAYS .
ARTHUR'S NEW KITE
SHADOWS ON THE WALL
THE FIVE FISHERS
THE: RACE .
THE BOAT BUILDER
A FUNNY REGIMENT







vi Contents.


THE SWING
THE YOUNG POLICEMEN
GOING A-WHALING
THE TENNIS PLAYERS.
THE PAPER CHASE
FRANK'S NEW HORSE
THE BIG SNOWBALL
THE SLIDE .
DRIVING HOME
OUR PICNIC .
THE TOP SPINNERS
A DAY IN THE HAYFIELD
A SICK DOLL
THE BAND OF THE RED,
THE MAY QUEEN.
" SEE-SAW ".
NOAH'S ARK. .
TOM'S HOLIDAY
THE HOME CONCERT
DOLLY'S NEW HEAD
THE YOUNG ARTIST
PLAYING AT SCHOOL
LONELY MILLIE
THE PLAYMATES
THE BOYS OF DITTON
THE HOBBY HORSE


''


WHITE AND BLUE


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PAGE
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
6o
62
64
66
68
70
,72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96























PLAYTIME.


SLAYTIME. What pleasant thoughts the word calls to
our mind! Playtime by the sea-digging on the sands,
rowing round the harbour, or watching the passing ships
through that big telescope which old Jack the coastguardsman
carries under his arm. Playtime in the country-gathering
wild flowers and fruit, listening to the birds singing so merrily,
or, after climbing those great hills, resting in the shade of the
trees, while some of our elder brothers and sisters are searching
for curious insects to add to their collections. Playtime after
school-when lessons being over for the day we run away to
the field, glad of the-fresh air and bright sunshine. Or play-
time at home-like little Will Robinson in our picture, who
is pretending to be Robinson Crusoe on the desert island,
waiting for man Friday to appear.







OUR FIRST CRICKET MATCH.

V MYv DEAR UNCLE,-
Knowing how, glad you are to hear
what Tom and I are doing at School, I send
you a short account of our first cricket match
this season. Most of.the boys in our school
--- are very young so we do not like to play
against other schools near, where the boys
are older. A challenge reached us from the
Manor House School, and Tom, our Captain, accepted it, and
we prepared for the match. Tom made us practise every
evening, and when the day came we all felt ready. We had
to go in first, and two wickets fell without a run. Then Tom
took the bat;. at first he played very carefully, only getting
,one run at a time, then he made a big hit right over the fence.
You should have heard how we cheered him. He kept in till
the last, and made thirty-five runs. We were all out for
seventy-five. I only made two, but Tom says I shall do better
soon. The Manor House boys made ninety, and so beat us by
fifteen runs. We are pleased with our captain, and he says
we worked well.
The photograph, from which the picture is made, was
taken by our teacher. That is Tom at the wicket, looking just
as he did on the day of the match; and the boy behind is
Bertie Graham, our wicket-keeper. He never flinches, however
hard the ball comes in, and very few balls go by him. I have
sent a picture on to mamma, and she has written to say she
is much pleased with it.
With love to Auntie, I remain, Dear Uncle,
Your affectionate nephew, JOHN.





















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Playtime Pictures.


TOM AT THE WICKET.


49






BATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK.

ALLY BROWN had been away at school
for several months, and now she is at home
for the summer holidays. She is a bright,
happy girl, always ready to help her school-
fellows, either.in their lessons or at play.' No matter
Show dull the weather is, Sally is always cheerful, for
she can find many ways to fill up the time, both indoors and
out. Her mamma calls her Sally Sunbeam. She is often
heard to say how much she misses her little daughter's bright
smile and cheerful ways when Sally is away at school.
Knowing that it would please her daughter, Mrs. Brown
invited little Mary Bates, one of Sally's cousins, to spend a
few weeks in the pretty country house in which they dwell.
, Mary had been very ill, and her parents were glad to send her
away from the crowded town where they live to kind Mrs,
Brown's country honfe. '
Yesterday Sally took Mary round the garden, and told
her the names of all the flowers, and helped her to pick a pretty
nosegay for her aunt. Then they wandered to the farm to get
some fresh milk. Mary was afraid to pass the big dog, but
Sally and he were old friends, so she made him put his paw
into Mary's hand in token of friendship.
This morning Sally showed her cousin how to play at
battledore and shuttlecock. Mary looked on.with wondering
eyes, while her cousin kept the shuttlecock from falling to the
ground. Sally beat it up into the air fifty times, and then the
wind caught the feathers and blew it out of reach. To-morrow
a new battledore is to be.bought for Mary, and the two chil-
dren will play at beating the shuttlecock from one to the other_


-;tt J'-A-

















































































TWENTY-ONE, TWENTY-TWO !


-r-. -r I- ---- r


li`'







THE DONKEY RACE.

:(, N a fine summer day last year, the
S children of our Band of Hope were
taken for a trip to Epsom Downs. When
they arrived on the downs the sun was
shining brightly, the birds were singing,
and the merry voices of other children, who
were already there, made the little ones think it was just the
place in which to spend a happy day. After dinner, Harry
Wilson and his three friends agreed to have a donkey race.
They were all kind-hearted boys, so they'told the donkey-
drivers that they would not allow them to run after the
donkeys and beat them with sticks; they 'would rather not go
at all than that this should be done. At first the donkey-
drivers would not let the donkeys go out alone with the boys,
but Harry and his friends were firm in their determination,
and so the drivers had to give way.
First the donkeys were got into line, ;and then the signal
was given to start; but the donkeys ".would not go. They
threw up their heels, and off fell several, of the boys. At last
the donkeys started, Harry's taking the'lead ; but his hat blew
away, and he had to wait until his brother. picked it up. Poor
Charley was not used to donkey riding, and he felt afraid
when his donkey. galloped, so he put his arms round its neck
and clung there just like Johnny. Gilpin did when he took his
famous ride to Edmonton. One of the boys had to get down
and lead his donkey, as it would not go with him upon its
back. Still, it was great fun, and, the boys said they liked it
much better as it was, than they would have' done had the
donkey-drivers run behind to beat the poor dub'ibi animals.
















































































ON THE DOWNS.


I




:-~s~a~en~-s~







THE YOUNG BUILDERS.


"BOYS and girls, c
haste away!
The tide is low on the s;
to-day.
Come for a sail, or come
wade ;
But we'll be busy. with pail
spade.


ome,

hands

and

and


SI I -At once to work let us all begin
Before the tide shall come flowing in.
We have not a single minute to waste,
We'll build our best though we build in haste;
And'wide and high our walls shall be
Tostand the siege of the rushing sea."
Busily toiled these children, and well,
Building more castles than I can tell;
Piers and bridges, and harbours, too.
But the tide came up, and the fresh wind blew:
One minute the buildings stood firm and fair,
And the next, they vanished; please tell me
Where ?



























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A MUSICAL EVENING.

"N OXW'S the time for a game at drum-
-N and-fife band," said Willy Austin, to
his brothers. "Mother and father have gone
for a walk, and they will not mind us making
as much noise as we like, if we do no harm.
I will be bandmaster, Tom shall play the
fife, and George the drum."
Neither of these musical instruments
were in the house, so the boys looked about to find things
that would suit their purpose. Tom found an old water-can
with a hole in the bottom, which the bandmaster said would
act as a finger key. George brought a saucepan, but Willy
knew his mother would not like that played with, so two old
iron lids were found, which when banged together, made a
grand noise. Willy had the meatstand, but he called it a.
triangle; and a small poker with which to beat time. Now
what shall we play? said the bandmaster. George proposed
Rule Britannia !" as his drum would be wanted in the loud
parts.. Tommy thought "Home, Sweet Home" was better,
but Willy preferred God Save the Queen."
The bandmaster gave four flourishes with the poker, and
the concert oommenced. The fife was a little out of tune, as
Tom could not make the key act. The drum did not sound
quite so well as that used in the band which passed the house
last week, but it pleased George. The triangle was very nice,
for Willy loved music, and was learning at school to sing by
notes. After they had played all the tunes they knew, their
parents returned, and came into the room just as the boys
were finishing Welcome, ever Welcome, Friends."

























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YOUNG MUSICIANS.F







BLIND MAN'S BUFF.

S,- 7WHEN Hetty Bowen was ten years old,
her parents gave a birthday party to a
-_ number of her little friends. For nearly a
*I week Hetty and her mother were busy sending
out invitations, decorating the rooms, and in
seeing that all things were being got ready.
When the day arrived, the children had a quiet tea, that is,
as quiet as twelve merry little children could be. After that
they all went into the large parlour for the evening's amuse-
ment. There were plenty of good things on the tables, and,
as it was Christmas time, the room was bright with holly
and mistletoe. First they had singing, then musical chairs,
and next a little girl proposed Blind Man's Buff. The tables
were put on one side of the room, and a handkerchief was
tied over Hetty's eyes. Then one of the children put these
questions: "How many horses has your father got?" "Three."
"What colour are they?" "Black, white, and grey." After this
all the children ran to hide themselves, and Hetty was told to
" turn round three times and catch whom you may." Hetty
caught several of the boys, but they were so much alike in
height that she could not guess their names correctly. Then
Hetty's playmate, Jennie Summers, was caught. "I know
you," said Hetty. "Who is it?" My Jennie!" Then
Jennie had to be blind man, and so the fun went on. till the
Christmas tree was brought in, and the toys were distributed.
Many toys were left after the party was over. These were
taken by Hetty on the following day to the Children's Hospital,
for Mrs. Bowen taught her daughter to think of those who had
not the same pleasures and comforts as she had.



























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"I'VE GOT YOU Il







WILLIAM GLADSTONE AT MARBLES.

AVE a game at marbles, will you, George?" said
Ralph Coleman to his.companion. Yes, I will,
Ralph, if you will set me up with two. I have lost
all mine." This was done, and the two boys were
soon deeply interested in their game. Sometimes
George won and sometimes Ralph, but at the end
S of the game George had just managed to get suffi-
cient from Ralph to pay back those he. had borrowed.
As they were walking home they met their teacher
and told him what a fine game at marbles they had
had. I remember,' said their teacher, reading
a very interesting story of Mr. Gladstone, when
a boy, playing at marbles with the lads in a Scotch village
where he was staying. One day the village boys were playing
at taw, the name given to marbles in Scotland, when a well-
dressed lad came out of a farmhouse near at hand, and asked
whether he might join them in a game. The boys were quite
willing, so they gave. him a few marbles to start with, just as
you, Ralph, did to George to-day. The boys, who were good
players, thought they would easily beat Willie Gladstone, and
win their marbles back, but they found that he could play
uncommonly well.' Next day he came again and began to
play, and would soon have won all their marbles, when one of
the boys got, cross, and used a, bad word. At this William
Gladstone said, '-If there is any more of this you will prevent
my having the pleasure of playing with you.. I detest bad
words, and'I will not play with boys who use them.' "
This was a good lesson for the boys, and it should be one
for you. Never play with those who use bad words.












H1. 7I '


A GAME AT MARBLES.







FRANK AND HIS WHISTLE.

RANK CLIFFORD is the happy possessor of a
new brass whistle. For a long time his only
musical instrument was an old tin one, much
knocked about by constant use. But many a
sweet tune had he played on it, to the delight of
his mother and sister, for Frank can play well.
One day, when passing a music shop, he saw a fine
brass whistle in the window, and having enquired
the 'price, he determined to save all his pocket-money until
he could afford to buy it. And at last he obtained it. The
first day after he purchased the new whistle he took it with
him to school, and when the lessons were over he, with
several other boys, went into the playground, and to their
delight produced his treasure. Frank played some stirring
tunes, and the boys thought they were soldiers going to battle,
with Frank as their leader. Then he changed the music to
some of the fine. old hymns they sang each Sunday in church,
and the boys' warlike thoughts passed away and they became
true-hearted, peaceful English boys once more. But Frank's.
greatest joy was in playing to the loved ones at home. His
mother was always glad to see him return from school, for he
was helpful to her in so many ways. After he had done all
his mother wished, he asked his sister Nelly to have her tea
in the wood-shed while he played his new whistle. Nelly was.
pleased to do so, for she had spent many a happy hour before
in listening to him. Indeed, she thought his. performances
"just lovely." Sometimes Nelly sings while Frank acconm-
panies her on the whistle, and their father and mother sit by
listening to them.


































*'
Es ~ -


"SHE THOUGHT HIS PERFORMANCES 'JUST LOVELY."'


2


,F',k.


r\







THE BATTLE.


THE boys at Highfield are a
-'_- merry lot, full of fun and
frolic. Charley Blake, who is
Looked upon as their captain, is
always ready to lead them in
i-their games. It had been snow-
Sing very heavily for some days,
-when Charley suggested that
i they should go and meet the
1N' J boys as they left the Grammar
School, on the top of the hill,
and have a battle of snowballs. It was a half-holiday in
Charley's School, so they had plenty of time to reach the gates
of the Grammar School, and make up a good supply of
snowballs, before the boys came out. Now, boys," said
Charley, play fair, do not put any stones in with the snow.
We will give them one volley only, and then allow them time
to make a good supply like we have." Charley posted him-
self near the gate, in order to give the signal to fire; but
when he saw George Hawkins, who had been Very ill during
the summer, leaning on Ernest Kent's arm, he stepped forward
so that all the boys might see him. Ernest was quite as ready
for fun as Charley and his friends were, so as soon as George
was safely on his way home, the battle commenced. All the
younger boys were ordered to stand behind and make up
snowballs, while the elder ones pelted each other until they
were tired. Dr. Mason, the master of the school, stood by, and
seemed to enjoy the fun almost as much as the boys. When the
boys left for home, Charley called for three cheers for Dr. Mason.



































APT
AWAITING FOR 'ILIE FOE.


AIA
33
- .-


----


4


c4 -~48
1~






JACK'S BOAT.

OH, brother Jack, how hard
you work
S. To make our little vessel
ready !"
Of course," said Jack, I wish
to see
That she can float quite
Straight and steady.

She is the best we yet
--have made,
7 *-._: .= < For she can sail and
cargo carry,
And if by adverse winds delayed,,
We'll know quite well what makes her tarry."

Said Eva, Tom sits over there,
He waits t&osee the launch, and cheer her.
I'll put a tiny doll on board,
And fancy it's the 'cox,' to steer her.

And Jack, I think we'll take her name
From what we read about in history."
Said Jack, Oh, it shall be the same
As Nelson's famous ship-the 'Victory.'"










































































THE FIRST VOYAGE.







SOUR FOUR-IN-HAND.

HO'S for a good game at Horses?" shouted
Philip Stevens, as he ran round the playground
after school was over. All the boys were ready,
so two teams.were made up, Philip being the
driver of one, and Samuel Morris of the other.
"Iwill drive down Farmer Ashton's lane, through
the meadow, over Mount Pleasant, and round the
road to the school," said Philip, "and you go the reverse
way and see who gets home first." Phil spon fastened on
the reins and started his horses, but they were all young
Sand frisky and did not pull well together. In fact, several
times the new-mown grass in the meadows attracted their
attention, and the driver had hard work to keep them from
staying to eat-no, I mean play with it. Whenever the driver
said, as drivers do, Steady David, steady boy," David, one
of the leaders, kicked up his heels and did not pull at all, while
Charley, the other leader, looked round at the driver and
seemed to laugh, as much as to say, You are not much of a
driver." Half way over the meadows the other team appeared
in sight, and the horses neighed and jumped about all over the
path. Still Philip knew he had four good horses, which if
properly managed, could run as fast as any other four in the
school, so he did not use a whip, but with kind words got
them well in -hand, and racing down the road in fine style,
reached the school door nearly two minutes before Samuel's ,
team came out of Farmer Ashton's. lane.
S The drivers agreed to have another run on the next fine
day, when Samuel ho doubt will do his best to get his team
home first.
















































































" GEE-UP."


--_
`"
0- c

`-"


~"/"

r --I~r~






30 ..... ..
BUILDING HOUSES.

ERTIE WALLIS has been very
7/ ill. For a long time his mother.
\ :,.., watched by his bedside almost
T \ night and day, but at last a change
-*l came and he began to get better.
_. 'o. *His sister Elsie was not allowed in
li-- ~ the sick room, and this pained her
Very much. She dearly loved Bertie,
but many times, before his illness, she had been cross with him
because he interrupted her in her lessons. Her mother often
chided her for being vexed with her little brother, but the
ieproof was soon forgotten. Now.God was speaking to her.
She remembered how on the last day before his illness,
Bertie was in the nursery, and she scolded him because he,
wanted her to join him at play. "Oh, you must play by.
yourself; I have no time," she had said, arCr -poor Bertie
had run to his mother and cried. But during those sad
days of his illness she prayed that God.would spare Bertie,
and that she might learn to control her temper, and be kind
and affectionate to him. To-day he has come downstairs
for the first time. There he sits on the floor, trying to build a
Roman Temple with a new box of bricks his father has bought
him. Elsie sits near, ready to help by picking up the blocks
when they fall'.out of her brother's .reach. She built several
very curious houses in order to please him. Mrs. Wallis sat
by the window-watching the two children, and her heart was
made glad when she saw Bertie put his arms round Elsie's
neck and say, You are a dear sister," and heard the reply,
" I will try never to get cross with you again."











































































BUILDING HOUSES.





32
HALF HOLIDAYS.

LL work and no play makes Jack a
dull boy." So says Mr. Longman,
Sthe schoolmaster, and all his scholars agree
with him. Nothing pleases him more
than to see the children enjoy their play, for
.. _&- afterwards he expects that they will give
attention to their lessons. 'Sometimes
Mr. Longman goes out with his scholars, and enters into all
their games just as if he was a boy once more.
Some of the girls have skipping ropes, or shuttlecock and
battledore, and others play at lawn tennis. The boys amuse
themselves at rounder or. trap and ball. Last week they
had a game at cricket. Mr. Longman was captain on one
side, and Mr. Smallman, the second master, on the other.
The game went on nicely till Tommy Traddles' dog Pincher
came to the field to search for his young masterr' The ball was
rolling along when Pincher arrived on the ground. He looked
at it very seriously and
then he jumped after it
ani caught it in his
mouth. "Good dog,"'
said BillyButtons, "give
it to me." But Pincher
wagged his tail and
looked roguishly at
Billy Buttons as much
as to say, "It is my
innings now," and away
he started across the






field, with Billy, Tommy, and the two
captains in hot pursuit. Pincher ran
round the. field at full speed, and not
one of them could catch him. It was
no use calling out Stop thief!" for
4D no policeman would try to stop
SPincher, so Tommy had to follow
the dog home. The two boys who
were batting took advantage of
Pincher's. wicked trick to make eight
Runs before they were stopped.
There is no chance for Pincher to play
at cricket now. Every half-holiday
When the school children are playing
in the fields he is fastened in his kennel. He looks very
dejected on those days, and does not seem at all like the dog
which ran across the cricket field with the ball in his mouth.
But perhaps Pincher hardly deserves his punishment, as he
did not understand the rules of the game.





IN- -l-l I1, -

) a e ^ ^, I'* "* ...
Ar :) II r-t' *

^.~ ........, '







ARTHUR'S NEW KITE.

S"-T7ILLY," said Arthur Janes,
S"will you come home with
Sme.and draw some figures on my
new kite? You know I cannot
draw as well as you, and I want
it to look very nice."
Arthur had been making a
I kite. He bought some flat cane
and used a long piece for the
4 centre, then fixed a bow and a
cross piece at the top, and covered
the whole, with strong, white
paper. Next he made paper
i a -- tassels for the ends of the bow,
and a long tail. String was
fixed near the middle so that the
kite might balance properly. But it looked white and bare, so
Arthur asked his companion to help him to ornament it.
Willy soon drew some pictures on the kite, including a most
wonderful-looking bird, and Arthur painted them. Soon after,
two other boys came in and helped to finish the kite. "There,"
said Arthur, "is it not a beauty ? "
Mr. Janes was called out of the house to give his opinion.
He thought it was very well made. "But," said he, I have
seen many finer kites in China. There they are sometimes.,
made the shape of a bird or bat, or even of animals. It is.
quite usual to see a number of men out in the fields gravely
holding a piece of string in their hands, and if you look up
you will see many strange-shaped kites flying about."


































































" THERE ISN T IT A BEAUTY f







SHADOWS ON THE WALL.

"T WISH Edward and Gracie
were home from school. We
do not know what to play at, nurse."
This was said by Willy Lee,
one wet November afternoon. He
and his brothers and sisters were
kept indoors because of the rain.
They had played at school until
they were tired, then Willy got his
bricks and tried to build a church,
like the picture on the lid of the
box. He only built a few rows when little Essie knocked them
down. He tried again, and Essie again upset them, so he
gave up the attempt. Then they stood at the window and
watched for the return of their elder brother and sister, Edward
and Grace. When they saw them open the garden gate, the
children ran to open the front door before they could knock.
Tea was soon ready, and, after it was cleared away, the
children told Grace what they had been doing during the day.
She praised Willy for amusing his sisters, and promised
that Edward should show them some funny tricks after the
lamp was lit. Grace lit the lamp. Then Edward clasped
his hands and held them near the wall, and there they saw a
shadow just like a rabbit. It moved its paws and ears, and
when Edward squeaked, Essie thought there was a rabbit in
the room. Then he made a cat which mewed, and a goose
which seemed to say Quack, quack," when it opened its mouth.
Then the little ones were sent to bed: and Gracie and Edward
were left to do their lessons.



















I: /jii


....



............
: IL :


THE RABBIT ON THE WALL.







THE FIVE FISHERS.

--THE five boys in our picture are
-- new friends. They are staying
-with their parents at a pretty fishing
village in the south of England, and
they have formed a friendship with
each other. Many a jolly day they
have spent together. Sometimes
they have been out with their parents on the water, or they have
rambled along the shore picking up shells and fossils, or
running and shouting as only boys can do. To-day they are
on more serious business. Frank Hamer's mother has been
speaking of a poor old woman, Mrs. Walton, who is very ill,
and in need of food. Frank is a generous boy; and when his
mother was speaking, he put his hands into his pockets, but
found them empty, all his pocket-money having been spent.
"Mother," said he, I have no money left, but I should like
to help; may I try to catch some fish and give them to Mrs.
Walton ?" "Yes, Frank," replied Mrs. Hamer, I do not like
'boys to fish simply for fun, but this is a good purpose, and I
am willing for you to try." Frank had no trouble in getting
friends to join him. Soon they were seated on the pier,
waiting for a bite. Look out, Frank," shouted George
Hunter, "there's a big one, be steady Here, wait, I'll put
my hat under it." It was safely landed, and proved to be a very
fine mackerel. Next they caught a whiting, and by tea-time
they had twenty fish of various sizes. Mrs. Walton was very
grateful to the boys for their kindness, and they felt that the
day had been pleasantly spent, and that their efforts to do good
had been successful.

















































































THE FIRST BITE.


$.
i







i
~


9

i~




J1





THE RACE.

H{O! boys and girls. Ho!
haste away,
The race is coming off to-day.
Franky and Freddy, Jim and
Joe,
Are standing ready in a, row.
They are the horses strong
and fleet;
' And they will gallop down
the street,.
Along the shore, across the
sands
To where the tall, black
beacon stands.
Who is this, sitting by the way?
'Tis Willie and his sister, May.
Poor thing, she is not well, and he
Has carried her a mile to see
The race, because he thinks that it
May cheer his sister up a bit.
The race is started! Off they go!
Hurrah for Jim Hurrah for Joe !
Franky and Freddy keep the pace:
The steadiest runner wins the race.










clce


A*'


- /










'' THE RACE IS STARTED "


*- -


Playtime Picture..


_i;
,i
--








9"


~^.







THE BOAT BUILDER.


SIT was a good day for Arthur
Stanley when his father gave
him a box of tools. Arthur was fond
of making toys for his younger
brother, Ronald, even when the only
tool he had was his pocket knife, one
blade of which was broken. Ronald
had long wished to have a boat, just
like one he often saw sailing on the
pond in front of their home, and Arthur promised to make
one. He did not succeed at first, but after several failures he
managed to cut a well-shaped boat out of an old log of wood.
He then made the masts, and Mary, his sister, sewed the sails
and made a pretty blue-and-white flag to fly at the peak.
Arthur first tested the boat's floating power in a large tub of
water, and he found it very steady.
On the great day of the launch, George Quick came with
his dog Rose to help at the ceremony. Ronald launched the
boat into the pond, saying, Your name shall be the Silver
Cloud.' It sailed along quite steadily, but just in the middle
of the pond there -grew a lot of weeds ;- and- the wind carried
the boat into their midst, and there it remained fast. The
boys feared that the Silver Cloud would be lost on its first
voyage. But George's dog was watching the boat, and. when
the dog saw that the boys- could not get the boat, it jumped
into the water and brought it safely ashore.
Arthur is now the head of a shipbuilder's yard. His early
training in the use of tools became of great value to him
when he made his first start in business life.














































THE LAUNCH OF THE SILVER CLOUD.'


I!f


-J


i
~~


INA






A FUNNY REGIMENT.

IT is. not very easy to play at soldiers
when you are as short of men as Tom
Tomkiris was. But Tom was not easily
discouraged. He lived in a lonely part
of the country, far away from other houses,
Siso he and his brother James had to make
-all the.fun for themselves. Tom had been
to the nearest town and had seen a number of soldiers, drawn
up in line, being drilled by an officer. When he returned home
he determined to form a regiment, and be its captain. Now,
James, you must be the bugler and flag-bearer, and we will
march round the house and get our soldiers together." So
away they went, James blowing a penny trumpet, and waving
an old red handkerchief tied to a long stick. But no recruits
came, so Fido the dog was enlisted, and made to follow the
flag. This was easily done, as Fido was usually to be found
allowing one of the two boys. Puss was tried, but she ob-
jected. Then James got his old wooden horse, and it followed
-in the rear by means of a piece of string attached to its head.
Then all marched into the drill ground, and Tom put his
soldiers through their drill. "Now I attention I" Fido took
no notice of this order, except to wag his tail. Stand straight! "
was the next command, and Fido rose upon his hind legs and
looked at his young master. Eyes right I Now, Master
Bugler, your eyes are wrong. March! and away they went
round the house, with trumpet blowing, flag waving, Fido
Sparking, and Tom singing a merry tune. They marched so
Swell that Captain 'Tom promised to take them out again
another day.






















































iEYE






"EYES RIGHT "







THE SWING.

N ELLY CURTIS had a pleasant surprise
to-day. It is her rule every bright
.morning to wander in the wood at the back
of the house, and gather a few wild flowers
or leaves to put on the table. As she entered
the wood this morning, she saw a large swing
hanging from the old oak tree. It was not
there yesterday, she was certain. Perhaps
papa has -had it put up for me," she said to
herself. She ran back to the house, forgetting
her usual floral tribute, and met her father in
the garden. "Oh, papa," said she, "there
is such a beautiful swing in the wood. Did
you have it put up for me?" "Yes, my
dear, I did, and I hope you will have pleasant swings on it,
only do not try to, swing too high. Your Cousin Ernest is
coming to-day, and' he will take care of you. No doubt you
will enjoy his company."
When Ernest came the two children went out to try the
swing.- Nelly got on first, and her cousin pushed her gently.
"I do like this, Ernest," said Nelly; "don't you think my
papa is very kind to have the swing put up for me.? And I am
so glad you came to-day, for you know I could not swing
myself well." Ernest then had a swing, but as he was a strong
boy he did not want anyone to push him. Many times after
this Nelly had a swing in the early morning; but she never
,stayed too long, as she knew her mamma would miss the nice
fresh flowers it was her custom to take indoors to decorate the
table with.






















2W' -.' 1


Ntus FIRST SwINlq


~c~c~- ~~~~
~"
.. ::::;`







THE YOUNG POLICEMEN.

S" "OW! you are police con-
Sstable number one, and I
am sergeant number two," said
Teddy to Duncan. The boys had
dressed themselves so as to look as
much like policemen as possible.
They had put on their overcoats,
and buttoned them up to the throat.
The leather straps which they used
to carry their books to school made fine belts, and they begged
from the gardener some old leather gloves to stick under the
belts. "We will use our hoop sticks as truncheons, aid
perhaps mamma will let us have two old hats of papa's, and
then we shall be complete," said Ted. Oh, no, sergeant,"
said number one, when on duty we must wear a badge round
our sleeve." "Ah, I forgot that, .our handkerchiefs must do.
I will tie your badge on, and you must commence duty at once.
If you need any help, blow your whistle, and I will come toyou."
SNumber one marched away, looking very important.
First he went into the garden and found everything quiet.
Then he peeped into the coal hole, but no suspicious persons
were there. As he passed the kitchen door he noticed a very
nice smell, so he entered and asked the cook whether she
needed any help. Cook was much amused, and rewarded him
with. a tart. My sergeant said I was to whistle if I needed
help. I must do so 'at once." The sergeant quickly came,
and gave efficient aid in disposing of the troublesome tarts.
Both constable and sergeant told the cook they wohld be
on duty the next day, and would see that she was protected.















































































THE "SPECIALS."







GOING A-WHALING.

AWAY we went a-whaling,
iF T A-sailing on the sea;
Tom, Johnny, and Jemima,
And they of course made three.
Then Sam and Sue, and they made two,
And three and two are five;
And Johnny took the kitchen tongs
To catch the whale alive.
And Harry was the north-east wind,
And he blew strong and fast
Against our sail- a handkerchief;
A broomstick was -our mast.
Said Tom, "We'll catch him by the nose,"
Said Johnny, By the tail,"
And Sam said, By the middle fin,
That's how to catch a whale."
" I'll put him in a pail," said Sue,
And take him home to mother;"
Jemima said, I've brought a jug,
In case we catch another."
And so we went a-whaling,
But no whale could we see-
We turned the good ship round about,
And home again sailed we.


































































GOING A-WALING.







THE TENNIS PLAYERS.

ERE, Joe," said Willy Brown, "are you ready'
for some fun?" "Yes, Willy, what is it?"
"Why, the ladies and gentlemen who were
playing at lawn tennis just now have gone into
/the house and left their bats and balls on the grass.
Suppose we have a game, eh ?" "All right," re-
plied Willy, I don't mind."
Willy was the elder, and he should have
known it was not right to touch things that did
not belong to him; but they were poor boys who
had not received the home training that my
young readers have had.
The boys had been lying on the grass, looking at the
ladies and gentlemen playing, and had heard the various names
called as the ball was struck, or the games were won. Joe
started their game with a vigorous blow at the ball, which
Willy just managed to stop, and with equal vigour he returned
it to his companion. They were so busy that they did not
notice the return of the proper players, until a lady laid her
hand on Joe's shoulder and said, What are you doing, my
boy ?" Joe looked up very bashfully, and recognized the lady
as one who taught in the ragged school which he sometimes
attended. I'm very sorry, ma'am, if I've done wrong; I did
not think of it," said Joe, very quietly. It is wrong," said
the lady," to touch things like these without permission, but
we do not blame you this time. I see you enjoyed the fun.
Will you and your companion stay and look after lost balls? "
The boys gladly.consented to do this, and were pleased when
they had plenty of work to do in seeking for stray balls.





















































"JOE STARTED THEIR GAME WITH A VIGOROUS BLOW."






THE PAPER-CHASE.

1. E have had such a glorious run
V this afternoon," said Harold
Denham to his sister Jane, as he entered
the house, his cheeks flushed and his
eyes sparkling. "Stephen and I were
the hares. Stephen knows his way all
over the place, and he is one of our
best runners. We had a good supply
of paper in the bags you made for me,
and we started five minutes before the hounds. We went
down Crocket's Lane, through the wood to Broadmoor, over
the old bridge, and then up the hill for home. Just as we
reached the other side of the wood we saw two of the hounds
coming straight down the path. We both ran back again into
the wood, of course leaving plenty of paper so that the hounds
could follow the scent; ,then back again out of the wood to the
old bridge before the hounds had found out the trick. -There
:was a strong wind blowing, which sent our papers in all direc-
tions, and we were afterwards told by the hounds that they
often lost our trail. You know, Jane, that many picnic parties
are held there, and I suppose the paper left by them confused
our pursuers. After reaching the top of the hill, Stephen and
I sat down to rest; we, did not wish to get too far ahead of
the hounds. We got to the goal three minutes before the first
hound crossed, the stile opposite the winning-post. All the
boys were very pleased with the run. They would like to have
caught us, but Stephen and I prefer it as it is. The boys
promise that *e shall be the hares again, and they intend to
have a good try to bring us home in triumph."





























































































THE PAPER-CHASE.


"' a


'"" ~L'
: '







FRANK'S NEW HORSE.


AST week a large box was delivered at Sunshine
Villa, addressed to Master Frank Trueman,
Sunshine Villa, Homepeace Road. It was so
large that it had to stand in the garden until Mr.
Trueman came home from business. The children
waited anxiously for their father to arrive, as they
were impatient to know what the box contained.
As soon as possible, Mr. Trueman opened it,
when first there appeared the head, and then the
body of a grand-looking horse. It was not alive,
but when it was put upon the ground, it was seen
That it could gallop almost as well as a live horse,
for it was fixed to a long wooden rocker. Mr.
[ Trueman carried the horse to its stable-the
nursery-and the children followed it. Then he
took from his pocket a'letter which he read aloud:
MY DEAR BROTHER,-I send a rocking-horse addressed
to Nephew Frank. I know that he shares all his toys with his
brother and sister, so that what is given to him will be equally
shared by them. Your Affectionate Brother, FRANK."
Mr. Trueman then placed Frank on the horse's back, and
left the children to enjoy their new treasure. The horse
plunged and kicked much to the delight of the boys, and the
astonishment of Lottie. She thought her dear donkey, which
only nodded its head as it travelled along, was much better
than this great gee-gee." When Frank had enjoyed a good
ride, Walter mounted upon- its back, and raced along in a
most exciting way. Then they asked papa to write and thank
uncle for his beautiful present.















































































THE FIST GALLOP.


Playtime Pictures.


I-







THE BIG SNOWBALL.

SURRAH for the snow!
S- Here's a glorious treat,"
cried little Jack Brown. Come
along Polly and Bertie, we will
make such a big snowball."
SJ The little ones ran down the
( garden path, their ears tingling
/and cheeks glowing, ready to
join in the fun. Little by little
--- .. the ball grew in size until it was
almost as tall as the children,
and quite as heavy. Puffing and blowing they rolled it along
until they could get it no further, when, just at the right
moment, their big brother, Robert, came home and helped them
to roll it near the garden door. Then taking Polly in his arms,
Robert led the way indoors to "thaw Polly's red nose," as he
said; and the boys quickly followed. "Well, Bertie," said
Robert, "how do you like making big snowballs, eh ?" "Oh I
it is fun," replied Bertie; it is hard work, though, but it
makes you feel so warm." "Yes it does," chimed in Jack,
"and hungry, too."
After tea they went out again to look -at Robert making
a snow man. It was a very funny figure, with pieces of coal
where its eyes and nose should have been. On its head Robert
put an old hat of Bertie's, .which had a large hole in the top,
through which the snow peeped. Robert said this would keep
its head cool.' When going to bed, Polly whispered to her
mother, I think, dear mamma, that God sent the snow to-
day to make us happy."














... ... -**.


'"-'. ~


s x~~,'`~
: ... ~-~~~
"~1F ~` -L.~i'- .e
'~C
~-L;4.
~
t..'~ ~ ~~F'


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I1


-----~- S.


"PUFFING AND BLOWING THEY ROLLED IT ALONG."


;-1







THE SLIDE.

"Hip, hip, hooray!
The ice will stand
Our weight to-day,
My merry band."
T HESE words were sung to a tune of his own,
by "laughing John Layton," as he was
called by his schoolmates, as he and three other
-boys ran down the,lane to the old mill pond, one cold winter
day. The boys had been warned by their schoolmaster not to
venture on the ice until it was strong enough to bear them
with safety, but to-day permission had been given, and the
boys quickly took advantage of it. They soon reached the
pond, John being the first to start sliding. Hip, hip,
hooray! he shouted, as one after the other they went down
one long slide and up another, made by its side, so as to lose
no tinie. George Fielder was second, Charley Ray third, and
Willy Cotton brought up the rear. Charley was a big boy,
not used to sliding, and he felt rather timid. Once he just
touched George's heels and over went the two boys in the snow,
and Willy Cotton fell on top of them. No harm was done
except that each boy got a lot of snow in his ears and down
his collar. Laughing John helped them up, brushed them
well, and away they went down the slide, one behind the
other, as happy as before.
The little girl and the young sailor boy who are looking on
are learning to skate. The sailor you see belongs to the good
ship Exotic, which means "of foreign origin." His skates
are quite foreign to him, but he intends to conquer that diffi--
culty, and will soon venture to race his sister across the ice.








































































:


:,
i
1'';'`;
1.


"' HIP, HIP, HOORAY HE SHOUTED."






DRIVING HOME.


"A\\AAY o'er the meadows! away and
away !
When all things are beautiful,
I blithe, and gay;
Oh isn't it nice !" to his sister
said Will,
As they sat, side by side, on the
slope of the hill.
She had wandered on by down and
dell,
To gather the flowers she loved so well;
Now, wearied and worn, had come to rest,
Her arm around him she loved the best.
Father and mother both were dead.
She sweetly smiled, and to Will she said,
" Across the meadows we two may roam,
But we have no carriage to drive us home !
So tie your reins to the broom or sloe,
And off at a merry pace we'll go !"




























L ;


~~~ i.i


HOMEWARD BOUND.







OUR PIC-NIC.


ON a lovely day in September,
when. the green leaves of the
S trees were becoming golden, Jane
and her little. sister, Dot, and her
brothers, Robert and Willy, got
Slave from their mother to go for a
ramble through the forest. Off
they went, as soon as breakfast
Swas over. Jane carried the basket
S which held the sandwiches, a few
a apples, and the bottles of milk; and
Dot took with her her father's large umbrella, to make a tent
for herself and her newdoll.: Of course, kind, brave Fido went
with the children as a protector. He was very useful and
trustworthy,. When they got to the forest, he took charge of
th basket of provisions while the children went to search for
blackberries and wood-nuts.
What pretty sights they saw I Up from a pond under the
slA de of the trees, 'rose a dragon-fly with its glittering body
and its four wings, finer than the finest gauze. Bobby was
much interested in a stag-beetle with its crooked horns, which
he saw walking down the path. From the shade of the ferns
a pheasant popped out its beautiful head, decked in blue and
purple, green.and brown. A thrush was seen by Jane, hunting
for snails. Some rabbits were searching for tender grasses
and other nice things to eat; and a pair of hedgehogs were
giving their babies an airing in the sunshine. When the
children were tired, they returned to Fido, and then all sat
down together in a sunny corner of the wood, and held their
pic-nic.







































































THE PICNIC IN THE WOODS.







THE TOP-SPINNERS.


SHAT more delightful game can
boys play at after school hours
Than "peg top?" George and Arthur,
James and Henry, had taken their tops
j with them to school, and sometimes
their hands, and I fear their thoughts
<- i also, had wandered during lessons to
i the pockets in which the tops were con-
cealed. All of the boys owned good
tops, of which they were very proud;
some of these were made of boxwood, with bright steel pegs,
and coloured circles round them.
After school they met in the playground, and laying down
two well-worn wooden tops, they carefully wound up their own
tops, and tried to knock the old ones into a hole between the
stones. Just listen," said Arthur, as he took the top up in
his hand while it was spinning, and held it to George's ear,
"how finely mine hums Arthur then hit the old tops with
his, and sent one near the hole. George managed with a well-
directed shot to knock it a little nearer, and James with a tap
put it in.
In China men amuse themselves with huge tops made
out of empty barrels. These tops need three men to spin
them, one to hold the barrel upright, and two to pull the
string which sets it in motion. When spinning, the top sounds
like the whistle of a steamer, and it can be heard many yards
away. I fancy I can hear the Chinese top-spinner saying,
" How finely it hums I"























































- 'r- ,.--



L4


, -- .--? ----


" HOW FINELY MINE HUMS."


- -


~-~;i==







A DAY IN THE HAYFIELD.

THERE are I suppose few boys
and girls who do not love to be
i in a hayfield. It is a delightful
place. How pleasant it is to watch
~ the mowers There they go in a long
row, moving up and down the field
as they cut the grass. And some-
Stimes they stop to sharpen their
-__ scythes, when the sound fills the
meadows with pleasant music.
Such were the sights and sounds which greeted the
children at Kirby Cross last hay season. The sun had been
shining in all its glory from early morning. It had peeped
into the children's window, and caused first one eye to open,
and then the other. Their ears then caught the sound of the
men sharpening their scythes, and out of bed they jumped
anxious to help at hay-making.
Farmer Brown did not mind how many children came to
see him at hay time. "There is something for little hands to
do," said he, as well as for big boys and girls. All must be
'busy bees' here to-day; no drones are wanted."
Fred and Susan, Kate and Harry, were each provided with
a wooden rake, with which to turn the grass over, so that all
parts might be exposed to the sun.
They all worked well, and their faces got red and their
arms brown with the heat. When tired they sat down to rest,
but Fred could not sit still long, and tried to bury his sister
Susan in the hay, and Kate did the same to her brother Harry.
And Milly and Baby enjoyed the play as much as anyone.































MILLY AND BABY IN THE HAY-FIELD.


i


.,i


1 ----St


~I






70


A SICK DOLL.

SHREE happy children were Ethel, Dora, -and
Alfred Gray. Alfred was a bright, cheerful boy,
/ fond of pranks, but never of that kind which
caused more pain than pleasure to those about
S' him. And Ethel and Dora loved their only
brother too dearly to complain when he joined
in their games, even if at times he was a little
rough and noisy. Ethel. had a doll, in whose
company all her quiet moments were spent. It
was undressed and put to bed every night, and
Sin the morning it was washed and dressed, and
if possible, taken for a ride in its perambulator.
One day Ethel thought that her doll did not
Look well, so she took it in her arms and, pre-
tended to send it to sleep. Harry was in the
room, and he made a squeaking noise with his
mouth as if the doll was in pain. I think I must send for
Grandma Dora," said Ethel, "she is quite as good as any
doctor.'" Frathk, like a good brother, went at once to Grandma
Dora's house (the parlour above), and found her seated in her
arm-chair, .knitting some stockings. Frank looked very grave
when he told her the news, so grandma put down her work at
once, fixed her spectacles firmly on her nose so that she could
see over them, and went with Frank to see the sick doll.
Grandma Dora looked with much concern at Miss Dolly,
and asked Ethel whether she had left the window of its bed-
room open last evening. "Yes," said Ethel, I did." Ah I
poor thing, it has caught cold, you must give it a warm bath,
then tuck it up in bed, and it will be better in the morning."




















































































DR. GRANDMA.


/. i ? -,







THE BAND OF THE RED, WHITE
AND BLUE.



THERE waves the Flag of England,
The old Red, White and Blue! "
Play up, my gallant drummer,
A loud, rat-tat-a-too,
VI As we go marching onward
In all our brave array,
On to the field of battle,
To conquer, not to slay.
Look at our Sergeant Maggie,
How boldly she steps out!
Were she to meet a foeman
She'd send him "right about."
And as for Private Johnnie,
Our noble Grenadier,
He's every inch a soldier-
Don't talk to him of fear.
We're fighting for the children
Who pine in rags for bread;
We're fighting for the pennies
To get them clothed and fed.
We're fighting for the children
Who have no homes like ours,
Who never see the sunshine,
And never smell the flowers.
Rat-tat-a-too, rat-tat-a-too,"
All who have- pennies, give them, do I










































I- -












-j S. _


"1RAT-TAT-A-TOO, RAT-TAT-A-TOO."


Playltme Pictures.







THE MAY QUEEN.

T ._ T-HE children in our picture are
scholars in a school in sunny France.
SThey have chosen one of their number to
be their queen for the year. The boys
have tied two ropes to a little wooden cart,
S and placed a seat upon it, and the queen,
having been first crowned with a garland
of flowers, is now seated in state on the
cart. The boys and girls are taking their
queen home, shouting and singing her praises.
A like custom to this used to prevail in England in olden
times. Lord Tennyson has written a beautiful poem in which
the chosen May Queen says-
You must wake and call me early,
Call me early, mother dear."
Perhaps Mary Walden, the queen of the little French school, is
thinking of these words. She is an English girl, living with
Sher widowed mother in the village. Mary attends the school,
for she wishes to perfect herself in the French language, so
that she may be able to help her mother by becoming a teacher.
All the scholars have learned to love her, and now they are
rewarding her by promising to obey her commands during the
coming year. And very gentle those commands will be, for
Mary knows it is easier to rule by words than blows.
When they reached Mary's home, Mrs. Walden was at
the door waiting her daughter's return, so Mary dismissed her
young subjects with this first command: "To-morrow is a
holiday. You must all meet me here early, and we will spend
a happy day in the woods together."





















































/I
r;/ .*


1--=-
r
r
c~ -i;
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----;

c,,
i- L'


OUR MAY QUEEN.


- A







"SEE-SAW."

% IT had been a warm day, and the
2 boys in school were hot and tired.
Their eyes often wandered to the
windows, through which they could
see the trees just waving in the breeze;
they were so eager to feel themselves
at liberty.. When the school was
dismissed, out ran the boys, and soon
they were jumping over each other's backs, playing at cricket,
or running after each other as lively as minnows in a stream.
But four of the boys evidently had some special purpose
in view. They left their companions, and crossed the old
wooden bridge without even looking at the fish beneath. Then
they climbed a stile leading to a field covered with long grass,
in which thousands of buttercups and daisies were growing.
Just over the field the trunk of an old tree was lying, and a
long plank was close by. There," said William Ferris, I
told you we could have a fine see-saw; here, come and help
me put the plank across the old tree." Soon he and John
Arnold were seated on the plank, and when. they were balanced
well William went up, shouting-
"Here we go up, up, up,"
while John called out-
Here we go down, down, down."
SBut the board struck the ground with a bump, and John
in his turn went up. Timothy Connell and Eddie Lister soon
had their turn, and while they were see-sawing Farmer Jones
crossed the field ; but seeing that the boys were doing no harm,
he Aet them play on, only warning Tim not to fall off the plank.








































































" SEE-SAW."






NOAH'S ARK.


SLITTLE Charley Harrison has
a very pretty box of toys. It
is intended to represent Noah's Arki
It contains several wooden figures
Which were meant by the maker to
Represent Mr. and Mrs. Noah and
a- b their sons and their wives. But as
all the figures are the same size and
shape, Charley has not yet found out which is Noah or which
is his wife. This, however, does not worry him. He likes'
the figures very much, for they will stand on the table without,
trouble; but when he tries to put the elephants and pigs, lions!
and lambs on their legs, he generally fails. They fall out of
Charley's fat fingers; or if he succeeds in putting up one, the'
other refuses to stand, and knocks its companion down. The
camel and cow, donkey and dormouse often get paired together,
much to the amusement of Charley's sisters, Bessie and Jenny.
It is not often that they can' spare time from their lessons;
to play with their brother. When they do so, order is brought;
out of confusion, and the animals are arranged in pairs for the!
journey properly. They pick up the toys and hand. them to:
Charley, -telling him at the same time what they are called.
Charley has his own names for some of the animals, which
'he much prefers to the more correct ones given by his sisters.:
When a duck is handed him he looks up at his sisters, with a
merry look on his round face, and calls out, "Quack, quack ;"
or "Mee-ow, mee-ow," when threat comes out. On Saturdayi
night Charley puts all his toys away, sighing just a little as he
says, Good-bye, till Monday."











































NOAH'S ARK


lr nxm



WNS\







TOM'S HOLIDAY.

STOM HARRIS occupies the posi-
: t tion of junior clerk in a ware-
Shouse in a large manufacturing town.
His parents live in a pretty village
M named Riversdale, and so Tom has
to reside with his Uncle and Aunt in
a house not far from his place of
business.
Tom does not have many oppor-
tunities of seeing the country now that he is at business, and
the anticipation of a holiday to be spent in his little country
village is a very pleasant one. Last year his employers told
him he might take a fortnight's holiday. When he heard this
he could scarcely contain himself for joy. What a fine chance
of going home to see his parents it afforded him! So he
wrote to them immediately, asking them to meet him on the
following Saturday at Riversdale Station.
The next four or five days were long ones to Tom, but
they passed away at last, and he was soon speeding along to
Riversdale. When he alighted from the train he found quite
a large party of friends waiting to greet him. There were his
mother and sister, his friend George Hurley, and Hector, his
father's dog.
Now, Tom's friend George owned a boat, and as he knew
of Tom's fondness for rowing he asked him to use the boat
whenever he cared to do so. Tom took advantage of this kind
offer, and every day he might have been seen going for a
"spin up the river. And capital exercise he found it. His
mother declared that she never saw a boy with such an appetite.




















































































A "SPIN" UP THE RIVER.


~-~5~--~""


~


~iss~jl





82


THE HOME CONCERT.

LEASANT and happy children live in
S Woodbine Cottage. No black looks
disfigure their smiling faces, no unkind
't J words are heard to pass their lips. One
Sday last month our little daughter Ellen
was asked to pay them a visit We are
S going to have a musical evening all by
Ourselves, Nelly," said one of the little
Girls. "We would like you to come, and
Spring some of your dolls with you. We
like to have plenty of listeners."
The following is a description of the visit as told by Nelly
on the next day:-" When I got there I found Maggie and
Agnes with Reggie in the front room.. There were a number
of dolls seated on the table and on chairs close by. I gave
Maggie the dolls I had with me, and one of them was put
right in the centre, as Agnes said it was the queen. There
were several books of music in the room, containing some of
the pretty pieces we sing at school. These were handed round
by Reggie, after which he stood on a stool to act as conductor.
I think we sang nearly every pretty piece in the book, but Reggie
said there were many more which they like. While we were
singing 'Suffer little children to come unto Me' we heard the
garden gate creak, and when Esther looked through the
window she saw poor Tommy Burton, leaning on the gate
listening to us. Reggie took him out a nice piece of cake,
and Tommy thought he was to go away, but Reggie said he
might stay as long as he liked. It was such a happy evening,
papa ; I do hope they will ask me to go again."
























THE HOME CONCERT.


r/-2


Ii' _l


-11







DOLLY'S NEW HEAD.



SFATHER sat beside the fire,
And, as the news he read,
S He heard his children tell tale
About their Dolly's head :
SDon't you remember Christmas day,
When Aunt brought Dolly down ?
She said it was the finest doll
She saw in London town!"
"Yes; Janie, I remember well
When Dolly first came here,
And we all kissed her, for she was
SA sweet and darling dear.
Alas! one day she lost her head,
While romping, I'm afraid;
But, with our rags and box of paints,
So fine a head we made
That each one wished to have her,
And, one day, after tea,
A quarrel rose, 'tis sad to say,
'Twixt Mary Jane and me.
'Twas wrong, I know, but very soon
We made it up again,
And darling Mary Jane kissed me,
And I kissed Mary Jane."






















































V~i .


~ZPK 7. '

7/ .


PAINTING DOLLY'S FACE.


__
~..8~1~" :~4--


I NO


~" '



d'


7I:- C-=~


y;


~








THE YOUNG ARTIST.


OUBTLESS many of my young readers are
just as fond of drawing and painting as
Arthur Hamilton was. His first attempt to
draw a man was very amusing. The head
looked like a triangle with marks for the eyes
and nose, and he left the, poor man without a
mouth. But it pleased him greatly; he thought
it was first-rate, so he tried again.
Arthur was a diligent boy at school as well as at home.
He gained several prizes, one of which was a box of paints.
This seemed to give him a new start, and he began to
colour his drawings. He copied a picture out of the
CHILDREN'S FRIEND-the head of a cow. When he tried to
colour it he found that he did not know what colours to use in
order to make his picture look natural.. So he went into the
fields and noted the colours just as they appeared on the living
animal. Then he returned home, and using the knowledge
thus gained, coloured his drawing in good style.
His success in this effort made him desirous of learning
how to paint a real picture, and he hopes by diligence and
perseverance to make for himself a good name.
When Benjamin West, .the celebrated painter, was a boy,
he was on one occasion asked by his mother to watch his little
sister, who was asleep in the cradle. While he was watching
her he drew a picture of the sleeping babe, which he showed
to his mother. She saw that it was well done, and gave him.
a kiss and praised him for his drawing.
In after life Benjamin West used to say, That kiss made
me an artist."










































































THE YOUNG ARTIST.







PLAYING AT SCHOOL.

"T ET us play at school, Mary," said Flossie
SIngham to her sister. You must be our
teacher, and we will be your scholars." It did not
take Mary very long to prepare herself for her new
position. First she tied over her bright curls a
white night-cap, put on her nose a large pair of
spectacles, _which, as they happened to be without
glasses, she could see through very well, then took
a pretty picture book in one hand and a long cane
in the other, and called her brother Benny before
her for the first lesson. Now, Benny was very backward at
school, and he often made sad mistakes there, and was in
constant disgrace with the schoolmistress. "How many are
twice four," said Mary. Benny put on a very puzzled look,
but did not answer. When the question was repeated he bent
down his head and said, "Please teacher I have not learned
that yet." Oh, dear," said teacher Mary, I must make an
example of you; put on the Dunce's cap and stand on the
chair till I call you." Benny knew it was only play, and he at
once obeyed.
"Now, Flossie, it is your turn. Can you spell work?"
Y' es teacher, W-O-R-K." "That's right. Now go and
help mother, while I hear Amy." Amy was always studying
when she had time, so she was able to answer all questions
without mistakes. Please teacher," said Amy, if you will
forgive Benny now I will teach him the multiplication table."
Benny. was called down from the chair, the Dunce's cap was
taken off, and in a short time Amy and he were heard singing
"twice one are two, twice two are four."





7-
fc^%^


1~
? 's


[1ff


"CAN YOU SPELL WORK?"


Playtime Pictures.


B 6







LONELY MILLIE.

Vl IN an old-fashioned village, many miles away
S from London, lives Millie Davis. Her
father is the gardener at the nobleman's house
There, .and Millie lives with her parents and
David her brother in a pretty lodge just by the
,park gates. David and Millie are companions.
,'"- David is only two years older than his sister,
but he acts as her protector as well as her
playmate. He is always with her whether at school or play,
taking care that she does not come to any harm.
To-day Millie's companion is very ill, and the doctor has
been to see.him. Millie would like to be near David; even if
she had to keep her little tongue quite still all day long, which
would be a very difficult task indeed, for she is always talking
about something. But her mother sent her into the garden to
play alone.
Millie tried hard to play, but she was too dull to do so.
She brought out of the house David's cart and drum, one end
of which is broken. She placed her doll in the broken end,
and walked up arid down pulling the cart along, but all the
pleasure has gone now David cannot play. She gently pulled
the cart on towards the house. Seeing her mother at the door
she ran up to her and said, "I cannot play alone, another dear,
do ask the doctor to make David well." "My dear Millie,"
replied Mrs. Davis, it is God alone that can make David
well." When Millie went to bed she remembered her mother's
words, and prayed earnestly that David might get well. God
bless my dear brother and make him well, so that he can play
with me again," was her prayer;




























































I -"


-:::----- -


rONBL'YIIILLIR.


jq


,/ I '


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--------
--





92
THE PLAYMATES.


SW HO guards the farm-
house night and day?
I do!" says .true and
trusty Tray..
Who is .it that loves. Tray
Sso well ?
"'Tis I !" says darling little Nell "
S There sit the two in an old barrel!
They never sulk and never quarrel.
Yet, why should Nell be sitting there,
SWhen all around is fine and fair?
This is the reason.: look at Tray !
'You see, he is on guard to-day,
And as he cannot now get out
With his dear friend to roam about,
She comes to him, and sits and talks'
About their long and pleasant walks;
And Tray vwill-smile as if to say,
"I thank you for your call to-day !"



















A AL


4


NELLY AND DOG TRAY.







STHE BOYS OF DITTON,
GROUP of boys were talking at the corner of a
street in the little town of Ditton, The subject
of conversation was evidently one of a serious
character, judging by their countenances. One of
the taller of the. lads-Stanley Winton by name-
was speaking-
"' Now, boys, I think it would be very cowardly
to take advantage of our master's absence by stay-
S ing away from school; and you know how he would
punish such a mean trick, I propose we go to school as usual."
The subject was argued for some time longer; but eventu-
ally the.advice of the elder lad was taken, and the boys moved
in a body towards the school and trooped in. They were
Surprised; however, to see the schoolmaster there before them,
Why had -he not ,gone to keep his appointment in London?
Seeing their surprise he said, "You no doubt wonder why I
am in school this afternoon, boys, but the gentleman whom I
was to visit has just arrived here, and as I have some business
to do with him this afternoon, I shall dismiss the school at
three o'clock."
When the boys were again out of school, four of their
number walked down the street, on their way to the fields,
where they meant to spend the remainder of the afternoon.
I am very glad we took Stanley's advice ard went in to
school," said one. We have got the holiday as it happens,
and are likely to enjoy it much better than if we played the
truant." And to this they all agreed.
Very quickly they reached the fields, and were soon playing
leap-frog, shouting and laiighing as only healthy boys can.
Evidently they are thoroughly enjoying themselves.




























































































"THEY WERE SOON PLAYING LEAP-FROG."


___~ ~ _I_ ~ _























THE HOBBY HORSE.


E are off for a canter on Carpet Down,
Past Coalbox Castle and Sideboard Town,
Round Hearthrug Corner and Armchair Place,
Then home to the stable at galloping pace.

My horse is a beauty, he goes so fast,
That tables and chairs seem flying past,
He never wants whipping, he never kicks,
And he knows me too well to play any tricks.

Gee up! Ho! ho! We're off and away,
He's really so frisky I dare not stay,
But I shan't tumble off, no, no, not I;
You'll see us come galloping home by-and-by.
From Hobby Horse. BY L. HASKELL.







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Cross," etc. With 15 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. as. 6d.
A splendid book of Travel and Adventure in the Far North- West.
A RIDE TO PICTURE-LAND: A Book of Joys for Girls and Boys. By R. V., Author of Sunshine for
Showery Days." With charming Coloured Frontispiece, and full of beautiful pictures for children. Paper boards, with
coloured design on cover. as. 6d.
A delightful Picture Book for little folks. A Picture Gallery by first-rate artists.
THE STORY OF JESUS: For Little Children. By Mrs. G. E. MORTON, Author of "Wee Donald," etc.
etc. Seventh Edition. Cloth, bevelled boards, with bold design in coloured inks on cover. Imperial 16mo. as. 6d.
NATURAL HISTORY STORIES. By MARY HOWITT. With 32 full-page Engravings by Harrison Weir,
L. Hard, etc., and numerous smaller Illustrations. Foolscap 4to, Cloth gilt, bevelled boards. (Uniform with Our
Dumb Companions.") as.
SUNNY TEACHINGS : A Coloured Bible Picture Roll. Size 12J by 191 inches. Contains 12 beautifully coloured
Pictures of Bible Subjects, printed on good paper. Mounted on roller, with cord for hanging, and with glazed coloured
cover. 2s. A treasure for the Schoolroom or Nursery.
CLOYIE AND MADGE. By Mrs. G. S. REANEY, Author of "Our Daughters," "Found at Last," etc.
Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra. is. 6d.
FINE GOLD; or, Ravenswood Courtenay. By EMMA MARSHALL, Author of "Eaglehurst Towers,' "A
Flight with the Swallows," etc. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. is. 6d.
GERALD'S DILEMMA. By EMMA LESLIE, Author of "BolinDbroke's Folly," "The Five Cousins,'" etc,
Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. is. 6d.
CHINE CABIN. By Mrs. HAYCRAFT, Author of "Red Dave," "Little Mother," etc. Fully Illustrated.
Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. Is.
DULCIE DELIGHT. By JENNIE CHAPPELL, Author of Her Saddest Blessing," For Honour's Sake," etc.
With s full-page Engravings. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. is.
JEMMY LAWSON; or, Beware of Crooked Ways. By E. C. KENYON, Author of "Jack's Heroism."
Illustrated. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. is.
MARION AND AUGUSTA; or, Love and Selfishness. By EMMA LESLIE, Author of Ellerslie House, '
"The Five Cousins," e c. With 6 full-page Illustrations. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. Is.
THE MOTHER'S CHAIN; or, The Broken Link. By EMMA MARSHALL, Author of "Fine Gold; or,
Ravenswood Courtenay," etc. fully Illustrated. Crown 8vo, handsomely bound in Cloth. is.
DAYBREAK IN THE SOUL; or, The Believer's Entrance upon Full Salvation. By Rev. E. W.
MOORE, M A., Author of The Overcoming Life," etc. Imp. 32mo, 144 pages,.Cloth gilt. is.

LONDON: S. W. PARTRIDGE, 9, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.



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