• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 Part I. Charts
 Age characteristics
 Household and marital status
 Income
 Housing
 Education
 Labor force participation
 Health and vital statistics
 Distribution by congressional...
 Part II. Tables
 Back Cover














Group Title: Special bulletin University of Florida
Title: Florida's older people
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086051/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida's older people a chart book
Series Title: Special bulletin University of Florida
Physical Description: 81 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Publisher: The Bureau,
The Bureau
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1953
Copyright Date: 1953
 Subjects
Subject: Older people -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Aged -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, College of Business Administration, University of Florida, Geinseville.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086051
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01749304

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Foreword
        Page ix
        Page x
    Part I. Charts
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Age characteristics
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Household and marital status
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Income
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Housing
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Education
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Labor force participation
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Health and vital statistics
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Distribution by congressional districts
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Part II. Tables
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Back Cover
        Page 83
        Page 84
Full Text


























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Special
Bulletin
Number 3
December, 1953


Price fifty cents


FLORIDA'S OLDER PEOPLE


A Chart Book





Bureau of Economic and Business Research

College of Business Administration

University of Florida

Gainesville


BUREAU STAFF
Director
GEORGE B. HURFF
Research Economists Associate in Research
WYLIE KILPATRICK ELISE C. JONES
FELIX MUEHLNER Graduate Assistant
CARTER C. OSTERBIND DAVID R. KENERSON







CONTENTS
Page
F orew ord ............................... ....... ... ........ ........................................ ix

Age Characteristics
Chart 1. Florida's Population Is Aging and Growing... ....................... 3
2. Florida's Age Distribution for Selected Years........................ 3
3. Southern Florida Counties Had Largest Percentage
Increase in Older People: 1940-1950........................... 5
4. Percentage of Each County's Population 65 Years
of Age and Over, Florida: 1950................ .................. 7
5. Older Women Are Outnumbering Older Men in Florida...... 9

Household and Marital Status
6. Household Status of Persons 65 Years of Age and
Over in Florida: 1950.................... ......... ....................... 9
7. Changes in Marital Status with Age in Florida: 1950..........11

Income
8. Median Income in 1949 of Men and Women in Florida........13
9. Income in 1949 of Men and Women 65 Years of Age
and Over in Florida.......................... .. ..............13
10. Sources of Income Among Retired Persons in Three
Florida Communities............- .......... .. -............... 15
11. Large Proportion of Persons 65 Years and Over
Receiving Public Pensions or Retirement Benefits,
in Florida: 1950............................. .... ....................17
12. Aged Save Less in United States.................................. ..........19

Housing
13. Homes Owned by Household Heads 65 Years of Age
and Over in Four Metropolitan Areas: 1950....................21
14. Homes Rented by Household Heads 65 Years of Age
and Over in Four Metropolitan Areas: 1950 ....................23

Education
15. Florida's Older People Have Had Less Schooling Than
Its Younger People: 1950....................................................25

Labor Force Participation
16. Men and Women 45 Years of Age and Over in Florida's
Labor Force: 1890-1950................ ............................ ....27
17. More Older Men Than Women in Florida's Labor
Force: 1950 .................... ........ ........ ................ ......................29
18. Life in Labor Force and in Retirement Shows In-
crease for Males in United States... ............................. 29
19. Men and Women 55 Years of Age and Over in and
out of Florida's Labor Force: 1950.......................................31








Chart 20. Industries Employing People 65 Years of Age and
Over in Florida: 1950.......... ------.... .. ............................33
21. Occupations of Employed Persons 65 Years of Age
and Over in Florida: 1950................... ................. 35

Health and Vital Statistics
22. Disability Increases with Age in United States--..............37
23. Major Impairments Increase with Age in United States......37
24. Most Frequently Reported Diseases Among Older
People in Florida: 1950....................................... ......39
25. Few Older People in United States Have Protection
Against Medical Costs.......-.......... ....... ...................39
26. Causes of Death of Persons 65 Years and Over in
Florida During 1950 .............. ............... ..............41
27. Average Future Lifetime for Florida's 65 Years and
Over Population Is Increasing..................... ......................41

Distribution by Congressional Districts
28. Population of Voting Age in Florida.......................................43

Table 1. Age Structure of the Population of Florida: 1900-1950........47
2. Percentage Change in Total Population of Florida
and in Population 65 Years of Age and Over, by
County: 1940 to 1950...............-...... .-- ..-.......... .....48
3. Population 65 Years of Age and Over, by Color and
Sex, in Florida Counties: 1950............................. ......50
4. Florida's Population 50 Years of Age and Over by
Division of Birth: 1950................. ..---- .......... .........52
5. Number of Men and Women 65 Years of Age and
Over, in Florida: 1900-1950 .......................... ..... 53
6. Household Status of Men and Women 65 Years of
Age and Over, in Florida: 1950........................................... 53
7. Institutional Population 65 Years of Age and Over
'in Florida: 1950........... ---......... -...........-- ........54
8. Marital Status of Men and Women 45 Years of Age
and Over in Florida: 1950...................................--- 55
9. Median Income in 1949 of Men and Women, by Age,
for the State and for Nonfarm and Farm Areas
in Florida: 1950.................. .................56
10. Income in 1949 of Men and Women, by Age, in Florida:
1950 ..............- --- --..................... ........57
11. Relative Frequency of Sources of Income Among
Older People in Five Florida Communities....................58
12. Persons 65 Years of Age and Over Receiving Specified
Governmental Pensions and Insurance Retirement
Benefits, in Florida: 1950-1951......................................59
13. Recipients and Payments of Old-Age Assistance and
Old-Age and Survivors Insurance, in Florida
Counties: 1950..... .................. ..................60








Table 14. Income Saved, Home Ownership, and Net Worth of
Spending Units, by Age of Head, in the United
States: 1950--- .........- -- ......... ................ .....................62
15. Value of Owner-Occupied Dwelling Units for Four
Florida Standard Metropolitan Areas, by Charac-
teristics of Head of Household, 65 Years of Age
and O ver: 1950.................................... .............. ..... .. 63
16. Characteristics of Dwelling Units, in Four Florida
Standard Metropolitan Areas, Owned or Rented
by Head of Household 65 Years of Age and Over: 1950....64
17. Gross Monthly Rent of Renter-Occupied Dwelling Units,
for Four Florida Standard Metropolitan Areas, by
Characteristics of Renter 65 Years of Age and
Over: 1950..................... ............................---- .....66

18. Years of School Completed by Persons 25 Years of
Age and Over in Florida: 1950........................................... 67

19. Men and Women 45 Years of Age and Over in Florida's
Labor Force: 1890-1950.................... .................... ..68

20. Labor Force Participation of Men and Women 65 Years
of Age and Over, in Florida: 1950............................-......-- 69

21. Average Number of Remaining Years of Life, in the
Labor Force and in Retirement, of Men at Selected
Ages, in the United States: 1940 and 1947---..........................70

22. Employment Status of Men and Women 55 Years of
Age and Over, in Florida: 1950............... --------................. 71

23. Employed Men and Women 65 Years of Age and Over,
by Industry, in Florida: 1950................................... ...........72
24. Major Occupation Group of Employed Persons by Age
in Florida: 1950---...................... .............. 73
25. Prevalence of Disability, by Chronicity, Age, Sex, and
Coler, in 8 Cities: 1935-1936..................... ..................... 74
26. Prevalence of Specified Impairments, by Age and Sex,
in the United States: 1935-1936............................................75
27. Cases of Certain Reportable Diseases Contracted by
Persons 65 Years of Age and Over, in Florida: 1950..........76
28. Per Cent of Population Insured Against Cost of Hos-
pitalization, All Ages and Persons 65 Years of Age
and Over, in the United States: March 1952......................77
29. Death Rates, by Important Causes, of Persons 65 Years
of Age and Over, Florida and the United States: 1950......78
30. Average Future Lifetime for Total Population, Florida
1929-1931, 1939-1941, 1949-1951...............................................79
31. Population 65 Years of Age and Over as a Percentage
of Population 21 Years of Age and Over by County
and Congressional District, in Florida; 1940 and 1950......80















FOREWORD


The rapid increase in' the older population of Florida has
social and economic implications which point to the need for
facts to throw light on this development. This chart book brings
together the available statistical information on Florida's older
population. Both published and unpublished sources of informa-
tion have been utilized, but the 1950 Census is the source used
most extensively, and for that reason, wherever possible, 1950
information is used from other sources to afford comparisons
within a common time period.
The charts appear in the fore part of the book. Opposite
each one is a brief text to add clarity in some instances, or to
direct attention to particular elements of the chart, or in a few
instances to supplement the content of the chart. The statistical
tables appear in the back portion of the book. These include sta-
tistics supporting the graphical information shown and also ad-
ditional related information.
The Census Bureau and other informational sources employ
groupings that do not always lend themselves to answering spe-
cific questions of interest. The attributes shown here do not pur-
port to cover all matters of interest or importance. Highlights
of the available information are presented in graphic form so
that the reader may obtain an understanding of some aspects of
the data without an extensive study of tabular or text material.
Tabulations have been included in the back of the 'book to bring
together the statistics from published and unpublished sources
and to afford a guide to the .informational sources.










The Florida State Improvement Commission published, in
June, 1953, Research Report No. 4, entitled Facts About Florida's
Older Population. This report, which discusses the recent find-
ings of the Retirement Research Division, points to the need for
the assembly of information to fill the gaps that exist in our
knowledge of Florida's blder population. This chart book does
not fill all of the gaps, but it does bring together the available
statistical information-a substantial portion of which has be-
come available since the Retirement Research Division concluded
its study. The assembly of information is continuing, but many
gaps can be filled only by resort to direct study by personal in-
terviews. Those interested in nationwide statistics on aging are
referred to the Fact Book on Aging published by the Federal Se-
curity Agency.
The research undertaking and the preparation of this report
were the work of Associate Professor Carter C. Osterbind, assist-
ed by Associate in Research Elise C. Jones. This work was car-
ried out under the general supervision of the Director and with
the assistance of the Bureau staff.

George B. Hurff
Director
Gainesville, Florida
December, 1953























PART I





CHARTS
















From 1900 to 1950, while the population of the United States
was increasing 98 per cent, the population of Florida increased
424 per cent. However, a greater difference than shown by these
figures is revealed by a comparison of the changes in the older
population. While the nation's age class of 65 years and over
was increasing 298 per cent, Florida's increase for this segment
of the population was 1603 per cent.
An increase in the proportion of people 45 to 64 years of
age and 65 years and over has occurred in each successive decade
during the half century ending in 1950. This continuous aging
of Florida's population is in part the result of the general na-
tionwide tendency of the population to age because of gains in the
control of infectious diseases, other advances in medical science,
and -also because of a higher standard of living. However, Flor-
ida's far greater increases in these older age categories are at-
tributable mainly to the fact that many older people have mi-
grated to Florida from other parts of the United States.





CHART I


FLORIDA'S POPULATION IS AGING AND GROWING
MILLIONS
3.0



2.5
..::: .-::: ..::::'.. -... :.:
2.0

/

1.5
/I /

I//

Il
/.

ppF-" 10.5


SOURCE: TABLE I


CHART 2


FLORIDA'S AGE DISTRIBUTION FOR SELECTED YEARS
PER CENT
100-



80-



60-



40-



20-




1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950

LEGEND E 65 YEARS OF AGE 45 TO 64 YEARS UNDER 45 YEARS
AND OVER OF AGE OF AGE
SOURCE: TABLE I


1900


1950




















While Florida's total population was increasing 46 per cent
during the 1940-50 intercensal period, the population 65 years of
age and over was increasing 81 per cent. Although the total pop-
ulation of the state increased substantially, 18 of Florida's coun-
ties experienced small declines in total population. However,
every county in the state had an increase in the number of those
65 years of age and over; and in almost all of the counties, in-
cluding those showing total population declines, the increase was
substantial in the age class of 65 years and over. For example,
Dixie County with a 44 per cent decline in total population had
a 35 per cent increase in the number of those 65 years and over.
Broward County, with an increase of almost 159 per cent in this
older age group, experienced the largest proportional increase
in the state.






CHART 3


SOUTHERN FLORIDA COUNTIES HAD LARGEST


PERCENTAGE INCREASE IN OLDER PEOPLE:


1940-1950







'i.-J



PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN COUNTY POPULATION
65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER

I I UNDER 39.9%

I 1 40% TO 79.9%

80% TO 119.9%

S120% AND OVER V,











souo5ll TAIUL I


P


j


















The ratio of people 65 years of age and over ranged from a
low of 4.1 per hundred people in Okaloosa County, to a high of
21.6 per cent in Osceola County. In 46 of Florida's 67 counties,
ratios of those 65 years of age and over to all ages ranged from
5 to 9.9 per cent, indicating that a majority of the counties did
not deviate greatly from the state-wide average of 8.6 per cent.
In 15 counties, however, over 10 per cent of the people were 65
years of age and over, and in three of these counties-Osceola,
Pinellas, and Charlotte-14 per cent or more of the population
was 65 years and over. In the first two counties are located
such well-known retirement communities as St. Petersburg,
Clearwater, and St. Cloud.









CHART 4


PERCENTAGE OF EACH COUNTY'S POPULATION


65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER, FLORIDA: 1950













J.-
\ LLi I X p -










I LESS THAN 5 0% PER 100 PERSONS

I 5 0% 9 9% PER 100 PERSONS

10 0%-14.9% PER 100 PERSONS '

15.0% AND OVER











SOURCE: TABLE 3



SOURCE S TABLE S



















In Florida, in 1950 the number of women outnumbered the
number of men in the age class of 65 years and over. This is
a reversal of the proportionate relationships shown in the five
preceding censuses of population. The 1910 and 1920 censuses
showed successive increases in the proportion of males to females
in the group 65 years of age and over; however, each decennial
census since 1920 has shown a successive decline in the propor-
tion of males in this age group.
In appraising the past and continuing significance in these
trends, it must be taken into consideration that they are greatly
influenced by the number of older men and women moving to
Florida from other parts of the country.
Chart 6 shows that in Florida more than 95 per cent of the
persons 65 years of age and over lived in households, while less
than 5 per cent lived in institutions, hotels, and in other non-
household groups.





CHART 5


OLDER WOMEN ARE OUTNUMBERING
OLDER MEN IN FLORIDA
THOUSANDS
130

120

POPULATION
00-65 YEARS OF AGE
AND OVER

80-- MEN
WOMEN


60


40


20



1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950

SOURCE: TABLE 5


CHART 6


SOURCE: TABLE 6


HOUSEHOLD STATUS OF PERSONS 65 YEARS
OF AGE AND OVER IN FLORIDA : 1950

LIVING IN HOUSEHOLD AND
HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD


LIVING IN HOUSEHOLD AND
NOT HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD


LIVING IN HOTELS, INSTITUTIONS
LABOR CAMPS, ETC.


10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%


.


1






















The proportion of widowed women, in 1950, was greater for
all the age groups shown in Chart 7 than was the proportion of
widowed males; and in the advanced age groups of 65 to 74 years
and of 75 years and over, the number of widows was greater
than the number of married or single women. Although the pro-
portion of widowed men increased with the advance in age, as
would be expected, even for the group 75 years of age and over
the proportion did not exceed 33 per cent, while almost 62 per
cent were in the married classification. On the other hand, al-
most 72 per cent of the women 75 years and over were widows.
In Florida, as in the United States, older men remarry more
often than do older women.






CHART 7

CHANGES IN MARITAL STATUS WITH AGE IN

FLORIDA 1950


MARRIED


WIDOWED

SINGLE AND
DIVORCED


0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%
PER CENT OF MEN AND WOMEN


70% 80% 90%


SOURCE: TABLE S


45 TO 54 YEARS OF AGE








MEN
WOMEN

)% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 9(
55 TO 64 YEARS OF AGE










SIII I I I
)% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90
65 TO 74 YEARS OF AGE











0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 9(

75 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER


MARRIED


WIDOWED

SINGLE AND
DIVORCED


MARRIED


WIDOWED

SINGLE AND
DIVORCED





MARRIED


WIDOWED

SINGLE AND
DIVORCED


I I I I I I I I


(


















On the average, men and women received their highest in-
come in the age range of 35 to 44 years. The median income of
both men and women was lowest when they first entered the
labor force and next to lowest when they reached the ages 65 and
over. However, the median incomes of women did not show the
pronounced differences revealed for men in the various age
groups. Starting with the age group of 20 to 24 years and con-
tinuing through the group 55 to 64 years, the average (median)
income for women remained almost unchanged.
In all age groups the median income of women was consid-
erably lower than that of men, while the greatest difference in
these averages occurred at the point of peak income (ages 35 to
44 years) for both men and women.
At ages 65 and over, of those reporting income, as shown in
Chart 9, almost 75 per cent of the women and 49 per cent of
the men had incomes of less than $1,000.00 in 1949.










INCOI
I4 en


CHART 8


MEDIAN INCOME IN 1949 OF MEN AND WOMEN IN FLORIDA
ME


,rp uv


$2,000


1S,600










SI400
S800 -


20-24 25-34 35-44
AGE


SOURCE: TABLE 9

CHART 9

INCOME IN 1949 OFMEN AND WOMEN 65 YEARS OF AGE
AND OVER IN FLORIDA
MEN


25%i


I :F j1VOr. j 9%.j1


WOMEN


28%I


B__1=----' -, ',"-, /- .. 0 f --


B0%

I I S 499 F'7$1,000- $1,999
( OR LOSS) 0 999
$500 S 999 5 2,000 52,999


. .|.. ,. / .0


1001

EIS1 3,000- s4,999

S 5,000ND OVER


SOURCE: TABLE 10 10


__1MEN
WOMEN


M MEN
















6 4 -65


14-19


-64 65+



















Although information on the sources of income of Florida's
retired people is not available, information is available on the
source of income of the retired white people in three Florida
communities.
Surveys in St. Petersburg (1950), Orlando (1951), and
West Palm Beach (1951) revealed pensions as the most import-
ant source of income for the retired white people in these three
Florida communities. Although there was much similarity in the
percentage distribution of the income sources of the retired
people in these communities, the distribution showed pensions
as an income source of a larger proportion of retired people in
St. Petersburg than in Orlando or West Palm Beach. It is also
noticeable that in St. Petersburg the retired people depended very
little on relatives, employment, or old-age assistance as an in-
come source.





CHART 10


SOURCES OF INCOME AMONG RETIRED


PERSONS IN THREE FLORIDA COMMUNITIES


PENSIONS


REAL
ESTATE
RENTS


SAVINGS


STOCKS
AND
BONDS


INVEST-
MENTS


ANNUITIES



RELATIVES


PART
EMPLOY-
MENT


OLD-AGE
ASSIST-
ANCE

LOANS
AND
MORTGAGES


TRUSTS



OTHER


20%

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL INCOME


ST. PETERSBURG

ORLANDO


WEST PALM
BEACH


SOURCE: TABLE II


..I I .. ..








. .. . .. . .
.........~~ .. . .I


0 1I


I





















There is some double counting in the analysis of the num-
ber of people receiving governmental benefits in that some re-
cipients of old-age and survivors insurance benefits were also
receiving old-age assistance. Not included in the analysis are
some pension plans with very small coverage.
Subject to the modifications noted, it may be said that ap-
proximately three-fourths of the people 65 years of age and over
who were not in the labor force were receiving some type of pub-
lic pension or retirement benefits. Over a third of those receiv-
ing public benefits were the recipients of old-age assistance, and
slightly less than a third were receiving old-age and survivors
insurance benefits. The number of persons covered by the other
types of benefits was comparatively small, but interestingly it
included 295 who were receiving Confederate pensions.






CHART II


LARGE PROPORTION OF PERSONS 65 YEARS OF

AGE AND OVER RECEIVED PUBLIC PENSIONS

AND RETIREMENT BENEFITS


PER CENT OF POPULATION
65 YEARS AND OVER


36.5%
RECEIVED NO
PUBLIC PENSIONS
OR RETIREMENT
BENEFITS

:.:/: : : : :: i:" .


--1-lll--li--i


63.5%
RECEIVED
PUBLIC PENSIONS
OR RETIREMENT
BENEFITS


3- I-











4-y* 4 '4' '4 '
%- ~ I w '4


OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE 29.3%






CIVIL SERVICE AND PANAMA CANAL
CONSTRUCTION RETIREMENT 6%


S RAILROAD RETIREMENT 2 3%


\TEACHERSAND STATE AND COUNTY
\OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT-.7%



OLD-AGE AND SURVIVORS INSURANCE
25.8%


CONFEDERATE PE S


:_ x -.- ---. .I -


SOURCE: TABLE 12


1950-1951


WORLD WAR I AND PRI -


E


. .


I i


ARS 2.7%


I






















A spending unit is composed of all persons living in the same
dwelling and belonging to the same family who pool their in-
comes to meet their major expenses. Information on savings and
net worth of spending units is not available for Florida. However,
a study of the saving and net worth of spending units based on a
nationwide sample reveals that, in 1950, spending units with
heads 65 years of age and over saved less on the average than
did all spending units, but the spending units with heads 65
years and over had on the average a higher net worth. In addi-
tion, a higher rate of home ownership was found to exist for
the group of spending units with heads 65 years of age and over.





CHART 12


AGED SAVE LESS IN UNITED STATES


50% OR
MORE


20%-49%



10%-19%



1%- 9%


NONE


NEGATIVE
SAVINGS


OWN
HOME

PAY
RENT


OTHER


NEGATIVE


I-S 999



S1,000-S 4,999


S25,000 OR
MORE

NOT
ASCERTAINED


0


SOURCE: TABLE 14


20 40

PER CENT OF SPENDING UNITS

19























In the four Florida metropolitan areas shown, the homes
owned and occupied in 1950 by household heads 65 years of age
and over had a wide range of values, and there was a high de-
gree of similarity between the home value distributions in the
respective metropolitan areas. For the four areas combined, the
number of homes, classified according to value, tended to in-
crease, going from lower to higher values, until home values of
$10,000 to $14,999 were reached. After this level of values, the
number of homes dropped appreciably.
A comparison of the respective metropolitan areas reveals
a definite uniformity in the pattern of the distribution of homes
according to the number of rooms in each unit. The home with
five rooms or more was found to be the most frequent size in each
area.





CHART 13

HOMES OWNED BY HOUSEHOLD HEADS 65 YEARS OF AGE

AND OVER IN FOUR METROPOLITAN AREAS: 1950


STAMPA-ST

SORLANOO

I MIAMI

i JACKSONV

















NUMBER OF
HOUSEHOLDS
11,000-

10,000-



8,000-



6,000-



4,000-



2,000-


PETERSBUF






ILLE


VALUE OF OWNER-OCCUPIED HOME

o O0 0 0a, a a0 I 0


o o o o o o o
0 0 0 0 m 0 0



o 0 0 o0 .o 2 0
e a a H a
RG '
















"-- --,-------"--~X,


NUMBER OF
HOUSEHOLDS
6,000


5,000



4,000



3,000



2,000



1,000


NUMBER OF ROOMS IN HOUSE

























2 3-4 5-5+ I 2 3-4 5-5+ I 2 3-4 5-5+ I 2 3-4 5-5+
NUMBER OF ROOMS


SOURCE: TABLES 15 AND 1I






















A large proportion of the homes rented by household heads
65 years of age and over were at gross monthly rentals of less
than $50. There was a striking contrast between the distribu-
tion of the amounts of gross monthly rentals in Miami and in
the three other metropolitan areas. Miami clearly had a larger
proportion of homes in the higher rental ranges. This fact may
be seen by a direct comparison of the distribution in Miami with
the distribution in each of the other areas.
A comparison of the room-size distribution of rented homes
(Chart 14) with the room-size distribution of owned and oc-
cupied homes (Chart 13), reveals that the largest number of
rented homes were three to four rooms in size while the largest
number of owned homes were five rooms and over.




CHART 14


HOMES RENTED BY HOUSEHOLD HEADS 65 YEARS OF AGE

ANDOVER IN FOUR METROPOLITAN AREAS: 1950



GROSS MONTHLY RENT



a 0 0 0 0 0 0 o
cr w w
5a a a* * *
-_ ,i 0 Iot c
S 0 0 0 0 o I NUMBER OF
S- o e e e) ( HOUSEHOLDS
.
----------------- 3,400
STAMPA- ST.PETERSBURG ,

ORLANDO

SMIAMI 2,500

SJACKSONVILLE


.- 2,000





S- 1,500




1,000




- 500





NUMBER OF
HOUSEHOLDS NUMBER OF ROOMS IN HOUSE
4,000 -



3,000 -



2,000- -.-



1,0 0 -



0 5 2 4


SOURCE;


2 3-4 5-5+ 1 2 -4 -5+" I Q .
NUMBER OF ROOMS
TABLES IS AND IT
23























A large segment of the 1950 nonwhite population 65 years
of age and over had never attended school, however, the largest
proportion of this age class had completed at least one year or
more of elementary school. Of the nonwhite population 25-64
years of age, a far greater proportion had attended school.
The age class of 65 years and over of the white population
is shown to have had less schooling than the 25 to 64 age class,
but only a very small proportion of the older group were without
some schooling.




CHART 15


FLORIDA'S OLDER PEOPLE HAVE HAD LESS

SCHOOLING THAN ITS YOUNGER PEOPLE; 1950



WHITE POPULATION


ONE YEAR OR MORE
OFELEMENTARY
SCHOOL


OF AGES 65 YEARS AND OVER


OF AGES 25-64 YEARS


NONWHITE POPULATION


/


OF AGES 65 YEARS AND OVER


OF AGES 25- 64 YEARS


SOURCE! TABLE 18















Because of changes by the Bureau of the Census, in the
definition of the labor force, precise measurement and projec-
tion on the basis of existing data are not possible. However, the
information shown in Chart 16 is deemed sufficiently accurate
to indicate broad trends or pronounced movements.
In Florida, the proportion of men 45 to 64 years of age in
the labor force declined during the period 1890 to 1950, where-
as the proportion of women of these ages in the labor force in-
creased. For purposes of comparison it may be added that in
the age class 45 to 64 years, for the United States, the propor-
tion of men in the labor force changed little during this period,
but the change in the proportion of women participating in the
force was almost the same for the United States as shown for
Florida.
For men and women 65 years of age and over in Florida,
there was a definite decline during the 60-year period in the pro-
portion of those in the labor force. The decline in the proportion
of men was more pronounced than that shown for women. These
changes corresponded somewhat to the changes in the United
States as a whole with the exception that during the tight labor
market period from 1940 to 1950 there was a slight increase in
the proportion of men and women 65 years of age and over in the
labor force of the nation. An important factor influencing the
information given on the participation of women in the labor
force is the fact that those women engaged in normal housekeep-
ing duties were not counted in the labor force unless they worked
on a for-hire basis of some type.








CHART 16


MEN AND WOMEN 45 YEARS OF AGE

AND OVER IN FLORIDA'S LABOR

FORCE 1890-1950


AGE 45 TO 64 YEARS


MEN-


SI 4


WOMEN


1920


1930


1940


1900


AGE 65 YEARS AND OVER


WOMEN


1900


MEN


1920


1930


1940


1950


SOURCES TABLE 19


PER CENT
100


0
1890


PER CENT


100


40



20


0
1890


~r~-rc~~cl


--




















It should be pointed out that a person in the labor force is
not necessarily employed, nor is he necessarily employed at his
highest skill. The labor force is composed of all people of work-
ing age who hold themselves out for employment for compensa-
tion.
Of the 236,175 people 65 years of age and over in Florida,
41,685 were in the labor force. A breakdown of this part of the
labor force on the basis of sex and age reveals, as shown in Chart
17, that almost 82 per cent of the group were men and that 62
per cent of the men and women together fell in the age range
of 65 to 69 years.
Chart 18, based on the tables of working life, shows that in
the United States between 1940 and 1947 the average number
of remaining years of life at various ages had increased, and
with this increase, the remaining years of labor force participa-
tion had increased. Thus men and women may, on the average,
anticipate a longer working life as well as a longer life.




CHART 17


MORE OLDER MEN THAN OLDER WOMEN

IN FLORIDA'S LABOR FORCE 1950
PER CENT
100
10 -- .;......; ....;--- ....-----------------
AGE

75 YEARS AND OVER
70-74 YEARS
65-69 YEARS

60



40-



20



0
LABOR FORCE MEN WOMEN
65 YEARS 65 YEARS 65 YEARS
AND OVER ANDOVER ANDOVER
SOURCE: TABLE 20


CHART 18


LIFE IN LABOR FORCE AND IN RETIREMENT SHOWS
INCREASE FOR MALES IN UNITED STATES


AVERAGE
NUMBER OF IN RETIREMENT
YEARS REMAINING
YEARS OF IN LABOR FORCE
20 1940 1947 LIFE


15 i 1940 947


AGE 55


SOURCE:TABLE 21


AGE65 AGE 70


AGE 60




















In the age range 55 to 64 years, in 1950 approximately 72
per cent of the men in Florida were in the labor force. However,
for the age group 65 years and over, the labor force participation
of men had declined to less than 30 per cent. The group "Institu-
tions, Retired, and Other" includes also those too old to work,
those voluntarily idle, and those for whom information on em-
ployment was not reported. For the men it includes those en-
gaged in housekeeping.
The major activity of women was keeping house. For the
women 55 to 64 years and 65 years and over, the percentage par-
ticipation in housekeeping differed very little. For the first age
group it was 66 per cent, and for the latter, almost 61 per cent.
The percentage of women unable to work was smaller than
that of men, but the percentage increase in the number unable
to work was greater for women than for men between the age
group 55 to 64 years and the group 65 years of age and over.





CHART 19


MEN AND WOMEN 55 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER
IN AND OUT OF FLORIDA'S LABOR FORCE
1950


AGE: 55- 64 YEARS


MEN WOMEN


AGE: 65 YEARS AND OVER


MEN WOMEN


SOURCE: TABLE 22
























Florida agriculture, forestry, and fisheries employed more
older people than did any other industry group as shown in
Chart 20. It should be noted that this concentration of older
people is in part a situation resulting from the departure of
young people from rural areas.
Women 65 years of age and over were employed mainly in
the service type industries. The three main ones in the order
of importance were personal services, wholesale and retail trades,
and professional and related services.




CHART 20

INDUSTRIES EMPLOYING PEOPLE 65 YEARS OF

AGE AND OVER IN FLORIDA: 1950


INDUSTRY NUMBER IN THOUSANDS
0 2 4 6 8 1(

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND :.....'.:::::: ::::::::::. : ::::: :::::::v:::::::.
FISHERIES .:i:!:i::i::::: : : : .:


MINING


CONSTRUCTION .. i
....:...'.:.:.:::.:.. .:.:.. .. ,,


MANUFACTURING .


TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
AND OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADES


FINANCE, INSURANCE AND .
REAL ESTATE


BUSINESS AND REPAIR SERVICES



PERSONAL SERVICES


ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION
SERVICES


PROFESSIONAL AND RELATED
SERVICES


PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION WOMEN



INDUSTRY NOT REPORTED



SOURCE: TABLE 25


















Chart 20 shows the types of industries in which Florida's
older people found employment, whereas Chart 21 shows the
major types of occupations of these older workers.
About 30 per cent of Florida's older workers were in two
broad occupational groups, "managers, officials and proprietors
(except farm)," and "farmers and farm managers," while "crafts-
men, foremen, and kindred workers" ranked next in importance.
Broad classifications such as these should be regarded with care
because they necessarily include such a wide range of occupa-
tions. Also it may be noted that an appraisal of the economic
status of older people may be made more accurately from income
data (see Charts 8 and 9) than from data on occupations. As
previously noted, over 82 per cent of Florida's older people were
not in the labor force (Chart 11).
More significant perhaps than the rank of the occupational
groups is the fact that the employment activity of the older
people was distributed over the range of major occupations with-
out pronounced concentration in any one of them.





CHART 21


OCCUPATIONS OF EMPLOYED PERSONS 65 YEARS
OF AGE AND OVER IN FLORIDA: 1950




MAJOR OCCUPATION PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF EMPLOYED PERSONS
0 4% 8% 12% 16% 20%

PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND
KINDRED WORKERS

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS


MANAGERS, OFFICIALS AND
PROPRIETORS EXCEPT FARM


CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS


SALES WORKERS


CRAFTSMEN, FOREMEN AND
KINDRED WORKERS

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED
WORKERS


PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS


SERVICE WORKERS EXCEPT
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN


LABORERS, EXCEPT FARM
AND MINE

OCCUPATIONS NOT REPORTED


SOURCE: TABLE 24






















No information is available to show for Florida the increase
of disability with age and the major impairments of age. How-
ever, a clue to what we may expect for Florida is shown in Chart
22 (based on a survey of eight United States cities) and Chart
23 (based on a nationwide survey).
The survey of eight cities in the United States showed the
extent to which disability increased with age. It ranged from
less than 3 per cent for the age group of 15 to 24 years, to ap-
proximately 14 per cent for the group 65 years and over.
For both men and women in the United States, the major
impairments-disabling orthopedic, total deafness and blind-
ness-showed a pronounced increase with the increase in age.





CHART 22



DISABILITY INCREASES WITH AGE IN UNITED STATES

(PERCENT DISABLED ON DAY OF SURVEY, 8 CITIES 1935-36)

PERCENT
16



12



8








UNDER 15-24 25-44 45- 64 65 YEARS
15 YEARS YEARS YEARS YEARS AND OVER

AGE
SOURCE: TABLE 25



CHART 23


MAJOR IMPAIRMENTS INCREASE WITH

RATE PER 1,000
25 -
DISABLING TOTAL
ORTHOPEDIC DEAFNESS

20 -


AGE IN UNITED STATES


BLINDNESS
(BOTH EYES )




EN
OMEN


45-64 65-74 75YEARS 45-64 65-74 75YEARS 45-64 65-74 75YEARS
YEARS YEARS ANDOVER YEARS YEARS ANDOVER YEARS YEARS ANDOVER
AGE
SOURCE; TABLE 26























The reporting of diseases is not complete, thus the infor-
mation does not permit a precise measure of the occurrence of
different types of diseases among older people in Florida. How-
ever, the number of reported cases of certain diseases that re-
quire special treatment and hospitalization is of significance in
appraising the economic costs of hospitalization and the proper
care of older people.
Although data are not available to show for Florida's older
people the protection they have against medical costs, a survey
of the United States, in March, 1952, suggests the extent of the
protection that may be found generally. Chart 25 shows that
those aged 65 to 69 years were covered to a greater extent by
hospital care insurance than were those 70 years and over. For
all persons 65 and over, 26 per cent were covered by hospital
care insurance. This is to be compared to a coverage of 56 per
cent for all ages.








CHART 24

MOST FREQUENTLY REPORTED DISEASES

AMONG OLDER PEOPLE IN FLORIDA
DISEASE I 950

PNEUMONIA
WHITE
:l NEGRO
TUBERCULOSIS NEGRO


SYPHILIS


DIABETES


CANCER

0 575 1150 1725 2300
NUMBER OF CASES REPORTED
SOURCE: TABLE 2T


CHART 25

FEW OLDER PERSONS IN UNITED STATES HAVE
PROTECTION AGAINST MEDICAL COSTS
PERCENT (PER CENT WITH HOSPITAL CARE INSURANCE, MARCH 1952)


SOURCE: TABLE 28


70- 74 YEARS
AGE


75 YEARS ANDOVER


65- 69 YEARS


















Florida's death rate among older people is low. In Florida
in 1950 there were only 51 deaths per 1,000 people 65 years of age
and over, whereas for the United States as a whole the compar-
able figure was 62.
The Number One cause of death in Florida, as in the na-
tion, was heart disease. The cardiovascular-renal (heart, circu-
latory, kidney) diseases accounted for slightly more than 33
1950, whereas the average number of deaths in the United
States was 42 per 1,000 people 65 years of age and over.
This difference was due mainly to Florida's lower death
rate from heart disease. For the age class of 65 years and over,
cancer accounted for seven deaths per 1,000 people as compared
to more than eight deaths per 1,000 in the United States as a
whole.
The average future lifetimes, based on three calendar peri-
ods, namely, 1929 to 1931, 1939 to 1941, and 1941 to 1951, show-
ed that at various ages the life expectancy of older people was
increasing. As of 1951, an older person in Florida in the age
range of 65 to 69 years could expect an average future life of
slightly over 15 years, whereas in the period 1929 to 1931, the
life expectancy in this age group was slightly less than 13 years.







CHART 26


CAUSES OF DEATH OF PERSONS 65 YEARS AND
OVER IN FLORIDA DURING 1950


CARDIOVASCULAR RENAL DISEASES


CANCER ALL OTHER
CAUSES
ACCIDENTS
i JlI -


SOURCE: TABLE 29


CHART 27


AVERAGE FUTURE LIFETIME FOR FLORIDA'S 65
YEARS AND OVER POPULATION IS INCREASING

AVERAGE FUTURE
LIFETIME
IN YEARS
18 PERIOD
1949-1951
I 5 1939-1941
t$||H_ _1929-1931









65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94

AGE IN YEARS


SOURCE: TABLE 30




















The electorate makes decisions that affect the economic and
social welfare of the state. Thus, the relative importance of Flor-
ida's senior citizens as voters or potential voters is shown. To
suggest in summary fashion the numerical importance of our
senior citizens in political areas smaller than the state itself,
the number of people 65 years of age and over and the number
21 to 64 years of age are given for each of the eight congression-
al districts in Florida. These two age groups are also compared
to the total population. State wide, the age class of 65 years and
over represented almost 13 per cent of our potential voting pop-
ulation. However, in the first district, it accounted for 171/2 per
cent of the voting population, with the proportion running al-
most as high as 25 per cent in Pinellas County, and in the fifth
district it accounted for 16 per cent, running as high as 30 per
cent in Osceola County.









CHART 28


POPULATION OF VOTING AGE IN FLORIDA




POPULATION


TOTAL
POT ATION 5 EARS ADOVER
KJt 21-64 YEARS


IST 2 ND 3 RD 4TH 5TH 6TH

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS


7TH 8TH


SOURCE: TABLE 31



























PART II



TABLES







TABLE 1. AGE


STRUCTURE OF THE POPULATION OF FLORIDA:
1900-1950


Total Population Population Population
Year n Under 45 45 to (4 05 Years of
Years of Age Years of Age Age and over


Number


1900..................
1910........--.......
1920.................---
1930...................
1940..............
1950......... ..........


528,542
752,619
968,470
1,468,211
1,897,414
2,771,305


*454,154
*640,875
*781,021
*1,155,051
1,416,987
1,973,608


60,447
89,947
146,785
241,958
349,210
560,223


13,941
21,797
40,664
71,202
131,217
237,474


Percentage Increase Since 1900


1910 ---.................
1920..................
1930....................
1940.................
1950.................


42%
83
178
259
424


41%
72
154
212
335


49% 56%
143 192
300 411
478 841
827 1,603


Percentage of Total Population



1900............... 100.0% 86.0% 11.4% 2.6%
1910................... 100.0 85.1 12.0 2.9
1920................. 100.0 80.7 15.1 4.2
1930..............-. 100.0 78.7 16.5 4.8
1940............. 100.0 74.7 18.4 6.9
1950--......-.......... 100.0 71.2 20.2 8.6

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population,
Bulletin P-B10, Table 16.
Includes a small number whose ages are unreported.








TABLE 2. PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN TOTAL POPULATION OF
FLORIDA AND IN POPULATION 65 YEARS OF AGE AND
OVER, BY COUNTY: 1940 TO 1950


Total Po n Population 65 Years of Age
Total Population
and Over
County
1940 1950 Percentage 1940 1950 Percentage
change change

Florida.......... 1,897,414 2,771,305 46.1% 131,217 237,474 81.0%


Alachua........ 38,607 57,026 47.7
Baker........... 6,510 6,313 3.0
Bay............... 20,686 42,689 106.4
Bradford...... 8,717 11,457 31.4
Brevard......... 16,142 23,653 46.5
Broward....... 39,794 83,933 110.9
Calhoun........ 8,218 7,922 3.6
Charlotte...... 3,663 4,286 17.0
Citrus............ 5,846 6,111 4.5
Clay.............. 6,468 14,323 121.4
Collier .......... 5,102 6,488 27.2
Columbia...... 16,859 18,216 8.0
Dade.. ............ 267,739 495,084 84.9
De Soto........ 7,792 9,242 18.6
Dixie............ 7,018 3,928 -44.0
Duval........... 210,143 304,029 44.7
Escambia...... 74,667 112,706 50.9
Flagler.......... 3,008 3,367 11.9
Franklin....... 5,991 5,814 3.0
Gadsden........ 31,450 36,457 15.9
Gilchrist........ 4,250 3,499 -17.7
Glades........... 2,745 2,199 -19.9
Gulf ............. 6,951 7,460 7.3
Hamilton...... 9,778 8,981 8.2
Hardee.......... 10,158 10,073 .8
Hendry......... 5,237 6,051 15.5
Hernando-.... 5,641 6,693 18.6
Highlands..... 9,246 13,636 47.5
Hillsborough 180,148 249,894 38.7
Holmes ........ 15,447 13,988 9.4
Indian River 8,957 11,872 32.5
Jackson........ 34,428 34,645 .6


2,518 3,470 37.8
295 373 26.4
1,031 1,911 85.4
502 810 61.4
1,517 2,666 75.7
2,446 6,333 158.9
403 549 36.2
385 630 63.6
429 702 63.6
901 1,267 40.6
160 324 102.5
946 1,380 45.9
17,239 37,755 119.0
596 953 59.9
204 276 35.3
10,561 17,934 69.8
3,358 5,760 71.5
194 300 54.6
377 495 31.3
2,018 3,013 49.3
203 245 20.7
130 132 1.5
228 345 51.3
566 704 24.4
691 964 39.5
201 280 39.3
438 634 44.7
717 1,392 94.1
11,681 20,127 72.3
810 1,025 26.5
616 1,046 69.8
2,123 2,702 27.3


. . .continued








TABLE 2.- PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN TOTAL POPULATION OF
FLORIDA AND IN POPULATION 65 YEARS OF AGE AND
OVER, BY COUNTY: 1940 TO 1950 (Continued)


Total Population Population 65 Years of Age
Total Population
and Over
County
1940 1950 Percentage 1940 1950 Percentage
change change


Jefferson...... 12,032 10,413
Lafayette..... 4,405 3,440
Lake.............. 27,255 36,340
Lee................. 17,488 23,404
Leon.............. 31,646 51,590
Levy.............. 12,550 10,637
Liberty ........ 3,752 3,182
Madison........ 16,190 14,197
Manatee........ 26,098 34,704
Marion......... 31,243 38,187
Martin.......... 6,295 7,807
Monroe......... 14,078 29,957
Nassau......... 10,826 12,811
Okaloosa...... 12,900 27,533
Okeechobee.. 3,000 3,454
Orange........ 70,074 114,950
Osceola........ 10,119 11,406
Palm Beach. 79,989 114,688
Pasco.......... 13,981 20,529
Pinellas......... 91,852 159,249
Polk........... 86,665 123,997
Putnam......... 18,698 23,615
St. Johns ...... 20,012 24,998
St. Lucie...... 11,871 20,180
Santa Rosa. 16,085 18,554
Sarasota...... 16,106 28,827
Seminole....... 22,304 26,883
Sumter ........ 11,041 11,330
Suwannee..... 17,073 16,986
Taylor .......... 11,565 10,416
Union........... 7,094 8,906
Volusia.......... 53,710 74,229
Wakulla........ 5,463 5,258
Walton........ 14,246 14,725
Washington.. 12,302 11,888


-13.5%
-21.9
33.3
33.8
63.0
-15.2
-15.2
-12.3
33.0
22.2
24.0
112.8
18.3
113.4
15.1
64.0
12.7
43.4
46.8
73.4
43.1
26.3
24.9
70.0
15.3
79.0
20.5
2.6
-.5
9.9
25.5
38.2
3.8
3.4
3.4


982 1,121 14.2%
200 257 28.5
2,483 4,065 63.7
1,336 2,324 74.0
1,758 2,778 58.0
774 1,004 29.7
219 245 11.9
921 1,159 25.8
2,352 4,728 101.0
2,335 3,407 45.9
530 831 56.8
1,171 1,468 25.4
621 805 29.6
686 1,142 66.5
178 258 44.9
5,875 11,831 101.4
1,445 2,458 70.1
5,298 10,332 95.0
1,478 2,497 68.9
12,434 29,936 140.8
5,917 10,033 69.6
1,536 2,230 45.2
1,502 2,297 52.9
613 1,359 121.7
946 1,244 31.5
1,353 3,430 153.5
1,423 2,374 66.8
694 912 31.4
1,096 1,327 21.1
530 839 58.3
318 393 23.6
5,720 9,190 60.7
323 404 25.1
943 1,283 36.1
743 1,016 36.7


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population,
Bulletin P-B10, Table 41.








TABLE 3. POPULATION 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER, BY COLOR AND SEX, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES: 1950


Population 65 Years and.Over


White Population 65 Years and Over j Nonwhite Population 65 Years and Over


Total
Total Total Total Total
County Population
(all ages) % of Male Female % of Male Female % of Male Female
County Number County Number County Number
Popul'n Popul'n Popul'n
Florida......... 2,771,305 237,474 115,971 121,503 203,540 99,048 104,492 33,934 16,923 17,011
Alachua........... 57,026 6.1% 3,470 1,632 1,838 3.7% 2,112 955 1,157 2.4% 1,358 677 681
Baker............... 6,313 5.9 373 184 189 4.3 271 125 146 1.6 102 59 43
Bay......-.......... 42,689 4.5 1,911 966 945 3.7 1,590 802 788 0.8 321 164 157
Bradford......... 11,457 7.1 810 409 401 5.7 655 324 331 1.4 155 85 70
Brevard .......... 23,653 11.3 2,666 1,351 1,315 9.8 2,311 1,170 1,141 1.5 355 181 174
Broward ......... 83,933 7.5 6,333 3,158 3,175 6.7 5,679 2,833 2,846 0.8 654 325 329
Calhoun........... 7,922 6.9 549 291 258 5.8 459 249 210 1.1 90 42 48
en Charlotte......... 4,286 14.7 630 356 274 13.1 563 316 247 1.6 67 40 27
o Citrus............... 6,111 11.5 702 398 304 8.7 533 300 233 2.8 169 98 71
Clay..... ........ 14,323 8.8 1,267 727 540 7.6 1,098 624 474 1.2 169 103 66
Collier............ 6,488 5.0 324 210 114 3.6 233 141 92 1.4 91 69 22
Columbia......... 18,216 7.6 1,380 696 684 4.9 895 451 444 2.7 485 245 240
Dade.............. 495,084 7.6 37,755 18,172 19,583 7.2 35,952 17,303 18,649 0.4 1,803 869 934
De Soto.......... 9,242 10.3 953 504 449 8.6 794 411 383 1.7 159 93 66
Dixie .............. 3,928 7.0 276 161 115 5.4 213 119 94 1.6 63 42 21
Duval----............ 304,029 5.9 17,934 7,956 9,978 4.5 13,630 5,971 7,659 1.4 4,304 1,985 2,319
Escambia........ 112,706 5.1 5,760 2,663 3,097 3.9 4,405 2,030 2,375 1.2 1,355 633 722
Flagler.......... 3,367 8.9 300 176 124 6.5 219 120 99 2.4 81 56 25
Franklin.......... 5,814 8.5 495 239 256 5.4 314 151 163 3.1 181 88 93
Gadsden........... 36,457 8.3 3,013 1,442 1,571 4.5 1,642 780 862 3.8 1,371 662 709
Gilchrist.......... 3,499 7.0 245 131 114 5.7 198 103 95 1.3 47 28 19
Glades.............. 2,199 6.0 132 82 50 4.4 97 61 36 1.6 35 21 14
Gulf.................. 7,460 4.6 345 190 155 3.4 252 141 111 1.2 93 49 44
Hamilton......... 8,981 7.8 704 338 366 4.6 418 199 219 3.2 286 139 147
Hardee ........... 10,073 9.6 964 519 445 9.0 899 485 414 0.6 65 34 31
Hendry ............ 6,051 4.6 280 171 109 3.6 218 132 86 1.0 62 39 23
Hernando....... 6,693 9.5 634 366 268 8.0 532 310 222 1.5 102 56 46
Highlands ....... 13,636 10.2 1,392 727 665 8.9 1,220 622 598 1.3 172 105 67
Hillsborough... 249,894 8.1 20,127 9,888 10,239 7.2 17,958 8,847 9,111 0.9 2,169 1,041 1,128











Holmes ........... 13,988 7.3
Indian River... 11,872 8.8
Jackson............ 34,645 7.8
Jefferson......... 10,413 10.8
Lafayette........ 3,440 7.5
Lake................. 36,340 11.2
Lee................. 23,404 9.9
Leon................. 51,590 5.4
Levy................. 10,637 9.4
Liberty............ 3,182 7.7
Madison......... 14,197 8.2
Manatee........... 34,704 13.6
Marion.......... 38,187 8.9
Martin.............. 7,807 10.6
Monroe............. 29,957 4.9
Nassau........... 12,811 6.3
Okaloosa ....... 27,533 4.1
01 Okeechobee.... 3,454 7.5
- Orange........... 114,950 10.3
Osceola ............ 11,406 21.6
Palm Beach.... 114,688 9.0
Pasco................ 20,529 12.2
Pinellas............ 159,249 18.8
Polk............ 123,997 8.1
Putnam............ 23,615 9.4
St. Johns....... 24,998 9.2
St. Lucie........ 20,180 6.7
Santa Rosa ... 18,554 6.7
Sarasota......... 28,827 11.9
Seminole.......... 26,883 8.8
Sumter.......... 11,330 8.0
Suwannee........ 16,986 7.8
Taylor ......... 10,416 8.1
Union........... 8,906 4.4
Volusia............ 74,229 12.4
Wakulla ......... 5,258 7.7
Walton.......... 14,725 8.7
Washington.... 11,888 8.5


1,025 517 508 6.7
1,046 550 496 7.6
2,702 1,283 1,419 4.7
1,121 537 584 3.8
257 150 107 6.7
4,065 2,023 2,042 9.9
2,324 1,299 1,025 8.7
2,778 1,207 1,571 2.8
1,004 559 445 5.9
245 129 116 5.8
1,159 547 612 4.6
4,728 2,433 2,295 12.2
3,407 1,709 1,698 5.9
831 493 338 8.9
1,468 688 780 4.0
805 406 399 4.3
1,142 578 564 3.6
258 147 111 5.9
11,831 5,561 6,270 9.4
2,458 1,250 1,208 20.5
10,332 5,075 5,257 8.0
2,497 1,357 1,140 11.4
29,936 14,132 15,804 18.2
10,033 5,035 4,998 7.0
2,230 1,106 1,124 6.6
2,297 1,055 1,242 6.9
1,359 728 631 5.5
1,244 666 578 5.7
3,430 1,805 1,625 11.2
2,374 1,203 1,171 6.1
912 500 412 5.8
1,327 691 636 5.4
839 455 384 5.3
393 232 161 3.3
9,190 4,336 4,854 10.9
404 219 185 4.7
1,283 672 611 7.5
1,016 535 481 6.9


948 479 469 0.6
898 466 432 1.2
1,621 813 808 3.1
399 192 207 7.0
228 129 99 0.8
3,593 1,756 1,837 1.3
2,045 1,132 913 1.2
1,457 621 836 2.6
634 351 283 3.5
186 98 88 1.9
647 310 337 3.6
4,257 2,161 2,096 1.4
2,258 1,123 1,135 3.0
700 405 295 1.7
1,206 573 633 0.9
551 283 268 2.0
1,017 513 504 0.5
204 114 90 1.6
10,824 5,079 5,745 0.9
2,328 1,178 1,150 1.1
9,222 4,487 4,735 1.0
2,340 1,261 1,079 0.8
28,907 13,674 15,233 0.6
8,675 4,333 4,342 1.1
1,572 773 799 2.8
1,716 766 950 2.3
1,125 610 515 1.2
1,067 577 490 1.0
3,235 1,688 1,547 0.7
1,645 827 818 2.7
662 349 313 2.2
911 472 439 2.4
546 303 243 2.8
299 164 135 1.1
8,076 3,773 4,303 1.5
248 133 115 3.0
1,105 572 533 1.2
828 435 393 1.6


77 38 39
148 84 64
1,081 470 611
722 345 377
29 21 8
472 267 205
279 167 112
1,321 586 735
370 208 162
59 31 28
512 237 275
471 272 199
1,149 586 563
131 88 43
262 115 147
254 123 131
125 65 60
54 33 21
1,007 482 525
130 72 58
1,110 588 522
157 96 61
1,029 458 571
1,358 702 656
658 333 325
581 289 292
234 118 116
177 89 88
195 117 78
729 376 353
250 151 99
416 219 197
293 152 141
94 68 26
1,114 563 551
156 86 70
178 100 78
188 100 88


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population, Bulletin P-B10, Table 41.









TABLE 4. FLORIDA'S POPULATION 50 YEARS OF AGE AND
OVER BY DIVISION OF BIRTH: 1950


Age
Place of Birth 70
50-50 60-69
and over


Total................................................... 245,380


Born in Florida ..................................


65,275


174,940 116,965


41,630


Born in other states


Total................................ ....

New England...................................

M iddle Atlantic................................

East North Central..........................

West North Central---............ .........

South Atlantic ..................... ........

East South Central..........................

West South Central .-........-...............

Mountain......................... .......

Pacific-........... ---.. ~~. -........



Born in territories, possessions, etc.....


Born abroad of American parents .....


State of birth not reported-...................


177,245 131,210


9,800

32,745

30,495

9,120

61,105

28,435

4,175

660

710



270


130


2,460


7,415

24,990

26,985

7,525

41,160

19,655

2,615

425

440


1,680


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U.


S. Census of Population,


Special Bulletin P-E No. 4A, Table 18. (Statistics are based on a 20 per
cent sample.)


23,745


91,595

6,860

19,160

22,260

4,725

24,535

12,225

1,395

210

225


1,355








TABLE 5. NUMBER OF MEN AND WOMEN 65 YEARS OF AGE
AND OVER, IN FLORIDA: 1900-1950

Number Per Cent
Year
Total Men Women Men Women


1900........................ 13,941 7,289 6,652 52.3% 47.7%
1910........................ 21,797 11,687 10,110 53.6 46.4
1920...................... 40,664 22,253 18,411 54.7 45.3
1930 ----........................ 71,202 38,086 33,116 53.5 46.5
1940........................ 131,217 67,094 64,123 51.1 48.9
1950........................ 237,474 115,971 121,503 48.8 51.2


Source: U. S. Bureau of
Bulletin P-B 10, Table 16.


the Census, 1950 U. 8. Census of Population,


TABLE 6.- HOUSEHOLD STATUS OF MEN AND WOMEN 65 YEARS
OF AGE AND OVER, IN FLORIDA: 1950

Total Men Women
Type of Household
and Household Status Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Per cent




Total........... 236,175 100.0% 114,885 100.0% 121,290 100.0%

In households......... 225,505 95.5 109,125 95.0 116,380 96.0

Head of
household with
spouse present... 73,740 31.2 73,740 64.2

Head of
household with
spouse absent..... 58,320 24.7 17,915 15.6 40,405 33.3

Not head of
household.......... 93,445 39.6 17,470 15.2 75,975 62.7

In hotels, insti-
tutions, labor
camps, etc........... 10,670 4.5 5,760 5.0 4,910 4.0


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population,
Bulletin P-C10, Tables 57, 58, and 60. (Statistics are based on a 20 per
cent sample.)








TABLE 7.- INSTITUTIONAL POPULATION 65 YEARS OF AGE
AND OVER IN FLORIDA: 1950


Age 65 Years and Over
Type of All
Institution Ages
Total White Nonwhite


Total Institutional
Population............................

Correctional Institutions

Federal prisons and
reformatories..................
State prisons and
reformatories..................
Local jails and
workhouses........................


Mental Hospitals

Federal hospitals.................
State, county, and city
hospitals............................
Private hospitals..............


Tuberculosis Hospitals

Federal...............................
State, county, and city.......


Homes for Aged and
Dependent

Federal and state................
County and city...................
Private nonprofit homes....
Other homes........................

Homes and Schools for
Mentally Handicapped
Private homes and
schools..... ..............


*22,870 *4,095 *3,632 463


486 5


4,673

2,946


1 4


47 29 18

66 44 22


38 13 13 -


6,565
88




23
1,136


764
418
875
1,816


1,108
25


224
188
792
1,445


224
154
765
1,371


36 24 24


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population,
Special Report P-E No. 2C, Tables 35 through 40. (Statistics are based on a
3-1/3 per cent sample.)
Details do not add to these totals because not included are the types
of institutions whose inmates, with one exception, are under 65 years of age.









TABLE 8.- MARITAL STATUS OF MEN AND WOMEN 45 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER IN FLORIDA: 1950

Age
Sex and 45 to 54 years 55 to 64 years 65 to 74 years 75 years and over
Marital Status
Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Percent Number Per cent


Men......................... ....................................... 156,890 100.0% 114,495 100.0% 79,890 100.0% 34,995 100.0%
Married................................ ......................... 137,605 87.7 96,210 84.0 61,235 76.7 21,580 61.6

Wife present ............... ................. 127,350 81.2 90,220 78.8 57,595 72.1 20,225 57.7
Wife absent..........--------............. .............. ... 10,255 6.5 5,990 5.2 3,640 4.6 1,355 3.9
Widowed...................... ................. 5,185 3.3 8,665 7.6 12,900 16.1 11,335 32.4
S Divorced............ ................................. .. 5,675 3.6 3,815 3.3 1,965 2.5 475 1.4
Single.............................................. 8,425 5.4 5,805 5.1 3,790 4.7 1,605 4.6

Women.............................. ......................... 164,555 100.0% 119,905 100.0% 85,800 100.0% 35,490 100.0%
Married............................................ 125,320 76.2 75,860 63.2 38,015 44.3 7,350 20.7
Husband present--------............................... --- 115,710 70.4 71,115 59.2 35,830 41.8 6,730 19.0
Husband absent..................................... 9,610 5.8 4,745 4.0 2,185 2.5 620 1.7
Widowed........................ --................-------. 24,995 15.2 34,780 29.0 41,680 48.6 25,375 71.5
Divorced............... .................... 7,455 4.5 3,675 3.1 1,360 1.6 185 .5
Single................................ .......... 6,785 4.1 5,590 4.7 4,745 5.5 2,580 7.3


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population, Bulletin
cent sample.)


P-C10, Table 57. (Statistics are based on a 20 per












TABLE 9. MEDIAN INCOME IN 1949 OF MEN AND WOMEN, BY AGE,
FOR THE STATE AND FOR NONFARM AND FARM AREAS
IN FLORIDA: 1950*


The State Urban and Rural Rural
Age Nonfarm Farm
Men Women Men Women Men Women



14 years and over.... $1,911 $805 $1,993 $830 $1,035 $427

14 to 19 years .......... 455 377 474 388 354 297

20 to 24 years.......... 1,388 840 1,417 854 980 420

25 to 34 years........ 2,300 890 2,359 908 1,376 475

35 to 44 years........... 2,425 948 2,500 970 1,439 514

45 to 54 years ........ 2,255 938 2,338 966 1,315 480

55 to 64 years.......... 1,923 857 2,012 876 1,010 466

65 years and over..... 1,023 565 1,110 589 642 383



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population,
Bulletin P-C10, Table 89. (Statistics are based on a 20 per cent sample.)

Definitions: Income is the sum of money received from wages or sal-
aries, net income (or loss) from self-employment, and income other than
earnings, before deductions for personal income taxes, social security, bond
purchases, union dues, etc. The median income is that income over which
half of the incomes received are higher in amount and under which half
the incomes are lower in amount.

*1950 is the date of the Census enumeration, whereas 1949 designates
the year for which the income information was obtained.










TABLE 10.- INCOME* IN 1949 OF MEN AND WOMEN, BY AGE, IN FLORIDA: 1950**


Persons with income
Total ................ ................
$ 1 $ 499........
(or loss)
$ 500 $ 999......-..-...
$ 1,000 $1,499................
$ 1,500 $1,999..............
$ 2,000 $2,499..............
- $ 2,500 $2,999................
$ 3,000 $3,499................
$ 3,500 $3,999................
$ 4,000 $4,499...............
$ 4,500 $4,999..............
$ 5,000 $5,999................
$ 6,000 $6,999................
$ 7,000 $9,999................
$10,00 and over................

Persons without income........

Income not reported............


809,455
94,165

113,495
114,445
100,465
94,570
67,920
65,580
41,925
29,750
17,350
26,420
12,480
14,105
16,785

114,180

81,315


489,480
52,275

60,455
72,300
63,715
61,815
45,940
43,950
27,220
18,360
10,290
14,655
6,525
6,495
5,485

76,550

52,650


229,880
20,230

30,220
29,665
28,315
26,315
18,135
18,515
12,715
9,700
6,040
9,950
4,845
6,240
8,995

20,225

21,280


90,095 474,065
21,660 168,470


22,820
12,480
8,435
6,440
3,845
3,115
1,990
1,690
1,020
1,815
1,110
1,370
2,305


112,325
63,585
45,005
33,960
18,510
12,360
5,700
3,550
1,650
3,175
1,420
1,920
2,435


17,405 529,890 334,790 145,685


7,385


61,760


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census,
cent sample.)


1950 U. S. Census of Population, Bulletin P-C10, Table


89. (Statistics are based on a 20 per


* See Definitions in footnote to Table 9.
** See footnote (*) to Table 9.


285,835
99,990

65,280
40,190
30,680
23,115
12,115
6,570
2,700
1,455
715
1,175
525
655
670


123,315
38,430

28,650
17,525
11,440
8,560
5,270
4,745
2,530
1,480
700
1,355
615
870
1,145


64,915
30,050

18,395
5,870
2,885
2,285
1,125
1,045
470
615
235
645
280
395
620

49,415

6,960


39,340


15,460








TABLE 11.- RELATIVE FREQUENCY OF SOURCES OF INCOME AMONG OLDER PEOPLE IN FIVE FLORIDA
COMMUNITIES

West Palm West Palm
St. Petersburg Orlando Beach sBeach Winter
Source of (White) (White) (White) (Negro) Park
1950 1951 1951 1951 1951
Income
No. Per cent No. Per cent No. Per cent No. Per cent No. Per cent

Pensions*......... ........ .......................................... 255 39.9% 88 25.9% 70 27.6% 24 21.2% 56 30.8%
Real estate rents.......................................................... 81 12.7 48 14.1 34 13.5 12 10.6 16 8.8
Savings.................... ............................. ................. 80 12.5 51 15.0 34 13.5 10 8.8 14 7.7
Stocks and bonds.............................................. ......... 50 7.8 20 5.9 23 9.1 32 17.6
Investments..................... ..................................... 45 7.0 12 3.5 15 6.0 3 2.7 10 5.5
Cn Annuities.... -----............................... ............... 32 5.0 17 5.0 13 5.2 14 7.7
oD
Relatives.... -----.........-----...... ........... ......-.......... 19 3.0 53 15.6 32 12.7 7 6.2 6 3.3
Full employment ........................................... - 11 9.7 11 6.0
Part employment........-..------............... ......-........ 15 2.3 14 4.1 13 5.2 14 12.4 3 1.6
Old-age assistance................. --.... -.........--. 12 1.9 31 9.1 9 3.6 16 14.2 2 1.1
Loans and mortgages................................ .......... 11 1.7 6 1.8 7 2.8 -
Trusts- -.......--....................-----------. 3 .5 -
Other------....................--- ....------... 13 2.0 2 .8 1 .9 18 9.9
Not given........... ................................... 24 3.7 15 13.3 -


Source: Florida State Improvement Commission, Facts About Florida's Older Population, Research Report No. 4, June, 1953,
Table 2.
Includes old-age and survivors insurance benefits.











TABLE 12. -PERSONS 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER RECEIVING
SPECIFIED GOVERNMENTAL PENSIONS AND INSURANCE
RETIREMENT BENEFITS, IN FLORIDA: 1950-51


Persons 65 Years of Age and Over

Item Percentage
distribution Percentage
Total of number distribution
not in of total
labor force



Total number of persons 65 years of
age and over ...- ................ ............. *236,175 100.0%

Number in labor force (1950).......... *41,685 17.6

Number not in labor force (1950).... *194,490 100.0% 82.4



Number receiving benefits..............---..... 149,988 77.1 63.5

Confederate pensions** ................... 295 .2 .1

Old-age assistance*** ------....................... 69,251 35.6 29.3

Old-age and survivors insurance*** 61,050 31.4 25.8

Railroad retirement........................... 5,400 2.8 2.3

Civil Service retirement
(employee annuitants).................... 5,791 3.0 2.5

Panama Canal Construction annuity 254 .1 .1

Teachers retirement system
(service) ..--......-....--.----.. ....-.. 1,213 .6 .5

State and county officers
and employees retirement systems 434 .2 .2

World War I and prior wars .......... 6,300 3.2 2.7




Source: Statistics obtained from annual reports of or from unpublished
data provided by the agency administering the named pension program.
Population statistics' are taken from the 1950 U. S. Census of Population.

*Based on a 20 per cent sample.

** Principally pensions to widows.

*** There is some double counting in the number of recipients in these
two classes since some of those receiving old-age and survivors insurance
benefits also receive old-age assistance.









TABLE 13.- RECIPIENTS AND PAYMENTS OF OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE
AND OLD-AGE AND SURVIVORS INSURANCE, IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES: 1950


Old-Age Assistance Old-Age and Survivors
Insurance

County Cases receiving Total amount Average number Total amount
assistance as of payments of recipients of payments
of June 1950 in 1950* 1950 in 1950


Alachua.............. 1,967 $ 935,197 426 $ 151,470
Baker.....-.............. 270 126,814 35 9,350
Bay........................ 1,032 478,394 456 173,910
Bradford ............... 539 253,215 67 31,790
Brevard....-.......... 694 322,489 374 185,130
Broward................ 908 409,369 1,107 650,760
Calhoun................. 387 182,511 71 22,440
Charlotte.............. 173 79,889 85 43,010
Citrus------.................. 361 176,548 88 44,880
Clay-----................... 380 178,794 136 78,540

Collier .................. 110 49,696 50 20,570
Columbia -........... 872 396,543 136 48,620
Dade .................... 4,875 2,243,786 6,741 3,620,320
De Soto ................ 347 158,404 139 46,750
Dixie-..................... 205 95,686 57 16,830
Duval..................... 6,754 3,026,336 3,799 1,488,520
Escambia............ 2,703 1,128,623 1,118 387,090
Flagler...--......-..... 135 65,228 32 16,830
Franklin............... 301 141,474 106 33,660
Gadsden................ 1,138 469,587 220 65,450

Gilchrist.............. 174 77,509 22 5,610
Glades................... 76 35,501 18 9,350
Gulf ....................... 205 98,727 59 22,440
Hamilton.............. 448 183,059 68 20,570
Hardee.................. 476 229,033 68 31,790
Hendry................. 134 64,879 55 24,310
Hernando.............. 253 120,848 96 37,400
Highlands............. 432 199,959 243 108,460
Hillsborough........ 5,863 2,586,871 4,268 1,913,010
Holmes.................. 750 327,796 78 31,790

Indian River........ 318 146,258 140 63,580
Jackson.............. 1,913 817,024 209 63,580
Jefferson.............. 793 324,389 88 29,920
Lafayette ............ 189 86,645 10 5,610
Lake...................... 1,0 0 497,468 498 261,800
Lee.--...............-.. 690 334,745 349 179,520




..... continued







TABLE 13.-RECIPIENTS AND PAYMENTS OF OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE
AND OLD-AGE AND SURVIVORS INSURANCE, IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES: 1950(Continued)

Old-Age and Survivors
Old-Age Assistance Insurance

County Cases receiving Total amount Average number Total amount
assistance as of payments of recipients of payments
of June 1950 in 1950* 1950 in 1950

Leon.................... 1,646 $ 757,406 288 $ 112,200
Levy.................... 668 312,429 133 41,140
Liberty................ 202 94,540 24 9,350
Madison............... 895 418,993 124 29,920
Manatee ............... 960 450,462 573 360,910
Marion.................. 1,842 844,122 497 198,220
Martin................... 191 88,169 122 67,320
Monroe................. 541 250,539 199 82,280
Nassau.................. 472 218,441 140 41,140
Okaloosa... ........... 784 366,273 146 50,490
Okeechobee......... 156 75,251 20 7,480
Orange.................. 2,733 1,285,473 1,842 1,002,320
Osceola................. 617 312,752 342 162,690
Palm Beach........ 1,625 731,556 1,759 923,780
Pasco.............. 661 316,768 320 170,170
Pinellas................. 2,740 1,259,202 4,381 2,885,410
Polk...................... 3,416 1,609,433 1,635 742,390
Putnam ................ 1,212 609,390 323 138,380
St. Johns........... 917 427,217 291 117,810
St. Lucie.............. 347 161,197 202 104,720
Santa Rosa.....-.. 924 435,480 153 50,490
Sarasota................ 422 177,621 540 370,260
Seminole.............. 985 461,046 249 112,200
Sumter.................. 603 273,665 72 24,310
Suwannee............. 843 367,114 110 35,530
Taylor................... 563 259,750 197 63,580
Union.................... 250 124,081 35 7,480
Volusia-.......-......... 2,186 1,039,499 1,376 748,000
Wakulla................ 297 136,355 23 7,480
Walton.................. 880 395,504 106 50,490
Washington.......... 738 340,386 138 37,400
Total.---............ 69,251 31,649,408 37,872 18,700,000
Federal funds.. 19,958,554 18,700,000
State funds...... 11,690,854

Source: Data on old-age assistance obtained from the 13th Annual Re-
port, State Welfare Board, July 1, 1949 June 30, 1950, and from the Flor-
ida Department of Public Welfare, Division of Research and Statistics.
Data on old-age and survivors insurance estimated from county totals as
of June 30, 1949, and February 28, 1951, provided by the Federal Security
Agency, Regional Office, Atlanta.
*Assistance payments shown are gross and represent obligations in-
curred by the agency at the time payments were written.







TABLE 14. INCOME SAVED, HOME OWNERSHIP, AND NET WORTH
OF SPENDING UNITS, BY AGE OF HEAD, IN THE UNITED STATES:
1950


All Nonfarm Spending Units
Item Nonfarm with Head 65 Years
Spending Units of Age and Over


Per cent of units falling
in specified groups


Per cent of 1950 income saved.................... 100% 100%
50% or m ore ........................................ 4 5
30% 49%-----------------------................ 8 6
20% 29% ....................................--- 9 5
10% 19% ............................ ... ........ 16 10
1% 9% --......--..........- ---- -------....... 24 20
N one ............................................................ 7 19
Negative savings ....................................... 32 35

Home ownership, 1950.............................. 100% 100%
Own hom e ............................................ 51 65
Pay rent ...............................-- .......--44 30
Other ..............-.......- ............ ...... 5 5

Net worth, 1950 ....... ----.... ........ .......-.......---100% 100%
Negative ......----..-----.......----................--8 1
$ 1 $ 999......................... ... ........ 27 26
$ 1,000 $ 4,999....................... .......... 23 15
$ 5,000 $24,999-.. ......................- .......... 32 42
$25,000 or more............................. ....... 8 14
Not ascertained ..... .-------...................... 2 2



Source: Survey of Consumer Finances, Federal Reserve Bulletin, De-
cember 1950, July 1951, and September 1951.

Definitions: A spending unit is composed of all persons living in the
same dwelling and belonging to the same family who pool their incomes
to meet their major expenses. Income saved is the difference between cur-
rent income and the sum of current expenditures for consumption and tax
payments. Consumption expenditures include expenditures for nondurable
goods and services and for automobiles and other consumer durable goods,
but do not include expenditures for purchase of houses, which are regarded
as capital assets. Expenditures to reduce debt are counted as savings and
increases in debt are deducted from savings. Net worth is the difference
between total selected reported assets and total reported debt.










TABLE 15. VALUE OF OWNER-OCCUPIED DWELLING UNITS* FOR FOUR FLORIDA STANDARD METROPOLITAN AREAS
BY CHARACTERISTICS OF HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD, 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER: 1950

Value
Area and Charactertistic
SArea and Char c Less $2,000 to $3,000 to $4,000 to $5,00,000 to 6,000 to $7,500 to $10,000 to 13,o001 to $20,000 or Not
of Head of Household Total than
$2,000 $2,999 $3,999 $4,999 $3,999 $7,499 $9,999 $14,999 $19,999 more reported

Jacksonville (Duval County).................... 4,350 365 330 375 355 470 750 505 595 240 205 160
Male head, wife present,
no nonrelatives..................... ... 2,275 155 165 165 190 265 390 250 340 140 125 90
Other male head.......................... ...... 720 65 65 80 35 75 125 85 85 35 30 40
Female head................................ 1,355 145 100 130 130 130 235 170 170 65 50 30
Miami (Dade County) ............................ 8,485 180 200 285 415 700 985 1,200 2,235 845 1,120 320
Male head, wife present,
no nonrelatives ..............----- 4,925 95 110 130 160 430 585 725 1,350 525 655 160
OS Other male head..................................... 1,370 60 25 60 105 100 170 195 235 130 235 55
- Female head..................... ............... 2,190 25 65 95 150 170 230 280 650 190 230 105
Orlando (Orange County)....................... 3,885 245 235 270 235 365 525 610 665 275 340 120
Male head, wife present,
no nonrelatives-............... ..... ........ 2,330 125 130 170 150 225 340 390 395 135 205 65
Other male head..............-..................... 425 40 40 30 20 40 40 65 60 35 40 15
Female head.............................................. 1,130 80 65 70 65 100 145 155 210 105 95 40
Tampa-St. Petersburg
(Hillsborough and Pinellas
Counties)........................................ ...... 13,880 1,015 875 1,045 980 1,260 1,750 1,990 2,390 905 910 760
Male head, wife present,
no nonrelatives.................. ......... 8,070 450 475 575 565 745 1,080 1,155 1,500 550 580 395
Other male head................................... 1,855 215 135 190 135 160 195 225 280 100 95 125
Female head..........................-....... 3,955 350 265 280 280 355 475 610 610 255 235 240

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. B. Census of Housing, Bulletins H-B72 (Jacksonville), H-B91 (Miami), H-B105 (Or-
lando), and H-B144 (Tampa-St. Petersburg), Table A-1 (Statistics are based on a 20 per cent sample.)
Excludes rooming houses with 5 lodgers or more, transient accommodations, institutions, and dormitories. Included are trailers,
boats, tents and railroad cars, occupied as living quarters.








TABLE 16. CHARACTERISTICS OF DWELLING UNITS*, IN FOUR FLORIDA STANDARD METROPOLITAN AREAS, OWNED
OR RENTED BY HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD, 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER: 1950

Tampa-St. Petersburg
Characteristics of Jacksonville Miami Orlando (Hillsborough and
Dwelling Units (Duval County) (Dade County) (Orange County) Pinellas Counties)


Owner-occupied units....................................................................... ............
Number of rooms
1 room .............................................. ........................................................
2 rooms.... .............. ...................... ........................
3 and 4 room s............................................................................. ..........
5 room s and m ore......................... ..................... ..........................
Not reported...........................................................................
Number of persons
1 person ...................................................................
2 persons................................................................... ...........
3 and 4 persons......................................................................... .....
5 persons or m ore ................................................................ ..........
Type of structure
1 dw selling unit, detached......................................................
All other dwelling units................. .. ......... ............-- .
Condition and plumbing facilities
Not dilapidated... .......... ...................................... ..........
With private toilet and bath, and hot running water......................
With private toilet and bath, and only cold water..........................
With running water, lacking private toilet and bath......-..............
No running water................................................
Dilapidated -.................-- ......... ..-..................... .................
With private toilet and bath, and hot running water......................
Lacking hot water, private toilet or bath.............................-...
Condition or plumbing not reported............ ............. .......


5,615

100
155
1,265
4,010
85

1,050
2,285
1,610
670

4,740
875

4,965
3,505
580
555
325
490
35
455
160


11,890

225
455
2,985
8,055
170

1,880
5,985
3,115
910

10,170
1,720

11,400
9,895
900
520
85
310
135
175
180


4,930


65
210
1,300
3,290
65

970
2,675
985
300

4,360
570

4,640
3,630
510
335
165
245
45
200
45


18,465

610
860
6,500
10,215
280

3,790
9,800
3,740
1,135

16,010
2,455

17,055
12,805
2,190
1,660
400
985
165
820
425










Renter-occupied units............................ .............................. 3,085 7,150 1,575 7,940
Number of rooms
1 room ............................................ -- ..... . -----.. .......... 285 730 130 745
2 room s................................................... ............ ... ..... ... ...... ..... 450 1,965 315 1,760
3 and 4 rooms................................ ..... ....................... ............ 1,355 3,155 785 3,945
5 rooms and more...................................... ...... 920 1,150 315 1,270
Not reported................................ .......... ................ 75 150 30 220

Number of persons
1 person....... .................................. 85209.. 885 2,045 480 2,950
2 persons ................................... 1,200 3,645 775 3,770
3 and 4 persons.... .................................-........ ..... 725 1,235 255 965
5 persons or more............................ .... .... .............. ....... 275 225 65 255

Type of structure
1 dwelling unit, detached......................... ........... 1,465 2,250 805 3,225
All other dwelling units................................... ... ................. 1,620 4,900 770 4,715

Condition and plumbing facilities
N ot dilapidated....................................................... ................................ 2,205 6,540 1,305 6,760
With private toilet and bath, and hot running water................... 1,135 5,595 840 4,630
With private toilet and bath, and only cold water........................ 325 475 190 840
With running water, lacking private toilet and bath.................... 570 395 190 1,060
No running water...................... ....-..---- .... ......- 175 75 85 230
Dilapidated.......................................... .... ....... .................. 805 405 200 855
With private toilet and bath, and hot running water...................... 40 40 15 65
Lacking hot water, private toilet or bath...................................... 765 365 185 790
Condition or plumbing not reported......................................... 75 205 70 325

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Housing, Bulletins H-B72 (Jacksonville), H-B91 (Miami), H-B105 (Or-
lando), and H-B144 (Tampa-St. Petersburg), Table A-8. (Statistics are based on a 20 per cent sample.)
*See footnote to Table 15.


____ ____


_ ___








TABLE 17.- GROSS MONTHLY RENT* OF RENTER-OCCUPIED DWELLING UNITS**, FOR FOUR FLORIDA STANDARD
METROPOLITAN AREAS, BY CHARACTERISTICS OF RENTER 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER: 1950

Gross Monthly Rent
Area and Characteristic Gross Monthly Rent
of Head of Household $p 9 or $10 to $15 to $20 to $25 to $30 to $35 to $40 to $50 to $60 to $75 to $100 or Rent-free or
total less $14 $19 $24 $29 $34 $39 $49 $59 $74 $99 more not reported

Jacksonville (Duval
County) ...................... 3,085 65 245 275 285 230 200 190 400 245 225 115 30 580
Male head, wife
present, no
nonrelatives -...........--- 1,115 15 70 85 95 55 60 80 200 130 95 55 10 165
Other male head---.............. 665 30 55 80 70 45 45 45 50 30 35 20 10 150
Female head.................... 1,305 20 120 110 120 130 95 65 150 85 95 40 10 265
Miami (Dade County) 7,150 25 120 110 325 275 395 345 870 740 810 940 1,085 1,110
Male head, wife
present, no
nonrelatives ................ 3,485 5 25 40 120 90 155 160 345 390 460 560 690 445
Other male head............---. 1,445 10 60 25 85 95 135 65 215 140 80 105 135 295
Female head-................. 2,220 10 35 45 120 90 105 120 310 210 270 275 260 370
Orlando (Orange
County) ...................... 1,575 15 55 105 120 160 120 85 145 130 135 105 40 360
Male head, wife
present, no
nonrelatives ................ 720 5 5 25 50 70 60 40 80 70 70 60 10 175
Other male head........... 245 10 15 15 20 40 25 25 5 15 10 10 55
Female head................... 610 35 65 50 50 35 45 40 55 50 35 20 130
Tampa-St. Petersburg
(Hillsborough and
Pinellas Counties) 7,940 105 370 475 590 700 650 605 1,075 700 540 420 420 1,290
Male head, wife
present, no
nonrelatives ............. 3,365 10 105 110 190 230 245 285 510 405 265 265 230 515
Other male head.......... 1,520 50 110 160 150 140 105 65 160 80 80 70 65 285
Female head............... 3,055 45 155 205 250 330 300 255 405 215 195 85 125 490

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Housing, Bulletins H-B72 (Jacksonville), H-B91 (Miami), H-B105 (Or-
lando), and H-B144 (Tampa-St. Petersburg), Table A-3. (Statistics are based on a 20 per cent sample.)
Gross monthly rent excludes any rent paid for furniture but includes the reported average monthly cost of utilities (water, elec-
tricity, gas) and fuels such as wood, coal, and oil.
** See footnote to Table 15.










TABLE 18.- YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED BY PERSONS 25 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER, IN FLORIDA: 1950


None .................................. 42,180 17,475 24,705 27,595 10,725 16,870 14,585 6,750 7,835


Elementary school ............
Less than 5 years..........
5 and 6 years................
7 and 8 years..................

High school .....................
1 to 3 years....................
4 years ............................

College ................................
1 to 3 years...............
4 years or more..............

Not reported ..................

Total .......................


691,805 464,290 227,515 569,020 363,560 205,460 122,785 100,730
182,475 77,355 105,120 146,770 56,010 90,760 35,705 21,345
172,075 104,710 67,365 145,035 82,100 62,935 27,040 22,610
337,255 282,225 55,030 277,215 225,450 51,765 60,040 56,775


618,025 570,180
283,500 250,790
334,525 319,390

234,090 223,080
131,415 125,745
102,675 97,335


47,845 556,980 511,090
32,710 257,225 225,670
15,135 299,755 285,420

11,010 205,210 194,835
5,670 116,220 110,930
5,340 88,990 83,905


50,880 38,360 12,520 42,000 31,015


45,890 61,045
31,555 26,275
14,335 34,770


10,375
5,290
5,085

10,985


28,880
15,195
13,685

8,880


59,090
25,120
33,970

28,245
14,815
13,430


22,055
14,360
4,430
3,265

1,955
1,155
800


7,345 1,535


34,015


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. H. Census of Population, Bulletin P-C10, Table 65. (Statistics are based on a 20 per
cent sample.)


1,636,980 1,313,385 323,595 1,400,805 1,111,225 289,580 236,175 202,160






TABLE 19.- MEN AND WOMEN 45 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER IN
FLORIDA'S LABOR FORCES*: 1890-1950


1890
Total population
Number in labor
force ................
Per cent in labor
force .... ............
1900
Total population
Number in labor
force ................
Per cent in labor
force ................
1920
Total population
Number in labor
force ................
Per cent in labor
forde ................
1930
Total population
Number in labor
force ..........------
Per cent in labor
force ................
1940
Total population
Number in labor
force ................
Per cent in labor
force ..............
1950
Total population
Number in labor
force .............
Per cent in labor
force ...............


15,201 7,871 5,365 13,163 6,653 4,531

15,024 7,645 4,597 3,078 1,473 818

98.8% 97.1% 85.7% 23.4% 22.1% 18.1%


21,544

20,712

96.1%


11,389

10,694

93.9%


54,714 29,526

**79,208

**94.0%


79,529

75,568

95.0%


105,318

93,591

88.9%


156,890

138,290

88.1%


49,787

42,940

86.2%


71,536

54,754

76.5%


114,495

82,870

72.4%


7,289

5,883

80.7%


22,253

14,451

64.9%


38,086

20,686

54.3%


67,094

24,858

37.0%


114,885

34,055

29.6%


17,745

4,208

23.7%


9,769

2,232

22.8%


39,781 22,764

**14,846

**23.7%


70,083

19,426

27.7%


101,966

31,889

31.3%


164,555

59,965

36.4%


42,559

8,147

19.1%


70,390

14,659

20.8%


119,905

27,685

23.1%


6,652

1,122

16.9%


18,411

2,135

11.6%


33,116

2,992

9.0%


64,123

4,837

7.5%


121,290

7,630

6.3%


Source: U. S. Census Bureau, Census of the United States, 1890, 1900,
1920, 1930, and 1950 U. S. Census of Population, P-C10, Table 69.
The 1940 and 1950 censuses of the labor force, in general, included
all people 14 years old and over, whether employed or unemployed, if such
persons worked or held themselves out for work for compensation either
on a direct or indirect basis. Specifically excluded were persons primarily
occupied with their own home housework, students, and certain other
groups. In population censuses prior to 1940, the labor force group was
designated as "gainful workers" 10 years of age and over, who were ident-
ified by means of a question relating to occupation, without reference to
labor market activity at any given time. As a result, census figures for
the earlier years are not directly comparable with the figures of later
censuses; however, the data are deemed sufficient to suggest the outlines
of major trends and relationships. (See Durand, John D., The Labor Force
in the United States, 1890-1960, pp. 12-16.)
**Age 45 to 64 years.
68
















TABLE 20. LABOR FORCE* PARTICIPATION OF MEN AND WOMEN
65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER, IN FLORIDA: 1950


Population in Labor Force
Total
Age and Sex
Population
Population Number Per cent


Total .................................................... 236,175 41,685 100.0%
65 to 69 years.................................... 98,610 25,880 62.1
70 to 74 years................................... 67,080 10,420 25.0

75 years and over.....................----- ... 70,485 5,385 12.9

M en ........................... .......... ........ 114,885 34,055 81.7

65 to 69 years.................-................ 47,080 20,780 49.9
70 to 74 years................................... 32,810 8,755 21.0
75 years and over........................... 34,995 4,520 10.8

W omen ........................... ........ ... 121,290 7,630 18.3
65 to 69 years........--....................- 51,530 5,100 12.2
70 to 74 years-........................ 34,270 1,665 4.0

75 years and over...........-............... 35,490 865 2.1


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U.
Bulletin P-C10, Table 66. (Statistics are based o


See definitions in footnote (*) to Table 19.


S. Census of Population,
n a 20 per cent sample.)














TABLE 21. AVERAGE NUMBER OF REMAINING YEARS OF LIFE, IN
THE LABOR FORCE* AND IN RETIREMENT, OF MEN AT SELECTED
AGES, IN THE UNITED STATES: 1940 AND 1947


Separations from the Labor Average Number of
Force (per 1,000 in labor force) Remaining Years of-
Age Interval
Due to Due to Due to Labor force
Life participi-
all causes death retirement tion

(Between successive (At beginning of
age intervals) age interval)

1940

55 to 59 years.................... 211.6 115.7 95.9 18.3 12.4

60 to 64 years............... 376.7 148.9 227.8 15.1 9.2

65 to 69 years----................... 495.5 191.8 303.7 12.2 6.8

70 to 74 years...........-....... 576.4 262.4 314.0 9.6 5.6

75 years and over........... -


1947

55 to 59 years.............. 160.5 115.1 45.4 18.6 13.2

60 to 64 years ----................... 354.7 148.6 206.1 15.3 9.7

65 to 69 years-----................... 501.8 189.2 312.6 12.4 7.0

70 to 74 years...................--544.3 258.8 285.5 9.9 5.9

75 years and over....... -



Source: U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Tables of Working Life, Bul-
letin No. 1001, August, 1950, Table 12.

See definition in fbotnote (*) to Table 19.








TABLE 22. EMPLOYMENT STATUS OF MEN AND WOMEN 55 YEARS
OF AGE AND OVER, IN FLORIDA: 1950


Men ...................... 229,380 100.0% 114,495 100.0% 114,885 100.0%
In civilian labor
force ................ 116,615 50.8 82,655 72.2 33,960 29.5
Employed ............ 109,850 47.9 77,890 68.0 31,960 27.8
Unemployed ...... 6,765 2.9 4,765 4.2 2,000 1.7


On active duty
with armed
forces ..............
Not in labor force
Keeping house....
Unable to work..
Inmates of
institutions ....
Other and not
reported* ........


Women ...................
In civilian labor
force ...............
Employed ............
Unemployed ......
On active duty
with armed
forces .............
Not in labor force
Keeping house....
Unable to work..
Inmates of
institutions ....
Other and not
reported* ........


310
112,455
2,085
47,145

3,580


59,645 26.0


241,195 100.0%


35,280
33,690
1,590


35
205,880
152,985
30,710


2,485 1.0

19,700 8.2


215
31,625
705
11,030


95
80,830
1,380
36,115


1,345 1.2 2,235 1.9

18,545 16.2 41,100 35.9


119.905 100.0%


27,650
26,400
1,250


35
92,220
79,405
5,265


121,290 100.0%


7,630
7,290
340



113,660
73,580
25,445


785 .7 1,700 1.4

6,765 5.6 12,935 10.7


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. 8. Census of Population,
Bulletin P-C10, Tables 66 and 68. (Statistics are based on a 20 per cent
sample.)
Includes students, the retired, those too old to work, those voluntari-
ly idle, seasonal workers who were not reported as unemployed, and persons
for whom information on employment was not reported.
(a) Less than one-tenth of one per cent.

















TABLE 23. EMPLOYED MEN AND WOMEN 65 YEARS OF AGE AND
OVER, BY INDUSTRY, IN FLORIDA: 1950


65 Years of Age and Over
Industry
Total Men I Women


Total ..................................................... 40,048 32,400 7,648
Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries.......... 8,792 8,058 734
M ining .......................................................... 104 102 2
Construction .......................... ................ 3,269 3,223 46
Manufacturing .......................-............ .... 3,078 2,809 269
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities........................ 1,632 1,569 63
Wholesale and retail trade.......................... 6,992 5,714 1,278
Finance, insurance, and real estate ........ 2,711 2,171 540
Business and repair services -----..................... 896 827 69
Personal services....................---...........---. 5,727 2,838 2,889
Entertainment and recreation services.... 594 536 58
Professional and related services............ 3,636 2,365 1,271
Public administration.................................. 1,427 1,278 149
Industry not reported.........................---....... 1,190 910 280


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census,
Bulletin P-C10, Table 82.


1950 U. S. Census of Population,









TABLE 24. MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP OF EMPLOYED PERSONS, BY AGE, IN FLORIDA: 1950


Total employed..................................................... 1,009,055 100.0%
Professional, technical, and kindred workers......... 81,494 8.1
Farmers and farm managers..................................... 40,042 4.0
Managers, officials and proprietors, except farm.. 116,246 11.5
Clerical and kindred workers..................................... 102,496 10.2
Sales workers...................................................... ... 80,482 8.0
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers.............. 132,093 13.1
Operatives and kindred workers ..................... 134,264 13.2
Private household workers........................-----......... 52,334 5.2
Service workers, except private household--............. 98,056 9.7
Farm laborers and foremen --------................................ 75,780 7.5
Laborers, except farm and mine---...............................----. 81,540 8.1
Occupations not reported ... .......................... ....... 14,228 1.4


191,638 100.0%
15,595 8.1
8,569 4.5
31,580 16.5
14,986 7.8
14,856 7.8
26,910 14.0
21,763 11.4
11,457 6.0
17,306 9.0
11,183 5.8
15,059 7.9
2,374 1.2


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population, Bulletin P-C10, Table 76.


105,190
8,535
7,545
18,585'
6,803
8,389
14,759
9,896
5,353
10,233
5,825
7,646
1,621


100.0%
8.1
7.2
17.7
6.5
8.0
14.0
9.4
5.1
9.7
5.5
7.3
1.5


40,048
3,545
5,346
6,965
1,955
3,122
4,484
2,431
1,804
3,815
2,568
3,053
960


100.0%
8.9
13.3
17.4
4.9
7.8
11.2
6.1
4.5
9.5
6.4
7.6
2.4
















TABLE 25. -PREVALENCE OF DISABILITY, BY CHRONICITY, AGE,
SEX, AND COLOR, IN 8 CITIES: 1935-1936
(Per cent of persons of specified ages disabled on the day of a
Public Health survey in 8 cities*)


Total ................ 5.12% 4.45% 2.94% 4.21% 6.76% 13.91%


Major chronic
diseases and
impairments** ..
All other
diagnoses ............

Nonwhite ................
W hite ......................
Males .....- ---
Females ..............


.47 .78 1.29 3.27 8.06


3.98 2.16 2.92 3.49 5.85


20.02
13.53
14.14
13.04


Source: Federal Security Agency, Fact Book on Aging, Table 23.
Atlanta, Georgia; Cincinnati, Ohio; Dallas, Texas; Fall River, Mas-
sachusetts; Newark, New Jersey; Oakland, California; St. Paul, Minnesota;
Seattle, Washington.
** Cancer, rheumatism, diabetes, nervous diseases, all circulatory di-
seases, tuberculosis, asthma and hay fever, hernia, nephritis, and major
orthopedic impairments.








TABLE 26. PREVALENCE OF SPECIFIED IMPAIRMENTS, BY AGE
AND SEX, IN THE UNITED STATES: 1935-1936
(Rate per 1,000 persons in the general population)


Males:


Disabling
orthopedic................ 3.2
Total Deafness----............. 1.2
Blindness in
both eyes................. 1.1


Nondisabling
orthopedic............ 24.8
Partial deafness............ 13.4
Blindness in
one eye.................... 4.7


Disabiling
orthopedic.-...........-. 1.9
Total deafness---............ 1.1
Blindness in
both eyes.................. 1.0


Nondisabling
orthopedic --................ 9.5
Partial deafness........... 11.6
Blindness in
one eye....................... 2.3


.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 5.7 13.7 21.4
.7 .8 .9 1.0 1.3 3.1 8.5


.1 .3 .4 .6 1.7 5.1 13.2



L.8 12.3 21.1 31.4 44.4 65.3 80.6
..4 3.1 4.1 8.9 19.4 71.4 174.7


.9 2.0 2.7 4.7 7.7 18.1 33.4


.7 1.0 1.2 2.7 8.3 16.2
.7 .8 .8 1.3 3.6 7.7


.2 .3 .4 1.2 4.5 16.8



5.7 7.0 8.2 15.0 30.7 46.1
2.4 4.5 8.5 18.6 51.0 132.8


.8 1.0 1.5 3.5 10.4 21.7


Source: Federal Security Agency, Fact Book on Aging, Table 24.


Females:


























TABLE 27. CASES OF CERTAIN REPORTABLE* DISEASES
CONTRACTED BY PERSONS 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER,
IN FLORIDA: 1950


Cancer........................ 2,300 1,202 904 110 79
Diabetes..................... 657 172 347 36 99
Syphlis....................... 373 154 44 128 44


Tuberculosis...:..........
Pneumonia.................
Gonorrhea..................
Meningitis, Epi........


311 180 81 38 10
144 69 61 7 3
11 1 9 1
3 2 1 -


Source: Florida State Board of Health,
1950, Annual Report, Supplement No. 2.


Florida Morbidity Statistics,


Since the completeness of reporting of diseases varies in counties and
cities in Florida, a knowledge of local conditions is necessary for interpre-
tation of the county data; however, for the purpose of determining the re-
lative occurrence of the listed diseases, the totals of these data suffice.
** Includes cases for which race or sex was not stated.























TABLE 28. -PER CENT OF POPULATION INSURED AGAINST COST
OF HOSPITALIZATION, ALL AGES AND PERSONS 65 YEARS
OF AGE AND OVER, IN THE UNITED STATES: MARCH 1952


Per cent
insured



*56%


All ages.


65 and over.. ... ........................

65 69...............- .............

70 74......... .................

75 and over........................... ..



Source: Federal Security Agency,

Estimate for December 1951.


Fact Book on Aging, Table 26.








TABLE 29.- DEATH RATES*, BY IMPORTANT CAUSES, OF PERSONS
65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER, FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES:
1950.
(Numbers after causes of death are International List numbers,
sixth revision, 1948.)


Cause of Deat Florida United States
Cause of Death
1950 1950


All causes---- .........------------........... ......-- ...... 5,134.9 6,232.2

Tuberculosis, all forms (001-019)............................ 43.0 58.7

Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms
of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues
(140-205) ....................................................... ..... 723.9 851.3

Diabetes mellitus (260)........................... ........ 82.5 120.4

Major cardiovascular-renal diseases**
(330-334, 400-468, 590-594)............................--------...... 3,325.5 4,214.1
Vascular lesions affecting central
nervous system (330-334) ....................-........... 776.1 918.2
Diseases of heart (410-443) .................................... 2,155.7 2,843.6
Hypertension without mention
of heart (444-447) ................................ ........ 64.0 66.2
Diseases of the circulatory system
(400-402, 450-468) .................................- ...... 208.4 262.4
Nephritis and nephrosis (590-594)**.................... 121.3 123.7

Influenza and pneumonia (480-493)........................ 128.4 190.1

Hernia and intestinal obstruction
(560, 561, 570) ..................................... ... 36.6 37.3

Hyperplasia of prostate (610).................................... 46.7 46.0

Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined
conditions (780-795) ...................... ---------..... 195.0 97.5

Accidents (E800-E962).........................---------............ 168.8 209.5
Motor-vehicle accidents (E810-E835)-----................. 48.8 42.8
All other accidents (E800-E802, E840-E962).... 120.0 166.7

All other causes........................................ 384.5 407.3


Source: Rates for Florida are estimated from statistics on resident
deaths compiled by the Florida State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital
Statistics; rates for the United States are estimated from statistics on
deaths compiled by the United States Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Rates per 100,000 persons enumerated as of April 1950.
** Includes List numbers 590-91 which are ordinarily excluded from
the cause group of Major cardiovascular-renal diseases by the National
Heart Institute and the National Office of Vital Statistics.








TABLE 30.-AVERAGE FUTURE LIFETIME FOR TOTAL POPULATION
FLORIDA, 1929-1931, 1939-1941, 1949-1951


Age
(In Years)


Average Future Lifetime (In Years)


1949-1951


-1 ...................... ....... ..........

1 ..................... ....... ..........

2-4 .............. .............. ......

5-9 ...................... ...................

10-14........................... ............

15-19....................................

20-24........-.........-.......-- ..........-

25-29..........-........................

30-34---.------------------ -.--------.
30-34................... ..........

35-39.......................----------------...........-----

40-44........................... ............

45-49.....................---- .....------

50-54.............-...... ...... ......

55-59...................... .........

60-64............................ .....

65-69............... --....... ....... ....

70-74........................ ............

75-79.................... ... ...... ..

80-84.....................--..........

85-89....................................

90-94....................... ...--...


67.71

69.23

68.40

65.64

60.87

56.04

51.38

46.82

42.28

37.81

33.47

29.33

25.19

21.66

18.39

15.28

12.25

9.60

7.30

5.46

4.23


1939-1941 1929-1931


61.20 56.60

63.88 59.24

63.27 58.87

60.74 56.59

56.08 52.13

51.40 47.53

46.97 43.40

42.75 39.58

38.63 35.79

34.64 32.09

30.69 28.43

26.94 25.00

23.42 21.66

20.19 18.53

17.09 15.51

14.05 12.72

11.13 10.15

8.54 7.99

6.57 6.21

4.95 4.92

3.89 3.85


Source: Unpublished data,
Vital Statistics.


Florida State Board of Health, Bureau of





TABLE 31.- POPULATION 65 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER AS A PERCENTAGE OF POPULATION 21 YEARS OF AGE AND
OVER BY COUNTY AND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT, IN FLORIDA: 1940 AND 1950


Florida...................... ..........
First....................... .....
Hernando.............................
Hillsborough............-..........
Pasco............... ..... ..............
Pinellas............................ ....
Second ............................. ....
Clay........ -....................
Duval....... ........................
Third. ... .................. .....
Bay-..-.............. .........
Calhoun ...................
o Escambia---.........................-------
Franklin .............----..............
Gadsden..................--.......
Gulf .................................. ...
Holmes..................................
Jackson..............................
Jefferson.............................
Leon..........-................
Liberty..........................
Okaloosa.........................
Santa Rosa..............................
Wakulla ..................--.............
Walton.......................... .....
Washington........................-
F ourth.......................... ....
Dade...........-............ ......-...
Monroe..............................----
Fifth.................... .......
Brevard..................................
Citrus..---- ................... -
Flagler.......................... ......
Lake.....................................
Marion..----------
M arion ....... ........................
Orangq.................................
Osceola..................... .........


1950 1 1940*
65 and 65 and
Population Population over as a Population Population over as a
Total 21 and 65 and per cent 21 and 65 and per cent
over over of 21 over over of 21
and over and over
..... .................. 2,771,305 1,823,513 237,474 13.0% 1,218,660 131,217 10.8%
... ....... 436,365 303,403 53,194 17.5 197,138. 26,031 13.2
... ......6,693 4,170 634 15.2 3,395 438 12.9
.. ......... 249,894 165,691 20,127 12.1 118,046 11,681 9.9
.................................. 20,529 13,241 2,497 18.9 8,846 1,478 16.7
- ................................ 159,249 120,301 29,936 24.9 66,851 12,434 18.6
... ............. ...... 318,352 206,772 19,201 9.3 142,686 11,462 8.0
14,323 8,456 1,267 15.0 4,004 901 22.5
304,029 198,316 17,934 9.0 138,682 10,561 7.6
........... 404,824 233,576 25,033 10.7 173,203 16,948 9.8
42,689 25,166 1,911 7.6 11,800 1,031 8.q
7,922 4,217 549 13.0 4,237 403 9.5
......................... 112,706 66,688 5,760 8.6 44,911 3,358 7.5
.................................. 5,814 3,396 495 14.6 3,507 377 10.7
.................... 36,457 22,113 3,013 13.6 18,951 2,018 10.7
.. ....... .... 7,460 4,199 345 8.2 4,146 228 5.5
...... 13,988 7,545 1,025 13.6 7,937 810 10.2
.... ...... ........ 34,645 18,837 2,702 14.3 17,837 2,123 11.9
...... ..... 10,413 5,667 1,121 19.8 6,466 982 15.2
... ......51,590 30,494 2,778 9.1 18,915 1,758 9.3
3,182 1,785 245 13.7 1,999 219 11.0
27,533 15,573 1,142 7.3 7,007 686 9.8
......... ..................... 18,554 10,187 1,244 12.2 8,527 946 11.1
...... .... ... 5,258 2,854 404 14.2 2,955 323 10.9
... ..... ... 14,725 8,361 1,283 15.3 7,579 943 12.4
............. ... ......... 11,888 6,494 1,016 15.6 6,429 743 11.6
........... 525,041 375,766 39,223 10.4 201,156 18,410 9.2
..... ... .... 495,084 356,606 37,755 10.6 191,970 17,239 9.0
.. ...................... 29,957 19,160 1,468 7.7 9,186 1,171 12.7
..................... ........ 371,454 246,528 40,202 16.3 176,055 23,617 13.4
... ........................... 23,653 16,010 2,666 16.7 10,581 1,517 14.3
... .......... ........ 6,111 3,854 702 18.2 3,481 429 13.2
...................... ...... 3,367 2,139 300 14.0 1,897 194 10.2
................ ........... 36,340 23,470 4,065 17.3 17,434 2,483 14.2
.................................. 38,187 23,648 3,407 14.4 18,800 2,335 12.4
...... ................... - 114,950 77,848 11,831 15.2 47,146 5,875 12.5
............ ................ 11,406 8,172 2,458 30.1 6,933 1,445 20.8







St. Johns........- .........................................
Seminole.................... .. ............ ........
Sum ter.................. ...... -... ...... ...............
Volusia......................... ........ .. .............
VlSixt------------------------------
Sixth..........................................
Brow ard........-. .......... ........ .............. .......
Charlotte......................... ............... ...
Collier........................................ .
G lades.................................. ..................... ..........
Hendry.........................................
Indian River............. ...... ...... ..........
Lee.................... ............ .........
Martin ..................... ..- -... ........
Okeechobee.................... ............................
P alm B each................... .................................
St. L u cie .................................. ..... ..... ......
Seventh............................ .... ..............
De Soto.........--....----- -------... .....................
Hardee............................... ........................
H ighlands............................. .......................... .......
S M anatee.................. ................. .. ............
Polk---....................--------------................. ............... ............
Sarasota........ --................................ ... ... .........
Eighth...................... ...... ........................
Alachua.................................. ......
B ak er................................ ......... .......
B radford................................ ............... .........
Colum bia ..-- ................. ......................
D ixie---.... .............. ..................................-- -
G ilchrist.......................... .... .............. .. .........
H am ilton......................................... ...... ............
Lafayette.... ........... .........................
L evy ................ .. .. ........................
M adison........ ............ ..................... ..............
N assau......... ..... .............. ...........................
Putnam .... .... .. ... .............. ..............
Suwannee.................................................... .........
T aylor............ .......... .. .........................- -
U nion............................... ....................... ........


24,998
26,883
11,330
74,229
284,362
83,933
4,286
6,488
2,199
6,051
11,872
23,404
7,807
3,454
114,688
20,180
220,479
9,242
10,073
13,636
34,704
123,997
28,827
210,428
57,026
6,313
11,457
18,216
3,928
3,499
8,981
3,440
10,637
14,197
12,811
23,615
16,986
10,416
8,906


16,060
16,773
6,747
51,807
191,969
56,792
2,996
4,090
1,355
3,659
7,540
15,523
5,346
2,092
79,771
12,805
142,338
6,194
6,168
8,596
23,261
77,703
20,416
123,161
34,606
3,299
6,291
10,555
2,201
1,898
4,876
1,877
6,307
7,631
7,201
14,662
9,375
6,087
6,295


2,297 14.3%
2,374 14.2
912 13.5
9,190 17.7
23,849 12.4
6,333 11.2
630 21.0
324 7.9
132 9.7
280 7.7
1,046 13.9
2,324 15.0
831 15.5
258 12.3
10,332 13.0
1,359 .10.6
21,500 15.1
953 15.4
964 15.6
1,392 16.2
4,728 20.3
10,033 12.9
3,430 16.8
15,272 12.4
3,470 10.0
373 11.3
810 12.9
1,380 13.1
276 12.5
245 12.9
704 14.4
257 13.7
1,004 15.9
1,159 15.2
805 11.2
2,230 15.2
1,327 14.2
839 13.8
393 6.2


12,776
13,918
6,396
36,693
121,821
26,501
2,416
3,335
1,700
3,362
5,498
11,260
4,212
1,731
54,385
7,421
97,687
4,786
5,934
5,635
16,619
53,767
10,946
108,914
23,175
3,233
4,718
9,688
4,246
2,198
5,239
2,337
7,370
8,620
6,159
11,524
9,313
6,738
4,356


1,502 11.8%
1,423 10.2
694 10.9
5,720 15.6
11,893 9.8
2,446 9.2
385 15.9
160 4.8
130 7.7
201 6.0
616 11.2
1,336 11.9
530 12.6
178 10.3
5,298 9.7
613 8.3
11,626 11.9
S596 12.5
691 11.6
717 12.7
2,352 14.2
5,917 11.0
1,353 12.4
11,230 10.3
2,518 10.9
295 9.1
502 10.6
946 9.8
204 4.8
203 9.2
566 10.8
200 8.6
774 10.5
921 '10.7
621 10.1
1,536 13.3
1,096 11.8
530 7.9
318 7.3


Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1950 U. S. Census of Population, Bulletin P-B10, Table 41.
* The 1940 data are compared on the basis of the 1950 Congressional Districts.








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