• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Abstract
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Demographic characteristics
 Travel activity
 Appendix














Group Title: Working Paper
Title: Household survey in Florida
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086050/00001
 Material Information
Title: Household survey in Florida
Series Title: Working Paper
Physical Description: 68 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Publisher: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida,
Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1982
Copyright Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Demographic surveys -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Households -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Population -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by the Survey Program.
General Note: "November, 1982."
General Note: Survey research program developed by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086050
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 09967921

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
        Title Page 3
        Title Page 4
    Abstract
        Abstract 1
        Abstract 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Demographic characteristics
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 9a
        Page 10
        Page 10a
        Page 11
        Page 11a
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
    Travel activity
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 39a
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
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        Page 50
        Page 51
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        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
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    Appendix
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
Full Text



















HOUSEHOLD SURVEY IN FLORIDA

Working Paper No. 12



Prepared by the
Survey Program


November, 1982



















HOUSEHOLD SURVEY IN FLORIDA

Working Paper No. 12



Prepared by the
Survey Program


November, 1982














University of Florida


College of Business Administration

Bureau of Economic and Business Research








Wen-Fu P. Shih, Survey Program Director






Denise Witte, Statistician
Scott Smith, Statistician
K.C. Chang, Graduate Assistant
Elizabeth Shorn, Graduate Assistant
Steven W. Einbender, Graduate Assistant
Barbara Jacobson, Typist




Interviews were conducted by

Madelyn Heise
Darren Law
Mark Quevedo
Rheua Stakely
Portia Whiteway









ABSTRACT





The Bureau of Economic and Business Research is conducting survey

research to generate economic and demographic data on the characteristics of

Florida's households. The present paper examines the data gathered from the

January-February, 1982, survey. A random digit dialing (RDD) method is

utilized to elicit responses from a sample of 1,139 households. The survey

data are studied and compared among eleven geographical regions. Characteris-

tics associated with household members, households and non-native Floridians

are analyzed along with a detailing of both intra- and interstate travel

activity by Florida residents. In respect to the former, the results show

that geographical differences exist among Floridians' age, marital status,

type of family, household size and family income distributions. The travel

data provide detail profiles of travelers for major counties in Florida and

eight geographical regions of the United States.









TABLE OF CONTENTS

Abstract i
CHAPTER 1 Introduction 1
I-1. Background and objective of study 1
I-2. Methodology 3
CHAPTER 2 Demographic Characteristics 4
II-1. Characteristics of household members 4
11-2. Characteristics of households 5
II-3. Characteristics of non-native Floridians 7
CHAPTER 3 Travel Activity 31
III-1. Instate travel 32
III-2. Out-of-state travel 35

Figure 1. Planning districts in Florida 10
Figure 2. Geographical regions in the United States 11


TABLES .

Table 1.1. Household members' sex distribution by district 12
Table 1.2. Household members' age distribution by district 13
Table 1.3. Household members' marital status distribution by district 14
Table 1.4. Family type by district 15
Table 1.5. Number of persons in household by district 16
Table 1.6. Type of housing unit by district 17
Table 1.7. Housing type by household size 18
Table 1.8. Housing ownership by district 19
Table 1.9. Household income by district 20
Table 1.10. Household income by household size 21
Table 1.11. Household income by age of respondent 22
Table 1.12. Education level of household head by district 23
Table 1.13. Distribution of heads of household native to Florida by district 24
Table 1.14. Non-native household head's reasons for move to Florida by district 25
Table 1.15. Reasons for non-native household heads' move to Florida by age 26
Table 1.16. Non-native household heads' years in Florida by district 27
Table 1.17. Non-native household heads' previous residences 28
Table 1.18. Non-native household heads' previous residences by district 29
Table 1.19. Non-native household heads' years in Florida by previous residence 30
Table 2.1. Travel in Florida by district 40
Table 2.2. Number of instate trips by origin (district) 41
Table 2.3. Instate travel activity by income 42
Table 2.4. Instate travel by family type 42
Table 2.5. Instate travel transportation by origin (district) 43
Table 2.6. Instate travel distance by origin (district) 44
Table 2.7. Instate travel duration by origin (district) 45
Table 2.8. Instate travel of household members by origin (district) 46
Table 2.9. Instate travel season by origin (district) 47
Table 2.10. Instate travelers' ages by season 48
Table 2.11. Instate travel activities by destinations--fifteen selected counties 49
Table 2.12. Out-of-state travel by district 50
Table 2.13. Number of out-of-state trips by origin (district) 51
Table 2.14. Out-of-state travel activity by income 52
Table 2.15. Out-of-state travel by family type 52







TABLES count. )


Out-of-state travel transportation by origin (district)
Out-of-state travel distance by origin (district)
Out-of-state travel of household members by origin (district)
Out-of-state travel duration by origin (district)
Out-of-state travel duration by age
Out-of-state travel season by origin (district)
Out-of-state travelers'age by season
Out-of-state travel destination by origin (district)
Out-of-state travel destination by age
Out-of-state travel activities by destination--eight regions in the
United States


APPENDIX


Estimation of travelers
Questionnaire
Answer sheet


I











I


I


I


Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table


2.16.
2.17.
2.18.
2.19.
2.20.
2.21.
2.22.
2.23.
2.24.
2.25.








1982 Household Survey in Florida


CHAPTER 1



Introduction



I-1. Background and objective of study

Florida grew very rapidly during the 1970s. According to the 1980 U.S.

Census, over the last decade Florida's population increased by almost three

million persons, or 43.4 percent. The distribution of this population growth

is not uniform; it is different from year to year, season to season and area

to area. These variations in population have significant impact on the

state's economy.

The demand for more detailed and recent demographic and seasonal infor-

mation increases as the impact of these new residents on the state economy

increases. Thus, a need exists for more frequent and continuous documentation

of Florida demographics.

One social behavior of Floridians that affects the state's economy as

well as seasonal variation in population is travel activity. As residents of

this well-known tourist state, Floridians are active intrastate travelers.

There is no doubt that the state's residents contribute considerable portions

yearly to Florida's multibillion-dollar tourist revenues. Whenever nationwide

recession, inflation and the high cost of gasoline decrease the number of

out-of-state vacation travelers, Floridians' intrastate travels play a more

important role in the state's tourist economy.








While instate travelers contribute to the state's tourist industry,

Floridians' out-of-state travels have caused seasonal residential variation in

some local areas. One group of retired citizens from the north live in the

state only from winter through early spring every year; another group of

senior citizens who have retired in Florida go back to their home states

during the summer. Despite the significant impacts they have on the local

economy and services, there is insufficient information regarding these

so-called "snow birds" to analyze the effects of their seasonal mobility.

Therefore, to update the state's demographic characteristics, to study

the impact of yearly population growth on demography and to follow Floridians'

travel behaviors, the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR),

University of Florida, embarked upon a yearly statewide household survey in

1980.

The survey collects households' demographic characteristics, household

heads' native status, housing units and detailed instate and out-of-state

travel activities.

This report presents the results of the third statewide household survey

conducted during January and February, 1982.

Chapter 2 discusses characteristics of households' members, information

on households and profiles of non-native Floridians. The data are analyzed by

the planning district (Figure 1) in which the respondents live. They are also

compared with the 1980 U.S. Census results at the state level where comparable

figures are available. The survey data are then evaluated and discussed.

Chapter 3 examines detailed profiles of Floridians' instate and out-of-

state travel activities. The survey data are also combined with the results

of the 1980 Census to estimate the number of travelers for sixteen populous

counties in Florida and eight geographical regions of the United States.








1-2. Methodology

This survey was conducted among households throughout the state during

January and February, 1982. A total of 1,139 households were sampled from the

population of 3,743,000 households (1980 U.S. Census provisional estimates).

A random digit dialing (RDD) telephone interview method was used to

collect the data. The RDD technique works to control sampling bias because

all telephone numbers, listed and unlisted, have an equal probability of being

selected. The question remains whether the exclusion of the 10 percent of

nontelephone households in Florida reduces the accuracy of a RDD survey. To

answer this question, the data are compared with U.S. Census results and

discussed in Chapter 2.

During the two-month data collection period, 3,000 randomly selected

numbers were dialed. Of these, 52 percent were determined to be nonworking,

nonresidential or "no contact" (no contact was made after at least four

attempts at varied times); 10 percent refused to provide the information; and

38 percent were eligible households who did participate in the survey.

To reach those residents who come from northern states during the winter

season, and to avoid the peak summer travel season when a large number of

Floridians are away from home, the survey was conducted during January and

February. Telephone interviews were undertaken from 9 AM to 9 PM on weekdays,

with evening calls between 6 PM and 9 PM having the highest completion rate.

However, the highest refusal rate was also found in this period. Since the

ratio of no-answer to total telephone attempts was lower for the evening

calls, the evening survey was found to be most efficient.

The size of the survey sample assures that the results are within plus or

minus 3 percentage points of the true value at a confidence level of 95

percent.

The smaller numbers of respondents in individual planning districts,

however, do not assure the same accuracy as does the state-level sample.








CHAPTER 2



Demographic Characteristics



This chapter is divided into three sections. The first section examines

characteristics of household members such as sex, age and marital status. The

second section discusses profiles of households according to such factors as

family type, household size, housing unit, housing ownership and income. The

last section presents information regarding inmigrant households, whose heads

are non-native, their reasons for moving to Florida, years in Florida and

states of origin.

The data are analyzed by the planning district in which the respondents

live and compared with 1980 U.S. Census data in the first and the second

sections. A discussion of possible sampling errors assumes these errors are

evenly distributed throughout the state; therefore, geographical comparisons

among planning districts are feasible.



II-1. Characteristics of household members

Tables 1.1 through 1.3 present survey results about Floridians' charac-

teristics. In the state there are slightly more females than males: 51.6

percent to 48.4 percent. This distribution is exactly the same as in the two

previous surveys (1980 and 1981) and the 1980 U.S. Census, indicating that sex

distribution in the state has been stable and our sample data in this variable

have been valid. However, the distribution is not uniform across the state.

While almost 58 percent of the household members in District One are female, I

only 42 percent are in District Three.

Age distributions are also very close to the 1980 Census result, with

only 1 percent fewer respondents found in the group 65 and older. The data




5



show that 23.5 percent of Floridians are younger than 18, those aged between

18 and 44 total 37.5 percent, 22.8 percent are between 45 and 65 and 16.2

percent are 65 and older. Significant geographical differences exist in this

distribution. The west coast of Florida (Districts Five, Eight and Nine)

shows a higher concentration of older people and the northwest panhandle has a

larger proportion of younger people than the rest of the state.

More than 52 percent of Floridians are currently married according to the

survey. This figure is slightly higher than the U.S. Census report of 48

percent. Undersampling has occurred with the widowed, divorced and separated

population. One reason is that this group is often in lower income house-

holds, more likely to be without telephones and thereby excluded from the RDD

survey. Another possible reason is that this group tends to be more cautious

and suspicious of strangers' telephone calls and refused to participate in the

survey. The largest concentration of widows is in District Five. Given that

the highest proportion of respondents aged 65 and older is in this area, this

finding is not surprising.



11-2. Characteristics of households

Table 1.4 presents family types in the state. These data are not avail-

able in the U.S. Census, but the current survey results are consistent with

our two previous surveys (1980 and 1981). Almost 69 percent of households are

husband-and-wife families, 9 percent are male-headed, 18 percent are female-

headed and 4 percent are other-type families. It is possible that husband-

and-wife families have been slightly over-represented than other types of

families because they are more likely to have telephones and to have someone

at home to respond to telephone interviews.

The average number of members in a household in the survey is 2.67, a

figure 4 percent higher than the 1980 Census finding of 2.55. This can be





I

explained by the fact that single-member households are more likely to be

missed in telephone surveys. Smaller households are more often found on the

west coast where older people are concentrated, and larger households are

located in the panhandle area where residents are younger on average than

those in other regions (Table 1.5).

Data on type of housing quarters are broken down by geographical areas,

household sizes and ownership in Tables 1.6, 1.7 and 1.8. One-family houses

detached from other houses predominate at 70 percent of the sample. Attached

one-family housing, such as townhouses, total approximately 5 percent. Multi-

family housing, either an apartment or condominium, accounts for about 17

percent, and mobile homes house about 8 percent of the households. The

greatest -oncentration of multifamily housing is in District Eleven, the Miami

area. Mobile homes are found to be more popular in west Florida in Planning

Districts Three and Five.

The type of housing units occupied by households are examined by the

household size in Table 1.7. Larger households are more likely to live in i

one-family detached houses than smaller households. Compared to more than 84

percent of the households with five or more members living in single-family

units, only 50 percent of the single-member households do so. On the other

hand, while 28 percent of the single-member households live in multifamily

units, only 7 percent of the households with five or more members do so. The

data also show that 76.4 percent own their living quarters.

Households' income categories are broken down by districts in Table 1.9.

Due to the high rate of nonrespondence to this question, the data are less

reliable at the district level. The relationships between household income

and size of the household and age of the respondent are compared in Tables

1.10 and 1.11, respectively. Single-member households earn significantly

lower incomes than other types of households because they have only one income



I








source and they are either relatively younger or are widows dependent on

Social Security.

Education for heads of household is shown in Table 1.12. Slightly more

than half of the household heads either attended college or completed college.



11-3. Characteristics of non-native Floridians

Florida's rapid population growth during the past thirty years has been

primarily the result of large numbers of people moving into the state. These

migrants affected not only the size of Florida's population, but its demo-

graphic structure as well. Furthermore, their cultural background and social

behavior have profoundly affected state politics and its social structure.

To study Florida's demographic and economic structure and potential

development, it is important to investigate the characteristics of migrant

households.

Since the mobility of the head of household is assumed to represent that

of the entire household, the survey focused on non-native heads of household

to research the characteristics of all migrants.

Table 1.13 identifies the distributions of native heads of household and

non-native heads of household in the state. Almost three out of four

household heads are non-natives, a figure consistent with previous surveys.

The distribution of these migrant households is not uniform across the state.

They are more likely living in the southeast and the west coast than in other

regions (Table 1.14).

Non-native household heads' reasons for moving to Florida, years in

Florida and previous residence are detailed in Tables 1.14 through 1.19.

Employment is cited by almost 25 percent as the reason for moving to

Florida, while combinations of retirement, climate and health are reported by








44 percent of the respondents. A family reason is also cited by almost 22

percent of the households.

Those reasons are cross-referenced with the ages of household heads. As

expected, most older immigrants cite retirement, climate and health, while

employment, family and school are reported more often by younger respondents.

The largest segment of immigrants moved to Florida in the past ten years

(46 percent). Twenty-eight percent have been in the state more than ten but

less than twenty-one years, and 26 percent have resided in Florida for more

than twenty years. The distribution of immigrants by length of residence in

the state is uniform among the eleven districts.

Data on non-native Floridians' previous residence are divided among eight

regions in the United States (Figure 2) and three foreign countries. Persons

moving to Florida from the Middle Atlantic states (Delaware, New Jersey, New

York and Pennsylvania) rank first in the survey with 29 percent of total

sampled migrant household heads. The East North Central states (Illinois,

Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin) rank second and account for 22.4 I

percent. The South Atlantic region (District of Columbia, Georgia, Maryland,

North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia) ranks third with

14.2 percent. More than 10 percent of migrant households are from foreign

countries, the majority of them from Latin America and the Caribbean.

To gain better insight into the distribution of migrants in the state,

the data are broken down by respondents' current districts of residence and

their native states. In general, the majority of migrants in northeast

Florida come from the South Atlantic and East North Central states, while the

majority of non-native residents in the southwest come from the Middle

Atlantic and East North Central regions. New England people, on the other

hand, seem more attracted to the southeast Gold Coast area, where a large

proportion of migrants came from New England, the Middle Atlantic and East



I








North Central states. Immigrants from Latin America, the Caribbean and other

foreign countries are predominately located in District Eleven, the Miami

area. Of 218 non-native household heads in this district, 53 (24.3 percent)

are from foreign countries.

When looking into migrants' previous residences and years in Florida, it

is interesting to note that the distribution has been about the same for the

past twenty years, with a majority of 60 percent of the immigrants coming from

the Middle Atlantic and East North Central areas. However, most migrants who

have resided in Florida longer than twenty years came not only from the Middle

Atlantic states, but also from the South Atlantic region. This indicates that

most people from the East North Central states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan

and Ohio are relative newcomers to Florida.
















Planning districts in Florida


DISTRICT 1
*BAY
ESCAMBIA
OKALOOSA
SANTA ROSA
*WALTON

DISTRICT 2

CALHOUN
FRANKLIN
GADSDEN
GULF
HOLMES
JACKSON
JEFFERSON
LEON
LIBERTY
WAKULLA
WASHINGTON

DISTRICT 3

ALACHUA
BRADFORD
COLUMBIA
DIXIE
GILCHRIST
HAMILTON
LAFAYETTE
MADISON
SUWANNEE
TAYLOR
UNION


DISTRICT 4 DISTRICT 8
BAKER HILLSBOROUGH
CLAY MANATEE
DUVAL PASCO
FLAGLER PINELLAS
NASSAU
PUTNAM DISTRICT 9
ST. JOHNS CHARLOTTE
CHARLOTTE
COLLIER
DISTRICT 5
GLADES
CITRUS HENDRY
HERNANDO LEE
LEVY SARASOTA
MARION
SUMTER DISTRICT 10
INDIAN RIVER
DISTRICT 6
MARTTN


BREVARD
LAKE
ORANGE
OSCEOLA
SEMTMTnT O


PALM BEACH
ST. LUCIE

DISTRICT 11


BROWARD
VOLUSIA
DADE
MONROE
DISTRICT 7 MONROE
DE SOTO
HARDEE
HIGHLANDS
OKEECHOBEE
POLK


*Moved from District 2 to District 1,
effective August, 1979.


/ 7
F "r ' .
' 4/


Figure 1.


S
'~"i~ ii












Figure 2. Geographical regions in the United States


"~~




S= = = = = = = = = = = = M M m mmm


Table 1.1. Household members' sex distribution by district


Sex District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

83 40 56 163 29 200 61 271 79 120 361 1,463
Male
42.1 47.1 57.7 49.1 46.0 46.8 51.7 47.9 45.7 53.6 48.6 48.4

114 45 41 169 34 227 57 295 94 104 382 1,562
Female
57.9 52.9 42.3 50.9 54.0 53.2 48.3 52.1 54.3 46.4 51.4 51.6

Total 197 85 97 332 63 427 118 566 173 224 743 3,025

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0












Household members' age distribution by district


Age District (N) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

61 26 27 95 11 102 31 113 25 54 170 715
Under 18
31.0 30.6 27.6 28.0 17.5 23.8 26.5 19.8 14.4 24.1 22.8 23.5

79 35 48 141 15 172 43 206 48 88 266 1,141
18-44
40.1 41.2 49.0 41.6 23.8 40.2 36.8 36.1 27.6 39.3 35.6 37.5

38 15 11 66 16 93 30 129 50 40 205 693
45-64
19.3 17.6 11.2 19.5 25.4 21.7 25.6 22.6 28.7 17.9 27.4 22.8

19 9 12 37 21 61 13 122 51 42 106 493
65 and older
9.6 10.6 12.2 10.9 33.3 14.3 11.1 21.4 29.3 18.8 14.2 16.2

Total 197 85 98 339 63 428 117 570 174 224 747 3,042

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


M M m m -M M M M M M M M M M M M M M


Table 1.2.




= = M = = = = M = = = M = M m m


Table 1.3.


Household members' marital status distribution by district


Marital status District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

105 36 41 168 34 215 65 316 111 120 377 1,588
Married
53.3 42.4 43.2 50.1 54.0 50.4 55.6 55.9 64.2 53.6 50.7 52.5

10 7 7 22 12 23 2 44 13 16 54 210
Widowed
5.1 8.2 7.4 6.6 19.0 5.4 1.7 7.8 7.5 7.1 7.3 6.9

d or 7 1 1 15 0 22 4 21 11 6 35 123
Divorced or
separated 3.6 1.2 1.1 4.5 0.0 5.2 3.4 3.7 6.4 2.7 4.7 4.1

75 41 46 130 17 167 46 184 38 82 277 1,103
Never married
38.1 48.2 48.4 38.8 27.0 39.1 39.3 32.6 22.0 36.6 37.3 36.5

Total 197 85 95 335 63 427 117 565 173 224 743 3,024

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0













Table 1.4. Family type by district

N
Family type District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

52 18 18 83 19 106 34 160 55 58 179 782
Husband & wife
73.2 64.3 54.5 69.2 73.1 67.5 81.0 71.4 74.3 68.2 64.4 68.7

6 2 4 13 1 12 3 16 7 7 30 101
Male headed only
8.5 7.1 12.1 10.8 3.8 7.6 7.1 7.1 9.5 8.2 10.8 8.9

13 5 5 21 4 31 3 41 10 16 59 208
Female headed only
18.3 17.9 15.2 17.5 15.4 19.7 7.1 18.3 13.5 18.8 21.2 18.3

0 3 6 3 2 8 2 7 2 4 10 47
Other
0.0 10.7 18.2 2.5 7.7 5.1 4.8 3.1 2.7 4.7 3.6 4.1

Total 71 28 33 120 26 157 42 224 74 85 278 1,138

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


I .












Table 1.5. Number of persons in household by district


Household size District () State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

13 6 6 13 3 18 5 39 9 16 48 176
1
18.3 21.4 20.0 11.0 12.0 11.5 11.9 17.6 12.3 18.8 17.3 15.6

23 8 7 46 13 68 18 100 42 35 115 475
2
32.4 28.6 23.3 39.0 52.0 43.6 42.9 45.0 57.5 41.2 41.4 42.1

7 3 8 26 5 31 5 37 14 8 46 190
3
9.9 10.7 26.7 22.0 20.0 19.9 11.9 16.7 19.2 9.4 16.6 16.8

22 5 4 19 2 22 10 26 4 19 38 171
4
31.0 17.9 13.3 16.1 8.0 14.1 23.8 11.7 5.5 22.4 13.7 15.2

6 6 5 14 2 17 4 20 4 7 31 116
5 or more
8.5 21.4 16.7 11.9 8.0 10.9 9.5 9.0 5.5 8.2 11.2 10.3

Total 71 28 30 118 25 156 42 222 73 85 278 1,128

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0












Table 1.6. Type of housing unit by district


Housing type District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

56 20 18 90 18 126 32 156 51 57 166 790
One-family house (detached)
80.0 74.1 54.5 76.3 72.0 80.3 76.2 70.0 69.9 67.1 60.4 70.0

3 2 0 6 0 3 0 10 5 8 22 59
One-family house (attached)
4.3 7.4 0.0 5.1 0.0 1.9 0.0 4.5 6.8 9.4 8.0 5.2

7 3 7 12 1 20 5 28 9 17 77 186
Multifamily
10.0 11.1 21.2 10.2 4.0 12.7 11.9 12.6 12.3 20.0 28.0 16.5

4 2 8 10 6 8 4 28 8 3 8 89
Mobile home
5.7 7.4 24.2 8.5 24.0 5.1 9.5 12.6 11.0 3.5 2.9 7.9

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 4
Other
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.4 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.4

Total 70 27 33 118 25 157 42 223 73 85 275 1,128

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 .100.0


M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M





















Table 1.7. Housing type by household size


Housing type # of persons in household State

1 2 3 4 5 or more

88 312 145 143 97 785
One-family (detached)
50.3 66.5 77.1 83.6 84.3 70.2

18 24 9 6 1 58
One-family (attached)
10.3 5.1 4.8 3.5 0.9 5.2

49 86 25 16 8 184
Multifamily
28.0 18.3 13.3 9.4 7.0 16.5

18 46 9 6 8 87
Mobile home
10.3 9.8 4.8 3.5 7.0 7.8

2 1 0 0 1 4
Other
1.1 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.9 0.4

Total 175 469 188 171 115 1,118

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0













Table 1.8. Housing ownership by district


Housing District (N) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

56 19 19 90 20 119 33 182 65 68 188 859
Own
80.0 70.4 57.6 76.9 80.0 75.8 80.5 82.0 89.0 80.0 68.4 76.4

14 8 14 27 5 38 8 40 8 17 87 266
Rent
20.0 29.6 42.4 23.1 20.0 24.2 19.5 18.0 11.0 20.0 31.6 23.6

Total 70 27 33 117 25 157 41 222 73 85 275 1,125

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


- - mmmm mm mm m m












Table 1.9. Household income by district


Household income District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 5 11 18 4 24 5 35 5 6 37 162
Under $10,000
19.7 20.0 37.9 16.7 18.2 18.6 13.9 19.2 9.3 8.5 16.8 17.3

21 12 10 37 11 53 15 64 26 29 68 346
$10,001-$20,000
34.4 48.0 34.5 34.3 50.0 41.1 41.7 35.2 48.1 40.8 30.9 36.9

23 6 4 36 4 40 11 58 16 19 75 292
$20,001-$35,000
37.7 24.0 13.8 33.3 18.2 31.0 30.5 31.9 29.6 26.8 34.1 31.2

5 2 4 17 3 12 5 25 7 17 40 137
$35,001 and above
8.2 8.0 13.8 15.7 13.6 9.3 13.9 13.7 13.0 23.9 18.2 14.6

Total 61 25 29 108 22 129 36 182 54 71 220 937

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


mM m MMmm m m m m m mm- m-











Table 1.10. Household income by household size

# of persons in household Income
Total
Under $10,000 $10,001-$20,000 $20,001-$35,000 $35,001 and up %

67 48 .21 8 144
1
46.5 33.3 14.6 5.6 100.0

59 157 102 64 382
2
15.4 41.1 26.7 16.8 100.0

17 50 61 30 158
3
10.8 31.6 38.6 19.0 100.0

10 47 72 18 147
4
6.8 32.0 49.0 12.2 100.0

5 43 33 16 97
5 or more
5.2 44.3 34.0 16.5 100.0


M M M M M M M m m M M M M M M M M M




















Table 1.11. Household income by age of respondent


Income Age (%) State


Under 18 18-44 45-64 65 and older

S4 43 37 79 163
Under $10,000
50.0 10.5 12.7 35.0 17.4

2 157 98 89 346
$10,001-$20,000
25.0 38.3 33.6 39.4 37.0

1 153 91 45 290
$20,001-$35,000
12.5 37.3 31.2 19.9 31.0

1 57 66 13 137
$35,001 and above
12.5 13.9 22.6 5.8 14.6


Total % 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0














Table 1.12. Education level of household head by district


Education District ( ) State
level
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 1 0 3 0 5 0 3 1 0 12 26
0-6
1.5 3.6 0.0 2.6 0.0 3.2 0.0 1.4 1.4 0.0 4.5 2.4

33 16 15 .60 17 76 21 100 35 34 112 519
7-12
49.3 57.1 45.5 52.6 68.0 49.0 51.2 46.7 49.3 40.0 41.8 47.1

33 11 18 51 8 74 20 111 35 51 144 556
College*
49.3 39.3 54.5 44.7 32.0 47.7 48.8 51.9 49.3 60.0 53.7 50.5

Total 67 28 33 114 25 155 41 214 71 85 268 1,101

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


* Includes those persons that attended college but did
also those with advanced degrees.


not complete it and


- - - - - - -

















Table 1.13. Distribution of heads of household native to Florida by district


Native Floridians District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

30 16 17 37 5 46 15 55 9 14 54 298
Yes
42.9 57.1 51.5 31.4 20.0 29.3 36.6 24.8 12.3 16.5 19.7 26.5

40 12 16 81 20 111 26 167 64 71 220 828
No
57.1 42.9 48.5 68.6 80.0 70.7 63.4 75.2 87.7 83.5 80.3 73.5

Total 70 28 33 118 25 157 41 222 73 85 274 1,126

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0









Table 1.14. Non-native household heads' reasons for move to Florida by district


Reasons District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

14 5 3 29 3 25 9 24 9 18 57 196
Employment
35.9 41.7 20.0 38.2 16.7 24.0 34.6 15.0 14.5 25.7 26.8 24.7

5 1 3 9 1 18 4 30 21 15 34 141
Climate
12.8 8.3 20.0 11.8 5.6 17.3 15.4 18.8 33.9 21.4 16.0 17.7

1 0 0 1 1 2 2 13 3 4 8 35
Health
2.6 0.0 0.0 1.3 5.6 1.9 7.7 8.1 4.8 5.7 3.8 4.4

4 2 1 6 7 25 5 44 18 17 40 169
Retirement
10.3 16.7 6.7 7.9 38.9 24.0 19.2 27.5 29.0 24.3 18.8 21.3

8 2 4 23 5 26 4 36 7 13 45 173
Family
20.5 16.7 26.7 30.3 27.8 25.0 15.4 22.5 11.3 18.6 21.1 21.8

1 1 3 3 1 2 0 5 0 0 6 22
School
2.6 8.3 20.0 3.9 5.6 1.9 0.0 3.1 0.0 0.0 2.8 2.8

6 1 1 5 0 6 2 8 4 3 23 59
Other
15.4 8.3 6.7 6.6 0.0 5.8 7.7 5.0 6.5 4.3 10.8 7.4

Total 39 12 15 76 18 104 26 160 62 70 213 795

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


- -- -- -- -- -- --















Table 1.15.


Reasons for non-native household heads' move to
Florida by age


Reasons Age ( ) State

18-44 45-64 65 and older

84 81 28 193
Employment
31.2 28.8 12.0 24.6

39 54 46 139
Climate
14.5 19.2 19.7 17.7

4 16 15 35
Health
1.5 5.7 6.4 4.5

5 53 109 167
Retirement
1.9 18.9 46.6 21.3

97 46 28 171
Family
36.1 16.4 12.0 21.8

20 1 0 21
School
7.4 0.4 0.0 2.7

20 30 8 58
Other
7.4 10.7 3.4 7.4

Total 269 281 234 784

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0















Table 1.16. Non-native household heads' years in Florida by district


Years in Florida District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

15 8 7 30 10 45 12 87 40 38 92 384
1-10
37.5 61.5 43.8 37.0 50.0 40.5 44.4 51.5 61.5 53.5 41.6 46.0

10 3 3 23 5 33 5 54 13 18 65 232
11-20
25.0 23.1 18.8 28.4 25.0 29.7 18.5 32.0 20.0 25.4 29.4 27.8

15 2 6 28 5 33 10 28 12 15 64 218
21 or more
37.5 15.4 37.5 34.6 25.0 29.7 37.0 16.6 18.5 21.1 29.0 26.1

Total 40 13 16 81 20 111 27 169 65 71 221 834

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


- - - - - - - - -m -













Non-native household heads' previous residences


No. of No. of
Region resp. % Region resp. %


New England
Connecticut
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Maine
Rhode Island
Vermont

Middle Atlantic
Delaware
New Jersey
New York
Pennsylvania

South Atlantic
Dist. of Columbia
Georgia
Maryland
North Carolina
South Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia

East North Central
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Ohio
Wisconsin

East South Central
Alabama
Kentucky
Mississippi
Tennessee


51 6.2







239 29.0





117 14.2









185 22.4






60 7.3


West North Central
Colorado
Idaho
Iowa
Kansas
Minnesota
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
South Dakoka
Utah

West South Central
Arizona
Arkansas
Louisiana
Missouri
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

Far West
Alaska
California
Hawaii
Nevada
Oregon
Washington

Latin America and
Caribbean
countries


Canada


Other countries


TOTAL


26 3.2












33 4.0









21 2.5










42 5.1

11 1.3

40 4.8

825 100.0


Table 1.17.





















Table 1.18. Non-native household heads' previous residences by district


Original residence District (N) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 1 3 3 4 2 2 9 2 9 15 51
New England
2.6 9.1 18.8 3.8 20.0 1.8 7.4 5.4 3.1 12.7 6.9 6.2

5 4 2 10 5 29 9 51 23 25 76 239
Middle Atlantic
12.8 36.4 12.5 12.5 25.0 26.4 33.3 30.4 35.4 35.2 34.9 29.0

3 1 2 23 1 23 3 19 8 8 26 117
South Atlantic
7.7 9.1 12.5 28.8 5.0 20.9 11.1 11.3 12.3 11.3 11.9 14.2

10 3 5 16 6 24 4 53 25 13 26 185
East North Central
25.6 27.3 31.2 20.0 30.0 21.8 14.8 31.5 38.5 18.3 11.9 22.4

14 1 1 7 4 6 3 9 0 5 10 60
East South Central
35.9 9.1 6.2 8.8 20.0 5.5 11.1 5.4 0.0 7.0 4.6 7.3

1 0 2 3 0 5 0 5 2 5 3 26
West North Central
2.6 0.0 12.5 3.8 0.0 4.5 0.0 3.0 3.1 7.0 1.4 3.2

5 0 0 6 0 5 3 10 0 0 4 33
West South Central
12.8 0.0 0.0 7.5 0.0 4.5 11.1 6.0 0.0 0.0 1.8 4.0

0 0 0 4 0 7 1 4 0 0 5 21
Far West
0.0 0.0 0.0 5.0 0.0 6.4 3.7 2.4 0.0 0.0 2.3 2.5

LatinAmericaand 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 2 1 34 42
Latin America and
Caribbean countries
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.8 3.7 1.2 3.1 1.4 15.6 5.1

0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 2 3 11
Canada
0.0 0.0 0.0 2.5 0.0 0.0 3.7 1.2 1.5 2.8 1.4 1.3

0 1 1 6 0 7 0 4 2 3 16 40
Other countries
0.0 9.1 6.2 7.5 0.0 6.4 0.0 2.4 3.1 4.2 7.3 4.8

Total 39 11 16 80 20 110 27 168 65 71 218 825

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0














Table 1.19. Non-native household heads' years in Florida by previous residence


Middle South East North East South West North West South
Years New England Atlantic Atlantic Central Central Central Central Far West Total

1-10 24 115 33 98 17 17 14 13 331

% 7.3 34.7 10.0 29.6 5.1 5.1 4.2 3.9 100.0

11-20 12 68 26 57 15 6 10 5 199

% 6.0 34.2 13.1 28.6 7.5 3.0 5.0 2.5 100.0
0
20+ 15 57 58 30 28 3 9 3 203

% 7.4 28.1 28.6 14.8 13.8 1.5 4.4 1.5 100.0


Total 51 240 117 185 60 26 33 21 733


= mm mm = mm -








CHAPTER 3



Travel Activity



This chapter examines Floridians' travel activities during 1981. The

survey focused on pleasure trips or vacation trips only; excluded were

business travel; crew members' trips by train, bus, airplane, truck or ship;

travel by students between home and school; and travel with the Armed Forces.

While national travel studies and the state's tourist statistics focus on

nonlocal travel only, this study covers local and nonlocal travels. There-

fore, one-way travel distance is not limited to a certain mileage.

The survey gathered information on instate and out-of-state pleasure

trips. Respondents who took trips during 1981 were asked the type of

transportation, one-way distance from home, duration, size of party, their

ages, months and destination for each trip. The data are analyzed by the

planning district in which the respondents live. A geographical comparison of

travel activities is also discussed.

Travel is measured in terms of "household trips" and "travel members." A

"household trip" is defined as travel by one or more persons in a household

away from home and return, whether or not an overnight stay is involved. If a

household takes three trips, it is counted as three "household trips."

"Travel members" are persons in a "household trip." If two persons took a

"household trip" they are accounted for as two travel members.

The number of travelers is estimated by combining the survey data with

1980 U.S. Census provisional estimates. The estimates are subject to sampling

errors and some response errors. The sample errors are within plus or minus 3

percentage points of true value at a 95 percent confidence level for overall

data. The response errors are caused by respondents' failure to recall the

trips.








In this chapter, instate travel data are detailed in the first section

and out-of-state travel results are analyzed in the second section.

I

III-1. Instate travel

In 1981, slightly less than 50 percent of Florida households took one or

more pleasure trips in the state (Table 2.1). The estimate shows more than

1.7 million households took a total of more than 3 million household trips,

indicating that more than 7 million individual Floridians, adults and

children, traveled in the state (see Appendix).

The proportion of households taking trips is quite uniform among the

eleven districts except in District One, where only 30 percent reported

instate travels.

While a majority of 52 percent of the traveled households took only one

instate trip, about 22 percent traveled twice, 19 percent traveled three times

and almost 8 percent took four trips or more (Table 2.2). Residents of the

west coast seemed to travel more frequently than those elsewhere in the state.

Tables 2.3 and 2.4 further analyze instate travel activities by household

income and family type. As expected, higher income families tend to travel

more on vacation than the less affluent. Compared to only 30 percent of the

families with a yearly income of less than $10,000 who traveled, 43 percent of

the families with a yearly income of $10,000 to $20,000, and more than 58

percent of the households with income higher than $20,000, traveled intra-

state.

In terms of family types, the data show that a significantly lower pro-

portion of female-headed households took trips, probably because female-headed

households' incomes are much lower than those of other families.

An overwhelming majority (94.3 percent) of intrastate travels were taken

by automobile. Only 2.6 percent traveled by airplane; these travelers all








lived on the southeast and the southwest coasts. Bus and train were the least

popular modes of transportation for instate travels.

One-way distance for instate travel was relatively short, with the

average being around 150 miles. The data did not show a geographical

difference among districts for the instate travel distance (Table 2.6).

The duration of intrastate travel is also short. More than 91 percent of

the households were away from home a week or less. Only 2.4 percent of the

total household trips took a month or longer (Table 2.7).

One-half of all trips reported in the state during 1981 were taken by two

members of a household. About 27 percent were taken by individuals traveling

alone, 9.5 percent by a party of three and about 14 percent by groups of four

or more members. The average size was 2.18, which is smaller than the state's

average household size. This indicates that smaller households tend to travel

more frequently than larger households (Table 2.8).

Floridians traveled intrastate all year around. About one-third of all

instate trips during 1981 occurred during the summer months (June, July and

August). The next popular months were in the fall (September, October and

November), with 26 percent of the household trips taken during this season.

It was closely followed by the winter months (December, January and February).

The spring (March, April and May), accounted for 17.5 percent of the instate

trips. Some geographical differences were noted from the survey data.

Northern Floridians seem more likely to travel during the summer than south-

erners (Table 2.9).

Table 2.10 examines the association between travelers' ages and the

travel season. Not surprisingly, age was one of the important factors in

determining travel season--younger persons traveled more frequently during

summer months and older persons during the fall and winter. While more than

51 percent of the instate travelers under 18 took trips during the summer,

only 22 percent of the travelers 65 and older did.









The data are further analyzed by travelers' destinations, with the

fifteen most popular counties selected for the detailed analysis. The

distributions by one-way travel distance, duration, transportation, months of

travel, travelers' ages and estimated number of travelers are presented in

Table 2.11.

The most popular destination is Orange County (Orlando) with 412 house-

hold trips in 1981. (Note again, that if one household took a trip to this

county two times it would be counted as two household trips.)

Local trips with a one-way distance of 50 miles or less are planned more

often to Broward County, Hillsborough County (Tampa-St. Petersburg) and

Sarasota County. More than 30 percent of the households traveled to these

areas from within a 50-mile radius.

Long-distance instate trips with a one-way distance of more than 250

miles are found to have destinations in Alachua County (Gainesville), Leon

County (Tallahassee) and Monroe County (Key West). Since Alachua and Leon

counties are located in the north and Monroe County in the south, this finding

is not surprising.

Due to the centralized location, instate visitors to Orange County

(Orlando) drive an average of approximately 120 miles.

Most instate travelers stay away from home one week or less. Compared to

all destinations in the state, a slightly longer duration is seen for trips to

Monroe County (Key West) and Leon County (Tallahassee).

Personal motor vehicles, including automobiles, trucks and recreational

vehicles, are by far the most popular means of transportation for Floridians'

intrastate travels. No geographical difference is observed.

Travel seasons varied among counties. Floridians travel more often

during December, January and February to Brevard, Dade (Miami), Monroe (Key

West), Palm Beach (West Palm Beach-Boca Raton) and Sarasota counties. Spring








(March, April and May) is not an active travel season in the state. More than

30 percent of the trips taken to Dixie, Hillsborough, Leon, Orange, Polk and

Volusia counties occurred during the summer (June, July and August).

On the other hand, the same proportion of trips was taken to Alachua,

Broward, Lee, Leon and Sarasota counties during the fall (September, October

and November).

The total number of travelers is estimated for the fifteen destinations

(see Appendix). As mentioned in the previous section, the estimates are

subject to sampling and response errors.

The "travelers" discussed in this study are different from those repre-

sented in the data of the U.S. Travel Data Center and the "tourists" counted

by the Florida Department of Commerce. This study imposes no age or distance

limits as do the other studies. Thus, travelers can be from within or without

their counties of residence in this survey. Also, each member on a household

trip counts as a traveler. When a household took two trips, each member

counts as two travelers.

The table shows that the most popular destination in the state, Orange

County, had an estimated more than 3.3 million Floridian visitors in 1981.

The next most popular place, Hillsborough County, attracted an estimated 2.4

million Floridians. While families with younger children are more likely to

visit Orlando, older people are more likely to visit the Tampa-St. Petersburg

area.



111-2. Out-of-state travel

This section discusses Floridians' out-of-state travel activities in

1981. The data are examined by travelers' origins (planning districts) and

travel destinations (regions). Comparisons of out-of-state and instate travel

activities are also discussed in this section.








Half of Florida households took out-of-state trips for pleasure or

vacation in 1981; a slightly higher percentage than that for instate travel

households (Table 2.12).

The proportion of households taking out-of-state trips is significantly

higher than that taking instate trips in the panhandle area (Districts One and

Two). This can be explained by its geographical locations on the border of

Alabama.

Of the households taking out-of-state trips, the majority took only one

in 1981, a frequency far less than that for instate trips (Table 2.13).

Household income is an important factor in out-of-state travel. House-

holds with more than $20,000 in annual income were much more likely to take a

trip than the households with less than $20,000 income. Moreover, this

association between travel activities and income was more pronounced for

out-of-state trips than instate trips (Table 2.14).

Table 2.15 shows travel activities by type of household. Female-headed

households were less likely to take out-of-state trips than other types of

households because they usually have lower household incomes.

The mode of transportation chosen by Floridians for out-of-state trips

was quite different from that for the instate trips. Compared to more than 94

percent of the instate travelers using a car, less than 56 percent of the

out-of-state travelers drove. More than 37 percent of the out-of-state trips

were by airplane, while only 2.6 percent were by bus or train (Table 2.16).

More than 52 percent of the trips taken by households in District Eleven were

by airplane.

Table 2.17 displays out-of-state travel one-way distances by origin

(planning districts). Almost one out of every two trips taken was between

1,000 and 3,000 miles, and almost one out of four trips was between 600 and

1,000 miles. Compared to the trips taken by southern residents, northern

Floridians' travel distances were much shorter.








The number of household members on an out-of-state trip in 1981 was

mostly one or two (Table 2.18), with the average number being slightly less

than that for an instate trip.

Table 2.19 shows trip duration by travelers' origin. The largest segment

of out-of-state trips took seven days or less (41.5 percent). Durations of

eight to fourteen days, fifteen to thirty days and more than thirty days were

reported in 27.8 percent, 18.4 percent and 12.3 percent of the total

out-of-state trips, respectively. The durations were much longer than those

for instate travels. Twenty-eight percent of out-of-state trips taken in

District Nine and more than 20 percent of the trips taken in District Five

were longer than one month.

Table 2.20 further details out-of-state travel durations by age groups.

While durations of a week or less were most popular for each age group, the

travelers 65 and older tended to take longer out-of-state trips than other age

groups.

Out-of-state travel seasons are broken down by travelers' origins in

Table 2.21. The peak travel season was summer, when more than 40 percent of

total out-of-state travels occurred. The slowest season was spring, with 19

percent. Compared to instate travel, (Table 2.9), Floridians were more likely

to travel out-of-state during the summer. They take more instate trips during

the winter. This phenomenon was apparent in the southwestern and the south-

eastern counties, where climates are pleasant in the winter but hot and humid

during the summer.

The travel seasons are further broken down by ages in Table 2.22. The

most active season was summer, regardless of travelers' ages. This is

especially pronounced in the school-age group, however, with almost 47 percent

of travelers 18 and younger taking out-of-state trips during the summer. When

compared to instate travel in Table 2.10, a remarkable difference was found








for the group 65 and older. While 32.1 percent of instate trips were taken in

the winter, less than 17 percent of out-of-state trips for this age group

occurred during this period. On the other hand, as opposed to 22 percent of

instate trips taken during the summer, almost 39 percent of the out-of-state

trips were taken then by this age group. This indicates that older travelers

were more likely to travel out-of-state during the summer and instate during

the winter than other age groups.

The statistics shown in Tables 2.19 through 2.22 confirm the findings in

the Sarasota Survey conducted by the Survey Program in 1979 (BEBR Working

Paper No. 1). That survey revealed that 20 percent of Sarasota (District

Nine) residents were away one month or more and during the peak travel season

in summer, one out of every three residents 65 and older were away from the

county in 1979. These large numbers of long-term travelers have certainly

caused significant seasonal variations in the local economy and population of

southwest Florida.

Out-of-state travel destinations are divided into the following U.S.

regions: (1) New England, (2) Middle Atlantic, (3) South Atlantic, (4) East

North Central, (5) East South Central, (6) West North Central, (7) West South

Central and (8) Far West (Figure 2).

Tables 2.23 to 2.25 examine Floridians' out-of-state travel profiles by

destinations. Table 2.23 shows that the most popular destination for a trip

outside the state in 1980 was the South Atlantic region (Georgia, Maryland,

North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia and Washington, D.C.),

accounting for 28.4 percent of total travel. The second most popular region

was the Middle Atlantic (Delaware, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania),

with 18.5 percent. While northern Floridians (Districts Three and Four) were

more likely to travel to the South Atlantic area, southerners were more evenly

divided among the Middle Atlantic, South Atlantic and East North Central

states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin).








Travel destinations for those aged 65 and older were different from those

of other age groups. Older travelers tended to choose the Middle Atlantic

area for out-of-state trips more often, while younger travelers were more

likely traveling to the South Atlantic.

Trips taken to South Atlantic and East South Central states (Alabama,

Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee) were shorter than those to other areas,

the majority of them lasting seven days or less. On the other hand, trips

taken to New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode

Island and Vermont), the Middle Atlantic and Far West states (California,

Nevada, Oregon and Washington) were relatively longer.

Transportation mode also differed according to the distance of destina-

tions. The majority of trips to the South Atlantic, West South Central, East

North Central and East South Central regions were taken by personal motor

vehicles, and the majority of trips to other regions were taken by airplane.

Travel seasons did not vary among destinations. Summer months were the

most popular season for out-of-state trips to every destination.

Table 2.25 also presents the estimated number of travelers to each

destination. As mentioned in the previous sections, the figures are subject

to sample errors. The favorite travel destination was the South Atlantic

region. It attracted more than two million Floridians in 1981. The second

most popular place was the Middle Atlantic, which attracted more than one

million travelers from the state.




Sm M m M mm m m mm mmm-


Table 2.1. Travel in Florida by district


Travel activity District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

21 13 15 65 12 65 21 101 40 41 131 525
Took trips
30.0 46.4 45.5 54.6 46.2 41.9 50.0 45.7 54.1 48.2 47.6 46.5

49 15 18 54 14 90 21 120 34 44 144 603
Did not take trips
70.0 53.6 54.5 45.4 53.8 58.1 50.0 54.3 45.9 51.8 52.4 53.5

Total 70 28 33 119 26 155 42 221 74 85 275 1,128

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0












Table 2.2. Number of instate trips by origin (district)


Number of trips District (N) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

16 4 9 41 4 33 15 47 17 20 68 274
1
76.2 30.8 60.0 62.1 33.3 50.8 68.2 47.0 42.5 48.8 51.9 52.1

3 4 2 13 2 14 3 24 10 11 27 113
2
14.3 30.8 13.3 19.7 16.7 21.5 13.6 24.0 25.0 26.8 20.6 21.5

2 5 2 9 4 12 2 19 8 6 29 98
3
9.5 38.5 13.3 13.6 33.3 18.5 9.1 19.0 20.0 14.6 22.1 18.6

0 0 2 3 2 6 2 10 5 4 7 41
4 and above
0.0 0.0 13.3 4.5 16.7 9.2 9.1 10.0 12.5 9.8 5.3 7.8

Total household 21 13 15 66 12 65 22 100 40 41 131 516

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


m m m m m n m m m M M M M M M M












Table 2.3. Instate travel activity by income


Travel Income ( )
activity
Less than Above
$10,000 $10,001-$20,000 $20,001-$35,000 $35,000

48 147 169 78
Took trips
29.6 43.0 58.3 57.4

114 195 121 58
Did not take trips
70.4 57.0 41.7 42.6


Total % 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


Travel
activity


Took trips


Did not take trial


Table 2.4.

Husband
and wife

373

48.3

400
s5
51.7


Instate travel by family type

Male headed Female headed
only only

48 80

47.5 38.6

53 127

52.5 61.4


Total % 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


Other

24

50.0

24

50.0













Table 2.5. Instate travel transportation by origin (district)


Transportation District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

25 25 23 99 27 121 36 181 81 70 217 905
Car
89.2 96.2 88.5 93.4 96.4 96.8 97.3 91.4 94.2 90.9 91.9 93.0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 3 14 25
Airplane
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 2.3 3.9 5.9 2.6

0 1 0 2 1 1 1 2 3 2 5 18
Bus or train
0.0 3.8 0.0 1.9 3.6 0.8 2.7 1.0 3.5 2.6 2.1 1.8

3 0 3 5 0 3 0 9 0 2 0 25
Other
10.7 0.0 11.5 4.7 0.0 2.4 0.0 4.5 0.0 2.6 0.0 2.6

Total trips 28 26 26 106 28 125 37 198 86 77 236 973

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


S- --mm mm m m m m m m M M M m m




-ge- m-m -


Table 2.6. Instate travel distance by origin (district)

N
Distance (miles) District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

7 1 3 25 9 30 3 59 14 16 33 200
1-50
25.0 3.8 11.5 23.1 31.0 24.0 8.1 29.6 16.1 20.8 13.9 20.4

1 7 6 23 10 31 14 40. 19 7 22 180
51-100
3.6 26.9 23.1 21.3 34.5 24.8 37.8 20.1 21.8 9.1 9.2 18.4

0 2 8 19 6 18 6 30 16 16 27 148
101-150
0.0 7.7 30.8 17.6 20.7 14.4 16.2 15.1 18.4 20.8 11.3 15.1

0 8 3 21 4 25 7 39 27 23 84 241
151-250
0.0 30.8 11.5 19.4 13.8 20.0 18.9 19.6 31.0 29.9 35.3 24.6

20 8 6 20 0 21 7 31 11 15 72 211
251 and above
71.4 30.8 23.1 18.5 0.0 16.8 18.9 15.6 12.6 19.5 30.3 21.5

Total trips 28 26 26 108 29 125 37 199 87 77 238 980

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0














Table 2.7. Instate travel duration by origin (district)


Number of days District () State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

25 24 24 95 26 116 35 182 80 73 213 893
1-7
89.3 92.3 92.3 88.0 89.7 92.8 94.6 91.5 92.0 94.8 89.5 91.1

2 1 1 9 2 5 0 10 6 2 14 52
8-14
7.1 3.8 3.8 8.3 6.9 4.0 0.0 5.0 6.9 2.6 5.9 5.3

0 1 1 3 0 1 1 5 1 1 8 22
15-30
0.0 3.8 3.8 2.8 0.0 0.8 2.7 2.5 1.1 1.3 3.4 2.2

1 0 0 1 1 3 1 2 0 1 3 13
31 and above
3.6 0.0 0.0 0.9 3.4 2.4 2.7 1.0 0.0 1.3 1.3 2.4

Total trips 28 26 26 108 29 125 37 199 87 77 238 980

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


- - - -- - - - m - -




m M - - - -- - -


Table 2.8. Instate travel of household members by origin (district)


Number of members District ( ) State
in a trip %
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

3 7 15 34 4 21 5 51 22 29 68 259
1
10.7 26.9 57.7 32.7 14.3 16.8 13.9 26.0 25.6 37.7 28.8 26.8

17 12 4 42 20 72 28 101 53 28 106 483
2
60.7 46.2 15.4 40.4 71.4 57.6 77.8 51.5 61.6 36.4 44.9 50.0

2 2 3 10 2 11 1 22 9 7 23 92
3
7.1 7.7 11.5 9.6 7.1 8.8 2.8 11.2 10.5 9.1 9.7 9.5

6 3 1 13 2 15 2 12 0 10 19 83
4
21.4 11.5 3.8 12.5 7.1 12.0 5.6 6.1 0.0 13.0 8.1 8.6

0 2 3 5 0 6 0 10 2 3 20 51
5 and above
0.0 7.7 11.5 4.8 0.0 4.8 0.0 5.1 2.3 3.9 8.5 5.2

Total trips 28 26 26 104 28 125 36 196 86 77 236 968

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0















Table 2.9. Instate travel season by origin (district)


Months District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

5 10 3 20 8 29 8 35 18 19 48 203
Dec. through Feb.
21.7 40.0 12.0 20.6 32.0 26.9 23.5 21.3 24.7 27.9 22.1 23.6

1 4 4 18 5 16 8 25 15 17 37 150
March through May
4.3 16.0 16.0 18.6 20.0 14.8 23.5 15.2 20.5 25.0 17.1 17.5

10 10 11 38 7 33 12 48 16 18 79 282
June through August
43.5 40.0 44.0 39.2 28.0 30.6 35.3 29.3 21.9 26.5 36.4 32.8

7 1 7 21 5 30 6 56 24 14 53 224
Sept. through Nov.
30.4 4.0 28.0 21.6 20.0 27.8 17.6 34.1 32.9 20.6 24.4 26.1

Total trips 23 25 25 97 25 108 34 164 73 68 217 859

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


I I .














Table 2.10. Instate travelers' ages by season


Age Season (N) State

Dec. thru Feb. Mar. thru May June thru Aug. Sept. thru Nov.

70 120 347 140 677
Under 18
10.3 17.7 51.3 20.7 100.0

340 249 537 425 1,551
18-44
21.9 16.1 34.6 27.4 100.0

320 245 403 334 1,302
45-64
24.6 18.8 31.0 25.7 100.0

261 143 179 229 812
65 and older
32.1 17.6 22.0 28.2 100.0












Table 2.11. Instate travel activities by destinations--fifteen selected counties


(%) Counties

Alachua Brevard Broward Dade Dixie Hillsborough Lee Leon Marion Monroe Orange Palm Beach Polk Sarasota Volusia

Travel distance
(miles)
1-50 7.8 17.5 34.3 13.9 25.4 30.3 13.8 3.7 23.9 6.8 14.6 25.6 25.7 32.1 13.4
51-100 13.7 23.8 9.7 20.3 17.5 15.6 17.4 9.3 10.9 16.5 20.4 26.8 34.3 25.6 35.3
101-150 18.6 31.3 9.7 8.9 11.1 17.0 24.8 22.2 8.7 18.1 16.0 12.2 7.1 14.1 15.1
151-250 17.6 16.3 28.0 27.8 23.8 20.1 27.5 24.1 30.4 27.1 30.6 19.5 25.7 17.9 21.8
251 and above 42.2 11.3 18.3 29.1 22.2 17.0 16.5 40.7 26.1 31.5 18.4 15.9 7.1 10.3 14.3

Duration (days)
1-7 89.2 97.5 94.6 94.3 92.1 90.9 95.4 85.2 97.8 83.5 95.6 92.7 92.9 97.4 91.6
8-14 2.9 2.5 4.3 3.8 4.8 7.4 2.8 3.7 2.2 5.2 2.9 3.7 2.9 2.6 4.2
15-30 3.9 0.0 0.0 0.6 2.4 0.6 0.9 3.7 0.0 8.2 1.0 2.4 2.9 0.0 3.4
31 and above 3.9 0.0 1.1 1.3 0.8 1.1 0.9 7.4 0.0 3.1 0.5 1.2 1.4 0.0 0.8

Transportation
Car 92.2 92.5 98.9 91.1 89.7 96.9 91.7 96.3 91.3 91.7 90.5 92.7 90.0 91.0 96.6
Airplane 6.9 0.0 0.0 2.5 7.1 1.1 5.5 3.7 0.0 6.1 3.9 2.4 0.0 3.8 0.8
Bus or train 0.1 0.0 1.1 2.5 1.6 1.1 0.9 0.0 2.2 0.8 1.9 4.9 4.3 5.1 0.0
Other 0.0 7.5 0.0 3.8 1.6 0.8 1.8 0.0 6.5 1.5 3.6 0.0 5.7 0.0 2.5

Season
Dec.-Feb. 17.9 44.4 22.7 33.3 20.7 26.4 23.0 20.4 22.0 30.1 21.0 36.1 26.6 30.4 23.6
Mar.-May 14.7 16.7 26.7 19.6 22.5 14.9 19.0 14.3 22.0 18.8 17.1 15.3 7.8 16.1 14.2
June-Aug. 29.5 26.4 16.0 21.7 32.4 34.7 21.0 30.6 29.3 28.1 37.4 20.8 45.3 19.6 39.6
Sept.-Nov. 37.9 12.5 34.7 25.4 24.3 24.0 37.0 34.7 26.8 22.7 24.4 27.8 20.3 30.4 22.6

Age
Under 18 7.1 8.2 17.8 16.2 18.3 15.4 16.5 2.2 18.4 12.2 24.6 10.4 16.2 14.8 10.7
18-44 44.1 23.9 36.2 39.9 45.5 29.3 28.1 30.0 28.6 36.9 41.3 31.3 29.2 23.1 39.9
45-64 37.1 51.6 26.5 24.4 17.5 32.0 33.3 44.4 18.4 37.6 26.8 36.1 25.3 17.2 35.6
65 and older 11.8 16.4 19.5 19.5 18.7 23.2 22.1 23.3 34.7 13.3 7.3 22.2 29.2 45.0 13.7

Number of trips 102 80 93 158 126 353 109 54 46 133 412 82 70 78 119

Estimated travelers 568 515 601 1,002 733 2,435 805 302 322 870 3,306 473 506 555 775
(thousands)


- - - - -


















Table 2.12. Out-of-state travel by district


Travel activity District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

31 15 11 55 14 80 19 111 40 50 144 570
Took trips
43.7 53.6 33.3 46.2 53.8 51.0 45.2 49.8 54.1 58.8 51.8 50.2

40 13 22 64 12 77 23 112 34 35 134 566
Did not take trips
56.3 46.4 66.7 53.8 46.2 49.0 54.8 50.2 45.9 41.2 48.2 49.8

Total 71 28 33 119 26 157 42 223 74 85 278 1,136

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


m M













Table 2.13. Number of out-of-state trips


Number of trips District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

22 13 8 48 9 57 15 92 33 38 106 441
1
71.0 86.7 72.7 87.3 60.0 72.2 78.9 83.6 82.5 76.0 73.6 77.5

5 2 2 5 4 18 3 14 5 9 27 94
2
16.1 13.3 18.2 9.1 26.7 22.8 15.8 12.7 12.5 18.0 18.8 16.5

3 0 1 2 2 1 0 2 2 3 6 22
3
9.7 0.0 9.1 3.6 13.3 1.3 0.0 1.8 5.0 6.0 4.2 3.9

1 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 5 12
4 and above
3.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.8 5.3 1.8 0.0 0.0 3.5 2.1

Total trips 31 15 11 55 15 79 19 110 40 50 144 569

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


_ - - --- -- --


by origin (district)












Table 2.14. Out-of-state travel activity by income


Travel Income ( )
activity
$35,000
Less than and
$10,000 $10,001-$20,000 $20,001-$35,000 above

46 151 177 93
Took trips
28.2 43.6 60.8 68.4

117 195 114 43
Did not take trips
71.8 56.4 39.2 31.6

Total 163 346 291 136

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


Travel
activity


Took trips


Did not take tri


Total

%


Table 2.15.

Husband
and wife

409

52.4

371
ps
47.6

780

100.0


Out-of-state travel by family type

Male headed Female headed
only only

52 83

51.5 39.9

49 125

48.5 60.1

101 208

100.0 100.0


Other

26

54.2

22

45.8

48

100.0













Table 2.16. Out-of-state travel transportation by origin (district)


Transportation District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

35 10 8 46 17 72 18 72 32 31 72 413
Car
77.8 58.8 53.3 71.9 73.9 66.7 72.0 53.7 64.0 49.2 36.2 55.6

9 7 6 16 3 29 6 56 16 26 105 279
Airplane
20.0 41.2 40.0 25.0 13.0 26.9 24.0 41.8 32.0 41.3 52.8 37.6

1 0 0 1 2 3 0 3 1 2 6 19
Bus or train
2.2 0.0 0.0 1.6 8.7 2.8 0.0 2.2 2.0 3.2 3.0 2.6

0 0 1 1 1 4 1 3 1 4 16 32
Other
0.0 0.0 6.7 1.6 4.3 3.7 4.0 2.2 2.0 6.3 8.0 4.3

Total trips 45 17 15 64 23 108 25 134 50 63 199 743

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


-I -









Table 2.17. Out-of-state travel distance by origin (district)


One-way distance District (N) State
(miles)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

6 2 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
15-100
13.3 11.8 0.0 7.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.7

6 0 2 5 2 1 1 4 0 5 5 31
101-300
13.3 0.0 13.3 7.8 8.3 0.9 4.2 2.9 0.0 7.6 2.5 4.1

4 6 2 17 4 21 6 21 7 9 16 113
301-600
8.9 35.3 13.3 26.6 16.7 19.4 25.0 15.4 14.0 13.6 8.0 15.1

18 3 3 16 7 33 5 31 7 10 42 175
601-1,000
40.0 17.6 20.0 25.0 29.2 30.6 20.8 22.8 14.0 15.2 21.0 23.4

9 4 6 20 9 49 10 72 29 40 122 370
1,001-3,000
20.0 23.5 40.0 31.2 37.5 45.4 41.7 52.9 58.0 60.6 61.0 49.4

2 2 2 1 2 4 2 8 7 2 15 47
3,001 and over
4.4 11.8 13.4 1.6 8.3 3.7 8.4 5.9 14.0 3.0 7.5 6.3

Total trips 45 17 15 64 24 108 24 136 50 66 200 749

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


M M mmm u mmm m mm m .












Table 2.18. Out-of-state travel of household members by origin (district)

N
Number of members District ( ) State
in a trip
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

9 6 7 16 2 24 6 36 11 20 75 212
1
20.5 35.3 46.7 25.0 9.1 22.6 24.0 26.9 22.9 32.3 38.7 29.0

17 6 7 30 17 59 13 77 33 27 95 381
2
38.6 35.3 46.7 46.9 77.3 55.7 52.0 57.5 68.8 43.5 49.0 52.1

9 1 0 7 2 12 2 10 2 5 13 63
3
20.5 5.9 0.0 10.9 9.1 11.3 8.0 7.5 4.2 8.1 6.7 8.6

7 2 1 8 1 7 4 6 2 9 9 56
4
15.9 11.8 6.7 12.5 4.5 6.6 16.0 4.5 4.2 14.5 4.6 7.7

2 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 1 2 19
5 and above
4.5 11.8 0.0 4.7 0.0 3.8 0.0 3.7 0.0 1.6 1.0 2.6

Total trips 44 17 15 64 22 106 25 134 48 62 194 731

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


- - -















Table 2.19. Out-of-state travel duration by origin (district)

N
Number of days District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

30 10 7 38 10 47 8 48 12 25 76 311
1-7
66.7 58.8 46.7 59.4 41.7 43.5 32.0 35.3 24.0 38.5 38.0 41.5

10 3 4 13 4 29 11 42 10 14 68 208
8-14
22.2 17.6 26.7 20.3 16.7 26.9 44.0 30.9 20.0 21.5 34.0 27.8

3 3 3 11 5 18 3 22 14 16 40 138
15-30
6.7 17.6 20.0 17.2 20.8 16.7 12.0 16.2 28.0 24.6 20.0 18.4

2 1 1 2 5 14 3 24 14 10 16 92
31 and above
4.4 5.9 6.7 3.1 20.8 13.0 12.0 17.6 28.0 15.4 8.0 12.3

Total trips 45 17 15 64 24 108 25 136 50 65 200 749

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0


MMM MMM . -















Table 2.20. Out-of-state travel duration by age


Number of days Age ( ) State

Under 18 18-44 45-64 65 and older

174 374 432 206 1,186
1-7
55.6 50.8 50.9 35.3 47.8

80 224 226 146 676
8-14
25.6 30.4 26.6 25.0 27.2

39 103 100 143 385
15-30
12.5 14.0 11.8 24.5 15.5

20 35 91 89 235
31 and above
6.4 4.8 10.7 15.2 9.5

Total travelers 313 736 849 584 2,482

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0















Table 2.21. Out-of-state travel season by origin (district)


Months District () State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

11 4 6 11 4 18 2 21 6 8 39 130
Dec. through Feb.
24.4 25.0 42.9 17.7 17.4 17.0 8.7 15.9 12.0 12.9 19.9 17.8

10 2 0 18 3 21 4 18 10 13 40 139
March through May
22.2 12.5 0.0 29.0 13.0 19.8 17.4 13.6 20.0 21.0 20.4 19.1

14 5 5 23 7 41 9 63 23 33 71 294
June through August
31.1 31.2 35.7 37.1 30.4 38.7 39.1 47.7 46.0 53.2 36.2 40.3

10 5 3 10 9 26 8 30 11 8 46 166
Sept. through Nov.
22.2 31.2 21.4 16.1 39.1 24.5 34.8 22.7 22.0 12.9 23.5 22.8

Total trips 45 16 14 62 23 106 23 132 50 62 196 729

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0















Table 2.22. Out-of-state travelers' age by season


Age Season (N) State

Dec. thru Feb. Mar. thru May June thru Aug. Sept. thru Nov.

52 50 146 65 313
Under 18
16.6 16.0 46.6 20.8 100.0

159 140 286 132 717
18-44
22.2 19.5 39.9 18.4 100.0

120 195 285 238 838
45-64
14.3 23.3 34.0 28.4 100.0

96 111 221 140 568
65 and older
16.9 19.5 38.9 24.6 100.0


- -- -- mm- m mmmm m m -m




- - - - __


Table 2.23. Out-of-state travel destination by origin (district)


Destination District ( ) State

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 1 1 1 1 8 1 6 0 6 11 37
New England
2.3 6.7 7.7 1.6 4.2 8.1 5.0 4.7 0.0 10.9 7.0 5.6

4 2 0 6 4 14 3 27 11 9 42 122
Middle Atlantic
9.1 13.3 0.0 9.7 16.7 14.1 15.0 21.3 25.6 16.4 26.8 18.5

8 4 6 30 6 31 8 38 11 13 32 187
South Atlantic
18.2 26.7 46.2 48.4 25.0 31.3 40.0 29.9 25.6 23.6 20.4 28.4

7 0 3 4 6 12 5 27 10 7 17 98
East North Central
15.9 0.0 23.1 6.5 25.0 12.1 25.0 21.3 23.3 12.7 10.8 14.9

9 3 0 7 5 15 1 10 2 4 10 66
East South Central
20.5 20.0 0.0 11.3 20.8 15.1 5.0 7.9 4.7 7.3 6.4 10.0

0 0 1 4 0 7 0 6 3 5 9 35
West North Central
0.0 0.0 7.7 6.5 0.0 7.1 0.0 4.7 7.0 9.1 5.7 5.3

11 4 1 5 1 5 2 8 2 6 16 61
West South Central
25.0 26.7 7.7 8.1 4.2 5.1 10.0 6.3 4.7 10.9 10.2 9.3

4 1 1 5 1 7 0 5 4 5 20 53
Far West
9.1 6.7 7.7 8.1 4.2 7.1 0.0 3.9 9.3 9.1 12.7 8.0

Total trips 44 15 13 62 24 99 20 127 43 55 157 659

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0













Table 2.24. Out-of-state travel destination by age


Destination Age ( )
(District)
Under 18 18-44 45-64 65 and older

12 42 46 36
New England
4.1 6.8 6.2 7.0

25 83 134 156
Middle Atlantic
8,6 13.3 18.0 30.4

117 212 225 84
South Atlantic
40.3 34.1 30.3 16.3

40 74 85 84
East North Central
13.8 11.9 11.4 16.3

45 71 97 34
East South Central
15.5 11.4 13.1 6.6

22 32 31 29
West North Central
7.6 5.1 4.2 5.6

19 54 60 54
West South Central
6.6 8.7 8.1 10.5

10 54 65 37
Far West
3.4 8.7 8.7 7.2

Total travelers 290 622 743 514

% 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0




- - -


Table 9 92;


On t-Af-cd-il- traiup1 1--;'ri-~ 1- h~ 1vr An.e1-ni1-nn--n4 nht ,.o~n4 r ;n th~ 1I.,4fr i-~A ~


Middle South East North East South West North West South
New England Atlantic Atlantic Central Central Central Central Far West

Duration (days)
1-7 45.8 32.5 56.7 46.9 68.8 34.4 49.0 28.6
8-14 26.4 36.4 25.2 25.2 19.6 21.3 29.2 29.8
15-30 11.1 17.2 11.0 18.2 8.0 31.3 15.6 26.2
30 and longer 16.7 13.9 7.1 9.8 3.6 13.1 6.3 15.5

Transportation
Car 34.7 39.4 79.4 62.0 82.0 48.3 52.1 31.3
Airplane 52.8 59.1 16.4 31.7 12.6 46.6 41.7 60.2
Bus or train 2.8 1.4 2.5 0.7 3.6 3.4 2.1 2.4
Other 9.7 0.0 1.8 5.6 1.8 1.7 4.2 6.0

Season
Dec.-Feb. 22.5 19.5 19.0 14.3 16.2 16.9 21.5 14.5
Mar.-May 21.1 19.0 19.8 15.0 16.2 15.3 17.2 30.1
June-Aug. 33.8 38.5 37.7 41.4 40.5 40.7 33.3 32.5
Sept.-Nov. 22.5 23.0 23.4 29.3 27.0 27.1 28.0 22.9

Travelers' age
Under 18 8.8 6.3 18.3 14.1 18.2 17.5 10.2 6.0
18-44 30.9 20.9 33.2 26.1 28.7 28.1 28.9 32.5
45-64 33.8 33.7 35.3 30.0 39.3 28.1 32.1 39.2
65 and older 26.5 39.2 13.2 29.7 13.8 26.3 28.9 22.3


Estimated travelers
in 1981 433 1,241 2,081 907 811 351 580 516
(thousands)









Appendix


Estimation of travelers

Let N denote the total number of households in Florida. Based on the
1980 U.S. Census provisional estimate, N = 3,743,000.
The estimated number of Floridians, E, and households, H, that took trips
in 1981 are estimated by the following equations:


X1
E = A N
2E=A-
X2


Xl
H = N
X2


where A = average number of travelers in each household trip in the
survey;

Xi = total number of household trips in the survey; and

X2 = total number of households responding to the travel question.

The total travelers, E., in district i or region i is estimated as

Xi.
E. = A. i N
E A X2i
i i X2

where A. = average number of travelers in each household trip in
district i or region i;

Xli = total number of households in district i or region i who
participated in the survey; and

X2i = total household trips in ith district or region.









Bureau of Economic and Business Research
University of Florida January, 1982



FLORIDA STATEWIDE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE

Q1. Hello, my name is I'm calling from the University of
Florida in Gainesville. We are working on a statewide household survey
for the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
First of all, I need to be sure I've dialed the right number.
Is this (telephone number) ?

YES NO )END CONTACT: I'm
Sorry -- please excuse
the ring.

Q2. Is this number a business or a home?

HOME ( BUSINESS END CONTACT: I'm
sorry -- please excuse
the ring.

Q2A. What county is this house in?

Q3. I am supposed to interview an adult in this household; are you an adult
in this household?

YES NO Is he (or she) available
now for me to talk to?

YES NO )

Make appointment to call
_back.

Q4. This survey will take approximately 3 minutes, and the responses are
strictly confidential. First, I'd like to get a listing of the members
of your household, not their names, just their age category, sex and
relationship to you. Let's start with you -- are you younger than 18,
18 to 44, 45 to 64, or 65 and over? (Record age, sex) Now, I'd like the
age category and sex and relationship to you of each of the other members
of your household. (Record age, sex and relationship in the table.)

Q5. What is his (her) marital status? (Record in the table.)

(1) now married (2) widowed (3) divorced or separated (4) never
married

Q6. Are all of your household members residing in Florida twelve months of
the year excluding vacation time? (If yes, skip to Q7.)

If not, could you tell me which months this persons) resides in Florida
(fill in Table 1) and which state he (she) resides in when away from
Florida during the rest of the year? (Skip to Q9 for non-12-month
residents.)









Florida Statewide Household Survey Questionnaire Page two


12-month residents only -- Q7 and Q8


Q7. If you and your household members reside in Florida all year around, did
you travel away from home for a vacation in Florida last year (1981)?

1) YES Fill in Table 2

2) NO

Q8. Did you or any member of the household travel out of the state for a
vacation during 1981? (Exclude the following: (a) travel as a crew
member on train, bus, airplane, truck or ship; (b) commuting; (c) travel
by student between home and school; (d) travel with the Armed Forces)

1) YES -Fill in Table 3


2) NO


Go to Q9


Q9. Are your living quarters


a single-family house (detached from any other house)
a townhouse
a building for multi-families
a mobile home or trailer
other, please specify


Q10. Do you own this unit or rent this unit?


(1) OWN


(2) RENT


Q11-Q15 RELATE TO HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD:


Qll. Is the head of the household a native Floridian?

(1) YES- Go to Q15

(2) NO

Q12. How long has he (she) lived in Florida? (years or months)

Q13. Where did he (she) live before moving to Florida?

Q14. What is the main reason he (she) moved to Florida?


(1) Employment
(2) Climate
(3) Health
(4) Retirement


Family
School
Other, specify
Don't know








Florida Statewide Household Survey Questionnaire Page three


Q15. What is the last grade he (she) actually finished in school?
Grade school/high school College and beyond

0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 21, 22, 23, 24, 25+


Q16. Is your total family or
YES

Is it above $20,000?
YES ( 5. NO

Is it above $25,000?

( YES 6) C6NO


Is it ab

(8. YES

Q17. Last of a
book?


For all Respondents

household yearly income above $18,000?

S$18,000) NO
Is it above $5,000?

SYES C 1. NO

Is it above $10,000?

YES C N


9. No answer
*ove $35,000? refused Is it above $15,000?
S 7 N 0. Don't kno 4. YES 3. NO

11, is this telephone number listed in the current telephone

Yes
Too new to be listed
Unlisted
Don't know


THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR TAKING THE TIME TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SURVEY.









QID
Int
Tel
No.
Dat


ANSWER SHEET FOR STATEWIDE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY
( ) Weekday
erviewer
phone No. Interview time
of calls attempted ( ) 9-12 AM
e( ) 5-6 PM


January, 1982


( ) Weekend


) 12-5 PM
) 6-9 PM


Q2A. County


Table 1


Q4 Q5 Q6 Q6
Check Relationship to Marital Months in Location away
head of HH Age Sex Respondent Status Florida from Florida
1 Respondent
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
10 _____________________ __________ _____________ ______________


TOTAL HOUSEHOLD
Age Categories: (1) under 18 (2) 18-44
Marital status: (1) married (2) widowed
(4) never married
Q7. Table 2--Florida


Destination (tourist attraction
or location)
Distance from home--one-way mileage
Transportation
Monthss1
Days for trip
Age category for each member (ref. Q4)
Total household members on trip
1. Specify each month (Jan., Feb., etc.)
2. Write over if more space is needed.


(3) 45-64 (4) 65 and over
(3) divorced or separated


I.

I

I

I

I

I





I

I




I



I

I

I






I

I




I



I


I




I

I



I

I

I



I


Q9. (1) single-family house (detached)
(2) townhouse
(3) multifamily
(4) mobile home
(5) -other,
Q10. (1) OWN (2) RENT
Qil. (1) YES (2) NO
Q12. ___years; months (if


less than a year)


state.


REASON:
(1) Employment
(2) Climate
(3) Health
(4) Retirement


Family
School
Other,
Don't know


Grade school/high school
0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12


5,000
5,001-10,000
10,001-15,000
15,001-18,000
18,001-20,000


College and beyond
21, 22, 23, 24, 25+


(6) 20,001-25,000
(7) 25,001-35,000
(8) 35,001 and up
(9) No answer, refuse
(0) Don't know


(1) YES (2) NEW (3) UL (4) DON'T KNOW


Q8. Table 3--Not Florida
1. 2. 3. 4.
Destination, state or country
Distance (one-way mileage)
Transportation
Months)
Days for trip
Age category for each member
Total household members on trip


Q13.
Q14.




Q15.


Q16. (1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)

Q17.




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