• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Publications
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Part I. Estimating the population...
 Part II. Personal income received...
 Part III. Retail trade in Florida...
 Part IV. Wholesale trade in Florida...
 Part I. Service trades in Florida...
 Part VI. Manufacturing in Florida...
 Part VII. Agriculture: Change and...














Group Title: State economic studies
Title: Personal income and other statistics for Florida counties
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086049/00001
 Material Information
Title: Personal income and other statistics for Florida counties
Series Title: State economic studies
Physical Description: viii, 66 p. : tables. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Publisher: Unknown
s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1957
Copyright Date: 1957
 Subjects
Subject: Income -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086049
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01243556
lccn - a 57009604

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Publications
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Foreword
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
    List of Tables
        Page viii
    Part I. Estimating the population of Florida counties
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Part II. Personal income received in Florida counties, 1954
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Part III. Retail trade in Florida counties
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Part IV. Wholesale trade in Florida counties
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Part I. Service trades in Florida counties
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Part VI. Manufacturing in Florida counties
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Part VII. Agriculture: Change and growth in Florida counties
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
Full Text












































0.
aC







































LIBRARY

A GIFT FROM


University of Florida











RECENT PUBLICATIONS
OF THE
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND
BUSINESS RESEARCH


COMMUNITY ECONOMIC SURVEYS
No. 1-Gainesville Economic Survey, 1950. 1950. 56 pp. . . . $1.00
SPECIAL BULLETINS
No. 1-Industrial Location in Florida. 1949
Second Impression, 1951. 63 pp. . . . . .50
No. 2-A Short Report on Florida Manufacturing. 1951. 16 pp. . .15
No. 3-Florida's Older People-A Chart Book. 1953. 81 pp. . . .50

STATE ECONOMIC STUDIES
No. 1-Manufacturing in Florida Counties and Cities. 1951. 96 pp. . 1.00
No. 2-Manufacturing in Florida. 1952. 177 pp. . . . .. 2.00
No. 3-Retail, Wholesale, and Service Trades in Florida. 1952. 76 pp. 2.00
No. 4-Revenue and Debt of Florida Municipalities
and Overlying Governments. 1953. 237 pp. .. ... 1.50
No. 5-Income Payments to Individuals in Florida Counties: 1950
1953. 43 pp.. . . . . . . . . 1.00
No. 6-Income Payments to Individuals in Florida Counties: 1952
1955. 38 pp.. . . . . . . . 1.00
No. 7-Florida's Commercial Fisheries: Markets, Operations,
and Outlook. 1955. 176 pp. . . . ... 3.00
No. 8-Financing New Manufacturing Plants in Florida. 1956. 34 pp. 1.00
No. 9-Personal Income and Other Statistics for Florida Counties
1957. 73 pp.. . . . . . . . 2.00

HOUSING RESEARCH PAPERS
No. 22-Closing Costs and Settlement Payments in the Jacksonville,
Florida, Mortgage Market, February 15-August 15, 1950.
1952. 36 pp. Obtainable from the Superintendent of
Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washing-
ton 25, D .C . . . . . . . . 20
No. 23-Residential Mortgage Financing, Jacksonville, Florida, First Six
Months of 1950. 1952. 97 pp. Obtainable from the Su-
perintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing
Office, Washington 25, D.C . . . . . ... .45

Except as noted, these publications may be ordered from the University of
Florida Press, Gainesville, Florida.











AND OTHER STATISTICS FOR


'- Y, o't a


Ct..fe


STATE ECONOMIC STUDIES, No. 9











BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Gainesville, 1957







So, WK)








A PUBLICATION
OF THE
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH

College of Business Administration
University of Florida


$2.00





STAFF

DIRECTOR

George B. Hurff


RESEARCH PROFESSORS

Wylie Kilpatrick

Felix Muehlner

Carter C. Osterbind


ASSISTANT IN RESEARCH
Elise C. Jones

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS
James R. Hoffman
Gordon S. Van Pelt


ASSISTANTS

Barbara Blalock
Mildred Burrows
Dorothy Gago
Eleanor Hankins
Fay Page















FOREWORD


THE INFORMATION set forth in this publication deals with a wide range of matters
basic to the economy of Florida. The estimates of personal income and of popu-
lation are a product of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research of the
University of Florida. Margins of error are present in all estimates and the
Bureau of Economic and Business Research continues to seek methods that will
improve and refine these figures. The analyses and information relating to
manufacturing, agriculture, and the retail, wholesale, and service trades are
based upon the most recent comprehensive data published by the United States
Bureau of the Census.

The usefulness to business of the information contained in this volume will
be evident to many readers. Here are found useful guides to marketers of
products, to advertisers, to newspapers, to public utilities, and in general to
those seeking business opportunity. Those striving to deal effectively with
problems involving the revenues and expenditures of local governments and the
financial relations of local governments with the state government will also find
this information useful.




GEORGE B. HuEFF
Director, Bureau of Economic
and Business Research



Gainesville, Florida
June, 1957


- V-














TABLE OF CONTENTS


LIST OF TABLES . . . . viii

PART ONE

ESTIMATING THE POPULATION OF FLORIDA COUNTIES-John N. Webb . 1

PART TWO

PERSONAL INCOME RECEIVED IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954-Wylie Kilpatrick 5
County variations-Changes from 1950 to 1954-Primary classes-Industrial
sources-County levels of personal income per capita-Income sources in rela-
tion to county levels of personal income

PART THREE

RETAIL TRADE IN FLORIDA COUNTIES-Carter C. Osterbind and Elise C. Jones 19
State-wide changes-Florida and other southeastern states-Retail trade in
Florida counties-Summary observations

PART FOUR

WHOLESALE TRADE IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
-Carter C. Osterbind and Elise C. Jones .. . . . ... 34
Florida and the United States-Regional changes in the United States-Florida
and other southeastern states-Wholesale trade in Florida counties-Wholesale
trade in Florida cities

PART FIVE

SERVICE TRADES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES-Carter C. Osterbind and Elise C. Jones 44
Compared to wholesale and retail trades-Florida and the United States-
Florida and other southeastern states-Service trades in Florida counties-Tour-
ism and service trade receipts in Florida counties

PART SIX

MANUFACTURING IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
-Carter C. Osterbind and Felix Muehlner . . . . . 54
Changes in Florida-Regional location and patterns of change-Manufacturing
in Florida's counties-Planning for future growth

PART SEVEN

AGRICULTURE: CHANGE AND GROWTH IN FLORIDA COUNTIES-C. C. Moxley 62
Northwest Florida-Northeast Florida-Central Florida-South Florida


-VII -








TABLES


1-POPULATION: FLORIDA AND FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1950, 1954,
1955, AND 1956 . . . . . . 3
2-PERSONAL INCOME: DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AMOUNT Ac-
CORDING TO POPULATION SIZE GROUPS OF FLORIDA COUNTIES
IN 1954 . . . . . . . . 5

3--PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL
IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954, 1952, AND 1950 . . 6
4--PERSONAL INCOME: FLORIDA COUNTIES GROUPED BY SIZE OF
CHANGE IN INCOME PER CAPITAL, 1950 TO 1954 . . 7
5-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL,
BY PRIMARY CLASSES, IN FLORIDA, 1954, 1952, AND 1950 7
6--PERSONAL INCOME: FLORIDA COUNTIES GROUPED BY LEVEL OF
INCOME PER CAPITAL IN 1954 . . . . . 9

7-PERSONAL INCOME: COUNTY POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS
ACCORDING TO COUNTY LEVELS OF INCOME PER CAPITAL IN
FLORIDA, 1954 . . . . 9
8-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL,
BY COUNTY LEVELS OF PERSONAL INCOME PER CAPITAL AND
BY PRIMARY CLASSES OF INCOME, IN FLORIDA, 1954 . 10
9--PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL,
BY COUNTY LEVELS OF PERSONAL INCOME PER CAPITAL AND
BY MAJOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCES, IN FLORIDA, 1954 . 11
10--PERSONAL INCOME: AMOUNT PER CAPITAL, BY MAJOR INDUS-
TRIAL SOURCES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . 13
11-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE DIS-
TRIBUTION OF INCOME PLUS PERSONAL CONTRIBUTIONS FOR
SOCIAL INSURANCE, BY MAJOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCES, IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . . . . 14
12-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE DIS-
TRIBUTION OF INCOME, BY PRIMARY CLASSES, IN FLORIDA
COUNTIES, 1954 . . . . . . .. 16
13-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT, BY PRIMARY CLASSES,
IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1952 AND 1950 . . . 18
14-RETAIL TRADE: COMPARISON, BY KIND OF BUSINESS, OF
FLORIDA WITH THE UNITED STATES, 1954 . . . 21
15--RETAIL TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, AND PAYROLLS, BY
KIND OF BUSINESS, IN FLORIDA, OTHER SOUTHEASTERN
STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954 . . 23
16--RETAIL TRADE: TOTAL SALES, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP,
IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . . . 24
17-RETAIL TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS
GROUP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . .. 26
18-RETAIL TRADE: SALES PER CAPITAL, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS
GROUP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . . 27
19-RETAIL TRADE: CHANGE IN SALES, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS
GROUP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1948 TO 1954 . . 28
20-RETAIL TRADE: AVERAGE SALES, TOTAL PAYROLLS, AND PAID
EMPLOYEES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . 29
21-RETAIL TRADE: CHANGES IN NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS,
PAYROLLS, AND PAID EMPLOYEES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES,
1948 TO 1954 . . . . . . . 29
22-RETAIL TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS AND SALES, BY KIND-OF-
BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA CITIES OF 2,500 INHABITANTS
OR MORE, 1954 . . . .. . 30
23--RETAIL TRADE: SALES SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT, BY KIND-OF-
BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA, 1954 . . . . 32


24-RETAIL TRADE: CHANGES IN SALES PER CAPITAL OF SELECTED
BUSINESSES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES WITH 500 RETAIL Es-
TABLISHMENTS OR MORE, 1948 TO 1954 . . . 33

25-WHOLESALE TRADE: CHANGES, BY TYPE OF OPERATION, IN
FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES, 1948 TO 1954 . 37

26-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS AND SALES, BY TYPE
OF OPERATION, IN FLORIDA, OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES,
AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954 . . . 37

27-WHOLESALE TRADE: PAYROLLS AND PAID EMPLOYEES IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . . . 38

28--WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS AND SALES IN FLORIDA
COUNTIES, 1954 . . . 39

29-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, INVENTORIES,
OPERATING EXPENSES, PAYROLLS, AND PAID EMPLOYEES,
BY KIND OF BUSINESS, IN FLORIDA, 1954 . . . 40

30--WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, PAYROLLS, AND
PAID EMPLOYEES IN FLORIDA CITIES OF 5,000 INHABITANTS
OR MORE, 1954 .. . . . . 41
31-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, PAYROLLS, AND
PAID EMPLOYEES, BY TYPE OF OPERATION, IN FLORIDA'S
METROPOLITAN AREAS AND SELECTED COUNTIES, 1954 42
32-SELECTED SERVICES: ESTABLISHMENTS AND RECEIPTS, BY
MAJOR GROUP, IN THE UNITED STATES, FLORIDA, OTHER
SOUTHEASTERN STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES,
1954 . . . . . . . . 48
33--SELECTED SERVICES: ESTABLISHMENTS, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS
GROUP, AND PAYROLLS, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . 49
34-SELECTED SERVICES: RECEIPTS, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP,
AND PERSONNEL, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . 50

35-SELECTED SERVICES: ESTABLISHMENTS, RECEIPTS, PAYROLLS,
AND PERSONNEL, BY KIND OF BUSINESS, IN FLORIDA, 1954 51
36-SELECTED SERVICES: HOTELS, MOTELS, TOURIST COURTS, AND
CAMPS, AND AMUSEMENTS IN FLORIDA COUNTIES AND
CITIES WITH 200 SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS OR MORE, 1954 52

37-SELECTED SERVICES: HOTELS, MOTELS, TOURIST COURTS,
TRAILER PARKS, AND SPORTING AND RECREATIONAL CAMPS
IN THE UNITED STATES, FLORIDA, OTHER SOUTHEASTERN
STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954 . . 53
38--MANUFACTURING: CHANGES IN VALUE ADDED AND NUMBER
OF EMPLOYEES IN FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES BY
MAJOR INDUSTRIAL GROUP, AND PAYROLLS AND CAPITAL
EXPENDITURES IN FLORIDA, 1954 . . . . 57
39-MANUFACTURING: FLORIDA AND THE OTHER SOUTHEASTERN
STATES, BY SELECTED MAJOR INDUSTRIAL GROUPS, 1954 58
40--MANUFACTURING: EMPLOYEES, PAYROLLS, AND ESTABLISH-
MENTS BY EMPLOYMENT SIZE CLASS, BY MAJOR INDUSTRIAL
GROUP, IN FLORIDA, 1954 . . . . . 59
41-MANUFACTURING: ESTABLISHMENTS, VALUE ADDED BY MANU-
FACTURE, PAID EMPLOYEES, PAYROLL, AND CAPITAL EX-
PENDITURES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954 . . . 60

42--ESTIMATED EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES IN
NONAGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN SELECTED FLORIDA
COUNTIES, JANUARY, 1957 . . . . . 61
483-AGRICULTURE: CHANGES IN FLORIDA FARMS AND FARM RE-
CEIPTS, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1949 TO 1954 . . 64


-VImI-







PART ONE


ESTIMATING THE POPULATION OF FLORIDA COUNTIES
JOHN N. WEBB, Professor of Economics
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


E VERY ten years the census taker calls at each residence,
hotel, boarding house, institution, camp, or other place of
residence, to record the number of persons living there, to-
gether with their age, color, sex, marital status, and other
important social and economic characteristics of the popula-
tion. This procedure is required by our basic law, the Con-
stitution of the United States of America, Article 1, Section 2.
It is from these ten-year (decennial) counts that we obtain
our knowledge of how many people are in the towns, coun-
ties, states, and the nation. The original purpose of the Con-
stitutional requirement for a decennial census was, and still
is, the apportionment of representatives to the Congress of
the United States. Censuses at ten-year intervals were ade-
quate to the needs of the country in its formative years, when
population was small and widely scattered; communication
depended on the horse, the barge, or the sailing vessel; and
public affairs were conducted primarily by local units of
government.
Today, when the total population of the United States is
about fifty times that of the day when the Constitution was
drafted, ten-year counts fail to meet the needs of government,
of trade, and of industry for current information about our
people. This failure is particularly marked in the state of
Florida where the population is increasing at an annual rate
of three times the rate of increase for the country as a whole.
Important problems arise at the county level by reason of
this rapid growth. For example, the number of circuit judges
is determined by the population in the counties comprising
each judicial circuit; funds for hospitals, schools, and roads
are closely linked to the number of inhabitants in the county.
These, and other needs are too urgent to wait upon the ten-
year counts required by law.
A need as pressing as that for knowledge of population
change during intercensal periods has not been allowed to
stand without remedies. Some states have conducted cen-
suses on the five-year mid-point of the ten-year periods;
cities and counties have paid the very considerable cost of
special censuses to meet specific needs; and there have been
developed several procedures for estimating population
change between official counts by the U. S. Bureau of the
Census.
In 1955 the Bureau of the Census reported that in 41 of
the 48 states one or more agencies were making estimates
of population in local areas of the state; and while a variety
of the methods were in use, the method developed by the
Census Bureau was the one used by nearly half of the esti-
mating agencies.
Florida is one of the states in which population estimates
for counties are made annually as a regular procedure, and,
in addition, are made for particular counties whenever, in


the judgment of local officials, a real need develops within
the county. The Bureau of Economic and Business Research
began making annual population estimates for each of the
67 counties of the state in 1954. The Bureau is now making
estimates at the request of the commissioners appointed by
the Governor under Senate Bill No. 46-xx (1955-56) for those
judicial circuits in the state where it is felt that additional
circuit judges are needed. These annual and special esti-
mates will be continued, with close attention to the improve-
ment in method now being made here and elsewhere
throughout the country.
The method used by the Bureau of Economic and Busi-
ness Research is the one developed by the Census and known
as "Migration and Natural Increase, Method II." It is simple
and logical in idea, though somewhat time consuming in
application. The logic runs as follows: The population of
a city, town, county, or state, will change between decennial
census counts for two reasons: (1) natural increase (or de-
crease) as a result of resident births being greater (or less)
than resident deaths; and (2) the migration of persons to or
from the area. Migration includes military personnel sta-
tioned in the area, residents leaving the area for military
duty in other areas, and the presence of institutional popu-
lation (state hospitals, prisons) and students at colleges and
universities, as well as new settlers.
The population of any area therefore, can be estimated
with a high degree of accuracy between decennial censuses
if adequate figures can be obtained about births, deaths, and
migration. A brief step-by-step account of the estimating
procedure used in making estimates of county population
in this state will make this statement clear.
The starting point is the latest official population census
(April 1, 1950) for the county. Subtract from this census
count the number of persons stationed on military posts, at-
tending college, or confined in correctional or remedial insti-
tutions (prisons, asylums, sanatoriums). The remainder is
the net civilian population of the area on the census date.
Now, add the resident births, month by month beginning
with April, 1950, and subtract the resident deaths, up to the
estimate date, and the result will be the correct civilian popu-
lation count if no one moved into or out of the area during
the time that has passed since the census was taken. All of
the information needed, so far, is of public record, carefully
collected by agencies of government, so there is no need to
estimate what the population of any area is at any time,
insofar as that population consists of the number reported
by the last census plus natural increase, military, and insti-
tutional changes.
The one fact that is missing is the net addition (or sub-
traction) of population by migration in the area since the


-1-






census of 1950. There is no direct measure of this change,
either in public or private records. Therefore, net migration
must be estimated; and al tough this is the only "estimate"
in a population estimate made by the census procedures,
migration can be of great importance in a state such as
Florida where population growth in the counties and the
state is so strongly influenced by the number of new residents
moving here from other parts of the country.
When a change in population cannot be measured directly,
the logical alternative is to find a measurable factor that is
closely associated with the missing information. For exam-
ple, when the population of a county grows, the county will
issue more automobile license plates, drivers' licenses, and
will have more telephone, water, and electric-light installa-
tions.
All of these facts are available in public records, and in-
directly they measure population growth. But the accuracy
of estimates of net migration depends not on finding some
figure that is associated with the movement of population
in, or out; accuracy depends upon finding the one related
figure that is most closely associated with population move-
ment. Experience in many areas shows that, so far,
the recorded fact most closely associated with net migration
is school enrollment in public, private, and parochial schools.
More particularly, it is the enrollment in those grades which
are attended by all, or nearly all children, and this means
the elementary grades, roughly, the first grade up to the first
year of high school. Changes in school enrollment in these
school-grades can be used as an accurate indication of migra-
tion in the area.
A net migration rate for the county is computed in the
following manner. At the time of the latest census (April 1,
1950) the number of children of elementary school age, say
6 through 13 years, is determined and expressed as a ratio
to the number of students enrolled in grades 1 through 8
as reported by the Florida State Department of Education.
Next, the number of students enrolled in the same grades
immediately preceding the time of the estimate is converted
into the number of children of ages 6 through 13 years by
applying the age-grade ratio of 1950. The only assumption
made is that substantially all children in the age range of
6 through 13 years do attend public, private, or parochial
schools, an assumption that common experience readily
justifies.
This procedure gives the number of children in the area
who are in a specific age group of 6 through 13 years, and
this number can be compared with the number who would
reach this age simply by "growing up" in the county during
the years between the last census and the time of the esti-
mate. For example, a child less than one year of age at the
time of the 1950 Census, would be 6 years of age on April 1,
1956, and, in the majority of instances, would be in the first
grade of elementary school. By parallel reasoning those
children reported to be of the ages under 1 year and through
7 years on April 1, 1950, would be, subject to mortality, ages
6 through 13 years on April 1, 1956, and attending school in
grades 1 through 8. Correction for mortality is easily made
by use of a standard life expectancy table compiled by the
National Office of Vital Statistics.
Without migration, the "aging" of school-age population
from the last census forward to the estimate date would


produce a number that would be the same for the age group
as the number determined by school enrollment on the esti-
mate date. But exact agreement between the number of
school-age population computed from school enrollment and
the number who "grew up" in the community seldom occurs
because it would happen only if there were no migration.
The difference between the size of the two school-age
groups-the group that grew up, and the group actually
attending school on the estimate date-is generally a sensitive
index of migration. When the difference is expressed as a
ratio to the number in the group that "grew up" it becomes
a migration rate. This rate is applied to the civilian popula-
tion of the 1950 Census plus one-half of the births since that
date to provide an "estimate" of net migration in the county.
Separate estimates of migration are computed by this method
for the white and nonwhite children because, in general, the
white population of Florida is much more mobile than the
nonwhite population.
An estimate of migration using school enrollment figures
provides the one item of information that is not a matter of
record. With it, the population of the area can be computed
by adding the following items:

Civilian population April 1, 1950
(military, colleges, and institu-
tional population have been
subtracted from the census
count) -------------------

Natural increase
(resident births minus resident
deaths) -------------

Net migration
(estimated from school
enrollment) ----------- ------

Military personnel
(military personnel stationed in
the county plus residents of the
county serving elsewhere)---- _____

Institutional population
(college, state hospital, penal)__

Total population of the area__

The population estimates for the 67 counties of Florida
that appear on the following page have been made by the
Census method described in the preceding paragraphs.
July 1, the reference date for each of the years, 1954 through
1956, was selected because the school enrollment figures have
not been available until after the close of the school year.
A January 1, or April 1, reference date would be more useful
for some purposes, and a shift to one of the earlier months
in each year is now under consideration.
Other changes that are being considered include estimates
of the age of population in each county, with particular
interest in the number of persons between 45 and 64 years
of age, and 65 years and older, and the population of the
major urban areas. Improvements in method are also under







TABLE 1.-POPULATION: FLORIDA AND FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1950, 1954, 1955, AND 1956
(All population figures are rounded to the nearest one-hundred)


State and County


Florida ---- -------
Alachua ----
Baker ._-
Bay __.
Bradford ----
Brevard -.. .
Broward -
Calhoun -
Charlotte .- -
Citrus --.. ----
Clay
Collier ....
Columbia 7--
Dade ..--.. .
De Soto -
Dixie
Duval -- -----
Escambia -
Flagler ----- --
Franklin -...
Gadsden --_
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf -
Hamilton -....
Hardee
Hendry _
Hemrnando .
Highlands
Hillsborough ...
Holmes
Indian River -...
Jackson -----
Jefferson -
Lafayette -
Lake ....-- ---
Lee .....-------
Leon ___
Levy
Liberty --
Madison
Manatee -
Marion .
Martin ---.. ---
Monroe -
Nassau -.-.--
Okaloosa -
Okeechobee ----
Orange -
Osceola .
Palm Beach ----
Pasco ...- ---
Pinellas .
Polk -__
Putnam -------
St. Johns -
St. Lucie -. ..
Santa Rosa -----
Sarasota -----
Seminole -----
Sumter -
Suwannee ----
Taylor ..
Union
Volusia
Wakulla .- -...
Walton .--- -
Washington


Total Civilian and
Military
Population
on April 1, 1950k


2,771,300
57,000
6,300
42,700
11,500
23,700
83,900
7,900
4,300
6,100
14,300
6,500
18,200
495,100
9,200
3,900
304,000
112,700
3,400
5,800
36,500
3,500
2,200
7,500
9,000
10,100
6,100
6,700
13,600
249,900
14,000
11,900
34,600
10,400
3,400
36,300
23,400
51,600
10,600
3,200
14,200
34,700
38,200
7,800
30,000
12,800
27,500
3,500
115,000
11,400
114,700
20,500
159,200
124,000
23,600
25,000
20,200
18,600
28,800
26,900
11,300
17,000
10,400
8,900
74,200
5,300
14,700
11,900


Total Civilian Population
on July 1


1954b


3,493,900
59,400
6,800
50,200
11,600
44,000
156,200
7,400
4,300
5,900
17,100
10,900
19,700
676,600
8,700
3,700
364,900
139,100
4,200
5,500
39,700
3,100
2,400
8,700
9,200
11,400
5,800
7,900
15,000
305,600
12,700
14,500
35,300
9,900
3,100
44,600
30,000
56,000
9,800
2,500
14,600
43,000
42,800
9,100
37,500
14,600
35,900
4,000
171,500
12,400
157,200
25,200
209,200
155,500
27,700
29,200
26,200
19,500
38,800
33,000
10,700
15,500
12,300
7,400
87,700
4,900
14,600
10,500


1955b


3,649,900
60,400
7,400
50,600
12,000
46,000
167,000
7,700
4,700
6,000
19,000
11,300
20,200
719,200
9,200
3,900
386,300
144,300
4,700
5,500
43,000
3,100
3,000
9,100
9,300
11,600
6,400
7,900
15,400
316,100
12,800
15,300
36,400
9,900
3,100
46,100
32,800
59,200
9,700
2,400
14,800
43,600
44,600
9,300
38,700
15,200
37,200
4,200
175,600
12,900
164,300
26,400
215,200
157,700
28,600
30,300
27,400
22,400
42,100
33,800
10,900
15,600
12,800
8,100
89,800
4,700
14,800
10,900


Total Civilian and
Military
Population
on July 1, 1956


*3,874,200
65,900
7,200
53,000
12,000
53,500
205,100
7,300
5,100
6,200
17,400
12,900
19,500
757,700
9,500
3,900
400,100
152,700
4,800
5,400
43,500
2,900
2,800
9,400
8,600
12,000
6,600
8,700
16,300
332,600
12,300
17,100
36,500
9,200
3,000
46,600
36,700
62,400
9,400
2,400
15,000
46,000
45,900
10,500

15,600
44,400
4,400
196,700
13,700
173,400
26,800
235,700
164,500
30,900
32,500
29,800
23,200
44,400
36,400
10,800
14,600
12,800
7,900
91,900
4,700
14,500
10,300


Percentage
change
in Total
Population,
1950 to 1956d


39.8
15.6
14.3
24.1
4.3
125.7
144.5
7.6
18.6
1.6
21.7
98.5
7.1
53.0
3.3

31.6
35.5
41.2
6.9
19.2
17.1
27.3
25.3
4.4
18.8
8.2
29.9
19.9
33.1
- 12.1
43.7
5.5
- 11.5
- 11.8
28.4
56.8
20.9
- 11.3
- 25.0
5.6
32.6
20.2
34.6
*
21.9
61.5
25.7
71.0
20.2
51.2
30.7
48.1
32.7
30.9
30.0
47.5
24.7
54.2
35.3
- 4.4
- 14.1
23.1
- 11.2
23.9
- 11.3
- 1.4
- 13.4


Percentage Distribution


Percentage Distribution
of Total Population
1950 [ 1956


100.0
2.1
.2
1.5
.4
.9
3.0
.3
.2
.2
.5
.2
.7
18.0
.3
.1
11.1
4.1
.1
.2
1.3
.1
.1
.3
.3
.4
.2
.2
.5
9.0
.5
.4
1.2
.4
.1
1.3
.8
1.9
.4
.1
.5
1.3
1.4
.3
1.1
.5
1.0
.1
4.1
.4
4.1
.7
5.7
4.5
.9
.9
.7
.7
1.0
1.0
.4
.6
.4
.3
2.7
.2
.5
.4


100.0
1.7
.2
1.4
.3
1.4
5.3
.2
.1
.2
.4
.3
.5
19.7
.2
.1
10.4
3.9
.1
.1
1.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.4
8.7
.3
.4
.9
.2
.1
1.2
.9
1.6
.2
.1
.4
1.2
1.2
.3

.4
1.1
.1
5.1
.4
4.5
.7
6.1
4.2
.8
.8
.8
.6
1.1
.9
.3
.4
.3
.2
2.4
.1
.4
.3


Source: Population in 1950 from the U. S. Census of Population, 1950; population for the other years are intercensal estimates made by Dr. John N. Webb of
the College of Business Administration, University of Florida, for the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
a Includes military personnel stationed in the county on April 1.
b Does not include military personnel stationed in the county on July 1.
c Includes military personnel stationed in the county on July 1.
d The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
o The 1956 estimate for Monroe County is omitted because of technical difficulties encountered in shifting from an estimate of civilian population to an estimate of
total population including military personnel. The 1955 estimate of 38,700 persons for Monroe County has been used in arriving at a state total for 1956.


-3-


I


I






study. School enrollment figures in some counties occasion-
ally fail to reflect the full volume of migration; and this is
particularly true of counties with large military establish-
ments. Alternative indicators of migration are being tested
with a view to supplementing school enrollment in counties
with unusual patterns of population change.
Estimating the population of counties is a fairly new de-


velopment and, like all new methods of research, is certain
to increase in accuracy as many workers apply and test new
procedures under a variety of conditions. As of now, the
Census method used to estimate the population of Florida
counties is, by general consent, the best available. But there
will be improvements, and the estimates in future years
should be better and more detailed than those presented here.


-4-







PART TWO



PERSONAL INCOME RECEIVED IN FLORIDA COUNTIES: 1954
WYLIE KILPATRICK, Research Professor
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH


S TATE personal income is the current income in all forms
received by residents of a state from all sources-from busi-
ness enterprises, federal and state and local governments,
households and institutions, and foreign countries. Compiled
annually by the U. S. Department of Commerce, the state
personal income series offers the most comprehensive
available record of differences among states in economic
structure and change. To provide a measure of such differ-
ences among Florida's 67 counties, the Bureau of Economic
and Business Research, at the University of Florida, has
developed a county personal income series. This county
series, which begins with 1950 and provides data at two-year
intervals, originally reported income payments to individuals,
but it has been broadened to conform to the revised basis
on which state personal income is now compiled. Included
in personal income are a broader coverage of "income in
kind" and a different treatment of transactions under private
pension, health, and welfare plans. The two major additions
to income in kind are the net rental value of owner-occupied
dwellings and the value of food and clothing furnished mem-
bers of the armed forces.
The county personal income series for Florida developed
by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research now in-
cludes data for the year 1954. In that year the personal
income of all individuals in Florida averaged $1,506 per
capital as against $1,314 per capital in 1950-a gain of 14.6
per cent. Income per capital as reported here for 1954, 1952,
and 1950 are less than the amounts computed for Florida
by the U. S. Department of Commerce because different
population figures were used. The state and county per
capital figures for 1954 have been computed by the Bureau
of Economic and Business Research on the basis of popula-
tion estimates by Dr. John N. Webb of the University of


Florida. These show a larger population figure for Florida
than that released by the Department of Commerce. The
per capital figures for 1950 were computed on Census-
reported population for April 1, 1950; those for 1952 were
computed on population adjusted to a trend line from 1950
and 1954 population, by county. The strikingly large popu-
lation growth of this state, from 2,771,000 in 1950 to 3,527,-
000 in 1954, necessarily resulted in a percentage increase in
income much less when measured on a per capital basis than
on a total amount basis. In total amount, personal income
rose 46 per cent during this period-from $3,641 million to
$5,313 -million.
COUNTY VARIATIONS IN INCOME
Important county variations are revealed by comparing
the amount and per capital size of income among the 67
counties. Hendry County's per capital income of $3,006 was
the largest among the counties in 1954, but the $17.4 million
income in amount of this county was only number 34 in size.
The lowest per capital of $551, in Holmes County, was based
on an income of $7 million, giving this county a rank of 51
in amount of income. Dade County ranked highest by the
various tests. In 1954 Dade was not only the largest in
population and amount of income ($1,289 million) but also
was number 2 in per capital income ($2,007). Table 3 shows
the total amounts of personal income in each county for
1950, 1952, and 1954, together with the selected rankings
of counties, and for the same years the per capital income
in all counties and their rankings on this basis.
The relation of population to the distribution of personal
income among Florida counties is shown not only in this
table but also in Table 2; here is shown the distribution of
personal income among Florida counties grouped into five


TABLE 2.-PERSONAL INCOME: DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AMOUNT ACCORDING TO POPULATION SIZE GROUPS OF FLORIDA COUNTIES IN 1954


1954 Population Number of (in million of dollars) Percentage of State Total Income per Capita
Size of County Counties 1950 1954 1950 1954 1950 1954 Percentage
me increase
All counties -- 67 $8,641.0 $5,312.8 100.0 100.0 $1,314 $1,506 14.6
Over 200,000 -- 4 1,858.0 2,716.0 51.0 51.1 1,538 1,759 14.4
Dade -..-- 1 861.0 1,288.9 23.6 24.3 1,739 2,007 15.4
Duval -- -- 1 476.0 679.1 13.1 12.8 1,566 1,790 14.3
Hillsborough 1 322.2 448.6 8.8 8.4 1,289 1,432 11.1
Pinellas ----- 1 198.8 299.4 5.5 5.6 1,248 1,429 14.5
100,001 to 200,000 5 765.5 1,215.6 21.0 22.9 1,391 1,546 11.1
50,001 to 100,000 4 242.4 324.1 6.7 6.1 1,077 1,249 16.0
10,001 to 50,000 32 661.2 924.3 18.2 17.4 1,023 1,163 13.7
10,000 and under 22 113.9 132.8 3.1 2.5 856 1,003 17.2

Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.








TABLE .--PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954, 1952, AND 1950
(With the year 1954 the Bureau of Economic and Business Research has substituted personal income for income payments as the basis for reporting income by county.
County income payments reported for the years 1950 and 1952 have been revised to conform to the new basis used for 1954; therefore, interyear comparisons may be
made from this table.)

Total Personal Income Rank of County in Rank of Personal Income Rank of County in Personal
State and County (in thousands of dollars) Total Personal Income County in per Capitaa Income per Capita
1954_____ ___ __ Population -r 1950
1954 1952 1950 1954 1952 1950 in 1954 1954 1952 1950 1954 1952 1950
State ------- $5,312,847 $4,536,000 $3,641,000 $1,506 $1,430 $1,314
Alachua .............----------- 64,283 60,830 57,523 14 13 11 11 1,097 1,056 1,018 38 35 35
Baker 4,689 3,640 8,145 58 60 62 54 690 554 498 60 66 67
Bay ---.....- 70,764 66,806 44,680 12 11 14 13 1,266 1,345 1,047 25 14 31
Bradford 8,319 7,212 6,820 47 48 49 41 717 625 595 58 59 58
Brevard .............. 59,683 42,794 24,086 17 19 25 14 1,255 1,179 1,018 27 26 36
Broward --- 221,666 153,970 117,772 8 9 9 8 1,468 1,289 1,403 10 19 11
Calhoun 5,045 4,606 4,881 57 57 57 53 682 602 553 61 62 62
Charlotte --.... 5,079 8,855 4,058 56 58 59 60 1,181 898 947 31 42 89
Citrus -- 5,358 5,087 4,517 55 55 56 55 908 848 739 44 46 48
Clay -------- 25,013 21,276 17,455 29 29 29 30 1,257 1,232 1,219 26 22 18
Collier ..... 15,824 12,062 10,928 36 38 37 43 1,452 1,367 1,684 12 13 4
Columbia -- 19,712 17,492 15,268 32 30 31 81 1,001 921 838 42 41 46
Dade --.-- 1,288,951 1,078,765 860,992 1 1 1 1 2,007 1,883 1,739 2 2 3
De Soto ......... 10,188 9,005 9,782 44 45 41 51 1,171 1,006 1,058 82 36 80
Dixie - 2,493 2,351 2,276 64 63 65 63 674 618 579 62 60 59
Duval 679,101 625,261 476,048 2 2 2 2 1,790 1,818 1,566 3 3 5
Escambia 220,168 186,471 137,246 9 8 8 9 1,461 1,404 1,218 11 11 19
Flagler 5,568 6,226 3,578 54 52 60 61 1,326 1,685 1,063 21 4 29
Franklin 3,801 4,914 4,127 59 56 58 58 691 870 710 59 45 50
Gadsden 8...... 37,614 38,408 34,261 23 20 18 23 1,133 1,198 1,113 35 24 26
Gilchrist --, 2,366 2,338 2,447 66 64 64 64 763 711 699 54 53 52
Glades -- -- 3,462 2,141 4,760 60 66 55 67 1,442 929 2,165 15 40 1
Gulf 12,606 12,720 8,463 39 35 45 50 1,448 1,567 1,134 14 6 23
Hamilton . 6,614 5,967 5,499 53 54 53 48 719 656 612 57 57 57
Hardee .---. 12,171 9,477 10,073 40 42 40 42 1,068 879 1,000 39 44 37
Hendry ...- 17,437 12,158 12,634 34 37 35 56 3,006 2,054 2,088 1 1 2
Hernando -. 7,459 7,017 5,836 50 50 52 52 944 957 872 43 88 45
Highlands -...- 22,033 16,808 15,441 30 82 30 33 1,469 1,171 1,132 9 28 24
Hillsborough 448,592 404,667 322,207 3 3 3 3 1,432 1,428 1,289 16 10 14
Holmes .......... 7,006 7,082 7,424 51 49 48 88 551 532 531 67 67 64
Indian River .... 20,471 17,183 14,500 31 31 32 37 1,412 1,296 1,221 18 18 17
Jackson .......------..---- 32,282 25,234 23,349 26 28 26 21 900 715 674 45 52 53
Jefferson ...... 7,471 5,970 5,944 49 53 51 46 755 589 571 55 65 61
Lafayette 2,391 2,237 2,265 65 65 66 65 771 686 658 53 56 54
Lake -----............ 65,527 54,026 48,414 13 14 13 17 1,469 1,327 1,332 8 16 13
Lee 40,076 36,101 28,905 22 23 23 24 1,336 1,342 1,235 20 15 16
Leon ......------------- 76,604 66,248 55,530 11 12 12 12 1,337 1,213 1,076 19 23 28
Levy 8,306 8,277 8,703 48 47 44 47 847 812 818 49 47 47
Liberty 2,031 2,091 2,006 67 67 67 66 812 741 630 52 51 56
Madison .... 11,987 10,243 8,987 41 40 43 36 821 711 633 50 54 55
Manatee --....... 44,984 37,185 30,608 20 22 20 18 1,046 951 882 40 39 43
Marion .. .. 51,073 44,901 39,484 19 18 17 19 1,193 1,105 1,034 80 30 33
Martin .------------........ 11,366 9,273 8,040 42 43 47 49 1,248 1,092 1,030 28 32 84
Monroe ........- - 62,488 45,008 42,408 15 17 16 15 1,320 1,149 1,416 22 29 10
Nassau .._-...... 16,775 16,360 12,684 35 33 84 35 1,149 1,189 990 84 25 38
Okaloosa ...-....... 56,242 46,564 30,776 18 16 19 16 1,221 1,247 1,118 29 21 25
Okeechobee ... 2,996 2,644 5,000 62 62 54 62 749 706 1,448 56 55 8
Orange ---- 268,449 213,667 157,246 5 6 7 5. 1,517 1,446 1,368 7 9 12
Osceola -......... 11,101 9,067 10,719 43 44 38 39 895 760 940 48 50 40
Palm Beach --.._ 258,605 213,262 176,916 6 7 5 7 1,706 1,589 1,543 4 5 6
Pasco-- _.--_ 27,733 26,967 24,816 28 26 24 28 1,101 1,172 1,209 37 27 20
Pinellas ..........--------.. 299,377 242,399 198,762 4 4 4 4 1,429 1,304 1,248 17 17 15
Polk ------ 246,700 219,623 176,338 7 5 6 6 1,582 1,558 1,422 6 7 9
Putnam ---...... 31,096 27,412 20,848 27 25 28 26 1,123 1,063 883 36 34 42
St. Johns ...--------- 42,374 37,387 30,129 21 21 21 25 1,451 1,8373 1,205 13 12 21
St. Lucie --------- 34,364 25,744 21,096 25 27 27 27 1,810 1,101 1,045 23 31 82
Santa Rosa -- .-- 17,546 16,021 13,540 33 34 33 29 814 795 730 51 48 49
Sarasota --------- 62,303 52,082 42,467 16 15 15 20 1,606 1,527 1,473 5 8 7
Seminole .---.......------. 34,668 32,863 29,449 24 24 22 22 1,009 1,066 1,095 41 33 27
Sumter ------------ 9,629 10,569 10,611 45 39 39 44 900 961 937 46 37 41
Suwannee ---. 13,887 12,552 11,961 38 36 36 32 896 775 704 47 49 51
Taylor -...-.....------ 14,300 10,159 9,141 87 41 42 40 1,163 890 878 33 43 44
Union .-----........------- 3,169 3,750 3,528 61 59 61 57 574 607 509 66 61 66
Volusia ............----------- 112,476 102,763 84,670 10 10 10 10 1,282 1,263 1,141 24 20 22
Wakulla ...--........ 2,927 3,040 2,879 63 61 63 59 597 600 548 65 63 63
Walton .--.----------.......... 9,151 8,716 8,436 46 46 46 34 626 594 573 64 64 60
Washington --...... 6,857 7,006 6,118 52 51 50 45 653 628 515 63 58 65


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
a Personal income per capital was computed on the following basis: For 1954, state and county population estimated as of July 1, by Dr. John N. Webb of the
University of Florida; for 1952, state and county population adjusted to trend line from 1950 to 1954; for 1950, state and county population as reported for April 1 by
the U. S. Bureau of the Census.


-6--







TABLE 4.-PERSONAL INCOME: FLORIDA COUNTIES GROUPED BY SIZE OF CHANGE IN INCOME PER CAPITAL, 1950 TO 1954
Percentage Increase Percentage Decrease

10.0% 10.1% 20.1% Over 10.0% Over
and less to 20.0% to 30.0% 30.0% and less 10.0%

Alachua Columbia Manatee Bay Leon Baker Franklin Collier
Broward Dade Marion Bradford Liberty Hendry Monroe Glades
Clay De Soto Nassau Brevard Madison Jackson Osceola < Okeechobee
Gadsden Dixie Orange Calhoun Martin Jefferson Pasco
Gilchrist Duval Palm Beach Charlotte Putnam Taylor Seminole
Hardee Escambia Pinellas Citrus St. Johns Sumter
Hernando Hamilton Polk Flagler St. Lucie
Holmes Hillsborough Santa Rosa Gulf Suwannee
Lee Indian River Union Highlands Washington
Levy Lafayette Volusia
Okaloosa Lake
Sarasota
Wakulla
Walton

Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.


classes by their 1954 population. Over one-half of the in- per capital income declined in nine counties. Aside from
come in Florida was concentrated in the four counties having the exceptionally large decreases of 48 per cent in Okee-
more than 200,000 people each (Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, chobee and of 33 per cent in Glades, the shrinkages varied
and Pinellas). Not far behind the Dade proportion of the between 3 per cent and 14 per cent in the other seven coun-
state's income, or over 24 per cent, was the nearly 23-per- ties suffering a loss.
cent proportion for the five counties ranging in population At the other end of the scale, per capital income rose over
from 100,000 to 200,000 (Broward, Escambia, Orange, Palm 30 per cent in five small counties, of which the largest in-
Beach, and Polk). The remaining 58 counties accounted for crease, 44 per cent, was experienced in Hendry County.
but 26 per cent of the income received by individuals in These changes are shown in Table 4.
Florida in 1954. PRIMARY CLASSES OF PERSONAL INCOME
A dependable measure of the relative income ranking of
a county is income per capital in the county expressed as a To understand the behavior of personal income, the total
percentage of income per capital in the state and of that in amount must initially be resolved into component primary

the nation. The economic well-being of the people, as indi- classes, of which the first consists of wages and salaries
coated by income per capital in 1954, was mirrored by the (after deducting personal contributions to social insurance

Florida average of $1,506; this was 85 per cent of the $1,770 funds). As Table 5 reveals, wages and salaries paid to em-
national average. In Dade, per capital income was 133 per ployees in Florida grew over 61 per cent-from $2,053 mil-
cent of the state average and 113 per cent of the national lion in 1950 to $3,311 million in 1954. Indeed, the increase
average; only in Hendry County were these percentages in payrolls accounted for three-fourths of the growth of in-
higher. In only one other county, Duval, was the income come in Florida during this period. To a minor degree,
level higher than in the nation. Income per capital was higher payrolls were augmented by other labor income, consisting
than the state average, however, in four other counties chiefly of employer contributions to private pension and
(Orange, Palm Beach, Polk, and Sarasota). welfare funds and compensation for injuries. Although small,
this source increased from $36 million in 1950 to $73 million
INCOME CHANGES, 1950 TO 1954 in 1954. Taken together, the two classes show that labor's
The previously cited growth of Florida personal income share of the total income in Florida rose from over 57 per
during the period from 1950 to 1954 does not, of course, cent to nearly 64 per cent during this period.
mean a uniform increase throughout the state. Indeed, in The next largest class consists of the net earnings of pro-
the face of Florida's general gains between 1950 and 1954, prietors or unincorporated businessmen (largely farmers.


TABLE 5.-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL, BY PRIMARY CLASSES, IN FLORIDA, 1954, 1952, AND 1950


Primary Class
of
Personal Income


Total net income __
Net wages and salaries-
Other labor income -
Proprietors' income __
Property income --
Transfer payments ___


Alnount Income by class as a
Percentage changes in class


Amount
(in millions of dollars)
1954 1952 1950


$5,312.8
3,311.4
73.3
817.9
757.7
352.5


$4,536.0
2,813.0
53.0
738.0
652.0
280.0


Total Personal Income


$3,641.0
2,053.0
36.0
711.0
549.0
292.0


.0 0



45.9
61.3
103.6
15.0
38.0
20.7


Income by class as a
percentage of total income
1954 I 1952 I 1950


1954


Amount

1952


4 -I I- 4 1


100.0
62.3
1.4
15.4
14.3
6.6


100.0
61.9
1.2
16.3
14.4
6.2


100.0
56.4
1.0
19.5
15.1
8.0


$1,506
939
21
232
215
100


$1,430
887
17
233
206
88


1950


$1,314
741
13
257
198
105


Percentage changea in class
1950 1950 1952
to to to
1954 1952 1954


14.6
26.7
61.5
- 9.7
8.6
- 4.8


8.8
19.7
30.8
- 9.3
4.0
-16.2


5.3
5.9
23.5
- .4
4.4
13.6


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
a The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.


-7-


Personal Income per Capita






retailers, and servicemen). Rising from $711 million in 1950
to $818 million in 1954, proprietors' income experienced the
smallest increase of any of the primary income classes. Prop-
erty income, comprising dividends, interest, and rent, rose
from $549 million in 1950 to $758 million in 1954. Although
each increased in amount, the proportion of total income in
Florida represented by these two classes dropped from
nearly 35 per cent to under 30 per cent during this period.
To guard against misunderstanding, the terms must be
clarified. Property income includes the net earnings of cor-
porations doing business in Florida only to the extent that
dividends are paid to Florida residents. In addition, divi-
dends received by Florida residents from out-of-state cor-
porations are included in this state's income in the same way
that dividends paid by Florida corporations to out-of-state
stockholders are included in the income of the states in which
they are residents. It should be noted that property income,
in addition to interest, dividends, and rent, includes the im-
puted rental value of owner-occupied homes, amounting to
$134 million in 1954.
The final class of primary income is transfer payments by
government and business to recipients who gave no goods
or services in return for the payments. Aside from a little
over $20 million in transfer payments by business, the total
transfers of $353 million in 1954 were by governments in the
form of social insurance, veterans' benefits, and public assist-
ance. Although growing moderately in amount, transfers
accounted for a smaller part of total income in 1954 than in
1950.
The restatement of primary classes into per capital personal
income shows the income trend. As would be expected, per
capital wages and salaries increased in amount-from $741
in 1950 to $939 in 1954. This was the most significant per
capital increase since the only larger one was, as Table 5
discloses, for the small class of "other labor income." Prop-
erty income per capital rose 8.6 per cent from 1950 to 1954,
but proprietors' income per capital suffered a drop of 9.7 per
cent. Moreover, transfer payments per capital shrank 4.8 per
cent between these years. These changes show that total per
capital income in Florida rose during this period chiefly from
larger payments in wages and salaries, because the increase
in property income was much more than offset by decreases
in proprietors' and transfer income.
With the year 1954, the National Income Division of the
U. S. Department of Commerce substituted personal income
for income payments as the basis for estimating income by
states. Therefore, the income estimates by the Bureau of
Economic and Business Research for 1950 and 1952 have
been revised to conform to the new basis. The county-by-
county figures for personal income in 1950 and 1952 are pre-
sented in Table 13. County-by-county statistics for personal
income by primary classes in 1954 are presented in Table 12
in a three-fold way-the amount of income from each class,
the percentage each class was of total income, and the per
capital income from each class. Since Tables 12 and 13 have
been prepared on the same basis, interyear comparisons may
be made.

INDUSTmAL SOURCES OF INCOME
In addition to examining total personal income by primary
classes, total income is resolved into the second classification


of the major industrial sources from which income is derived.
Table 11 sets forth these sources contributing to Florida's
income in 1954. One necessary exception must be noted.
One-sixth of the total income ($901 million) cannot be classi-
fied by industry because the income was derived from divi-
dends, interest, rent, labor income other than payrolls, and
small business transfers.
The largest single industrial source, equaling 21 per cent,
consisted of the $1,122 million in payments by federal, state,
and local governments. Of that amount, $790 million were
governmental wages and salaries, of which $482 million were
paid by the federal government and $308 million by Florida
state and local governments. The remaining $332 million
consisted of public-to-private transfers in the form of social
insurance, veterans' benefits, and public assistance. Govern-
mental payments exclude, it should be noted, contract con-
struction and the purchase of land and goods because these
transactions are with private businessmen whose earnings
enter into the reported income.
Next in size was income in the amount of $973 million
from retail and wholesale trade, accounting for 18 per cent
of total income in Florida. Akin to this class are the service
occupations, comprising personal, auto repair, gasoline and
other business trades, and the medical, legal, and other pro-
fessions. The service category of $649 million was 12 per
cent of total income. Taken together, all trades contributed
$1,622 million to income in Florida, accounting for over 30
per cent of the total income in 1954. Since this proportion
was much larger than the governmental share, the combined
category may be considered the most important source of
income in Florida.
The relative contributions of manufacturing and agricul-
ture to the Florida economy form a moot question that is
answered differently in various years in terms of income. In
1954, the manufacturing contribution of $420 million was
unmistakably larger than the $336 million contribution by
agriculture. The method of reporting industrial sources of
income, however, makes difficult a comparison between these
two industries. These and other industrial sources consist
of the sum of two primary classes-wages and salaries and
proprietors' income. Dividend payments by corporations,
which bulk large in manufacturing and small in agriculture,
are included in the property income that is unclassified by
industry. If dividends could be identified by industry, which
presently is impossible, the income size of manufacturing
would be even greater than that reported for 1954.
The income of $397 million in 1954 from the construction
industry was almost equal to that from manufacturing. Con-
struction in past years has occupied-and bids in future years
to occupy-a dynamic role superior in Florida to the corre-
sponding roles in many states. The combination category of
transportation, communication, and utilities accounted for
income amounting to $323 million.
County-by-county data concerning indicated industrial
sources of Florida's personal income in 1954 are presented
in Tables 10 and 11, according to three bases-the amount
of income from each source, the percentage each source was
of total income, and the per capital income from each source.


-8-






TABLE 6.-PERSONAL INCOME: FLORIDA COUNTIES GROUPED BY LEVEL OF INCOME PER CAPITAL IN 1954

$500 $700 $900 $1,100 $1,300 $1,500 Over
to $700 to $900 to $1,100 to $1,800 to $1,500 to $1,800 $1,800

Baker Bradford Alachua Bay Broward Indian River Duval Dade
Calhoun Gilchrist Citrus Brevard Collier Lake Orange Hendry
Dixie Hamilton Columbia Charlotte Escambia Lee Palm Beach
Franklin Jefferson Hardee Clay Flagler Leon Polk
Holmes Lafayette Hernando De Soto Glades Monroe Sarasota
Union Levy Jackson Gadsden Gulf Pinellas
Wakulla Liberty Manatee Marion Highlands St. Johns
Walton Madison Seminole Martin Hillsborough St. Lucie
Washington Okeechobee Nassau
Osceola Okaloosa
Santa Rosa Pasco
Sumter Putnam
Suwannee Taylor
Volusia
Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.

COUNTIES GROUPED INTO LEVELS OF The extent of urbanization, the proportion of people gain-
PERSONAL INCOME PER CAPITA fully employed, and the age composition of the population
The most significant way in which to analyze differences all have an important relationship to income levels. The
in per capital total personal income and the variation in latest information about these three influences is the 1950
sources of income is to group the 67 counties into income Census of Population, whereas the figures for total popula-
levels according to the size of per capital income. Table 6 tion by county for 1954 are intercensal estimates. In the
identifies the counties composing the seven income levels span of four years changes will have occurred in these three
into which the counties have been classified. The highest factors, and these changes will be greater in those counties
level, counties in which 1954 income was over $1,800 per which exceeded the average population growth rate for the
capital, contains but two counties-populous Dade and small state. The reader should be mindful of this in reading the
Hendry. The next highest level, counties having income per following discussion dealing with urbanization, employment,
capital from $1,500 to $1,800, contains five counties, all of and age composition.
which are populous (Duval, Orange, Palm Beach, Polk, and Urbanization is directly correlated with income levels. As
Sarasota). In the third highest level are 16 counties having Table 7 shows, counties with the highest income levels had
incomes per capital from $1,300 to $1,500, among which are the largest proportion of urban population; and, where the
four of the most populous counties (Broward, Escambia, urban population was a smaller proportion, the county in-
Hillsborough, and Pinellas), four middle-sized counties, and come level was lower. Rural population represented 5 per
eight counties small in population. In the lower income cent or less of the population in the three highest income
levels are only two populous counties, Bay and Volusia. level counties and varied between 21 per cent to 37 per cent
As a consequence of the concentration of most of the popu- in the three lowest level counties. Not to be forgotten is the
lous counties in the high-income levels, the seven counties in fact that farming often is important in the populous counties.
the two highest levels accounted for 44 per cent of total pop- Moreover, in a considerable number of largely rural counties,
ulation and 53 per cent of total income in the state. If the per capital income was in the range of middle income levels.
third highest level is also included, nearly 76 per cent of Agriculture and low income are not synonymous.
Florida's population and 83 per cent of the income were in A striking finding was the relation between employment
the 23 counties in which per capital income exceeded $1,300. and income levels. In the counties of the two highest income
The 44 counties having per capital income below $1,300 ac- levels, 40 per cent of the population was gainfully employed;
counted for only 24 per cent of the state's population and 17 but in the counties of the two lowest levels, only 34 per cent
per cent of the income, and 28 per cent were employed. The explanation for this

TABLE 7.-PERSONAL INCOME: COUNTY POPULATION CHARACTERISTIcs ACCORDING TO COUNTY LEVELS OF INCOME PER CAPITAL IN FLORIDA, 1954

Population in 1954 Population in 1950 Percentage Distribution of Population, by Ages in 1950
Level of County
Personal Income Number Per cent Per cent Per cent Under 21 to 64 65 years
per Capita of state urban employed 21 years years and over

All counties------ 3,526,983 100.0 65.5 37.9 34.2 57.2 8.6
Over $1,800 648,139 18.4 93.0 40.7 28.1 64.3 7.6
$1,500 $1,800- 902,635 25.7 72.5 40.0 33.9 58.3 7.8
$1,300 $1,500- 1,114,810 31.7 71.4 37.5 33.7 56.7 9.6
$1,100 $1,300- 435,003 12.4 43.2 86.8 36.8 54.1 9.1
$900 $1,100-_ 216,718 6.2 37.6 35.4 39.2 52.1 8.7
$700 $900- 127,960 3.6 13.7 33.6 42.8 48.0 9.2
$500 $700-- 71,655 2.0 12.1 28.1 43.3 49.3 7.4

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census and Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.


-9-






correlation is mainly found in the distribution of population
by age group. The population under 21 years of age was a
relatively small proportion in the high-income level counties
and materially larger in the low-income level counties. Ac-
cordingly, the population flom 21 to 64 years of age-which
forms the group from which most employees are drawn-
was a large proportion in counties having high-income levels;
and, as the proportion for this age group decreased, the in-
come level fell. Whether the income level is high or low
is markedly influenced by the proportion of population gain-
fully employed as well as by the productivity of those em-
ployed.

INCOME SOURCES IN RELATION TO COUNTY
LEVELS OF PERSONAL INCOME
A significant question is to what extent the primary classes
(property, wages and salaries, etc.) of personal income vary
with the county level of income. The nature of the variation
in the composition of income, both by primary classes and
by industrial sources, furnishes an important clue to the
reasons for differences in county levels of income. Table 8
sets forth the variations in amounts of personal income and
per capital income in 1954, according to levels of county per-
sonal income per capital and primary income classes.
The class of wages and salaries averaged $1,276 per capital
in counties averaging incomes per capital of over $1,800 and
dropped sharply to $340 per capital in counties with per
capital incomes ranging from $500 to $700. As a percentage
of total county income, however, the spread between high-
and low-income levels was smaller. Thus, in the highest per
capital income level, per capital wages and salaries was 63.3
per cent of all county income as against 53.9 per cent in
the lowest level.
Another influence contributing to variations in income
classes was the greater proportion of business, especially


agriculture, in an unincorporated form in the lower income
levels. Accordingly, the percentage of total income from pro-
prietors' earnings ranged from 23 per cent in the lowest in-
come per capital level to 13.9 per cent in the highest level.
Nonetheless, per capital income from proprietors' earnings
was larger in the highest level ($280) than in the lowest
one ($145).
A more pronounced difference prevailed for property in-
come, of which $668 million of the Florida total of $758 mil-
lion was found in the three highest levels of county income
per capital. As a result, property income as a proportion of
total income was as large as 15.9 per cent in the highest level
and as small as 5.8 per cent in the lowest. In average income
per capital, the spread was extreme-between $321 for the
highest county level of income per capital to $37 for the
lowest level. In contrast, per capital transfers varied only
to a minor degree among county per capital income levels.
Transfers were roughly proportional to population. In con-
sequence, transfers as a proportion of total income rose from
as little as 5 per cent for the highest income level to 16.5
per cent for the lowest level.
Another way of examining county income levels-by major
industrial source-is presented in Table 9. The two most
important private industrial sources of income among all the
levels of income per capital were retail and wholesale trades
and service trades and professions, with the exception of
the poorest counties (having incomes below $900 per capital)
which depended more heavily upon agriculture. An inverse
correlation prevailed between income levels and per capital
agricultural income, which increased as the income level fell.
Per capital income from mining and fisheries was as large in
the lower income levels as in the higher, except in the per
capital level from $1,500 to $1,800 containing the mining in-
dustry of Polk County.
After trades and services, the largest private contributors


TABLE 8.-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL, BY COUNTY LEVELS OF PERSONAL INCOME PER CAPITAL
AND BY PRIMARY CLASSES OF INCOME, IN FLORIDA, 1954
Primary Class IPrimary Class
Level of County Number Total,a Total, P ri Ca i ,
Personal Income of All Other All .a "
per Capita Counties Classes Wages and labor Proprietors' Property Transfers Classes 0 8 8
saiarieSb income income income I' 0 g .S E-
Amount of Income (in thousands of dollars) Income per Capita
All counties ........ 67 $5,312,847 $3,311,447 $73,300 $817,900 $757,700 $352,500 $1,506 939 21 232 215 100
Over $1,800 ....... 2 1,306,388 827,158 24,665 181,505 208,091 64,969 $2,016 1,276 38 280 321 100
$1,500 to $1,800- 5 1,515,158 929,074 19,478 238,523 238,997 89,086 $1,679 1,029 22 264 265 99
$1.300 to $1,500- 16 1,591,200 994,100 20,212 241,922 220,780 114,186 $1,427 892 18 217 198 102
$1,100 to $1,300- 14 529,402 347,035 5,818 78,895 55,868 41,786 $1,217 798 13 181 128 96
$900 to $1,100- 8 220,917 129,797 1,933 43,466 24,275 21,446 $1,019 599 9 201 112 99
$700 to $900-- 13 104,644 59,952 843 23,209 7,064 13,576 $ 818 469 7 181 55 106
$500 to $700 -- 9 45,138 24,331 351 10,380 2,625 7,451 $ 630 340 5 145 37 104
Amount of Income in Each Level as a Percentage Income per Capita in Primary Class as a
of the Amount for All Counties Percentage of Total, All Classes

All counties .._. 67 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 62.3 1.4 15.4 14.3 6.6
Over $1,800 ... 2 24.6 25.0 33.6 22.2 27.5 18.4 100.0 63.3 1.9 13.9 15.9 5.0
$1,500 to $1,800 5 28.5 28.1 26.6 29.2 31.5 25.3 100.0 61.3 1.3 15.7 15.8 5.9
$1,300 to $1,500- 16 29.9 30.0 27.6 29.6 29.1 82.5 100.0 62.4 1.3 15.2 13.9 7.2
$1,100 to $1,300 14 10.0 10.5 7.9 9.6 7.4 11.8 100.0 65.5 1.1 14.9 10.6 7.9
$900 to $1,100. 8 4.2 3.9 2.6 5.3 3.2 6.1 100.0 58.7 .9 19.7 11.0 9.7
$700 to $900 13 2.0 1.8 1.2 2.8 1.0 3.8 100.0 57.2 .8 22.2 6.8 13.0
$500 to $700- 9 .8 .7 .5 1.3 .3 2.1 100.0 53.9 .8 23.0 5.8 16.5
Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
a Figures are rounded, therefore the classes do not always add to the total.
b Excludes personal contributions for social insurance.


-10-












TABLE 9.-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND AMOUNT PER CAPITAL, BY COUNTY LEVELS OF PERSONAL INCOME PER CAPITAL AND BY MAJOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCES, IN FLORIDA, 1954


County Level of
Personal Income
per Capita


All counties
Over $1,800
$1,500 to $1,800
$1,300 to $1,500
$1,100 to $1,300
$ 900 to $1,100-
$ 700 to $ 900-
$ 500 to $ 700-



All counties
Over $1,800-
$1,500 to $1,800-
$1,300 to $1,500-
$1,100 to $1,300-
$ 900 to $1,100 --
$ 700 to $ 900-
$ 500 to $ 700-


All counties -- -
Over $1,800 .
$1,500 to $1,800---- ---
$1,300 to $1,500 -
$1,100 to $1,300 -------
$ 900 to $1,100 --
$ 700 to $ 900---- ---
$ 500 to $ 700 --.-


Number
of
Counties


Total
Personal
Income


Personal
Contribu-
tions for
Social In-
suranceb


Personal Income plus Personal Contributions for Social Insurance, by Industrial Source


Manu-
facturing


Agri-
culture


Mining
and
fisheries


Transpor-
tation, Finance,
Con- communi- real estate,
struction cation, and and
utilities insurance


Retail
and
wholesale
trades


Service
trades and
professions


Govern-
ments


Unclassi-
fied by
industry


Amount of Income (in thousands of dollars)
67 $5,312,847 $74,753 $419,500 $336,400 $43,152 $396,600 $322,637 $223,800 $973,000 $648,880 $1,122,258 $901,373
2 1,306,388 17,761 86,035 34,469 4,176 114,352 121,923 68,881 262,014 206,550 173,263 252,486
5 1,515,158 20,200 114,333 109,141 19,494 107,473 82,132 71,511 291,744 172,488 288,290 278,752
16 1,591,200 22,955 137,690 93,206 10,665 128,018 79,446 60,415 289,844 175,064 378,496 261,311
14 529,402 7,316 55,445 43,346 5,265 29,312 20,958 13,660 75,132 61,560 164,256 67,784
8 220,917 3,972 13,259 28,618 1,808 11,750 10,314 6,283 36,057 23,606 64,495 28,699
13 104,644 1,761 9,321 19,867 994 3,895 6,049 2,014 12,199 6,920 36,176 8,970
9 45,138 788 3,417 7,753 750 1,800 1,815 1,036 6,010 2,692 17,282 3,371

Income per Capita
67 $ 1,506 21 119 95 12 112 92 63 276 184 318 256
2 $ 2,016 27 133 53 6 176 188 106 404 319 267 390
5 $ 1,679 22 127 121 22 119 91 79 323 191 319 309
16 $ 1,427 21 124 84 10 115 71 54 260 157 340 234
14 $ 1,217 17 127 100 12 67 49 31 173 142 378 156
8 $ 1,019 19 61 132 8 54 48 29 166 109 298 132
13 $ 818 14 73 155 8 30 47 16 95 54 283 70
9 $ 630 11 48 108 10 25 25 15 84 38 241 47

County Level as a Percentage of All Counties
I I I I I a


1UU.U
24.6
28.5
29.9
10.0
4.2
2.0
.8


1UU.U
20.5
27.2
32.9
13.2
3.2
2.2
.8


1UU.0
10.2
32.5
27.7
12.9
8.5
5.9
2.3


100.0
9.7
45.2
24.7
12.2
4.2
2.3
1.7


100.0
28.8
27.1
32.3
7.4
3.0
1.0
.4


100.0
37.7
25.5
24.6
6.5
3.2
1.9
.6


100.0
30.7
32.0
27.0
6.1
2.8
.9
.5


100.0
26.9
30.0
29.9
7.7
3.7
1.2
.6


100.0
31.8
26.6
27.0
9.5
3.6
1.1
.4


100.0
15.4
25.7
33.8
14.6
5.8
3.2
1.5


100.0
28.0
30.9
29.0
7.5
3.2
1.0
.4


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
* Because figures have been rounded, the addition of the classes less the personal contributions does not always give the exact total.
b By definition, personal income excludes personal contributions for social insurance.


-----------------------
-----------------------
---------------------
--- -------- --------
------------ - --
-------------- ___






to income levels were transportation, communication, utili-
ties, finance, and construction. The size of the income from
these industries corresponded closely with the county income
levels: a large volume and proportion in the high levels
which decreased as the income level became lower.
Income from manufacturing followed an individual pat-
tern without concentration. The bulk of this class of income
was found in the 37 counties composing the levels of income
over $1,100 per capital. In the four income levels of this
large group, per capital manufacturing was about the same.


Manufacturing income per capital in the remaining 30 low-
income counties, although smaller per capitawise, was
almost as large a proportion of total income as in the high-
income counties.
Income from governments revealed a different pattern from
that of private industries. Even though the bulk of this in-
come was paid in the four higher income levels, the largest
per capital payments were not in the two highest levels but
in the two middle-sized county levels of income. The rela-
tively large size of governmental income per capital in the
lower income levels was conspicuous.


-12-








TABLE 10.-PERSONAL INCOME: AMOUNT PER CAPITAL BY MAJOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954

Personal Income' Per Capita Personal Income plus Personal Contributions for Social Insurance,
per Capita by Major Industrial Sources
Percentage Per Capita --- --- -- Transpor- --- --- --
Change in Personal Transpor-
State and Popula Percentae Contribu- station, Service
County tion, 1954 change Total tionsfor Manufac- Agri- Mining Construc- communi- Retail and trades and Govern- Unclassi-
over 1950 1954 over from all Social during culture and tion cation, wholesale profes- ments fledby
1950 sources Insurance fisheries utilities, trades sons industry'
and
finance

State --. --- *27.3 14.6 $1,506 $21 $119 $ 95 $ 12 $112 $155 $276 $184 $318 $256
Alachua 3.7 7.8 1,097 30 76 71 2 60 83 184 103 420 129
Baker ------------ 7.7 38.6 690 11 82 173 --- 21 50 90 31 197 56
Bay 30.9 20.9 1,266 19 175 5 9 64 75 200 104 526 127
Bradford 1.2 20.5 717 15 72 44 50 17 53 108 59 258 70
Brevard ---- 101.0 23.3 1,255 16 25 66 13 70 48 162 350 393 144
Broward -- 79.8 4.6 1,468 17 78 69 5 202 151 292 208 185 295
Calhoun ---- 6.6 23.3 682 11 87 136 2 6 69 80 32 225 56
Charlotte -- .3 24.7 1,181 14 41 208 80 22 113 187 122 236 188
Citrus ---------- 3.5 22.9 908 14 26 83 104 33 53 141 88 256 139
Clay -- ---- 38.9 3.1 1,257 19 116 83 44 71 38 84 80 662 96
Collier 68.0 -13.8 1,452 13 68 311 50 101 110 154 147 175 351
Columbia .-- 8.1 19.5 1,001 18 60 107 -- 90 67 146 108 347 95
Dade -- -- 29.7 15.4 2,007 27 131 39 7 177 296 406 320 268 391
De Soto ...----- 5.9 10.7 1,171 19 41 321 -- 20 88 165 123 325 108
Dixie ...- 5.8 16.4 674 13 90 56 12 4 34 95 49 290 58
Duval .. 24.8 14.3 1,790 30 165 11 3 119 239 376 187 412 308
Escambia .. 33.7 20.0 1,461 27 200 10 3 119 104 200 113 586 153
Flagler - 24.7 24.7 1,326 17 264 342 --.- 106 57 101 178 177 118
Franklin .. 5.3 2.7 691 13 41 10 111 17 42 98 52 272 61
Gadsden 7.9 1.8 1,133 15 111 347 13 81 41 135 72 237 110
Gilchrist .. -11.4 9.2 763 13 37 250 .... 10 39 92 44 256 47
Glades ... 9.1 -33.4 1,442 13 3 894 --.. 13 67 85 73 252 68
Gulf - 16.7 27.7 1,448 23 547 6 1 55 165 130 83 202 282
Hamilton --. 2.4 17.5 719 11 93 204 25 22 74 60 199 52
Hardee ---. 13.2 6.8 1,068 11 53 429 25 50 155 84 194 90
Hendry --_ -- 4.1 44.0 3,006 21 363 1,667 86 74 246 142 227 222
Hernando 18.0 8.3 944 15 41 101 103 72 63 117 108 232 122
Highlands .. 10.0 29.8 1,469 14 30 495 --.. 59 77 251 148 226 198
Hillsborough -- 25.4 11.1 1,432 21 193 44 15 94 148 319 145 289 206
Holmes --- -- 9.1 3.8 551 9 38 168 1 12 21 52 23 219 26
Indian River -- 22.1 15.6 1,412 14 45 350 8 112 81 263 145 206 217
Jackson 3.5 33.5 900 14 43 166 .. 24 45 136 166 257 76
Jefferson 4.9 32.2 755 10 53 268 23 39 75 47 208 52
Lafayette .-- 9.9 17.2 771 10 21 351 __ 24 12 55 37 243 38
Lake ..... 22.7 10.3 1,469 13 68 532 2 68 65 211 125 200 210
Lee ... 28.2 8.2 1,336 15 57 135 55 80 123 278 166 213 245
Leon -_ .. 11.1 24.3 1,337 35 76 29 3 115 101 207 129 550 163
Levy .___ 7.8 3.5 847 15 128 107 17 65 75 93 44 245 89
Liberty -21.4 28.9 812 17 167 163 .. 14 27 38 33 332 54
Madison ----- 2.8 29.7 821 11 155 182 ...... 60 44 90 44 187 71
Manatee --- 23.9 18.6 1,046 12 77 113 6 81 75 185 98 199 225
Marion 12.1 15.4 1,193 18 121 144 27 85 89 223 123 244 156
Martin 16.6 21.2 1,248 14 24 229 9 80 129 131 127 217 316
Monroe ...--- 58.1 6.8 1,320 17 20 ** 34 49 43 128 109 861 93
Nassau 14.0 16.1 1,149 20 533 18 32 21 56 127 55 199 127
Okaloosa ... 67.3 9.2 1,221 17 10 24 3 34 46 97 84 871 67
Okeechobee 15.8 -48.3 749 13 60 61 ...... 39 46 144 78 241 95
Orange ---- 53.9 10.9 1,517 16 100 161 1 116 125 308 179 276 267
Osceola ---- 8.7 4.8 895 11 75 103 .... 22 50 177 104 242 134
Palm Beach -. 32.1 10.6 1,706 17 51 183 1 149 126 287 219 270 436
Pasco 22.8 8.9 1,101 13 234 185 2 27 47 133 87 257 141
Pinellas 31.5 14.5 1,429 19 69 19 2 133 126 273 199 288 338
Polk ..--- 25.8 11.3 1,582 19 157 303 115 87 100 250 165 217 203
Putnam 17.3 27.2 1,123 15 322 112 15 64 71 141 85 195 15
St. Johns ... 16.8 20.4 1,451 26 58 186 1 62 226 167 188 243 347
St. Lucie -.. 30.0 25.4 1,310 15 57 342 7 63 80 270 129 204 r- 174
Santa Rosa .. 16.2 11.5 814 13 29 88 2 17 25 62 31 530 43
Sarasota --- 34.6 9.0 1,606 17 44 42 3 152 156 308 283 214- 421
Seminole 27.8 7.9 1,009 15 49 157 31 121 176 86 264 119
Sumter .--------- 5.6 3.9 900 27 41 130 11 16 261 74 54 -71 70
Suwannee 8.7 27.3 896 13 49 261 7 40 72 119 63 / 225 74
Taylor 18.1 32.5 1,163 17 359 36 6 176 48 142 79., 198 135
Union --- *-20.4 12.8 574 12 42 147 -- 6 14 39 21 291 27
Volusia ------ 18.2 12.4 1,282 17 58 59 1 82 150 249 N93 245 263
Wakulla 6.8 8.9 597 13 41 38 13 32 7 116 60 263 40
Walton .....-- -- .8 9.2 626 10 17 86 -- 39 50 118 52 218 55
Washington ...... -11.7 26.8 653 11 47 88 56 51 71I 30 270 51

Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
a Personal income by definition excludes personal contributions for social insurance.
b Finance includes real estate and insurance.
Unclassified by industry are dividends, interest, and rent; labor income other than salaries and wages; minor business transfers; and miscellaneous small industries.
Inmates of state institutions are excluded from county population but are included in Florida population. /
** Less than one-half of one dollar.
-.. Zero. .-


-13-











'rABLE 11.-PERsONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF INCOME
PLUS PERSONAL CONTRIBUTIONS FOR SOCIAL INSURANCE BY
MAJOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954
(Dollar figures are in thousands)

Amount and Percentage Distribution of Personal Income plus Personal Contributions for Social Insurance by Major Industrial Source
Total Personal ---------------------------------------------------- -----
Income plus I Transportation, Finance,
State and County Personal Con- Manufacturing Agriculture Mining and Construction communications, real estate, and Retail and Service trades Governments Unclassified
tributions for / fisheries and utilities insurance wholesale trades and professions by industry-
Social -- --- -- --- -- ---- ---- ----- ------
Insurance Amount o Amf % Amountof % of Amount Amount Amount of Amount % of of Amount of
n n AAmount -tAmount atoal Amount l Amolunt ut t Al moun t Aot total total Amount total Amount total
tota totl toal ttal totd


State .... ...--
Alachua --
Baker
Bay ---
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun -
Charlotte .
Citrus
Clry
'Collier
Columbia
Dade -
De Soto
Dixie ..
Duval
Escambia -
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden _
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf __
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry ..
Hernando
Highlands ---
Hillsborough
Holmes --
Indian River
Jackson __ _
Jefferson __


$5,387,600
66,048
4,764
71,816
8,495
60,426
224,136
5,127
5,140
5,439
25,377
15,973
20,073
1,306,591
10,357
2,543
690,254
224,227
5,639
3,877
38,138
2,407
3,493
12,806
6,712
12,302
17,558
7,575
22,247
455,285
7,121
20,679
32,766
7,573


$419,500
4,445
558
9,751
839
1,174
11,714
642
177
156
2,317
736
1,176
83,928
359
333
62,598
30,106
1,109
227
3,695
116
7
4,760
858
602
2,107
325
448
60,487
489
649
1,543
524


8 $336,400 6


4,134
1,177
295
514
8,161
10,479
1,004
894
489
1,655
3,392
2,105
24,802
2,795
209
4,141
1,522
1,437
55
11,518
776
2,146
52
1,874
4,886
9,667
800
7,421
13,817
2,137
5,071
5,967
2,653


$ 43,152 1
108 *

518 1
578 7
626 1
776 *
15 *
343 7
615 11
883 3
547 3

4,176 *

44 2
1,203 *
483 *

612 16
436 1


10



810 11

4,565 1
15 *
110 1


$396,600
3,519
144
3,565
192
3,349
30,466
46
93
193
1418
1,098
1,771
113,853
174
14
45,024
17,917
445
94
2,689
32
82
481
234
284
499
572
879
29,345
149
1,626
854
228


$322,637
2,983
246
2,609
448
1,017
9,234
85
340
187
569
297
895
121,650
600
74
53,252
10,213
140
185
765
70
120
1,077
108
284
273
274
806
32,756
194
366
734
331


$223,800
1,905
97
1,554
167
1,264
13,623
429
145
125
190
899
425
68,722
162
51
37,377
5,438
99
45
613
51
40
363
98
285
159
220
344
13,768
69
806
883
55


$973,000
10,778
613
11,182
1,258
7,691
44,085
591
803
829
1,669
1,675
2,878
260,590
1,486
350
142,655
30,102
426
541
4,480
285
204
1,130
678
1,772
1,424
921
3,759
99,933
658
3,813
4,886
745


$648,880
6,029
210
5,816
685
16,628
31,348
234
525
517
1,599
1,600
2,121
205,726
1,071
180
70,778
17,058
746
288
2,400
135
176
718
548
954
824
854
2,221
45,457
294
2,102
5,960
462


$1,122,258
24,592
1,337
29,418
2,997
18,673
27,949
1,668
1,013
1,508
13,160
1,904
6,829
171,947
2,824
1,073
156,392
88,304
743
1,497
7,885
795
604
1,761
1,833
2,213
1,316
1,836
3,393
90,460
2,781
2,984
9,211
2,063


$901,373
7,555
382
7,108
817
6,843
44,462
413
807
820
1,917
8,825
1,873
251,197
936
215
116,834
23,084
494
333
3,657
147
164
2,454
481
1,022
1,289
963
2,976
64,697
335
3,152
2,728
512


continued ..


I -
I I







TABLE 11.-(CONTINUED)
(Dollar figures are in thousands)


State and County



Lafayette
Lake
Lee -
Leon
Levy -----
Liberty
Madison ...-
Manatee __
Marion __
Martin
Monroe ......--
Nassau _..
Okaloosa ..
Okeechobee
Orange __
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco -_ -.
Pinellas ---.--
Polk .....-
Putnam _--
St. Johns -.
St. Lucie __
Santa Rosa _
Sarasota _.
Seminole ..
Sumter
Suwannee -
Taylor
Union
Volusia ...
Wakulla
Walton _
Washington _


Total Personal
Income plus
Personal Con-
tributions for
Social
Insurance


2,420
66,076
40,535
78,633
8,452
2,072
12,153
45,505
51,813
11,487
63,308
17,065
57,002
3,049
271,264
11,237
261,126
28,066
303,230
249,754
31,532
43,127
34,761
17,827
62,960
35,181
9,924
14,084
14,519
3,236
113,980
2,989
9,295
6,974


Amount and Percentage Distribution of Personal Income plus Personal Contributions for Social Insurance by Major Industrial Source


Manufacturing

Amount % of
total


64
3,036
1,699
4,346
1,253
417
2,260
3,313
5,189
221
953
7,790
465
238
17,758
927
7,804
5,897
14,473
24,450
8,906
1,683
1,484
630
1,723
1,699
437
758
4,419
232
5,085
202
242
492


3
5
4
6
15
20
19
7
10
2
2
45
1
8
7
8
3
21
5
10
29
4
4
4
3
5
5
5
30
7
4
7
3
7


Agriculture Mining and
i fisheries


o % of
Amount total


1,087
23,725
4,038
1,643
1,046
408
2,662
4,841
6,166
2,082
2
262
1,120
244
28,460
1,278
27,663
4,658
4,076
47,260
3,109
5,421
8,964
1,896
1,617
5,396
1,389
4,040
447
814
5,184
186
1,252
919


Amount total


93
1,638
176
164


275
1,138
78
1,618
467
150

115

186
56
433
17,880
402
41
175
34
110

115
103
68

100
64


Construction


Amount

74
3,041
2,391
6,591
635
36
871
3,480
3,636
724
2,323
301
1,577
156
20,464
274
22,554
690
27,913
13,533
1,778
1,809
1,661
370
5,898
1,077
169
624
2,164
31
7,154
157
576
589


Transportation, Finance,
communications, real estate, and
and utilities insurance


% of IAmount
Amount total Amount


26
1,423
1,897
2,504
622
67
509
1,500
2,448
755
1,093
673
1,425
133
9,502
201
7,713
837
10,759
9,569
1,349
5,577
1,184
232
2,096
3,457
2,717
585
436
38
7,135
30
513
450


% of
total


Retail and
wholesale trades

Amount % of
total


Service trades
and professions
Amount tof
Amount I total


Governments

Amount total


_________ 4 I 1 4 -4 I- F


12
1,496
1,790
3,286
114
1
134
1,727
1,345
423
955
150
694
49
12,642
424
11,424
356
15,588
6,093
616
1,017
903
311
3,975
713
74
524
153
37
5,995
2
222
84


170
9,405
8,329
11,835
914
96
1,308
7,941
9,526
1,191
6,051
1,853
4,479
575
54,533
2,189
43,540
3,342
57,141
39,075
3,893
4 862
7,094
1,344
11,941
6,052
797
1,840
1,752
213
21,835
569
1,727
748


114
5,587
4,994
7,416
428
82
638
4,213
5,272
1,154
5,174
801
3,856
312
31,754
1,284
33,250
2,204
41,579
25,727
2,345
5,495
3,393
673
10,979
2,958
575
984
974
114
16,915
294
764
314


754
8,904
6,398
31,492
2,402
831
2,734
8,558
10,424
1,980
40,757
2,910
40,132
963
48,878
2,999
40,943
6,467
60,406
33,772
5,398
7,097
5,340
11,417
8,305
9,748
2,904
3,484
2,441
1,606
21,531
1,287
3,193
2,840


31
13
16
40
29
40
22
19
20
17
63
16
70
32
18
27
16
23
20
14
17
16
15
63
13
28
28
25
17
49
19
43
34
42


Unclassified
by industry&
% I of
Amount total


119 5
9,366 14
7,361 18
9,344 12
874 10
134 6
1,037 9
9,657 21
6,669 13
2,879 25
4,382 7
1,858 11
3,104 5
379 12
47,158 17
1,661 15
66,049 24
3,559 13
70,862 23
32,395 13
3,736 12
10,125 23
4,563 13
920 5
16,316 26
4,081 12
747 8
1,142 8
1,665 11
151 5
23,046 20
198 7
806 9
538 8


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
* Unclassified by industry are dividends, interest, and rent; labor income other than salaries and wages; small business transfers; and miscellaneous small industries.
O Less than one per cent.
... Zero.














TABLE 12.-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE DISTRnmUTION OF INCOME, BY PRIMARY CLASSES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954

Amount and Percentage Distribution of Personal Income by Primary Class (dollar figures are in thousands) Personal Income per Capita, by Primary Class
Wages
Wages and salaries and
State and County Total less personal Other labor income Proprietors' income Property income Transfer payments salaries Oher Proprie-
State and County amount contributions Total' less con- labor tots' Property Transfer
for social insurance __tributions income income income payments
Amount Amount t Amount of Amount %of Amount of for social
total Amount total Amount total total Amount total insurance


State __ --__ -
Alachua --------- __ --- -
Baker -- -__-----.---
Bay .---..... --
Bradford
Brevard -----
Broward -------- -
Calhoun ------------- --
Charlotte ---.------
Citrus -.-------
Clay
Collier
S Columbia
Dade d.
S De Soto ..
Dixie -- - --
Duval
Escambia
Flagler --
Franklin
Gadsden - --
Gilchrist -------- -.
Glades
Gulf -- --
Hamilton -...-----
Hardee ._
Hendry
Hernando -- ----
Highlands ---.... .
Hillsborough ... ...-
Holmes
Indian River ---..
Jackson _. .... -..
Jefferson .


$5,312,847
64,283
4,689
70,764
8,319
59,683
221,666
5,045
5,079
5,358
25,013
15,824
19,712
1,288,951
10,188
2,493
679,101
220,168
5,568
3,801
37,614
2,366
3,462
12,606
6,614
12,171
17,437
7,459
22,033
448,592
7,006
20,471
32,282
7,471


$3,311,447 63
42,493 66
2,772 59
53,538 76
5,431 65
42,337 70
127,499 57
2,629 52
2,661 52
2,880 54
18,937 75
8,211 52
11,842 60
817,485 63
5,266 52
1,500 59
464,234 69
167,674 76
3,469 62
2,398 63
22,254 60
1,122 48
1,247 36
8,708 69
3,697 56
5,138 42
9,673 56
4,346 58
10,008 45
301,326 67
3,028 43
10,389 51
18,740 58
3,794 51


$73,300
501
29
888
108
375
3,615
43
38
67
295
156
240
24,506
39
23
9,016
3,509
97
32
474
7
7
357
60
54
159
159
152
6,945
29
215
270
50


$817,900
8,909
1,088
6,367
1,048
7,765
39,807
1,341
1,095
972
2,647
3,177
4,289
175,316
3,135
415
69,079
18,177
1,377
410
9,585
808
1,868
903
1,762
5,122
6,189
1,435
7,714
57,106
2,377
5,708
8,095
2,324


15
14
23
9
13
13
18
27
22
18
11
20
22
14
31
17
10
8
25
11
25
34
54
7
27
42
35
19
35
13
34
28
25
31


$757,700
6,361
300
5,461
585
5,780
37,624
319
714
695
1,429
3,464
1,446
207,182
799
168
98,357
17,158
321
271
2,741
121
135
1,890
352
815
909
714
2,593
51,323
262
2,688
2,122
393


14
10
6
8
7
10
17
6
14
13
6
22
7
16
8
7
14
8
6
7
7
5
4
15
5
7
5
10
12
11
4
13
7
5


$352,500
6,019
500
4,510
1,147
3,426
13,121
713
571
744
1,705
816
1,895
64,462
949
387
38,415
13,650
304
690
2,560
308
205
748
743
1,042
507
805
1,566
31,892
1,310
1,471
3,055
910


7
9
11
6
14
6
6
14
11
14
7
5
10
5
9
16
6
6
5
18
7
13
6
6
11
9
3
11
7
7
19
7
9
12


$ 1,506
1,097
690
1,266
717
1,255
1,468
682
1,181
908
1,257
1,452
1,001
2,007
1,171
674
1,790
1,461
1,326
691
1,133
763
1,442
1,448
719
1,068
3,006
944
1,469
1,432
551
1,412
900
755


$ 939
725
408
958
468
890
845
355
619
488
952
753
601
1,273
605
405
1,224
1,113
826
436
670
362
520
1,001
402
451
1,668
550
667
962
238
716
522
383


$ 21
9
3
16
9
8
24
6
9
11
15
14
12
38
4
6
24
23
23
6
14
2
3
41
7
5
27
20
10
22
2
15
8
5


$ 232
152
160
114
90
163
264
181
255
165
133
291
218
273
360
112
182
121
328
74
289
261
778
104
192
449
1,067
182
514
182
187
394
226
235


$ 215
109
44
98
50
122
249
43
166
118
72
318
73
323
92
45
259
114
76
49
83
39
56
217
38
71
157
90
173
164
21
185
59
40


$ 100
103
74
81
99
72
87
96
133
126
86
75
96
100
109
105
101
91
72
125
77
99
85
86
81
91
87
102
104
102
103
101
85
92


continued . .








TABLE 12.-(CONTINUED)


State and County


Lafayette -------
Lake
Lee ---------- --
Leon -- ------
Levy
Liberty ---
Madison ----
Manatee ---------
Marion
Martin ----- ------
Monroe --
Nassau -----------
Okaloosa --------
Okeechobee -
Orange ------
Osceola --- -
Palm Beach
Pasco ----------
Pinellas ----------
S Polk ------------
-I Putnam --- --
St. Johns ----
St. Lucie -------
Santa Rosa
Sarasota ----- --
Seminole -------
Sumter ----- -- -
Suwannee -----
Taylor ---- -
Union -- -
Volusia
Wakulla _----...- --
Walton --- -
Washington --


Amount and Percentage Distribution of Personal Income by Primary Class (dollar figures are in thousands)


Wages and salaries
Total less personal
amount contributions
for social insurance
Amount I of


$ 2,391
65,527
40,076
76,604
8,306
2,031
11,987
44,984
51,073
11,366
62,488
16,775
56,242
2,996
268,449
11,101
258,605
27,733
299,377
246,700
31,096
42,374
34,364
17,546
62,303
34,668
9,629
13,887
14,300
3,169
112,476
2,927
9,151
6,857


$ 942
26,834
22,851
53,976
4,936
1,070
6,532
23,214
30,297
5,331
50,622
12,613
46,181
2,121
152,901
5,825
137,978
15,811
160,195
140,977
19,814
22,099
18,992
12,202
32,984
21,144
5,683
6,597
10,113
1,549
61,882
1,836
4,857
3,762


40
40
57
71
59
53
55
52
60
46
82
75
82
71
57
52
53
58
53
57
63
52
55
69
53
61
59
46
71
49
55
63
52
55


Other labor income

% of
Amount total


$ 4
463
265
759
106
23
148
393
632
62
307
438
270
56
3,065
97
2,469
350
2,887
4,428
575
221
257
37
500
249
51
96
417
10
965
18
78
89


Proprietors' income Property income Transfer payments


I % of
Amount total


$ 1,067
25,593
7,246
9,193
1,465
513
3,200
8,040
10,056
2,268
4,446
1,243
4,013
143
55,754
2,082
43,446
5,833
43,464
60,719
5,225
7,155
8,988
2,486
9,525
6,604
1,657
4,654
1,573
882
18,090
435
2,066
1,366


44
39
18
12
18
25
27
18
20
20
7
7
7
5
21
19
17
21
15
25
17
17
26
14
15
19
17
34
11
28
16
15
23
20


Amount


$ 99
8,278
6,562
7,81T
664
94
751
8,680
5,363
2,678
3,720
1,151
2,562
278
40,775
1,435
60,162
2,881
63,993
24,783
2,722
9,349
3,871
798
14,920
3,442
579
915
982
123
20,605
156
636
390


% of
total Amount


4
13
16
10
8
5
6
19
10
24
6
7
5
9
15
13
23
10
21
10
9
22
11
5
24
10
6
7
7
4
18
5
7
6


$ 279
4,359
3,152
4,865
1,135
331
1,356
4,657
4,725
1,027
3,393
1,330
3,216
398
15,954
1,662
14,550
2,858
28,838
15,793
2,760
3,550
2,256
2,023
4,374
3,229
1,659
1,625
1,215
605
10,934
482
1,514
1,250


Personal Income per Capita, by Primary Class


Total*


$ 771
1,469
1,336
1,337
847
812
821
1,046
1,193
1,248
1,320
1,149
1,221
749
1,517
895
1,706
1,101
1,429
1,582
1,123
1,451
1,310
814
1,606
1,009
900
896
1,163
574
1,282
597
626
653


I I


Proprie-
tors' Property
income income


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
a Since per capital figures have been rounded to the nearest dollar, the primary classes do not always add to the total.
* Less than one per cent.


Transfer
payments


,


Wages
and
salaries Other
less con- labor
tributions income
for social
insurance

$ 304 $ 1
602 10
762 9
942 13
504 11
428 9
447 10
540 9
708 15
586 7
1,069 6
864 30
1,003 6
530 14
864 17
470 8
910 16
627 14
765 14
904 28
715 21
757 8
724 10
566 2
850 13
615 7
531 5
426 6
822 34
281 2
705 11
375 4
332 5
358 8


$ 344
574
241
160
149
205
219
187
235
249
94
85
87
36
315
168
287
231
208
389
189
245
343
115
245
192
155
300
128
160
206
89
141
130


$ 32
186
219
136
68
38
51
202
125
294
79
79
56
70
230
116
397
114
306
159
98
320
148
37
385
100
54
59
80
22
235
32
44
37


$ 90
98
105
85
116
132
93
108
110
113
72
91
70
100
90
134
96
113
138
101
100
122
86
94
113
94
155
105
99
110
125
98
104
119







TABLE 13.-PERSONAL INCOME: TOTAL AMOUNT, BY PRIMARY CLASSES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1952 AND 1950

(In thousands of dollars)


1952


1950


State and County


State -- -

Alachua .-----
Baker .---
Bay --__-
Bradford --
Brevard ----
Broward ---..
Calhoun ---...
Charlotte -..
Citrus ----
Clay .-- ---
Collier ---
Columbia ---..
Dade --.---
De Soto ---...
Dixie-----..
Duval ----
Escambia- -
Flagler --- -
Franklin -...
Gadsden ---
Gilchrist ----
Glades .---- -
Gulf ---....
Hamilton .---...-
Hardee -.... --
Hendry ----....
Hernando .......----
Highlands --..
Hillsborough--....
Holmes _-------
Indian River --
Jackson ----......
Jefferson ---- -.
Lafayette .......-..
Lake ---
Lee ___-
Leon ----
Levy -....---
Liberty ---- --
Madison ....-..
Manatee -__
Marion ____.....--
Martin -------------
Monroe -___-.... ..
Nassau------------
Okaloosa---......
Okeechobee .....
Orange __ --
Osceola ----
Palm Beach ------
Pasco_..........
Pinellas -- ----. -
Polk .... -
Putnam __- -
St. Johns---
St. Lucie .. --
Santa Rosa-......
Sarasota ----... -
Seminole .--
Sumter... -.------
Suwannee ---
Taylor --.
Union -- --..
Volusia ----
Wakulla --.
Walton -----
Washington ....--


Wages and
salaries less
Total personal con-
tributions for
social
insurances


$4,536,000

60,830
3,640
66,806
7,212
42,794
153,970
4,606
3,855
5,087
21,276
12,062
17,492
1,078,765
9,005
2,351
625,261
186,471
6,226
4,914
38,408
2,338
2,141
12,720
5,967
9,477
12,158
7,017
16,808
404,667
7,082
17,183
25,234
5,970
2,237
54,026
36,101
66,248
8,277
2,091
10,243
37,185
44,901
9,273
45,008
16,360
46,564
2,644
213,667
9,067
213,262
26,967
242,399
219,623
27,412
37,387
25,744
16,021
52,082
32,863
10,569
12,552
10,159
3,750
102,763
3,040
8,716
7,006


$2,813,000

39,136
2,337
52,194
4,237
29,655
89,887
2,578
2,231
2,824
16,987
5,851
10,572
678,704
5,112
1,424
409,142
144,441
4,715
3,311
21,8364
1,238
1,341
9,206
3,111
4,434
6,708
4,238
8,103
272,698
2,765
9,041
12,943
3,301
953
23,265
20,564
47,702
4,854
1,259
5,536
19,044
26,678
4,659
35,885
11,383
39,158
1,753
124,897
4,476
114,393
12,161
129,990
122,054
17,986
20,252
16,281
10,838
26,234
17,081
5,968
6,266
6,695
2,046
56,328
1,719
4,750
4,063


Other
labor
income


$53,000

560
29
723
83
413
2,009
40
47
48
157
143
154
14,372
98
20
7,276
1,909
145
55
345
12
27
279
55
86
99
69
167
5,357
40
215
245
43
9
485
364
630
116
36
149
342
529
77
386
289
204
42
2,316
102
2,132
293
2,669
2,652
472
329
335
60
546
291
80
130
230
12
1,173
36
70
94


Pro-
prietors' Property
income income


$738,000

9,272
581
5,431
1,284
6,285
28,892
1,012
547
941
1,660
3,117
3,723
157,786
2,195
359
70,505
14,212
809
586
11,471
638
476
776
1,752
3,413
4,231
1,427
5,133
55,384
2,735
4,773
7,232
1,358
892
20,568
7,753
7,039
1,701
419
2,685
7,965
9,057
1,531
3,416
2,444
2,730
281
43,786
1,910
36,072
10,008
36,035
62,590
4,216
5,706
4,596
2,462
10,957
9,900
2,461
3,591
1,310
995
19,135
653
1,890
1,250


$652,000

5,903
270
4,630
550
4,158
25,444
290
560
625
1,101
2,450
1,222
177,416
727
196
104,293
13,893
318
299
3,051
130
130
1,839
336
625
734
616
2,190
44,916
290
2,033
1,929
410
130
6,519
4,984
6,428
541
75
616
6,549
4,604
2,261
3,053
934
2,154
215
31,307
1,235
50,789
2,332
54,156
19,484
2,278
8,205
2,812
794
11,670
2,959
504
968
884
130
17,641
150
681
384


Transfer Total
payments


$280,000

5,959
423
3,828
1,058
2,283
7,738
686
470
649
1,371
501
1,821
50,487
873
352
34,045
12,016
239
663
2,177
320
167
620
713
919
386
667
1,215
26,312
1,252
1,121
2,885
858
253
3,189
2,436
4,449
1,065
302
1,257
3,285
4,033
745
2,268
1,310
2,318
353
11,361
1,344
9,876
2,173
19,549
12,843
2,460
2,895
1,720
1,867
2,675
2,632
1,556
1,597
1,040
567
8,486
482
1,325
1,215


$3,641,000

57,523
3,145
44,680
6,820
24,086
117,772
4,881
4,058
4,517
17,455
10,928
15,268
860,992
9,782
2,276
476,048
137,246
3,578
4,127
34,261
2,447
4,760
8,463
5,499
10,073
12,634
5,836
15,441
322,207
7,424
14,500
23,349
5,944
2,265
48,414
28,905
55,530
8,703
2,006
8,987
30,608
39,484
8,040
42,408
12,684
30,776
5,000
157,246
10,719
176,916
24,816
198,762
176,338
20,848
30,129
21,096
13,540
42,467
29,449
10,611
11,961
9,141
3,528
84,670
2,879
8,436
6,118


Wages and
salaries less
personal con-
tributions for
social
insuranceb


$2,053,000

34,681
1,743
31,489
3,569
12,930
63,346
1,883
1,687
2,045
13,066
4,121
7,986
499,605
4,256
1,076
299,457
97,068
1,877
2,495
16,982
952
1,107
4,954
2,269
3,357
5,757
3,068
5,970
202,531
2,041
6,720
9,680
2,675
775
19,039
13,613
37,133
3,901
996
4,018
14,190
20,446
3,457
34,634
7,774
23,889
1,794
80,235
3,578
82,901
9,543
103,533
85,929
11,698
15,528
11,994
7,577
20,140
13,947
4,990
4,812
5,805
1,356
43,513
1,396
3,803
2,620


Other Pro-
labor prietors'
income income


$36,000

456
18
419
62
217
1,306
25
32
33
96
92
107
9,855
75
14
4,987
1,180
69
38
254
9
18
154
34
59
83
49
111
3,718
28
144
165
35
7
354
224
449
81
24
98
231
374
54
238
170
117
35
1,533
73
1,491
203
1,926
1,706
269
230
225
33
390
226
65
93
169
8
825
24
56
57


$711,000

10,242
683
4,686
1,495
5,746
25,129
1,432
1,394
1,208
1,887
4,972
4,022
138,726
3,943
630
64,186
13,352
1,225
538
11,631
942
3,352
585
2,081
5,051
5,573
1,499
6,274
51,065
3,643
4,610
8,620
1,962
1,085
19,495
7,195
6,943
3,070
579
3,285
7,753
10,098
1,812
2,769
2,520
2,710
2,641
38,909
4,768
33,028
10,985
29,752
60,073
4,383
5,266
4,697
3,050
9,782
9,894
3,607
4,580
1,377
1,358
16,248
759
2,389
1,756


Property Transfer
income payments


$549,000

5,277
227
3,910
468
3,011
20,023
248
475
523
969
1,176
1,031
159,010
618
172
71,872
12,508
227
256
2,897
117
110
2,123
241
530
780
508
1,793
37,571
194
1,903
1,492
803
110
6,243
5,236
5,580
461
69
318
5,291
4,175
1,966
2,404
669
1,566
139
25,243
1,084
49,325
1,967
47,021
15,380
1,824
6,254
2,431
662
9,926
2,610
332
537
706
158
15,819
131
578
222


$292,000

6,867
474
4,176
1,226
2,182
7,968
793
470
708
1,437
567
2,122
53,796
890
384
35,546
13,138
180
800
2,497
427
173
647
874
1,076
441
712
1,293
27,322
1,518
1,123
3,392
969
288
3,283
2,637
5,425
1,190
838
1,268
3,143
4,391
751
2,363
1,551
2,494
391
11,326
1,216
10,171
2,118
16,530
13,250
2,674
2,851
1,749
2,218
2,229
2,772
1,617
1,939
1,084
648
8,265
569
1,610
1,463


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.
a Personal contributions for social insurance amounted to a total of $60,000,000 in 1952.
b Personal contributions for social insurance amounted to a total of $46,000,000 in 1950.


-18-


9






PART THREE


RETAIL TRADE IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
CARTER C. OSTERBIND, Research Professor
ELISE C. JONES, Assistant in Research
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH


T HE 1954 U. S. Census of Business provides the first de-
tailed information available on retail, wholesale, and service
trades since 1948. The rapid growth of Florida makes this
information especially valuable. That retail, wholesale, and
service trades are important sources of the income paid to
residents of Florida is emphasized by the fact that wages and
salaries from these trades were approximately 36 per cent
of the total wages and salaries received by Floridians in 1954.
This proportion was greater than the national average and
above the averages of most of the states.
Although income from retail, wholesale, and service trades
may be an important segment, the income structure of a
state is the product of many economic activities. The fact
that in comparison to other states, Florida's retail, wholesale,
and service trades are a proportionately greater source of
income means, of course, that its other economic activities
are proportionately smaller sources. The prominent relative
position of income from trades in the Florida economy is
attributable in part to the impact of tourism. Trade as an
income source obviously is influenced by the volume of sales,
and those Florida counties with the highest per capital retail
sales are the counties where the vacation business is large.
The 1954 Census of Business provides information on sales,
employment, payrolls, and the number of establishments in
the retail, wholesale, and service trades. Within the three
trade classifications, data are given on particular types of
business activity. These data are shown not only for the
state as a whole but also for counties and communities.

STATE-WIDE CHANGES IN RETAIL SALES
During the period from 1948 to 1954, the dollar volume
of retail sales in Florida increased 72.5 per cent. This was
the greatest percentage increase experienced by any state in
the nation. For this same period the Bureau of the Census
has estimated that Florida's population growth was about 37
per cent. Running slightly ahead of the increase in retail
sales, personal income received by Floridians is estimated
to have increased by 74 per cent. Although the increases
since 1948 have been significant, growth has been underway
over a much more extended period of time. When the 1954
retail sales are compared to those of 1939, the increase is
revealed to be the rather sizeable amount of 550 per cent.
By 1954, the aggregate value of Florida's retail sales had
reached the $4,014-million mark.
On a per capital basis, retail sales in Florida in 1954 were
$1,138, while personal income per capital was estimated by
the Bureau of Economic and Business Research to be $1,506.
Ranking high among the states, Florida was above the na-
tional average in retail sales per capital.


FLORIDA COMPARED TO OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES
With retail sales amounting to $4,014 million, Florida led
the Southeastern States in 1954. North Carolina and Virginia
with retail sales of $3,210 million and $3,121 million, respec-
tively, were its closest rivals; while at the other extreme,
Mississippi and South Carolina had retail sales of only $1,282
million and $1,519 million, respectively. Retail sales in
Florida were also above those of any other southeastern state
in most of the major types of retailing. These include food
stores; eating and drinking places; apparel and accessories
stores; furniture, home furnishings, and appliance dealers;
automotive groups; gasoline service stations; lumber, build-
ing materials, hardware, and farm equipment dealers; and
drug and proprietary stores. Retail sales of general mer-
chandise stores in North Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia
were greater than the sales of such stores in Florida. In
nonstore retail sales (sale made at customer's home, at the
site of another business establishment, or by mail order)
Florida was also fourth, having been exceeded by Georgia,
Tennessee, and North Carolina.
By 1948 Florida had achieved a leading position among
the Southeastern States in both aggregate volume of retail
sales and in per capital sales. In the period from 1948 to 1954
this state continued to move ahead with not only the largest
dollar increase in retail sales but also the greatest percentage
increase. Florida's increase of 73 per cent was followed by
North Carolina's 44 per cent. Increases in the other South-
eastern States ranged from 28 to 42 per cent. (If adjustment
is made for the increase in the price level of approximately
12 per cent during the period, the various increases are not
as large-Florida's would be 54 per cent, North Carolina's
28 per cent, and the increases of the other states would range
from 14 to 26 per cent.) In Florida the greatest increases
were made by the automotive group of businesses and by
gasoline service stations which gained 109 and 101 per cent,
respectively.
Florida also had a larger number of retail establishments
than did any state in the southeast. Although it ranked first
in the number of establishments for most types of retail
businesses, it ranked only eighth in the number of general
merchandise stores; sixth in number of food stores; and
second in gasoline service stations.
Per capital retail sales in Florida of $1,138 in 1954 were
considerably above per capital sales in any other southeastern
state. Next in order of rank was Virginia with $870, while
the figure for Mississippi was $582.
As already noted, the favorable trade developments in
Florida are closely linked to its large tourist industry and to
its increasing population. Obviously, the aggregate volume


-19-






of retail sales as well as the per capital retail sales would be
smaller if it were not for tourist spending. Thus, when direct
comparisons are made between Florida and the other South-
eastern States, as above, Florida's economy is viewed in its
most favorable light. Although retail sales per capital in
Florida are above the national average, they are still below
the average for many states. If it were possible to separate
from the total value the retail sales that result from spending
by residents, the latter figure would probably result in aggre-
gate and per capital amounts somewhat more comparable to
the figures shown for the other Southeastern States.
Florida has made great progress in many ways, but it
should not be overlooked that much of the economic develop-
ment has been essentially of the type responsive to the grow-
ing tourist trade and the growing population rather than of
the type directly responsive to employment and enterprise
opportunities. The one area of economic activity in which
most of the Southeastern States are ahead of Florida is manu-
facturing. The personal income statistics of the Department
of Commerce show that the total wage and salary disburse-
ments from manufacturing were lower in Florida than in
any other southeastern state except Mississippi. Thus, in
viewing Florida's great economic expansion in trade its status
in other areas of economic activity should not be forgotten.
RETAIL TRADE IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
The retail trade in the 67 counties presents a wide range
of difference in the changes between 1948 and 1954 and in
the relative importance of total and per capital retail sales.
It is interesting to note that all of the counties had an in-
crease in value of retail sales as well as in per capital sales
between 1948 and 1954. The greatest increase in value oc-
curred in Collier County where it was 322 per cent, while
the smallest increase was in nearby Glades County where it
was 13 per cent. The largest increase in per capital retail
sales, 140 per cent, was in Collier County also. Two other
counties had increases of more than one hundred per cent-
Levy with 110 and Liberty with 104.
Per capital sales figures are given for each county because
they are helpful in the analysis of trade developments. The
reader should recognize, however, that they are subject to
some margin of error because they are necessarily based on
intercensal population estimates. Such estimates are more
difficult to make for small areas such as counties than for
larger areas such as the state or nation.
There are many considerations to be weighed in examin-
ing the retail trade data presented in the accompanying
tables. It is not possible to discuss the changes in each
county that are the results of differences in population and
population changes, in economic activity and development
and in the importance of tourism, and other differences. To
give a summary review of the data, attention will be given,
first, to the 14 counties which accounted for 82 per cent of
Florida's retail sales in 1954 and, second, to the 53 counties
which accounted for approximately 18 per cent.
Retail trade in the 14 counties having sales in excess of
$50 million each in 1954.-Widely scattered throughout the
state, this group of 14 counties accounting for 82 per cent
of Florida's retail sales in 1954 includes Escambia in the
most western part of the state, Duval in the northeast, and
Dade in the extreme south. The other eleven counties in this


group are Hillsborough, Pinellas, Orange, Broward, Palm
Beach, Polk, Volusia, Sarasota, Leon, Bay, and Alachua.
Although these counties are scattered throughout the state,
the importance of Dade and the adjacent counties in the
total volume should not be overlooked. Dade County ac-
counted for about one-fourth of the retail sales in 1954, while
Dade together with the two nearby counties of Broward and
Palm Beach accounted for more than one-third of the sales.
However, when the counties in the central or northern and
western parts of the state are grouped, they likewise account
for a significant proportion of the 1954 retail sales.
Among the 14 counties leading in retail sales, per capital
sales were highest in those which are generally known to
attract large numbers of winter visitors and tourists. The
highest per capital retail sales were found to have been in
Sarasota, Dade, and Broward counties, while the lowest were
in Escambia, Alachua, and Polk.
As would be expected, there was a close correspondence
between the ranks of the counties in total retail sales and
their ranks according to population. However, the respective
ranks of the counties in population and in total retail sales
were not always the same. For example, Sarasota ranked
eleventh in retail sales but nineteenth in population.
In terms of the percentage change in total retail sales
between 1948 and 1954 the majority of the 14 counties did
not deviate widely from the average percentage increase for
the state-Dade and Leon with respective increases of 71.4
per cent and 70.2 per cent were just under the state average
of 72.5 per cent. At the two extremes of this group were
Broward with an increase of 138.7 per cent and Alachua
with an increase of 35.5 per cent. The percentage increases
for the remainder of the counties were from 54 to 102 per
cent. Likewise the increases in the per capital retail sales
of these leading counties did not deviate widely from the
state average increase of 27 per cent; however, eight of the
14 counties were below the state average increase. Among
the group the highest percentage increase in per capital sales
was in Leon while the lowest was in Palm Beach County.
This is interesting because Palm Beach is an important tourist
area and Leon is not; however, in 1948 Palm Beach, having
experienced an earlier spurt in retail sales, ranked near the
top in retail sales per capital, whereas Leon County ranked
considerably lower.
Statistics on income in Florida counties for 1954 reveal
that the 14 counties with the highest retail sales in 1954 were,
with one exception, the counties with the highest total in-
come payments to individuals. The one exception was Sara-
sota which ranked sixteenth instead of fourteenth. This close
correspondence between income received by Floridians,
retail sales, and population again accords with expectations.
For the state as a whole, the payrolls for those employed
in retail trade increased between 1948 and 1954 by 62 per
cent, and the number of paid employees increased 28 per
cent. For the 14 counties with the retail sales in excess of
$50 million each, the increases in payrolls ranged from a low
of 30 per cent in Alachua County to a high of 125 per cent
in Broward. The increases in the majority of these counties
were very close to the average for the state. The same two
counties-Broward and Alachua-had the high and low ranks,
respectively, in the change in number of paid employees.
The former had an increase in paid employees of 77 per cent


-20-







and the latter a decrease of 6 per cent. The remaining 12
counties had increases ranging from 12 to 50 per cent.
The percentage changes in the various types of retailing
between 1948 and 1954 in Florida's 14 leading counties reveal
that the average changes were often the results of widely
differing changes in particular types of retailing. In Dade,
food store sales increased 84 per cent, the sales of eating and
drinking places increased slightly less than 50 per cent, and
sales by the automotive group, 138 per cent. In Duval, food
store sales increased about 70 per cent while sales by general
merchandise stores increased 20 per cent. Broward, which
had the greatest increase in total retail sales among these
14 counties, registered substantial increases in all types of
retailing: 145 per cent in food store sales; 144 per cent in
sales by eating and drinking places; and 128 per cent in sales
by general merchandise stores. Although certain changes
in particular types of retail trade within various counties
give some insight into the character of the economic change
in the county, other changes can be interpreted only in the


light of information on local developments. For example, the
difference in the rate of change in sales by food stores and
by eating and drinking places in Dade may be related in a
meaningful way to changes in population and tourism.
Retail trade in the 53 counties having sales of less than
$50 million each.-Although this large group of 53 counties
accounted for only 18 per cent of the retail sales in 1954, it
includes several counties that appear destined to be among
the state's leaders in retail sales in the future if their present
rate of growth continues. These are Lee, Brevard, Monroe,
Okaloosa, and Indian River counties. Although Collier was
near the bottom in rank among the counties both in total
and in per capital retail sales in 1948, it showed the highest
rate of growth in retail sales between 1948 and 1954. In rate
of population growth between 1950 and 1954 Collier ranked
third in the state; and in the number of paid employees and
size of payrolls in retail trade, Collier also showed by far the
largest rates of increase in the state.
While 17 of the 53 counties in this group were equal to


TABLE 14.-RETAIL TRADE: COMPARISON, BY KIND OF BUSINESS, OF FLORIDA WrrH THE UNITED STATES, 1954

Number of Establishments Amount of Sales, All Establishments Amount of per Capita Sales Payroll in Number of Avg. Wkly.
Florida, Paid Em- Wages
Percentage change,' Total Percentage change,a Percentage change,a Entire ployees in in Florida
Kind of Business Total 1948 to 1954, in- in Florida 1948 to 1954, in- Total 1948 to 1954, in- Year Florida (for full-
in (in thou- in (in thou- (work week time em-
Florida United sands of United Florida Florida United sands of ended near- ployees
Florida States dollars) Florida States States dollars) est Nov.15) on Nov. 15)


All retail trade -.-
Food stores, total -_--
Grocery stores ...-
Other food stores ...-
Eating, drinking places,
total -___ --
Eating places
Drinking places ..
General merchandise
group, totaL__ .
Apparel, accessories
stores, total _-....
Shoe stores ----.........
Other apparel stores
Furniture, home fur-
nishings, appliance
dealers, total ....-
Automotive group,
total -- -
Gasoline service sta-
tions, total --....
Lumber, building ma-
terials, hardware,
farm equipment
dealers, total ......
Farm equipment
dealers -
Lumber, building ma-
terials, supplies,
equipment, hard-
ware dealers --
Drugstores, proprietory
stores, total ..-
Drugstores ...
Proprietory stores .-
Other retail stores, total
Liquor stores
Fuel, ice dealers .--
Feed, farm, garden
supply stores tt
Jewelry stores ---
Other retail stores .
Nonstore retailers, total


41,303
7,778
5,903
1,843

7,918
5,101
2,795

1,538

3,305
535
2,664

2,459

2,079

4,715


1,884

136


1,746

1,596
n.a.
n.a.
6,004
857
411

538
611
2,929
2,027


27.0
- 2.2
- 9.1
26.1

10.9
20.3
- 3.6
33.4
41.7
63.1
32.9

46.4

32.5

26.4


31.3

50.0


29.2

31.1
n.a.
n.a.
41.9
- 6.6
134.9

41.6
49.0
24.7
2,567.1


3.2
- 16.6
- 20.3
- 7.5

- 1.9
8.9
- 15.5

7.6

7.9
24.2
1.8

14.1

.8
1.2


3.3

6.7


2.1

1.3
n.a.
n.a.
15.1
- 5.2
26.1

12.5
18.1
- 2.6
1,496.7


$4,014,417
912,968
843,078
69,498

353,683
243,904
109,457

345,754

287,775
47,056
238,893

220,934

779,435

268,713


306,757

25,808


280,871

139,335
n.a.
n.a.
332,358
75,860
34,709

84,089
31,600
98,108
66,705


72.5
72.6
73.7
59.4

63.0
64.8
58.6
39.5

60.8
67.1
58.4

68.3

108.7

100.7


60.6

65.0


60.2

46.8
n.a.
n.a.
55.1
37.7
82.3

62.7
41.1
48.5
341.8


31.9
36.1
39.2
- 25.6

23.1
35.6
3.7
13.1
14.0
29.8
10.7

30.7

48.8

66.1


17.8

17.5


17.8

30.9
n.a.
n.a.
24.4
23.3
17.2

29.0
16.4
18.7
95.3


1,138
259
239
20

100
69
31

98
82
13
68


27.0
27.0
27.8
17.6

7.1
21.1
14.8

3.2
18.8
18.2
17.2

23.5

53.5

46.2


17.6

16.7


17.6

8.1
n.a.
n.a.
14.6
4.8
42.9

20.0

12.0
216.7


19.6
23.5
26.6
- 32.3

11.0
22.7
- 6.9
2.8
3.0
20.0


17.8

34.8

52.3


6.6

6.2


6.7
22.2
n.a.
n.a.
12.5
11.1
5.9

19.0
12.5
8.3
75.0


$405,980
50,495
43,787
6,708

58,561
47,674
10,887
49,819

34,776
5,699
29,077

30,178

70,058

20,030


32,869

3,064


29,805

19,259
17,764
1,495
31,096
4,565
5,109

5,285
4,179
11,958
8,839


169,913
23,906
20,658
3,248

34,545
28,892
5,653
25,320

14,110
2,026
12,084

10,537

18,335

8,898


10,530

903


9,627
8,792
7,797
995
12,170
1,730
1,886

2,063
1,442
5,049
2,770


$ 50.25
47.66
48.23
44.57

34.87
33.62
41.30
45.62

49.55
58.81
48.18

59.18

71.13

49.43


63.27

64.60


63.18
45.64
47.04
34.03
54.76
51.54
65.12

53.95
59.57
51.41
61.41


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
a The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
__ Zero.


-21-






or above the average rate of increase in retail sales for the
state, there were 36 of them that fell below, and quite a
number that fell significantly below, the average. A complete
explanation of the differences in the rates of growth between
counties would require an examination of the conditions in
each; however, it is evident that although different combina-
tions of influences account for the accelerated growth of
those that moved ahead of the average rate of increase in
retail sales for the state, those that lagged behind had a
number of things in common. One characteristic widely
common to this group was a geographic location that did
not enable them to participate in the large tourist industry
of the state, and in the main, according to 1952 income data
available, their most important source of income was from
agriculture. It is important also to point out that these
are not the counties in which the greatest agricultural devel-
opments have taken place. In general, the retail trade figures,
considered in relation to the income figures for 1954 and


to the 1954 population estimates, reveal that there are a
number of counties in Florida that are deriving little benefit
from the tourist trade or the developments in manufacturing
and agriculture.
SUMMARY OBSERVATIONS
Accompanying Florida's economic growth, per capital retail
sales and per capital personal income have risen. This indi-
cates that the growth in retailing, as well as in other eco-
nomic activities, has contributed to the improved average
economic status of Florida's residents. An examination of
the economic characteristics by counties reveals, however,
that in individual counties the rate of growth, the per capital
and total retail sales, and personal income differ widely.
These data direct attention to the areas having benefited
least from the economic developments of recent years and to
which attention should be given in the various plans to pro-
mote the state's economic development.


-22-






TABLE 15.-RETAIL TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, AND PAYROLLS, BY KIND OF BUSINESS,
IN FLORIDA, OTHER SouTHEASTERN STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954

Kind-of-Business Group
Lumber,
building
Total General Apparel, Furniture, materials, Drug
State in Food Eating, merchan- acces- home fur- Auto- Gasoline hardware, stores, Other Nonstore
State stores drinking dise series nishings, motive service farm proprie- retail retailers
places group stores appliance group stations equip- tary stores
dealers ment stores
dealers


Florida -- -
Other Southeastern States
Alabama ---
Georgia --
Kentucky -- --
Mississippi -..... -
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee -
Virginia -
Selected Vacation States
Arizona ---
California
Nevada -- -


Florida ---
Other Southeastern States
Alabama -
Georgia ..------ -
Kentucky --
Mississippi --
North Carolina .- .
South Carolina .-- -
Tennessee --
Virginia ---
Selected Vacation States
Arizona --
California
Nevada --



Florida ---------
Other Southeastern States
Alabama --
Georgia --
Kentucky --
Mississippi -.
North Carolina .. ...
South Carolina
Tennessee --
Virginia
Selected Vacation States
Arizona -
California --
Nevada -- --



Florida ----
Other Southeastern States
Alabama .
Georgia _--- ---
Kentucky -----------
Mississippi -
North Carolina .--..
South Carolina .--...
Tennessee __- -..
Virginia .- .__. .
Selected Vacation States
Arizona .
California
Nevada .. .


Number of Establishments

41,303 7,778 7,918 1,538 3,305 2,459 2,079 4,715 1,884 1,596 6,004 2,027

26,158 8,163 2,886 2,320 1,575 1,324 1,413 2,938 1,123 900 2,614 902
32,395 9,378 3,620 2,224 1,913 1,672 1,929 4,113 1,373 1,171 3,854 1,148
26,472 7,430 3,931 2,201 1,400 1,172 1,509 2,641 1,528 782 3,096 782
16,926 4,892 1,931 1,784 1,055 799 962 1,837 912 648 1,666 440
38,049 10,583 4,127 2,905 2,331 2,123 2,195 5,176 1,661 1,020 4,488 1,440
20,581 5,986 2,153 1,399 1,201 1,092 1,268 2,684 861 672 2,666 599
31,067 8,737 4,315 2,387 1,731 1,564 1,782 3,396 1,488 1,050 3,465 1,152
30,959 7,817 4,384 2,665 1,820 1,558 1,683 4,036 1,322 843 3,625 1,206

9,728 1,659 2,159 460 553 560 534 1,315 481 330 1,324 353
131,289 23,061 26,986 4,195 9,981 8,606 6,320 14,768 6,033 3,559 21,234 6,546
2,717 307 795 110 200 119 156 349 117 95 391 78

Total Sales (dollar figures are in millions)
$ 4,014 $ 912 $ 354 $ 346 $ 288 $ 221 $ 779 $ 269 $ 307 $ 139 $ 332 $ 67

$ 2,112 $ 527 $ 96 $ 265 $ 133 $ 108 $ 433 $ 145 $ 137 $ 65 $ 180 $ 23
2,963 677 140 354 171 144 581 222 203 97 272 102
2,201 528 150 259 125 98 428 144 186 74 182 27
1,282 288 53 152 81 58 270 104 110 40 116 10
3,210 692 134 394 196 177 610 245 255 95 331 81
1,519 376 63 170 90 92 299 127 114 49 124 15
2,759 639 136 330 174 133 556 201 205 77 226 82
3,121 724 180 391 183 148 574 232 197 103 347 42

$ 1,001 $ 231 $ 79 $ 109 $ 52 $ 53 $ 169 $ 89 $ 99 $ 35 $ 76 $ 9
15,644 3,868 1,318 1,556 977 968 2,666 1,111 1,030 494 1,337 319
330 65 40 30 21 14 58 33 21 17 27 4

Sales per Capita

$ 1,138 $ 259 $ 100 $ 98 $ 82 $ 63 $ 221 $ 76 $ 87 $ 40 $ 94 $ 19

$ 679 $ 169 $ 31 $ 85 $ 43 $ 34 $ 139 $ 47 $ 44 $ 21 $ 58 $ 7
810 185 38 97 47 39 159 61 55 26 74 28
735 176 50 86 42 33 143 48 62 25 61 9
582 131 24 69 37 26 123 47 50 18 53 4
755 163 31 93 46 42 143 58 60 22 78 19
679 168 28 76 40 41 134 57 51 22 55 7
821 190 40 98 52 40 165 60 61 23 67 24
870 202 50 109 51 41 160 65 55 29 97 12

$ 1,008 $ 232 $ 80 $ 110 $ 53 $ 53 $ 170 $ 90 $ 100 $ 35 $ 77 $ 9
1,246 308 105 124 78 77 212 89 82 39 106 25
1,514 303 183 138 95 66 266 153 94 78 122 16

Payroll, Entire Year (dollar figures are in millions)


406

191
289
210
112
311
139
262
327

107
1,841
39


$ 14
296
5


59 $


50 $


35 $


$ 7
133
2


30 $


70 $


20 $


33 $


311 $


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U.
* Less than $500,000.


S. Census of Business, 1954.


-23-







TABLF. 16.-RETrAL. TRADE: TOTAL SALES, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954

All Retail Sales Amount of Retail Sales by Kind-of-Business Group (in thousands of dollars)
Lumber,
Rank County Total Furniture, building Drug
among total as a amount Eating, General Apparel, home Auto- Gasoline materials, stores, Other
counties percentage (in thou- Food drinking merchan- acces- furnish- motive service hardware, propri- retail Nonstore
State and County (in de- of state sands of stores places disc series ings, and group stations farm etary stores retailers
sending total dollars) group stores appliance equipment stores
magnitude) dealers dealers

State .....-...... -- ..------- ---- 100.0 $4,014,417 $912,968 $353,683 $345,754 $287,775 $220,934 $779,435 $268,713 $306,757 $139,335 $332,358 $ 66,705
Alachua --------- 13 1.3 53,223 13,111 2,841 2,756 3,690 2,399 11,715 4,980 4,663 1,811 5,047 210
Baker ----- --... 58 .1 3,797 1,167 n.a. 375 49 n.a. n.a. 517 211 n.a. 459 n.a.
Bay .----- --- 14 1.3 53,205 12,970 4,382 5,563 3,091 3,238 9,187 4,881 4,519 1,817 3,351 206
Bradford ---- --- 46 .2 7,939 2,207 536 n.a. 452 525 1,737 1,358 177 301 n.a. 32
Brevard 19 1.0 39,032 11,081 3,417 1,177 1,561 1,905 6,851 4,807 3,580 1,590 2,648 415
Broward __ .---------- 5 5.6 225,165 49,506 25,525 15,053 20,402 15,667 41,394 12,117 15,735 8,821 17,353 3,592
Calhoun ---- -- -- - 50 .1 5,574 1,062 136 608 184 159 n.a. 720 n.a. 274 1,303 24
Charlotte ---- - 52 .1 5,370 1,688 615 295 n.a. n.a. 1,116 554 304 n.a. 312 n.a.
Citrus -------- ------- ------- 53 .1 5,334 1,397 1,068 196 80 n.a. 364 1,137 512 213 329 n.a.
Clay --- -------- --- ------ 43 .2 8,270 2,012 555 401 179 173 2,594 1,361 383 379 135 98
Collier ---.. .. ....--- - -------- 39 .3 10,176 2,098 1,352 635 533 355 667 1,221 1,430 446 1,397 42
Columbia 30 .4 16,471 3,789 1,612 1,096 755 1,159 3,406 2,036 913 354 1,308 43
Dade 1 24.6 989,054 215,151 113,059 85,012 97,709 56,859 182,422 50,959 68,880 35,647 66,718 16,638
De Soto 45 .2 7,967 1,998 270 n.a. 369 253 1,765 466 794 n.a. 1,416 n.a.
Dixie ..- --- ----- 60 .1 2,961 974 290 137 n.a. 176 n.a. 346 n.a. n.a. 112 n.a.
Duval 2 10.9 438,818 108,494 27,913 38,989 27,970 22,837 103,276 23,395 22,982 15,180 41,060 6,722
Escambia 9 3.2 129,249 32,987 9,424 11,893 9,766 7,637 29,048 7,852 6,668 3,852 8,819 1,303
Flagler 61 .1 2,955 619 631 n.a. n.a. --.. 239 675 279 234 n.a. --
Franklin 57 .1 3,813 1,198 688 314 n.a. n.a. 382 391 347 149 143 24
Gadsden 27 .5 20,478 4,865 616 2,163 1,023 1,051 3,923 1,789 3,092 629 1,150 177
Gilchrist 62 .1 2,326 693 n.a. n.a. .. n.a. n.a. n.a. 627
S Glades ___66 1,364 542 n.a. 180 __ 371 n.a. n.a. 129
Gulf _-_ 48 .2 7,199 2,360 399 313 426 455 1,462 623 469 250 426 16
Hamilton 54 .1 4,551 1,493 199 571 n.a. n.a. n.a. 726 518 136 358 n.a.
Hardee 37 .3 10,211 2,281 452 839 272 344 2,459 881 1,065 280 1,310 28
Hendry -_ 44 .2 8,060 1,655 653 417 n.a. 186 1,875 940 1,704 190 n.a. 163
Hernando 49 .2 6,683 1,553 338 314 n.a. n.a. 1,949 1,322 450 221 412 n.a.
Highlands ___- 31 .4 16,396 4,359 779 487 767 969 4,074 1,729 1,472 492 1,146 122
Hillsborough __3 8.0 321,112 73,703 26,245 36,151 17,654 16,489 64,279 18,940 19,241 12,157 29,706 6,547
Holmes ----- 56 .1 4,196 1,505 183 274 326 150 n.a. 266 n.a. n.a. 48 n.a.
Indian River 29 .5 18,660 4,107 1,755 734 817 968 2,924 1,823 1,814 677 2,740 301
Jackson 26 .5 22,080 5,124 832 2,931 1,002 945 5,249 1,583 2,548 533 1,209 124
Jefferson 51 .1 5,395 1,391 107 435 262 447 1,129 650 714 n.a. n.a. 16
Lafayette ---___ 64 .1 2,112 436 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 185 n.a. n.a. 420 __
Lake ...-- 18 1.1 43,128 10,862 2,626 2,434 1,906 1,663 8,835 3,449 3,874 1,413 5,793 273
Lee ---- 16 1.1 44,653 10,451 2,874 4,989 2,320 2,023 7,869 2,917 5,437 1,537 3,749 487
Leon 12 1.5 58,267 11,001 3,576 3,917 5,727 2,540 9,971 5,578 8,844 1,255 5,288 570
Levy --- -. 42 .2 8,636 1,697 517 546 157 497 2,432 1,556 387 218 533 96
Liberty -----... 65 1,448 767 n.a. 98 __ n.a. 199 n.a. 321 n.a.
Madison -.-- ...... 41 .2 9,016 2,208 320 458 673 644 1,585 534 1,653 197 446 298
Manatee -....... 17 1.1 44,440 12,098 2,367 3,683 2,199 2,760 9,127 2,910 4,621 1,418 2,930 327
Marion .. 15 1.1 45,574 8,777 3,857 2,908 3,129 1,869 7,885 4,009 6,484 1,165 4,848 643
Martin .. .. 38 .3 10,195 3,136 1,106 171 362 248 1,878 1,019 1,253 675 321 26
Monroe --- _- -. 20 .8 33,139 8,410 6,322 1,903 2,677 1,532 4,262 2,841 1,885 1,227 1,703 377
Nassau -. 36 .3 10,566 1,791 1,251 1,022 225 279 1,965 2,260 911 167 677 18
Okaloosa _- -- 22 .7 27,268 5,509 2,717 1,608 1,233 1,315 8,790 2,373 1,876 724 908 215
Okeechobee 59 .1 3,749 1,110 238 n.a. n.a. 291 1,016 382 52 n.a. 396 n.a.
Orange - 6 5.4 215,294 42,671 14,026 19,857 13,338 11,609 41,450 15,354 18,376 6,347 16,042 16,224
Osceola - ..... 32 .3 12,983 3,742 1,277 440 827 1,052 2,071 1,461 556 397 1,045 115
Palm Beach --- -- ......--- 7 4.9 198,461 42,257 17,950 12,413 18,043 15,560 35,813 12,298 12,894 6,547 22,274 2,412
Pasco __------ ___ 28 .5 20,064 5,298 1,642 677 n.a. 1,963 2,953 2,043 1,791 641 1,339 n.a.
Pinellas ...-- -........---- 4 7.2 288,859 55,942 25,379 47,416 16,662 12,030 48,108 16,851 30,329 9,780 24,164 2,198
Polk ._ ___-........ ... 8 3.7 147,395 38,097 7,596 8,941 8,825 8,647 30,264 11,426 12,356 4,549 14,750 1,944

continued .








TABLE 16.-(coNTrNUED)

All Retail Sales Amount of Retail Sales by Kind-of-Business Group (in thousands of dollars)
Lumber,
Rank County Total Furniture, building Drug
among total as a amount Eating, General Apparel, home Auto- Gasoline materials, stores, Other
counties percentage (in thou- Food drinking merchan- acces- furnish- motive service hardware, propri- retail Nonstore
State and County (in de- of state sands of stores places dise series ings, and group stations farm etary stores retailers
sending total dollars) group stores appliance equipment stores
magnitude) dealers dealers

Putnam -- -- 24 .6 $ 24,079 $ 5,641 $ 1,502 $ 1,326 $ 1,066 $ 1,274 $ 4,858 $ 1,727 $ 1,012 $ 1,317 $ 4,205 $ 151
St. Johns ..- -. 23 .6 25,441 5,950 3,050 784 1,395 1,153 5,607 2,709 1,576 1,150 1,861 206
St. Lucie -----....-- .......- 21 .8 30,708 7,806 2,202 1,492 1,806 1,738 7,931 1,810 2,420 921 2,438 144
Santa Rosa ---- ------------- 40 .2 9,043 3,105 842 143 416 598 1,585 1,041 532 198 583
Sarasota 11 1.5 62,042 13,940 6,347 2,513 4,526 4,306 12,110 3,641 6,934 2,504 4,813 408
Seminole -................- 25 .6 23,466 6,720 1,148 1,307 996 1,334 4,376 1,847 1,246 926 3,427 139
Sumter _- 47 .2 7,576 1,914 409 593 89 113 970 779 408 267 2,001 33
Suwannee ----------- -- --- 33 .3 12,317 2,291 384 713 686 375 2,565 1,095 1,805 363 1,992 48
Taylor ----- 34 .3 11,834 3,481 1,252 575 310 238 2,130 1,899 586 268 n.a. n.a.
Union -63 .1 2,220 674 82 395 - n.a. n.a. 440 n.a. n.a. 152
Volusia -- -10 2.7 107,043 22,208 12,774 9,506 7,002 6,582 17,227 8,787 8,287 5,067 8,661 942
Wikulla --- 67 1,283 639 164 187 ..... ----- ----- 161 90 .._. n.a. n.a.
Walton 35 .3 10,636 1,995 597 1,157 262 406 3,205 1,075 1,172 n.a. 612 n.a.
Washington .........-- 55 .1 4,398 1,204 159 398 377 238 382 n.a. 363 n.a. 539 n.a.


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S Census of Business, 1954.
n.a. Not available.
..a. Zero.
Less than one-tenth of one per cent. 9







TABLE 17.-RETAIL TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954

All Establishments Number of Establishments by Kind-of-Business Group
Lumber,
County Furniture, building
total as General Apparel, home materials, Drug
State and County a per- Total Food Eating, merchan- acces- furnish- Auto- Gasoline hardware, stores, Other Nonstore
centage number stores drinking dise series ings,and motive service farm proprie- retail retailers
of state places group stores appliance group stations equip- tary stores
total dealers ment stores
dealers

State ...---- 100.0 41,303 7,778 7,918 1,538 3,305 2,459 2,079 4,715 1,884 1,596 6,004 2,027

Alachua 1.4 579 143 73 25 50 34 31 88 32 23 60 20
Baker .2 84 27 3 9 3 1 2 17 4 2 14 2
Bay ..------------- 1.4 576 125 111 30 31 28 35 96 15 25 61 19
Bradford ---- .3 122 35 19 2 8 8 7 21 3 3 10 6
Brevard 1.3 536 87 112 18 32 23 37 83 25 18 75 26
Broward -. --. 5.4 2,227 274 500 71 253 161 108 197 93 75 384 111
Calhoun -... .2 95 17 8 8 4 5 5 25 3 4 12 4
Charlotte .3 115 24 23 7 2 6 8 14 5 2 22 2
Citrus ----- .3 129 18 34 9 3 1 9 29 12 4 8 2
Clay ___ .3 143 30 31 8 5 3 8 28 7 5 13 5
Collier .... .4 151 16 38 10 11 10 5 15 13 4 25 4
Columbia ---- .6 237 59 39 9 13 10 15 38 10 7 32 5
Dade --- 20.3 8,351 1,154 1,848 217 1,001 524 350 712 331 371 1,298 545
De Soto .2 100 22 10 2 7 4 8 13 6 2 24 2
Dixie .2 64 27 7 4 2 5 2 4 1 3 7 2
Duval 8.3 3,430 782 558 149 229 178 147 386 132 170 513 186
Escambia --- 2.9 1,199 330 225 31 92 56 62 117 39 31 159 57
Flagler --_ .2 66 10 19 1 1 3 19 4 3 6
Franklin .2 93 29 21 5 2 1 3 6 10 3 8 5
Gadsden .... .7 296 101 31 24 23 14 12 43 11 7 19 11
Gilchrist ....-- .1 30 14 2 1 2 1 2 8
Glades .- .1 28 8 1 5 .---- 8 2 1 3
Gulf__ .3 135 47 21 8 6 7 7 15 4 6 11 3
Hamilton ....-- .2 93 23 17 11 2 4 4 13 5 3 10 1
Hardee ..-......... .3 133 21 17 5 3 3 11 35 7 7 18 6
Hendry __ .2 84 14 20 4 2 4 8 11 5 5 2 9
Hernando .-...... .2 97 14 18 5 --.... 1 7 28 4 5 13 2
Highlands --- .5 227 48 33 8 15 16 19 31 12 7 31 7
Hillsborough ... 8.3 3,409 748 636 114 170 208 173 378 170 128 470 214
Holmes -.. .2 97 45 14 3 7 4 5 7 2 2 6 2
Indian River .5 221 37 40 9 19 19 11 31 13 9 28 5
Jackson .... .. .8 325 105 43 29 13 14 20 44 17 7 21 12
Jefferson ..-- .2 91 29 3 12 6 5 4 15 4 2 7 4
Lafayette --- .1 41 15 1 2 1 1 2 3 2 2 12
Lake -- 1.4 592 107 82 31 38 27 39 89 23 18 115 23
Lee ------------- 1.2 494 85 84 25 33 28 28 58 33 20 83 17
Leon .. 1.3 521 108 74 16 59 26 32 74 31 12 63 26
Levy ....-- .4 164 48 19 12 5 11 6 23 8 10 11 11
Liberty .. .1 21 4 1 3 1 5 1 _. 4 2
Madison _.. .4 147 48 15 9 13 8 5 15 11 3 9 11
Manatee _. 1.4 567 114 101 28 35 38 37 56 36 27 70 25
Marion .-- 1.3 533 130 89 31 36 23 23 83 26 14 62 16
Martin .4 171 32 38 4 8 7 11 31 15 6 15 4
Monroe 1.1 467 73 154 15 35 25 26 35 17 16 60 11
Nassau -.-. .4 157 16 38 11 6 4 7 35 6 5 26 3
Okaloosa .8 323 78 57 18 24 17 26 42 16 7 33 5
Okeechobee .. .1 54 11 9 2 2 4 5 5 5 1 8 2
Orange .---- 4.6 1,896 324 316 70 142 132 122 237 100 73 290 90
Osceola .5 216 52 34 8 14 9 13 35 11 6 28 6
Palm Beach ...--- 5.1 2,123 259 433 70 207 169 102 226 98 79 379 101
Pasco --- --- .8 327 65 73 10 5 18 17 57 17 8 48 9
Pinellas 6.8 2,797 441 606 77 217 174 133 287 127 118 461 156
Polk .- ..... 3.9 1,602 353 238 67 118 108 100 204 81 57 211 65
Putnam .--.. .8 315 78 59 9 17 21 22 39 10 13 42 5
St. Johns -. 1.0 427 77 101 15 25 23 18 49 18 13 66 22
St. Lucie .9 358 73 59 11 28 25 26 37 13 11 52 23
Santa Rosa .4 160 57 21 3 6 6 10 34 8 3 12
Sarasota-- 1.7 696 95 143 19 66 52 32 68 41 29 114 37
Seminole .8 336 95 52 10 14 30 17 31 21 8 43 15
Sumter .-.-- .3 138 29 23 10 4 4 7 22 10 8 16 5
Suwannee -- .4 172 44 22 13 10 5 8 27 15 5 20 3
Taylor -- .4 155 45 29 10 6 3 7 26 8 6 13 2
Union ----- .1 46 9 5 8 2 1 13 2 2 4
Volusia ... 3.5 1,436 254 312 46 103 93 60 166 60 68 229 45
Wakulla .1 50 26 7 5 4 4 2 2
Walton ......-- .3 144 42 36 12 4 3 5 19 3 2 12 6
Washington ... .2 94 28 12 5 9 5 4 12 4 2 13 --_

Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
-- Zero.


-26-






TABLE 18.-RETAIL TRADE: SALES PER CAPITA, BY KIND-OF-BUSINEss GouP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954

Retail Sales Retail Sales per Capita by Kind-of-Business Group
per Capita Lumber'
Fur--- .Lumber,
F State and County General Apparel, ture, materials, Drug
County as a per- Total Food Eating, merchan- acces- home Auto- Gasoline hardware, stores, Other Non-
centage per stores drinking dise series furnish- motive service farm proprie- retail store
of state capital places group stores ngs, and group stations equip- tary stores retailers
per appliance ment stores
capital dealers dealers

State ...-- ---....----------- 100 $1,138 $ 259 $ 100 $ 98 $ 82 $ 63 $ 221 $ 76 $ 87 $ 40 $ 94 $ 19
Alachua ...------. 80 908 224 48 47 63 41 200 85 80 31 86 4
Baker .----------... 49 558 172 n.a. 55 7 n.a. n.a. 76 31 n.a. 68 n.a.
Bay ------------ .. 84 952 232 78 100 55 58 164 87 81 33 60 4
Bradford ------ 60 684 190 46 n.a. 39 45 150 117 15 26 n.a. 3
Brevard ------ 72 821 233 72 25 33 40 144 101 75 33 56 9
Broward --------- 131 1,492 328 169 100 135 104 274 80 104 58 115 24
Calhoun ---- ------------ 66 753 144 18 82 25 21 n.a. 97 n.a. 37 176 3
Charlotte ------- -------110 1,249 393 143 69 n.a. n.a. 260 129 71 n.a. 73 n.a.
Citrus ------- 79 904 237 181 33 14 n.a. 62 193 87 36 56 n.a.
Clay ...-------.. -------. 37 416 101 28 20 9 9 130 68 19 19 7 5
Collier ---------------- 82 934 192 124 58 49 33 61 112 131 41 128 4
Columbia ---- -. 73 836 192 82 56 38 59 173 103 46 18 66 2
Dade --- ---- 135 1,540 335 176 132 152 89 284 79 107 55 104 26
De Soto ----- 80 916 230 31 n.a. 42 29 203 54 91 n.a. 163 n.a.
Dixie -- 70 800 263 78 37 n.a. 48 n.a. 94 n.a. n.a. 30 n.a.
Duval ---- -- 102 1,157 286 74 103 74 60 272 62 61 40 108 18
Escambia ---------- 75 858 219 63 79 65 51 193 52 44 26 59 9
Flagler - .-- -- 62 704 147 150 n.a. n.a. -- 57 161 66 56 n.a. -
Franklin ._ 61 693 218 125 57 n.a. n.a. 69 71 63 27 26 4
Gadsden --_ 54 617 146 19 65 31 32 118 54 93 19 35 5
Gilchrist .-.. 66 750 224 n.a. n.a. .. --..... n.a. n.a. n.a. _... 202 -
Glades .----------- 50 568 226 n.a. 75 -- -- __ 155 n.a. n.a. 54
Gulf -- ------_ 73 827 271 46 36 49 52 168 72 54 29 49 2
Hamilton 43 495 162 22 62 n.a. n.a. n.a. 79 56 15 39 n.a.
Hardee 79 896 200 40 74 24 30 216 77 93 25 115 2
Hendry --- 122 1,390 285 113 72 n.a. 32 323 162 294 33 n.a. 28
Hernando 74 846 197 43 40 n.a. n.a. 247 167 57 28 52 n.a.
Highlands --- 96 1,093 291 52 32 51 65 272 115 98 33 76 8
Hillsborough ---- 90 1,025 235 84 115 56 53 205 60 61 39 95 21
Holmes ...--- 29 330 118 14 22 26 12 n.a. 21 n.a. n.a. 4 n.a.
Indian River ...-- 113 1,287 283 121 51 56 67 202 126 125 47 189 21
Jackson ..----------- 54 616 143 23 82 28 26 146 44 71 15 34 3
Jefferson ...--. 48 545 141 11 44 26 45 114 66 72 n.a. n.a. 2
Lafayette ---- 60 681 141 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 60 n.a. n.a. 135
Lake -.---------- 85 967 244 59 55 43 37 198 77 87 32 130 6
Lee _.------. 131 1,488 348 96 166 77 67 262 97 181 51 125 16
Leon --- .. --- 89 1,017 192 62 68 100 44 174 97 154 22 92 10
Levy ..-. 77 881 173 53 56 16 51 248 159 39 22 54 10
Liberty ... 51 579 307 n.a. 39 .....-- n.a. -_ 80 n.a. 128 n.a.
Madison -- ...-----. 54 618 151 22 31 46 44 109 37 113 13 31 20
Manatee ------ 91 1,033 281 55 86 51 64 212 68 107 33 68 8
Marion .... 94 1,065 205 90 68 73 44 184 94 151 27 113 15
Martin -- .---- 98 1,120 344 121 19 40 27 206 112 138 74 35 3
Monroe 62 700 178 134 40 57 32 90 60 40 26 36 8
Nassau -----. 64 724 123 86 70 15 19 135 155 62 11 46 1
Okaloosa ------ 52 592 120 59 35 27 29 191 52 41 16 20 5
Okeechobee --- ...--------- 82 937 278 60 n.a. n.a. 73 254 96 13 n.a. 99 n.a.
Orange ---------------- 107 1,217 241 79 112 75 66 234 87 104 36 91 92
Osceola ------- 92 1,047 302 103 35 67 85 167 118 45 32 84 9
Palm Beach -- ---------- 115 1,310 279 118 82 119 103 236 81 85 43 147 16
Pasco -.- .-- 70 796 210 65 27 n.a. 78 117 81 71 25 53 n.a.
Pinellas ---- 121 1,379 267 121 226 80 57 230 80 145 47 115 10
Polk --- -- 83 945 244 49 57 57 55 194 73 79 29 95 12
Putnam ..-- ------ 76 869 204 54 48 38 46 175 62 37 48 152 5
St. Johns -.--- 77 871 204 104 27 48 39 192 93 54 39 64 7
St. Lucie --- 103 1,171 298 84 57 69 66 302 69 92 35 93 5
Santa Rosa ---- 37 419 144 39 7 19 28 74 48 25 9 27
Sarasota ----- 141 1,599 359 164 65 117 111 312 94 179 65 124 11
Seminole 60 683 196 33 38 29 39 127 54 36 27 100 4
Sumter ..-..- 62 708 179 38 55 8 11 91 73 38 25 187 3
Suwannee ------ 70 795 148 25 46 44 24 165 71 116 23 129 3
Taylor 85 962 283 102 47 25 19 173 154 48 22 n.a. n.a.
Union ------ 35 402 122 15 72 n.a. n.a. 80 n.a. n.a. 28
Volusia 107 1,220 253 146 108 80 75 196 100 94 58 99 11
Wakulla ---..... 23 262 130 33 38 - ---- -- 33 18 ...... n.a. n.a.
Walton ........ 64 728 137 41 79 18 28 219 74 80 n.a. 42 n.a.
Washington --..._ 37 419 115 15 38 36 23 36 n.a. 35 n.a. 51


Source: Basic sales data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954. Per capital figures are computed on the basis of intercensal estimates,
by Dr. John N. Webb, University of Florida, of 1954 civilian population in Florida counties, to which have been added the compilations of military population except
in a few less-populous counties where it appeared that military personnel traded mainly outside the county, and from which have been subtracted the institutional
population in a few counties where the status of the inmates precluded their trading in the county.
n.a. Not available.
Zero.


-27-






TABLE 19.-RETAIL TRADE: CHANCE IN SALES, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1948 TO 1954

Percentage Changea in Total Sales of -
Percent- -
age Lumber,
ChangeR Furni- building
in per General ture, materi- Drug
State and County Capita All Eating, mer- Apparel, home Auto- Gaso- als, hard- stores, Other
Sales estab- Food drinking chan- acces- furnish- motive line ware, proprie- retail
of All lish- stores places dise series ings, ap- group service farm tary stores
Estab- ments group stores pliance stations equip- stores
lish- dealers ment
ments dealers

State -----..........---- ---------- 27.0 72.5 72.6 63.0 39.5 60.8 68.3 108.7 100.7 60.6 46.8 55.1
Alachua ---....... 22.4 35.5 29.9 11.7 16.8 62.3 32.1 46.9 80.0 2.9 33.7 59.4
Baker ----- 42.0 52.1 50.8 n.a. n.a. 54.6 n.a. n.a. 204.1 30.2 n.a. 235.0
Bay .. 31.3 91.8 73.8 85.7 107.0 45.4 113.2 142.1 120.6 98.6 78.8 43.4
Bradford 32.6 40.9 23.6 89.4 n.a. 16.2 44.6 37.5 162.2 56.9 n.a. n.a.
Brevard .... 7.6 131.7 109.9 82.0 111.3 124.6 113.3 212.3 129.3 108.0 174.1 158.6
Broward 18.8 138.7 145.2 143.7 128.1 146.1 146.5 191.9 136.6 71.3 120.0 71.9
Calhoun ...._._ ... 80.6 67.5 3.3 .7 2.6 41.5 20.1 n.a. 198.8 n.a. n.a. 746.1
Charlotte -.. --.--. 75.7 81.4 87.3 89.8 23.4 n.a. n.a. 436.5 75.3 11.9 n.a. n.a.
Citrus __--_. 48.9 45.1 20.0 60.4 37.1 11.1 n.a. 26.8 100.2 108.1 6.0 13.4
Clay 8.6 60.9 12.3 43.8 19.7 49.2 n.a. 205.2 112.7 37.2 63.4 n.a.
Collier -- --.'- 140.7 321.5 256.8 283.0 248.9 n.a. n.a. t 166.6 193.6 437.3 1,008.7
Columbia -- .. - 31.2 44.0 31.7 96.0 7.4 71.2 90.0 59.3 50.9 25.9 12.4 11.1
Dade ~ 20.0 71.4 84.4 49.6 43.4 63.9 52.3 137.8 87.9 58.2 21.0 19.6
De Soto -- 42.2 38.2 11.2 23.1 n.a. 47.6 22.2 98.1 17.7 15.6 n.a. 135.2
Dixie -- ---- 72.8 40.8 75.8 18.9 n.a. 49.2 n.a. 21.4 n.a. n.a. n.a.
Duval ..... 21.5 61.5 70.5 40.4 20.1 28.5 54.6 97.4 87.7 51.1 42.8 42.1
Escambia ... 19.0 70.7 74.3 42.7 50.2 54.5 138.7 78.7 124.0 39.1 58.3 49.1
Flagler -.. ----.- 45.2 84.8 57.5 199.1 n.a. n.a. 100.0 n.a. 38.6 n.a. n.a. n.a.
Franklin ...-. 85.3 74.0 19.6 133.2 230.5 n.a. n.a. n.a. 105.8 76.1 16.4 164.8
Gadsden ... ... 8.4 19.0 21.7 90.1 .3 12.3 2.6 4.2 93.0 131.1 37.0 43.5
Gilchrist ........ 64.1 39.4 75.4 n.a. n.a. n.a. -100.0 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 850.0
Glades -_ 9.0 13.4 94.3 n.a. n.a. n.a. -100.0 -- 97.3 n.a. n.a. 8.5
Gulf 58.4 87.7 133.2 24.7 50.7 n.a. 63.1 65.6 167.4 235.0 47.0 n.a.
Hamilton 36.7 37.9 48.0 12.3 15.0 n.a. n.a. n.a. 123.4 113.2 13.3 n.a.
Hardee ... 35.3 52.7 30.0 n.a. 195.4 49.4 n.a. 145.7 47.3 7.6 34.0 50.0
Hendry 55.5 53.1 76.6 73.7 47.8 n.a. 31.9 58.0 341.3 69.7 137.5 n.a.
Hemando 23.0 49.8 31.8 13.4 292.5 n.a. n.a. 63.4 100.3 15.1 39.0 78.4
Highlands 63.6 92.2 51.3 10.9 50.3 85.7 141.6 197.4 193.5 58.4 48.6 145.4
Hillsborough 16.2 54.3 49.9 44.4 20.8. 26.6 38.6 88.3 64.3 62.9 56.1 32.1
Holmes __ 54.2 37.2 85.6 9.0 34.0 n.a. 42.9 n.a. 26.3 n.a. n.a. 86.0
Indian River 62.7 109.0 53.6 151.8 77.3 57.7 66.6 175.8 77.9 136.5 63.5 242.5
Jackson --..-- 40.3 45.5 58.3 159.2 7.2 13.3 99.4 36.7 123.0 25.9 20.6 119.8
Jefferson 58.9 46.4 8.2 54.3 23.2 48.0 154.0 146.0 51.2 68.4 n.a. n.a.
Lafayette --- 92.4 62.1 7.4 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 69.7 n.a. n.a. n.a.
Lake -- -___ 41.8 82.9 66.8 108.1 28.8 126.4 36.6 163.9 48.1 49.4 32.1 125.5
Lee ...-- ------ 48.2 100.0 92.7 127.7 68.9 141.9 78.7 99.8 113.2 149.3 65.1 67.5
Leon ....- 41.4 70.2 40.3 58.2 7.0 75.5 34.8 67.3 127.1 124.4 _. 193.3
Levy __...-.... 110.3 87.3 15.4 12.1 90.2 8.2 118.9 347.1 106.9 14.8 47.3 133.8
Liberty ....- 103.9 54.4 188.3 n.a. n.a. --.. n.a. _- 468.6 n.a. -_- t
Madison ... 87.8 88.2 28.4 62.4 101.8 181.6 86.1 83.2 2.5 399.4 5.9 100.9
Manatee 30.9 70.7 71.5 26.7 14.1 98.5 120.1 138.4 70.2 97.8 26.7 13.1
Marion ....... 28.2 49.1 30.0 116.9 16.7 52.3 28.9 28.4 101.6 133.4 20.7 15.2
Martin ... ... .... ---... 55.1 87.9 65.2 77.2 n.a. n.a. 13.3 274.1 120.6 48.3 181.2 23.0
Monroe 20.1 112.1 72.0 109.0 94.2 113.8 74.7 297.6 374.3 1.1 77.1 98.3
Nassau 27.5 49.8 9.3 147.2 66.2 n.a. 18.7 116.6 113.0 n.a. 10.7 37.6
Okaloosa .... .. 51.0 183.0 107.8 185.1 188.2 345.1 113.5 408.4 247.4 70.5 61.2 40.1
Okeechobee 34.6 60.2 64.4 124.5 n.a. n.a. n.a. 150.2 7.0 n.a. n.a. 85.9
Orange 21.5 102.8 79.3 83.2 35.2 78.4 85.5 119.4 200.5 158.6 49.1 37.5
Osceola .----- 47.7 64.1 42.1 67.1 61.2 134.3 89.9 113.1 124.1 .2 47.6 14.1
Palm Beach .. 10.0 54.7 57.2 45.3 24.3 43.5 77.0 61.9 116.8 3.8 40.0 70.5
Pasco 52.5 99.1 56.4 54.0 36.2 n.a. 182.4 144.0 117.8 89.3 84.7 67.4
Pinellas .._ 31.0 88.3 108.4 73.6 54.3 67.2 44.3 140.1 128.4 80.9 88.9 75.8
Polk ..-... 31.8 76.2 58.4 77.0 34.5 51.1 58.2 90.0 98.3 67.6 34.9 160.0
Putnam .. ...-- 19.9 46.8 33.2 44.6 1.3 43.3 63.5 41.1 20.4 183.5 241.2 53.9
St. Johns .. 21.8 48.2 2.9 67.5 3.8 39.9 79.6 73.6 95.0 119.2 33.9 18.3
St. Lucie 16.4 64.9 67.0 55.0 25.2 123.5 93.3 117.8 36.0 2.7 191.5 24.8
Santa Rosa ..-. ..- 30.9 56.7 36.8 145.5 69.3 n.a. 69.9 86.5 97.9 30.1 62.3 n.a.
Sarasota -..------- 28.8 92.5 72.9 84.1 71.4 112.8 129.7 157.5 118.5 17.3 107.1 89.9
Seminole ------- .6 33.1 38.8 1.7 57.7 75.0 108.1 93.4 68.2 39.5 42.9 142.0
Sumter _... .... ....... .... 59.8 51.7 22.8 27.8 42.5 36.4 67.2 91.3 30.7 13.7 48.3 318.6
Suwannee _.... ... 67.2 40.3 1.0 8.5 26.0 64.1 23.6 78.2 66.2 35.3 32.5 108.8
Taylor .... ......... 54.4 78.3 99.7 251.7 171.2 n.a. 60.8 34.4 126.3 n.a. 35.4 n.a.
Union .._... ..... 63.4 33.4 7.2 74.5 158.2 n.a. n.a. n.a. 182.1 n.a. n.a. 49.2
Volusia .._ 31.0 63.9 30.7 117.4 40.4 61.2 67.9 79.4 90.6 65.0 66.9 63.9
Wakulla ------- 27.8 18.0 22.6 10.4 38.5 ...... -100.0 -.- 10.6 ** n.a. n.a.
Walton ---- 57.2 57.1 17.8 123.6 328.5 n.a. n.a. 73.2 64.4 20.3 n.a. 170.8
Washington ....... 59.3 39.8 16.8 6.7 8.2 65.4 11.2 19.0 n.a. 20.2 n.a. 360.7

Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
a Although the 1948 sales figures for the different kind-of-business groups have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the
percentages computed are deemed adequate to show the approximate changes between 1948 and 1954. The group classified as nonstore retailers in the 1954 Census
has been included in the total for all establishments but omitted from the detail because in the 1948 Census these establishments were classified in one of the major
"store" type groups on the basis of commodities handled. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
o Increased from no sales in 1948 to $137,000 in 1954.
t Increased from no sales in 1948 to $667,000 in 1954.
e Increased from no sales in 1948 to $90,000 in 1954.
t Increased from no sales in 1948 to $321,000 in 1954.
n.a. Not available.
-.- Zero.
-28-








TABLE 20.--RETAIL TRADE: AVERAGE SALES, TOTAL. PAYROLLS, AND PAID EMPLOYEES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954
Total Total
Average Sales- Payroll,& Entire Year Number Average Sales- Payroll,a Entire Year Number
Paid
Employees, E Paid
Per Total (in Ass (work County Per Total (in As a (work
State and County establish- Per thousands percentage week establish- Per thousands percentae week
meant employee of dollars) nearest ment employee o dollars ) of tota ended
Nov. 15) sales nearest
Nov. 15) Nov. 15)


State 1... $ 97,200 $ 23,600 $405,980


Alachua ...
Baker
Bay ------....
Bradford
Brevard
Broward .-
Calhoun ....
Charlotte -....
Citrus
Clay ..----..---
Collier .. -
Columbia
Dade ..-
De Soto
Dixie ... ..
Duval ...-- .
Escambia ..
Flagler --
Franklin
Gadsden ..
Gilchrist
Glades ..
Gulf ---.......- --
Hamilton ...-
Hardee ....
Hendry ..--- -
Hernando .-- -
Highlands .
Hillsborough -.
Holmes -------
Indian River ---
Jackson
Jefferson


91,900
45,200
92,400
65,100
72,800
101,100
58,700
46,700
41,300
57,800
67,400
69,500
118,400
79,700
46,300
127,900
107,800
44,800
41,000
69,200
77,500
48,700
53,300
48,900
76,800
96,000
68,900
72,200
94,200
43,300
84,400
67,900
59,300


4,993
177
5,019
545
3,460
22,640
273
408
384
588
906
1,415
111,131
711
159
45,167
12,975
261
224
1,621
159
57
538
270
695
688
501
1,306
32,517
244
1,619
1,663
363


169,913
2,325
95
2,239
293
1,615
8,764
156
208
223
289
354
672
42,533
344
81
19,045
5,716
128
139
750
66
33
269
168
341
274
237
591
14,582
149
709
849
191


Lafayette ...
Lake -- ......
Lee ...-...
Leon ... .
Levy -- ....
Liberty -------
Madison -...
Manatee -....-
Marion -... --
Martin ----.
Monroe ----.
Nassau --....
Okaloosa ...-
Okeechobee -
Orange _....
Osceola __-
Palm Beach .
Pasco
Pinellas ...------
Polk -....-- -..
Putnam ....
St. Johns ....
St. Lucie -
Santa Rosa ..
Sarasota --...-...--
Seminole .--
Sumter .........---
Suwannee ..--.
Taylor ..----......--
Union ---........
Volusia ------.......
Wakulla ......-__.
Walton ___.-..
Washington ..-..-


$ 51,500
72,900
90,400
111,800
52,700
69,000
61,300
78,400
85,500
59,600
71,000
67,300
84,400
69,400
113,600
60,100
93,500
61,400
103,300
92,000
76,400
59,600
85,800
56,500
89,100
69,800
54,900
71,600
76,300
48,300
74,500
25,700
73,900
46,800


$ 29,700
28,200
27,200
22,400
33,200
43,900
22,300
25,900
22,700
26,000
22,500
24,800
26,300
33,800
23,500
26,900
23,400
25,000
21,700
24,200
27,500
25,900
23,400
29,200
24,200
24,000
33,700
25,000
25,300
38,300
23,200
36,700
31,100
27,500


$ 102
3,619
4,279
5,783
459
76
709
3,697
4,533
828
3,020
853
2,395
283
22,963
918
21,711
1,671
30,536
13,702
1,876
2,056
2,998
614
6,243
1,969
451
901
849
115
10,973
54
809
258


71
1,532
1,641
2,604
260
33
405
1,717
2,008
392
1,472
426
1,035
111
9,165
483
8,492
803
13,340
6,086
875
984
1,311
310
2,569
977
225
492
467
58
4,604
35
342
160


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
Payroll does not include compensation of proprietors or of partners of unincorporated businesses.


TABLE 21.-RETAIL TRADE: CHANGES IN NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS, PAYROLLS, AND PAID EMPLOYEES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1948 TO 1954


Percentage Change' in-
Paid em-
ployees,
Number Payrolls, work week
of estab- entire ended
lishments year nearest
Nov. 15


27.0

2.5
16.7
32.0
13.0
39.9
67.4
26.7
59.7
16.2
10.0
139.7
17.3
29.4
- 5.7
4.9
16.5
15.3
32.0
27.4
13.4
- 11.8


62.3

30.4
27.3
112.9
41.9
159.8
125.0
64.5
70.7
42.2
78.2
508.1
48.6
53.3
53.6
9.7
36.8
76.5
222.2
61.2
23.2
5.3


28.3

- 6.4
- 19.5
49.8
5.0
72.4
76.6
22.8
22.4
21.9
29.0
254.0
3.2
25.3
9.6
19.0
11.7
31.0
109.8
25.2
6.3
15.4


County


Glades _.
Gulf __.
Hamilton -.
Hardee ..
Hendry ....-
Hernando ..
Highlands --
Hillsborough
Holmes ---
Indian River
Jackson __
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee ---...--
Leon --
Levy -
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin ..
Monroe


Percentage Change' in-
Paid em-
ployees,
Number Payrolls, work week
of estab- entire ended
lishments year nearest
Nov. 15
26.0 25.0
46.7 79.3 35.2
5.7 16.9 4.0
3.9 31.4 7.2
12.0 41.6 15.1
11.5 35.8 5.8
14.6 84.5 39.4
15.8 38.0 15.4
- 9.3 46.1 4.2
24.2 129.6 65.7
19.0 52.3 16.0
- 7.1 68.1 13.7
32.3 45.7 61.4
28.4 91.3 29.5
47.5 92.5 40.7
26.2 74.7 26.3
- 3.5 44.3 11.1
41.1 64.9
19.5 98.6 39.2
29.5 68.2 34.0
21.7 54.3 23.3
40.2 81.6 48.5
62.7 113.4 66.5


County


Nassau .-
Okaloosa ....
Okeechobee
Orange .....-
Osceola --
Palm Beach
Pasco ...-
Pinellas ....-
Polk ---.... .
Putnam ..
St. Johns .
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota ..
Seminole ..
Sumter ..
Suwannee ..
Taylor ..._
Union -_....
Volusia ..
Wakulla -_
Walton ....-
Washington


Percentage Change* in-
Paid em-
ployees,
Number Payrolls, work week
of estab- entire ended
lishments year nearest
Nov. 15


16.3
41.0
2.5
46.9
14.9
19.3
18.5
47.6
21.4

16.3
41.5
- 4.8
52.6
12.0
- 3.5
4.2
20.2
- 8.0
40.6
4.2
18.0
12.2


54.8
233.6
53.0
99.4
66.9
64.2
111.0
79.5
71.5
76.6
38.5
65.9
107.4
75.2
45.5
55.5
40.3
90.8
27.8
65.2
22.7
52.6
27.7


26.0
102.5
14.4
50.1
38.0
34.8
51.5
41.9
34.5
27.0
6.6
35.4
18.8
36.0
3.2
25.0
14.2
51.1
- 17.1
26.3
- 31.4
.3
- 3.6


-29-


22,900
40,000
23,800
27,100
24,200
25,700
35,700
25,800
23,900
28,600
28,700
24.500
23,300
23,200
36,600
23,000
22,600
23,100
27,400
27,300
35,200
41,300
26,800
27,100
29,900
29,400
28,200
27,700
22,000
28,200
26,300
26,000
28,200


State and
County


Florida ..

Alachua ..--
Baker ..--
Bay --.-
Bradford
Brevard
Broward -
Calhoun
Charlotte -..
Citrus --....
Clay ___ ..-
Collier --_-
Columbia --
Dade
De Soto ..
Dixie ...--
Duval __
Escambia _
Flagler __
Franklin
Gadsden ....
Gilchrist ._


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
1 Although 1948 figures for payrolls and paid employees have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages computed
are deemed adequate to show the approximate changes between 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
.._ Zero.


1 -


. I


I









TABLE 22.-RETAIL TBADE: ESTABLISHMENTS AND SALES, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA CrTIES OF 2,500 INHABITANTS OR MORE, 1954


_______ .r -I- ______


Percentage
change,A
1948 to
1954


Total
number


Percentage
change,'
1948 to
1954


Amount
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


Food
stores


Eating,
drinking
places


+ F + r 4 1 4
$ 193 $ 314


Apalachicola ___
Arcadia ___
Auburndale .
Avon Park
Bartow _______
Belle Glade
Boynton Beach
Bradenton
Chattahoochee
Chipley
Clearwater
Cocoa
Coral Gables
Crestview
Dade City
Dania
Daytona Beach
DeFuniak Springs
DeLand ______
Delray Beach
Dunedin
Eustis
I Fernandina Beach ---
Fort Lauderdale __
Fort Meade
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce _____- ----
Gainesville --
Green Cove Springs ------
Gulfport _- --
Haines City
Hallandale
Hialeah ________---
Holly Hill ____
Hollywood -
Homestead
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach ....--
Key West - ---
Kissimmee --..
Lake City ---
Lake Wales _____---
Lake Worth -- --
Lakeland _________
Leesburg. -... .. . ..--..
Live Oak __ ----
Madison
Marianna
Melbourne _____ -
Miami __ -- -- ------


26
3
35
12
27
8
28
44
37
35
69
51
53
45
24
39
34
28
30
34
n.a.
11
48
74
20
56
48
3
16
95
25
n.a.
156
n.a.
63
32
24
25
39
30
24
15
43
30
38
31
35
41
68
39


58
92
66
77
141
116
60
324
59
81
496
139
408
103
107
115
688
88
193
187
57
88
74
1,167
54
374
333
348
72
37
109
71
287
62
449
151
2,877
111
317
114
206
125
250
564
181
131
105
148
165
4,970


57
40
64
106
102
65
179
76
60
61
134
143
137
127
143
72
56
55
38
102
n.a.
93
36
122
59
95
66
33
78
91
116
n.a.
343
n.a.
119
107
51
77
94
75
48
101
52
63
84
52
100
56
153
60


$ 2,540
7,381
4,287
5,892
14,334
10,945
4,263
32,616
3,649
3,716
53,616
11,919
60,571
9,934
11,513
6,065
62,686
8,710.
16,239
17,944
4,922
7,992
5,665
133,122
2,861
39,160
29,444
42,115
5,201
1,042
7,611
8,974
26,179
3,043
42,785
18,255
374,854
8,534
26,742
7,932
15,216
11,264
16,008
60,986
18,058
10,533
7,630
13,939
14,021
620,318


$ 627
1,803
1,604
1,779
4,556
2,638
1,059
8,174
847
1,018
11,339
3,640
12,930
2,167
2,856
2,225
10,982
1,282
4,091
4,235
1,236
2,109
990
23,129
847
8,559
7,623
10,119
1,313
373
2,623
559
9,130
256
10,781
4,827
80,094
3,492
7,200
2,550
3,623
3,096
6,304
13,726
3,514
1,887
1,709
2,837
3,777
123,711


$ 193
270
241
165
552
397
555
1,300
125
n.a.
3,771
523
4,397
446
576
1,235
7,488
300
777
1,806
201
446
327
11,447
118
2,219
1,966
1,956
256
250
395
4,346
3,579
529
3,966
657
21,413
1,732
4,406
553
1,307
402
1,468
2,366
857
302
176
475
1,118
56,963


General
merchan-
dise
group


$ 314
n.a.
208
195
529
524
n.a.
3,193
321
n.a.
3,433
589
1,820
461
520
159
7,535
490
1,137
273
n.a.
n.a.
707
12,597
145
3,947
1,492
2,001
212
18
190
n.a.
1,033

1,550
928
36,786
365
1,709
n.a.
1,004
326
265
6,096
1,121
575
n.a.
1,137
n.a.
76,282


Furniture,
Apparel, home Auto-
accessories furnishing, motive
stores appliance group
dealers


$ n.a. $ n.a. $ 382
369 253 1,765
84 280 n.a.
n.a. 398 n.a.
598 804 3,399
414 550 2,339
29 46 _
2,073 2,390 8,100
263 n.a. n.a.
n.a. 238 382
2,974 3,036 13,354
473 993 2,503
6,992 3,571 11,107
506 691 3,805
355 n.a. 1,899
135 534 n.a.
5,462 3,959 10,941
262 406 3,205
742 1,576 3,643
1,610 813 5,098
112 151 n.a.
410 450 2,347
225 279 n.a
15,106 10,931 25,839
n.a. 185 n.a
2,210 n.a. 7,722
1,806 1,738 n.a
3,530 2,217 10,460
n.a. n.a. n.a
-_ n.a. -
n.a. 166 1,23(
n.a. n.a. n.a
587 2,216 26'
n.a. n.a
3,877 2,956 8,81(
432 726 5,04
27,267 21,033 98,31,
306 219 n.a
n.a. 1,387 4,03,
n.a. 815 1,03;
755 1,159 n.a
414 3,17'
1,193 1,046 n.a
4,724 3,444 13,72:
875 634 5,25,
n.a. n.a. 2,56
611 n.a. 1,58
831 762 4,13
755 n.a. 3,02
50,669 38,803 143,10


3










2

3
L.











5
5
3
3
9
9


Sales by Kind-of-Business Group (in


Establishments Total Sales


thousands of dollars)
Lumber,
building Drug
Gasoline materials, stores, Other
service hardware, propri- retail Nonstorers
stations farm etary stores
equipment stores
dealers

$ n.a. $ 270 $ n.a. $ n.a. $ n.a.
n.a. 794 n.a. n.a. n.a.
340 785 n.a. 336 50
665 n.a. n.a. 476 n.a.
1,177 1,486 419 786 28
866 962 357 1,674 224
365 n.a. n.a. 663 n.a.
1,907 2,789 982 1,495 223
491 682 n.a. 33
468 363 n.a. 539
2,647 7,369 1,977 3,378 338
802 722 480 1,040 154
2,288 n.a. 1,824 n.a. 198
670 669 291 n.a. n.a.
729 1,031 363 429 n.a.
536 272 258 669 n.a.
3,936 4,264 2,936 4,730 453
848 1,172 n.a. 612 n.a.
1,244 1,248 554 n.a. n.a.
942 1,472 610 970 115
319 n.a. 266 n.a. 36
354 505 352 828 n.a.
385 n.a. n.a. 203 n.a.
6,075 10,379 4,660 10,836 2,121
502 324 n.a. -
2,429 4,997 1,271 3,347 n.a.
n.a. 2,174 921 1,953 n.a
3,328 1,648 1,441 3,904 144
656 n.a. n.a. 70 n.a
244 n.a. 24 19 .
936 417 301 1,084 n.a
577 n.a. n.a. 217 n.a.
1,986 3,670 1,051 2,064 598
745 n.a. 138 636 146
1,912 2,583 2,038 3,335 9751
1,138 1,920 745 1,785
17,146 n.a. 11,943 36,171 mn.
788 n.a. 493 558
1,525 1,415 708 n.a. 377
701 n.a. n.a. 575 61
1,655 913 354 n.a. n.a.
834 1,145 n.a. 600 n.a
1,061 1,344 725 1,439 1n.
3,240 4,142 1,730 6,687 1,10
869 1,575 470 2,816 74
935 n.a. n.a. 1,474 48
322 1,527 197 446 n.a.
584 1,702 n.a. n.a. 31
1,523 1,153 576 819 55
I28,550 31,500 18,437 38,669 13,625

continued .





TABLE 22.-(coNTNurED)


Establishments


Percentage
change,4
1948 to
1954


Total
number


Total Sales


Percentage
change,a
1948 to
1954


Amount
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


Sales by Kind-of-Business Group (in thousands of dollars)


Food
stores


Eating, General Apparel,
drinking merchan- accessories
places dise stores
group


Furniture,
home
furnishing,
appliance
dealers


Auto- Gasoline
motive service
group stations


____________________________________ .1 5 r r r r I


Miami Beach ....
Miami Shores _
Miami Springs
Mount Dora
New Smyrna Beach
North Miami
Ocala
Opa Locka
Orlando
Ormond
Pahokee --.----------
Palatka ------ --
Palm Beach
Palmetto
Panama City
Pensacola
Perrine
Perry ----
Pinellas Park
S Plant City --. .---
Pompano Beach
Port St. Joe
Quincy - -------
Riviera Beach ------ ---
St. Augustine
St. Cloud
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Sebring
South Miami ----------
Starke
Stuart
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tarpon Springs
Titusville
Vero Beach
Wauchula
West Miami
West Palm Beach --.-
Winter Garden
Winter Haven
Winter Park ----


10
2
n.a.
n.a.
52
236
23
n.a.
60
n.a.
16
8
37
42
54
48
n.a.
45
n.a.
1
54
n.a.
31
43
18
n.a.
44
14
49
33
114
n.a.
35
42
57
9
n.a.
26
16
n.a.
7
39
49
63


1,312
43
91
79
157
205
277
91
1,262
63
79
205
246
95
449
866
31
109
40
201
170
88
148
113
344
75
1,624
231
523
116
105
91
89
490
2,948
109
77
149
93
24
821
86
250
178


20
214
n.a.
n.a.
64
859
34
n.a.
95
n.a.
76
54
62
62
92
75
n.a.
76
n.a.
37
153
n.a.
- 3
194
43
n.a.
76
20
81
86
81
n.a.
81
73
82
58
n.a.
117
67
n.a.
34
69
92
167


$121,640
18,363
6,702
5,006
9,608
23,260
32,831
6,102
165,199
4,224
5,560
19,846
18,248
6,026
45,872
99,032
1,752
8,891
1,588
17,793
14,474
5,834
9,857
7,200
21,863
3,438
199,357
18,693
52,728
8,516
7,194
6,994
7,702
55,663
290,650
6,438
4,546
16,271
8,225
1,423
105,146
7,237
27,578
17,528


$ 23,540
n.a.
746
1,335
2,559
2,521
5,546
2,827
25,402
978
724
4,060
1,685
1,797
10,165
20,588
751
2,438
278
5,411
4,126
1,661
2,833
2,506
4,940
1,100
33,723
5,630
11,573
2,189
2,022
1,651
2,410
10,603
63,991
1,921
1,387
3,484
1,766
n.a.
20,349
2,442
6,070
5,708


$ 29,195
101
2,549
345
992
1,905
1,900
1,089
9,478
408
210
900
2,318
363
2,813
5,237
106
897
305
610
1,149
256
355
1,287
2,295
239
15,069
701
4,754
344
562
461
639
3,188
24,227
505
296
1,413
346
n.a.
7,119
316
1,546
1,411


$ 2,380
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
372
596
1,774
162
18,784
38
127
n.a.
164
204
5,170
10,734
n.a.
220
n.a.
758
190
221
506
n.a.
663
80
42,772
n.a.
2,381
n.a.
324
n.a.
n.a.
3,767
34,373
526
n.a.
568
n.a.
169
10,117
245
767
273


$ 34,879
329
309
415
214
880
2,852
162
12,323
199
n.a.
n.a.
6,931
n.a.
n.a.
9,354
81
310

n.a.
1,029
426
695
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
12,592
996
4,284
538
668
n.a.
n.a.
5,727
16,382
202
166
n.a.
272
n.a.
7,448
228
2,215
569


$ 3,541
n.a.
78

659
5,663
n.a.
n.a.
9,909
n.a.
n.a.
1,194
2,590
n.a.
n.a.
6,249
95
238
n.a.
1,122
592
n.a.
701
383
1,153
237
7,437
1,165
3,961
571
1,027
525
n.a.
n.a.
15,175
132
n.a.
942
344

9,564
n.a.
2,021
1,079


$ 4,335
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
1,805
n.a.
6,959

37,972

898
n.a.
28
552
n.a.
27,290
n.a.
2,130
n.a.
n.a.
2,858
n.a.
1,649
190
n.a.
1,039
32,206
n.a.
11,278
2,521
216
1,737
n.a.
9,971
60,853
1,183
845
2,924
n.a.
n.a.
26,183
n.a.
7,499
343


Lumber,
building
materials,
hardware,
farm
equipment
dealers


$ 3,993
511
1,408
475
634
1,986
2,073
620
6,892
564
443
1,299
328
443
3,850
4,536
251
1,433
252
1,285
1,054
462
842
742
2,394
240
10,359
1,327
2,916
647
490
1,099
590
4,928
16,513
458
631
1,445
647
376
4,902
629
1,550
4,708


Drug
stores,
propri-
etary
stores


Other
retail
stores


$ 6,852 $ 10,720 $


$ 1,458
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
1,302
2,634
5,407
451
12,240
n.a.
149
n.a.
n.a.
1,273
n.a.
3,915

n.a.
n.a.
1,552
1,392
n.a.
625
439
1,285
201
20,704
n.a.
5,030
761
622
177
602
n.a.
17,301
534
321
1,774
n.a.
n.a.
6,530
531
3,014
1,146


n.a.
598
n.a.
465
1,075
949
412
4,490
464
122
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
1,533
2,907
n.a.
n.a.

n.a.
493
n.a.
390
442
n.a.
n.a.
6,393
n.a.
2,004
n.a.
n.a.
301
623
1,255
11,472

274
n.a.
242
n.a.
3,489
263
754
851


Nonstore
retailers


427
336
1,183
545
n.a.
3,861
n.a.
12,072
533
1,871
3,744
3,685
892
2,558
7,396
n.a.
608
n.a.
1,961
1,208
n.a.
n.a.
802
1,568
98
16,627
n.a.
4,214
559
n.a.
405
263
n.a.
24,216
772
404
2,247
n.a.
n.a.
8,499
518
1,775
1,302


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954 and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
Although 1948 figures have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages computed are deemed adequate to show approximate changes between 1948 and 1954. Change
is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
... Zero.


n.a.
48
101
61
206
n.a.
n.a.
15,587
n.a.
648
n.a.
186
n.a.
n.a.
826
n.a.
n.a.
60
64
383
16
n.a.
26
166
n.a.
1,475
103
333
42
42
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
6,147
205
44
n.a.
28
n.a.
946
307
367
138








TABLE 23.-RETAIL TRADE: SALES SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP, IN FLORIDA, 1954

Lumber,
Furniture, Building
General Home Materials, Drug
Sales Size of Food Eating, Merchan- Apparel, Furnish- Auto- Gasoline Hardware, Stores, Other Non-
Establishment Total Stores Drinking dise Accessories ings, motive Service Farm Proprie- Retail store
(annual sales volume) Places Group Stores Appliance Group Stations Equip- tary Stores Stores Retailers
Dealers ment
Dealers
Number of Establishments


Total --- ---
Establishments
operated
entire year
having sales of-
$1,000,000 and over
$500,000 to $999,000
$300,000 to $499,000
$100,000 to $299,000
$50,000 to $99,000 _
$30,000 to $49,000 --
$20,000 to $29,000 --
$10,000 to $19,000
Less than $10,000 -
Establishments
not operated
entire year .......- .


Total ..-----.....
Establishments
operated
entire year
having sales of-
$1,000,000 and over
$500,000 to $999,000
$300,000 to $499,000
$100,000 to $299,000
$50,000 to $99,000 --
$30,000 to $49,000
$20,000 to $29,000 -
$10,000 to $19,000 .-
Less than $10,000 -
Establishments
not operated
entire year ..-...--


Total ---__---
Establishments
operated
entire year
having sales of-
$1,000,000 and over
$500,000 to $999,000
$300,000 to $499,000
$100,000 to $299,000
$50,000 to $99,000 __
$30,000 to $49,000 -
$20,000 to $29,000 __
$10,000 to $19,000 _
Less than $10,000
Establishments
not operated
entire year -------. --


41,303 7,7781 7,918


7,149
230
128
141
795
1,201
1,342
997
1,270
1,045

629


$4,014,417 $912,968


3,795,369
1,226,795
441,032
336,942
829,418
488,909
237,581
111,103
87,644
35,945


867,736
408,647
93,737
53,766
128,956
83,165
51,170
24,130
18,053
6,112


219,048 45,232


$405,980


386,174
117,275
48,688
39,616
98,345
50,588
19,556
6,863
4,360
883

19,806


6,859
5
38
72
562
998
1,160
1,080
1,620
1,324

1,059


$353,683


315,428
6,103
25,679
27,274
86,499
68,450
44,663
26,071
22,948
7,741

38,255


1,538


1,452
51
49
48
208
301
230
166
228
171


3,305


3,102
17
43
78
618
799
617
341
362
227

203


2,459


2,271
9
37
76
520
444
345
255
298
287


2,079 4,715


4,045

17
572
1,264
964
487
473
265

670


$268,713


237,098

2,251
6,166
81,994
88,913
37,459
11,899
6,880
1,536

31,615


1,885
170
186
200
451
279
167
112
141
179

194


Sales (in thousands of dollars)


$345,754


337,935
212,857
35,107
18,326
33,242
21,117
8,950
3,985
3,248
1,103

7,819


$287,775


277,552
27,425
29,151
29,555
95,988
56,391
24,221
8,183
5,274
1,364

10,223


$220,934


209,839
15,028
25,458
29,190
83,266
31,756
13,202
6,222
4,129
1,588

11,095


$779,436


739,649
421,726
126,299
77,286
82,249
19,688
6,576
2,682
2,047
1,096

39,786


1,884


1,768
42
74
115
431
363
254
164
191
134

116


$306,757


299,347
83,268
52,485
43,871
76,458
25,858
9,810
4,004
2,805
788

7,410


I 1,596


1,478
5
20
34
345
399
227
155
166
127

118


$139,335


133,580
n.a.
13,434
12,565
56,048
28,989
8,858
3,790
2,445
n.a.

5,755


6,004 2,027


5,532 1,892
16 7
48 8
90 11
579 59
872 51
771 85
676 175
1,055 392
1,425 1,104

472 135


$332,358 $66,705


314,957
n.a.
31,396
34,584
94,295
61,064
29,471
16,250
14,680
n.a.


62,248
19,920
6,035
4,359
10,423
3,518
3,201
3,887
5,135
5,770


17,4011 4,457


Payroll, Entire Year (in thousands of dollars)


$50,495 $58,561 $49,819 $34,776 $30,178


48,082 52,777 48,932 33,711 29,111
23,291 1,522 34,876 4,274 3,271
5,571 6,326 5,025 3,890 3,428
3,421 6,495 2,316 3,801 3,996
8,066 16,969 3,650 12,154 11,572
4,691 10,703 2,054 6,326 4,277
1,883 6,328 656 2,248 1,532
559 2,574 233 601 659
541 1,575 101 355 334
59 285 21 52 42

2,413 5,784 887 1,065 1,067


Source: Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
___. Zero.
n.a. Not available.


$70,058 $20,030 $82,869 $19,259


67,003
36,924
11,910
7,290
7,861
1,987
592
247
126
66


17,924
169
560
7,981
6,930
1,743
356
148
37


32,155
7,258
5,967
5,185
9,230
3,241
889
214
127
44


18,609
n.a.
1,960
2,044
8,807
3,523
718
218
81
n.a.


3,055 2,106 714 650


$31,096


29,778
n.a.
3,501
3,404
10,236
6,288
2,688
1,090
859
n.a.

1,318,


$8,839


8,092
3,141
941
1,104
1,819
568
279
112
113
15

747


--32-


37,433
552
634
882
5,140
6,971
6,162
4,608
6,196
6,288

3,870








TABLE 24.-RETAIL TRADE: CHANGES IN SALES PER CAPITAL OF SELECTED BUSINESSES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
WITH 500 RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS OR MORE, 1948 TO 1954

Percentage Change, in Sales per Capita of-
General Lumber,
Meat merchan- Furniture, building ment Drug
markets, dise Women's home fur- Auto- Gasoline materials, equip- stores,
County Grocery fish (sea- Eating Drinking group Shoe clothing, nishings motive service supplies, and farm proprie-
stores food) places places (except stores specialty stores, group stations equip- Hardware tary
markets variety stores antique ment dealers stores
stores) stores dealers
Alachua 28 n.a. 15 38 n.a. 43 11 13 32 64 34 2 19
Bay 17 n.a. 18 38 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 66 50 n.a. n.a. 22
Brevard 1 n.a. 17 12 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 45 6 n.a. n.a. 27
Broward 28 67 22 5 12 25 20 9 45 18 10 29 9
Dade 37 36 .... 4 8 6 4 67 32 21 20 17
Duval 34 5 12 20 38 49 41 13 14 8
Escambia 25 75 5 8 14 20 24 125 25 58 n.a. n.a. 13
Hillsborough 20 100 -- 6 1 5 6 41 22 n.a. n.a. 18
Lake ------ 31 n.a. 89 39 n.a. -100 n.a. n.a. 104 15 n.a. n.a. 3
Leon --- 15 n.a. 36 33 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 39 86 n.a. n.a. 15
Manatee 30 n.a. ... 9 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 83 31 n.a. n.a. 3
Marion .---- 9 n.a. 77 115 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 10 74 n.a. n.a. 4
Orange 10 33 8 33 19 17 39 6 31 81 100 30 10
Palm Beach 15 -- 9 11 6 18 3 8 15 53 -21 -39
Pinellas 43 125 21 4 7 60 2 18 68 57 n.a. n.a. 31
Polk 20 43 11 20 40 -- 25 42 49 33 10
Sarasota 33 n.a. 34 4 n.a. 110 n.a. 61 72 47 11 49 38
Volusia 6 69 78 62 9 22 47 14 43 52 35 20 35


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Busines, 1948.
Although 1948 sales figures have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages computed are deemed adequate
to show approximate changes between 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
__ Zero.


-33-







PART FOUR


WHOLESALE TRADE IN FLORIDA COUNTIES

CARTER C. OSTERBIND, Research Professor
ELISE C. JONES, Assistant in Research
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH


THE wholesale trade statistics examined here are based
on the 1954 Census of Business by the U. S. Bureau of the
Census. The statistics give a broad view of the structure of
the wholesale market and of the major changes between the
Census years of 1954 and 1948. These data also show the
importance of the wholesale trade activity in providing pay-
rolls and employment in Florida and within the various
counties of the state.
Sales from wholesale trade in Florida in 1954 amounted
to $3,402 million. This figure represents the sales of estab-
lishments or places of business primarily engaged in selling
merchandise directly to retailers, to industrial, commercial,
institutional or professional users, or to other wholesalers, as
well as the sales of those acting as agents in buying merchan-
dise for, or selling merchandise to, such persons or com-
panies. Prior to the changes in recent years, Florida's com-
paratively small population, undeveloped manufacturing,
and peninsular position appear to have operated to make
wholesaling a rather unimportant component of the total of
its business activity. However, the recent rapid increase in
Florida's population along with its general economic and in-
dustrial development, including an increase in manufacturing
activity, have given a strong impetus to the development
of wholesale trade.
Merchant wholesalers, the type usually known simply as
wholesalers or jobbers, with sales of $1,735.8 million, ac-
counted for 51 per cent of the wholesale sales in Florida in
1954. The percentage distribution of sales by other types of
wholesalers was as follows: manufacturers' sales branches
and sales offices, 19 per cent; petroleum bulk plants, termi-
nals, and liquid petroleum gas facilities, 12 per cent; mer-
chandise agents and brokers, 12 per cent; and assemblers of
farm products, 6 per cent.
Among the above types of wholesalers, those engaged in
the sale of food and kindred products accounted for by far
the greatest volume of sales. Their sales, in excess of $1,353.2
million, made up 40 per cent of wholesale sales in Florida in
1954. The next in order of importance were those whole-
salers dealing in gasoline, distillates, and residuals with sales
of $411.4 million, followed by those selling machinery and
equipment with sales of $239.9 million, and those selling elec-
trical and electronic machinery and appliances with sales of
$211.5 million.
Among the merchant wholesalers, the sales of the five most
important according to commodity classes were as follows:
grocery, confectionery, and meat wholesalers, $324.7 million;
beer, wine, and distilled spirits wholesalers, $186.1 million;
machinery, equipment, and supplies distributors, $18J.0 mil-


lion; electronics and electrical goods distributors, 159.0 mil-
lion; and farm products (edible) distributors, $144.3 million.
Among the manufacturers' sales branches and sales offices,
the sales branches (with stocks) had sales of $424.2 million,
while the sales offices (without stocks) had sales of $222.0
million.

FLORIDA IN RELATION TO THE UNITED STATES
By 1954 the aggregate wholesale sales in Florida had in-
creased 76 per cent over the level of sales in 1948. During
this same period of time, the aggregate sales by wholesalers
throughout the United States had increased 30 per cent.
Florida's increase of 76 per cent was exceeded in only three
states in the nation: Nevada with 96 per cent, Arizona with
92 per cent, and New Mexico with 78 per cent. On the basis
of wholesale sales per establishment, Florida's average in
1954 amounted to $640,800 in comparison to an average for
the United States of $927,860. Florida's increase in sales per
establishment, based on the relationship of 1954 to 1948,
however, was 13 per cent in comparison to the nationwide
increase of 11 per cent. Thus, the principal factor contrib-
uting to Florida's large increase in total sales was not a
sizable increase in average sales per establishment, but rather
the significant increase in the number of establishments. In
the United States as a whole, the number of establishments
engaged in wholesale trade in 1954 was 17 per cent above
the number in 1948, while in Florida the 5,309 establishments
engaged in wholesale trade in 1954 represented an increase
of 56 per cent over the number operating in 1948.

REGIONAL CHANGES IN THE UNITED STATES
The Bureau of the Census divides the United States into
four major geographical regions designated as the Northeast,
the South, the North Central, and the West. A comparison
of these broad geographic regions indicates that the western
region had the greatest percentage increase in sales from
wholesale trade with an increase of 45 per cent between 1948
and 1954. The southern region was next with 37 per cent,
while the northeastern and north central regions had simi"
changes with respective increases of 25 and 24 per cent. The,
state having the greatest influence on the percentage change
reported for the western region was California. Its wholesale
sales were much greater than the combined sales of the other
states in the region. In the southern region there were some
wide variations but the increases in a majority of states
closely approximated the average increase. In this region
Florida's increase of 76 per cent was highest, while West,


-34-






Virginia's increase of less than 1 per cent was lowest. In the
northeastern region the large sales of New York and Penn-
sylvania were the most influential in determining the per-
centage increase. A comparison of the various regional
increases in wholesale sales as well as increases within por-
tions of the regions reveals they are closely related to the
population changes that occurred in the various regions and
states during the same period of time.

FLORIDA COMPARED TO OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES
The geographically linked Southeastern States include in
addition to Florida the states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and
Virginia. Among this group Florida ranked fourth in dollar
volume of wholesale trade in 1954. Tennessee ranked first
with sales of $4,564 million. Georgia was second with $4,548
million, and North Carolina third with $4,184 million. Al-
though Florida's sales of $3,402 million were substantially
below these three leaders, Florida was considerably above
the remaining five states. In terms of the percentage change
in wholesale trade between the years 1948 and 1954, how-
ever, Florida was first with an increase of 76 per cent. Geor-
gia was second with a 44-per-cent rise, and Alabama third
with an increase of 42 per cent. All of the states were above
the national average in the percentage increase in sales with
the exception of Mississippi, and this state with an increase
of 28 per cent was only slightly below the national average
rise of 30 per cent. With 5,309 wholesale establishments in
1954, Florida led all of the Southeastern States in the number
of such establishments. In second place was North Carolina
with 4,752, followed by Georgia with 4,496.
Although Florida was not in first position in the volume
of wholesale trade, its payrolls from wholesale trade were
greater in amount than those in any other southeastern state.
In Florida, aggregate payrolls from wholesale trade in 1954
amounted to $207.4 million. The state next in rank was
Georgia with payrolls amounting to $200.8 million, followed
by Tennessee with $166.2 million. In number of paid em-
ployees and active proprietors of unincorporated businesses
(hereafter referred to as personnel), Florida was also the
leader of the Southeastern States. In Florida in 1954 there
were 64,857 people so classified who were engaged in whole-
sale trade. Next in order of rank were Georgia with 54,247
and North Carolina with 50,617. Florida also showed the
greatest percentage increase in the amount of payrolls. From
1948 to 1954 the amount of payrolls for the entire year
increased 74 per cent and the number of personnel increased
36 per cent. Nearest to Florida in payroll increase was North
Carolina with a 59-per-cent rise, followed by South Carolina
with an increase of 55 per cent. Georgia's wholesale trade
payrolls had increased 53 per cent. Of the increases in per-
sonnel between 1948 and 1954, South Carolina, with a
38-per-cent rise, was higher than Florida. Georgia with 26
per cent followed Florida.
WHOLESALE TRADE IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
In the accompanying tables there are shown for all of the
counties in Florida, for which the information is available,
the number of establishments in 1954 and total sales, sva'es
per establishment, the payroll, and the number of employees
engaged in wholesale trade. In accordance with, the Census


law, any data which would disclose the operations of an indi-
vidual establishment or business organization are not pub-
lished. For this reason detailed information is not available
for a number of the smaller counties in Florida although
their trade activity is included in the state totals.
For those counties for which both 1948 and 1954 data are
available, there is a wide range in the volume of total sales
and in the percentage change in sales between 1948 and
1954. In volume of sales Dade led with a total of $842 mil-
lion, followed closely by Duval with $822 million. Gulf had
the largest increase in wholesale trade over 1948 with an in-
crease of 578 per cent, followed by Okaloosa with an increase
of 466 per cent. All of the counties in the state for which
information is available reveal increases with the exception
of Osceola, Martin, De Soto, and Nassau. In Nassau, whole-
sale trade declined approximately 51 per cent. Information
accounting for this decline is not yet available, but it may in
part be due to the wide fluctuations in the production of the
menhaden fisheries.
Wholesale trade in nine Florida counties having sales in
excess of $70 million each in 1954.-The nine leading counties
in wholesale trade in 1954 had sales of $2,864.8 million which
accounted for 84.2 per cent of the sales in Florida. These
nine counties were Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, Orange, Polk,
Broward, Escambia, Pinellas, and Palm Beach. As noted
before, the two leaders among this group in dollar sales were
very close together. Dade was in first place, Duval Was
second, and Hillsborough was third with sales of $517 mil-
lion. Among this group the greatest percentage changes in
1954 sales over those of 1948 took place in Polk, Broward,
and Pinellas. There the respective increases we.e 207 per
cent, 155 per cent, and 110 per cent.
Although each of the counties in this group experienced
substantial population increases, it appears Jtat the respec-
tive increases in wholesale trade were more closely linked to
the increases in population that occurred both within and
beyond their respective county boundaries. This accords
with expectations and is strongly supported by a comparison
of wholesale sales per capital in each of the counties in 1954
and 1948.
With noticeable exceptions in Polk and Palm Beach, there
was a tendency for the average wholesale sales per establish-
ment to be lower for the'se establishments located in the
counties that had experienced the greatest percentage change
in dollar volume of wholesale sales between 1948 and 1954.
This was no doubt duE to the many new small establishments
in these counties. Duval, although slightly below Dade in
aggregate sales volume, was considerably below Dade in the
number of establishments in 1954, having had only 715 in
comparison to Dade's 1,324. This means that the average
size of the wholesale establishments in Duval was much
larger than in Dade-having been $1,150,000 in Duval in
comparison to $636,000 in Dade. The average sales per
wholesale establishment in Duval were not only almost twice
the average sales for such establishments on a state-wide
basis, but were above the average sales per establishment for
wholesale firms in the United States, the latter having been
$927,860 in 1954. The sales per wholesale establishment in
Duval were above the national average in 1948, but this figure
reached an even higher point above the national average
in 1954. Although the sales per establishment had increased


-35-






substantially in a number of the large counties between 1948
and 1954, having been as great as 95 per cent in Polk, never-
theless, as noted earlier, the most significant increases in sales
were attributable to the increase in the number of wholesale
establishments. For example, in Broward the increase in total
sales was 155 per cent, while the increase in sales per estab-
lishment was only 11 per cent. This clearly indicates the
establishment since 1948 of a large number of comparatively
small firms in Broward.
Despite Duval's substantial growth in most types of whole-
sale activities, by 1954 Dade had moved into first place in
Florida in most categories of wholesale trade activity. In
1948 Dade was only slightly above Duval in payrolls, but
in 1954 payrolls from wholesaling in Dade amounted to $54.4
million compared to $40.5 million in Duval. In 1948 the
number of paid employees engaged in wholesaling was
higher in Duval; however, in 1954 Dade had moved ahead
with 13,646 workers engaged in wholesaling compared to
10,391 in Duval. In the counties next in rank, namely, Hills-
borough, Orange, and Polk, the wholesale payrolls amounted,
respectively, to $28.4 million, $15.7 million, and $10.9 million,
while the respective number of paid employees was 7,617,
5,435, and 4,874.
Among the nine leading counties in wholesale trade the
greatest percentage change in payrolls was in Broward which
also had the greatest percentage change in number of paid
employees between 1948 and 1954. The respective increases
were 317 per cent and 219 per cent. Pinellas was second with
a 105-per-cent increase in payrolls and a 54-per-cent increase
in number of employees.
Wholesde trade in the 58 counties having sales of less
than $40 m'!lion each in 1954.-In further groupings accord-
ing to their relative importance in the total volume of whole-
sale trade, of the 58 remaining Florida counties there were
39 which accounted for 14.5 per cent of the wholesale trade,
18 which accounted for 1.3 per cent of the trade, and one
county which reported no wholesale trade activity at all.
Among the 39 counties accounting for 14.5 per cent of the
wholesale trade in Florida, the 1954 total volume of sales
ranged from a high of $36.4 million in Bay to a low of $1.4
million in Okeechobee. As previously noted, Gulf had the
largest percentage change in sales with an increase of 578
per cent over the 1948 figure. Ii- 1954, sales in this county
amounted to $4 million. In second position was Okaloosa
with an increase of 466 per cent and an aggregate sales
volume of $7.1 million in 1954. The Laird ranking county in
percentage increase, with 287 per cent, was Suwannee with
wholesale sales of $9.5 million in 1954. The greatest per-
centage change in payrolls and in number of paid employees
between 1948 and 1954 was in Okaloosa where the respective
increases were 764 per cent and 447 per cent. Baker had
the second largest percentage rise in payrolls with 293 per
cent, followed by Monroe with 292 per cent. In the per-
centage change in number of paid employees, however, these
counties were substantially outranked by Franklin and Wash-
ington which had respective increases of 443 and 323 per
cent. These various increases are noted principally to sug-


gest some of the interesting changes that are taking place in
the wholesale structure of the state. The particular rates of
change and certain characteristics are related to numerous
features of the wholesale structure which cannot be fully
explored here. For example, in some cases the counties had
almost no wholesale activity in 1948 and a rather substantial
volume in 1954. The increases are in some instances attribut-
able to an influx of a number of firms in response to diversi-
fied needs for wholesale distribution, whereas in other cases
some one or two large wholesale firms have moved into an
area and thus brought about rather substantial increases in
payrolls and in the number of paid employees.
Because of the Census disclosure rule, detailed information
is not available on the sales of the firms in the 18 counties
accounting for 1.3 per cent of the total wholesale trade in
Florida; however, data are given on the number of establish-
ments in each of the various counties. The number of firms
ranges from 1 in two of the counties up to 16 firms in Pasco;
however, with the exception of two counties, the number of
establishments per county is 8 or less.

WHOLESALE TRADE IN FLORIDA CITIES
A more meaningful view of the location of wholesale trade
activity is probably given by the analysis based on county
comparisons; however, it is interesting to take a look at the
wholesale trade activity in Florida cities based on the 1948
and 1954 Census data. Based on a city comparison, Jackson-
ville held the top position in 1954 with sales of $790 million;
Miami was in second place with sales of $666 million, and
Tampa in third place with sales of $493 million. On a sales-
per-establishment basis, Jacksonville outranked Tampa and
Miami with per-establishment sales of $1,195,760 followed
by Tampa with per-establishment sales of $814,100 and
Miami with $653,950. In aggregate payrolls, however, Miami
led all the cities in the state with $43.5 million, followed by
Jacksonville with $38.4 million and Tampa with $27.1 million.
The three cities next in order of importance on the basis
of sales were Orlando with sales of $132.8 million, Pensacola
with $69.1 million, and St. Petersburg with $62.7 million. It
is interesting to note that the average sales per wholesale
establishment of $1,613,840 in Winter Haven was the highest
average per establishment of any city in the state. On the
basis of the size of payrolls, the cities following the three
leaders were Orlando, St. Petersburg, and Pensacola, fol-
lowed closely by Ft. Lauderdale. Orlando, St. Petersburg,
and Pensacola also followed Miami, Jacksonville, and Tampa
in the number of paid employees.
As was true in the case of county-wide changes through-
out the state, the changes in wholesale activities in the cities
of Florida varied greatly. However, in all but three of the
cities for which information is available there were increases
in wholesale sales, and in the majority of them the increases
were far in excess of the average increases experienced
throughout the nation. The most significant highlight of the
changes between 1948 and 1954 was the substantial increase
in wholesale sales in the majority of Florida's counties and
cities.


-36-







TABLE 25.--WHOLESALE TRADE: CHANGES BY TYPE OF OPERATION, IN FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES, 1948 TO 1954

Percentage Change,a from 1948 to 1954, in-

Type of Operation Number of Amount of sales Average annual Value of inven- Payrolls employees (wof pairk
establishments by all sales per stories on hand, entire year week ended nearest
establishments establishment end of year, at cost enNov.e yr wek ended nearest

Florida United Florida United Florida United Florida United Florida United Florida United
States States States States States States

Total .._--- ... 56 17 76 30 13 11 54 31 74 42 36 12
Merchant wholesalers ------ --- 76 28 84 32 4 3 59 35 83 45 55 17
Manufacturers' sales branches,
sales offices 46 5 n.a. 37 n.a. 44 n.a. 24 n.a. 37 n.a. 3
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals
and LP gas facilities .----.--... 3 3 62 53 61 49 41 30 92 56 39 18
Merchandise agents, brokers -.--- 94 22 147 20 27 2 142 59 100 52 60 29
Assemblers of farm products ----------- 9 -21 n.a. 9 n.a. 16 n.a. 6 n.a. 14 n.a. -18

Source: Basic figures are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
a The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.


TABLE 26.-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS AND SALES, BY TYPE OF OPERATION,
IN FLORIDA, OTHER SouTHEASTERN STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954

Amount of Sales Establishments and Sales, by Type of Operation
Total A Manufacturers' Petroleum bulk
Num- As a Merchant sales branches, plants, terminals Merchandise Assemblers of
ber of Percent- per- wholesalers sales offices and LP gas facilities agents, brokers farm products
State Estab- age cent- Total (in
lish- change,1 age of thousands No. of No. of No. of No. of No of
ments 1948 to United of dollars) estab- Sales (in estab- Sales (in estab- Sales (in estab- Sales (in estab Sales (in
1954 States lish- thousands lish- thousands lish- thousands lish thousands ish- thousands
total ments of dollars) ments of dollars) ments of dollars) ments of dollars) ments of dollars)

Florida ..... 5,309 76 1.4 $3,402,041 3,699 $1,735,809 411 $ 646,136 557 $ 421,910 379 $ 392,413 263 $205,773
Other South-
eastern States
Alabama -... 2,818 42 1.0 $2,327,228 1,814 $1,020,901 264 $ 740,013 423 $ 240,040 245 $ 268,095 72 $ 58,179
Georgia 4,496 44 1.9 4,547,575 2,658 1,598,873 671 1,833,686 568 301,766 482 679,040 117 134,210
Kentucky 2,720 33 .9 2,188,582 1,721 964,714 167 450,458 413 235,620 322 468,495 97 69,295
Mississippi 1,863 28 .5 1,183,831 1,095 543,830 88 86,426 442 150,282 147 230,635 91 172,658
N. Carolina 4,752 37 1.8 4,183,672 2,957 1,516,983 379 999,416 728 521,238 533 967,298 155 178,737
S. Carolina 2,016 36 .6 1,341,240 1,256 634,373 146 139,726 379 230,707 174 293,217 61 43,217
Tennessee -- 3,877 37 1.9 4,563,996 2,531 2,243,621 386 887,857 379 298,283 491 996,742 90 137,493
Virginia ---..... 3,362 *38 1.1 2,577,462 2,213 1,223,291 296 504,376 414 367,939 339 413,708 100 68,148
Selected Vacation
States
Arizona .....--.. 1,285 92 .3 $ 776,255 848 $ 418,788 86 $ 89,771 212 $11]0,368 90 $109,940 49 $ 47,388
California ..... 19,876 50 7.9 18,617,352 13,831 8,413,460 2,066 5,599,783 1,378 1,232,051 1,914 2,522,327 687 849,731
Nevada .--..- 335 *96 .1 **154,000 231 109,150 13 n.a. 82 85,353 7 5,723 2 n.a.

Source: Basic figures are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
1 The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
Computed on the basis of the 1948 figure which has not been revised to the basis of the 1954 Census.
*0 Preliminary figure; final figure not available.


-37-








TABLE 27.-WHOLESALE TnADE: PAYROLLS AND PAm EMPLOYEES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954


State and County


County
Payroll as
Percentage
of County
Sales


5 I


State ---------...--

Alachua --
Baker -------
Bay -..
Bradford ---
Brevard -----
Broward ..--
Calhoun ..-
Charlotte .
Citrus ...------
Clay -- -
Collier
Columbia ---
Dade ------
De Soto -----
Dixie -- -
Duval -----.
Escambia ---
Flagler -
Franklin ...
Gadsden .-
Gilchrist ----
Glades _--
Gulf -.__ .
Hamilton ----
Hardee -- --
Hendry --
Hernando ----
Highlands -
Hillsborough ---
Holmes -----
Indian River --
Jackson ----
Jefferson ----


6.1

5.1
3.5
5.6
n.a.
6.6
5.9
3.4
n.a.
2.1
n.a.
9.3
4.1
6.5
11.6
n.a.
4.9
5.7
n.a.
9.5
3.1
n.a.
n.a.
2.7
2.0
2.4
n.a.
n.a.
8.9
5.5
n.a.
10.0
4.9
n.a.


I I


Number
Paid Em-
ployees
work week
ended
nearest
Nov. 15)


Payroll,
Entire
Year (in (
thousands
of dollars)


$207,427

1,477
55
2,035
n.a.
1,300
6,420
83
n.a.
34
n.a.
440
222
54,398
507
n.a.
40,473
4,704
n.a.
278
362
n.a.
n.a.
106
47
285
n.a.
n.a.
2,052
28,368
n.a.
981
751
n.a.


Percentage Change,a
1948 to 1954 in-
Amount Number of
of paid em-
payrolls ployees


64,857

590
26
625
n.a.
684
1,640
31
n.a.
54
Lna.
294
101
13,646
397
n.a.
10,391
1,390
n.a.
255
246
n.a.
n.a.
66
25
159
n.a.
n.a.
1,071
7,617
n.a.
507
390
n.a.


74

73
293
183
n.a.
54
317
152
n.a.
- 61
n.a.
95
36
69
- 1
n.a.
27
49

271
126
n.a.
n.a.
56
38
26
n.a.
n.a.
236
54
n.a.
98
130
n.a.


26

68
271
117
n.a.
4
219
82
n.a.
42
n.a.
213
25
37
39
n.a.

13

443
165
n.a.
n.a.
154
14
- 27
n.a.
n.a.
103
11
n.a.
51
185
n.a.


County (continued)



Lafayette --
Lake ....- -
Lee ..--- -.-
Leon ---
Levy ------.
Liberty -------
Madison ----
Manatee ----
Marion -------
Martin --
Monroe ----
Nassau .------
Okaloosa ---
Okeechobee --
Orange .---.
Osceola ----
Palm Beach --
Pasco --
Pinellas
Polk ...-- - -
Putnam --------
St. Johns --
St. Lucie .---
Santa Rosa ---
Sarasota ----
Seminole -_---
Sumter __.
Suwannee
Taylor -
Union ..---.--
Volusia ----
Wakulla
Walton ----
Washington ---


County
Payroll as
Percentage
of County
Sales



.82
.58
1.05
n.a.
n.a.
.12
.37
.86
.04
.43
.09
.21
.04
5.15
.14
2.20
n.a.
2.39
4.76
.23
.41
1.00
n.a.
.42
.73
n.a.
.28
.09
n.a.
.90
n.a.
.13
.06


Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
Although the 1948 data have not been adjusted by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages computed are deemed adequate
to show the approximate changes between 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
None in 1948.
.. Zero.
n.a. Not available.


-38-


I


Number
Payroll, Paid Em-
Entire ployees
Year (in (work week
thousands ended
of dollars) nearest
Nov. 15)


$ 3,364 1,950
1,415 536
2,224 710
n.a. n.a.
n.a. n.a.
118 62
1,152 510
1,734 708
38 16
1,173 338
141 43
406 175
60 27
15,706 5,435
326 269
4,714 1,424
n.a. n.a.
5,964 1,899
10,945 4,874
401 191
806 239
2,381 1,065
n.a. n.a.
1,066 379
2,881 1,741
n.a. n.a.
200 52
154 61
n.a. n.a.
2,297 834
n.a. n.a.
148 56
104 55


Percentage Change,a
1948 to 1954 in-
Amount Number of
of paid em-
payrolls ployees


262 204
146 149
191 154
n.a. n.a.
n.a. n.a.
- 16 48
99 11
55 11
- 5 27
292 210
37 33
764 447
82 35
57 25
18 5
46 31
n.a. n.a.
105 54
47 6
8 30
211 81
24 8
n.a. n.a.
86 189
11 39
n.a. n.a.
117 18
19 41
n.a. n.a.
84 30
n.a. n.a.
2 20
271 323







TABLE 28.-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS AND SALES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954


State and
County


State _-__..
Alachua -.
Baker ---
Bay ---_
Bradford --
Brevard -
Broward ----.
Calhoun ...--
Charlotte --. --
Citrus _-....
Clay .---..
Collier --
Columbia ---.-
Dade -
De Soto ----
Dixie --
Duval ----
Escambia ---
Flagler .--..
Franklin ..-
Gadsden ....
Gilchrist .....
Glades __
Gulf --...........
Hamilton ......
Hardee -........
Hendry .......--
Hernando, .-
Highlands ....
Hillsborough
Holmes --
Indian River_
Jackson -
Jefferson --
Lafayette --
Lake .
Lee -.
Leon -----.
Levy ----- .
Liberty -
Madison -
Manatee ---
Marion _-_-
Martin -
Monroe --
Nassau -.--,
Okaloosa .-
Okeechobee _
Orange -
Osceola ..--
Palm Beach -
Pasco _.
Pinellas -..
Polk --- -
Putnam _-
St. Johns _-
St. Lucie .-
Santa Rosa -_
Sarasota ..-
Seminole .--
Sumter _.---
Suwannee _-
Taylor ..-
Union -_-..
Volusia .....
Wakulla _
Walton --__
Washington --


County
total as a
percent-
age of
state
total


100.0
1.2
.2
1.2
.1
.9
3.8
.2
.1
.2
*
.4
.4
24.9
.2
.1
13.5
2.4
.1
.6
.5
*
.1
.1
.3
.1
.2
.5
12.1
.1
.4
.7
.2

1.4
1.2
1.6
.2
*f
.2
1.1
1.2
.2
.6
.3
.3
.2
5.8
.2
3.5
.3
4.2
4.0
.6
.7
1.1
.1
1.0
.8
.1
.3
.3

2.2
*
.3
.2


Number of Establishments


Total
number


5,309
65
9
63
7
46
204
10
7
11
2
23
19
1,324
12
5
715
127
4
30
24
2
1
6
7
18
7
8
26
641
3
22
35
8

72
65
84
11
2
9
57
63
8
33
15
18
10
307
13
187
16
225
213
32
39
57
5
56
42
6
15
14
2
117
1
14
10


Mer-
chant
whole-
salers


3,699
33
5
45
2
22
155
3
2
6
1
10
8
1,058
4
3
506
93
1
27
13


3
3
5
1
1
10
472
1
9
19
2

23
47
62
2
3
39
37
4
25
10
12
7
223
4
137
9
178
127
14
22
28
1
41
18
1
5
8

77
6
6


Amount of Sales (dollar figures are in thousands)


Other
operating
types


1,610
32
4
18
5
24
49
7
5
5
1
13
11
266
8
2
209
34
3
3
11
2
1
3
4
13
6
7
16
169
2
13
16
6

49
18
22
9
2
6
18
26
4
8
5
6
3
84
9
50
7
47
86
18
17
29
4
15
24
5
10
6
2
40
1
8
4


Total
amount


By other
By merchant operating
wholesalers types


$3,402,041 $1,735,809


County
total as a
percent-
age of
state
total

100.01
.8
*
1.1
n.a.
.6
3.2
.1
n.a.

n.a.
.1
.2
24.8
.1
n.a.
24.2
2.4
n.a.
.1
.3
n.a.
n.a.
.1
.1
.3
n.a.
n.a.
.7
15.2
n.a.
.3
.5
n.a.
.8
.6
1.1
n.a.
n.a.
.1
.4
.9
*
.4
.1
.2

5.1
.1
2.2
n.a.
2.4
4.8
.2
.4
1.0
n.a.
.4
.7
n.a.
.3
.1
n.a.
.9
n.a.
.1
.1


28,734
1,572
36,350
n.a.
19,771
108,451
2,453
n.a.
1,604
n.a.
4,756
5,480
842,031
4,366
n.a.
822,238
82,101
n.a.
2,917
11,581
n.a.
n.a.
3,976
2,327
11,693
n.a.
n.a.
23,042
516,997
n.a.
9,780
15,373
n.a.

28,035
19,677
35,615
n.a.
n.a.
4,128
12,540
29,129
1,457
14,708
2,991
7,118
1,363
175,058
4,811
161,782
n.a.
81,415
161,782
7,963
14,056
33,960
n.a.
14,407
24,961
n.a.
9,511
3,149
n.a.
30,662
n.a.
4,509
2,193


14,245
366
14,865
n.a.
2,941
52,820
913
n.a.
572
n.a.
2,073
1,941
567,534
491
n.a.
334,276
56,970
n.a.
1,841
5,715


624
805
748
n.a.
n.a.
3,708
269,633
n.a.
1,834
4,710
n.a.

2,877
12,379
24,907
n.a.

490
5,056
15,418
263
11,147
1,449
3,312
1,012
105,897
228
45,150
n.a.
46,632
62,505
2,097
4,798
5,527
n.a.
9,823
5,118
n.a.
678
1,338

18,686

1,298
1,013


$1,666,232
14,489
1,206
21,485
n.a.
16,830
55,631
1,540
n.a.
1,032
n.a.
2,683
3,539
274,497
3,875
n.a.
487,962
25,131
n.a.
1,076
5,866
n.a.
n.a.
3,352
1,522
10,945
n.a.
n.a.
19,334
247,364
n.a.
7,946
10,663
n.a.

25,158
7,298
10,708
n.a.
n.a.
3,638
7,484
13,711
1,194
3,561
1,542
3,806
351
69,161
4,583
29,593
n.a.
34,783
99,277
5,866
9,258
28,433
n.a.
4,584
19,843
n.a.
8,833
1,811
n.a.
11,976
n.a.
3,211
1,180


Average
Annual
Sales per
Establish-
ment


$ 640,800
442,100
174,700
577,000
n.a.
429,800
531,600
245,300
n.a.
145,800
n.a.
206,800
288,400
636,000
363,800
n.a.
1,150,000
646,500
n.a.
97,200
482,500
n.a.
n.a.
662,700
332,400
649,600
n.a.
n.a.
886,200
806,500
n.a.
444,500
439,200
n.a.

389,400
302,700
424,000
n.a.
n.a.
458,700
220,000
462,400
182,100
445,700
199,400
395,400
136,300
570,200
370,100
399,700
n.a.
361,800
759,500
248,800
360,400
595,800
n.a.
257,300
594,300
n.a.
634,100
224,900
n.a.
262,100
n.a.
322,100
219,300


Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
a Percentage changes for Florida are computed on the basis of 1948 figures which have been adjusted by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census.
Although the 1948 data for the counties have not been adjusted to the new basis, the percentages computed are deemed adequate to show the approximate change
between 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
0 Less than one-tenth of one per cent.
n.a. Not available.
... Zero.


-39-


Percentage Change,a
1948 to 1954, in-
Average
Total annual
number of Total sales per
establish- sales establish-
ments ment

56 76 13
62 72 6
50 178 85
70 149 47
40 n.a. n.a.
92 124 17
129 155 11
150 93 23
40 n.a. n.a.
10 45 32
S n.a. n.a.
229 136 28
12 30 17
71 96 14
8 -14 7
-- n.a. n.a.
9 32 19
32 45 9
20 n.a. n.a.
150 123 11
60 98 24
Sn.a. n.a.
.... n.a. n.a.
100 578 239
40 29 8
29 106 60
17 n.a. n.a.
14 n.a. n.a.
13 270 228
28 61 25
- 25 n.a. n.a.
38 158 87
119 35 38
- 11 n.a. n.a.

60 253 120
71 133 36
100 208 54
- 35 n.a. n.a.
100 n.a. n.a.
10 94 116
39 53 10
17 89 62
4 4
65 224 97
25 51 -61
200 466 89
43 47 3
25 83 46
-13 20 7
42 47 4
- 11 n.a. n.a.
42 110 48
58 207 95
22 17 50
34 170 101
97 71 13
25 n.a. n.a.
115 148 15
14 17 36
50 n.a. n.a.
36 287 184
8 37 27
100 n.a. n.a.
33 83 37
- 80 n.a. n.a.
17 27 9
233 191 13







TABLE 29.-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, INVENTORIES, OPERATING EXPENSES, PAYROLLS,
AND PAID EMPLOYEES, BY KIND OF BUSINESS, IN FLORIDA, 1954

Amount of Sales Value of Inven- Average
toes, End of Year Total Number Salary
Operating Payroll, Paid and Wages
Expenses Entire Employees per Paid
Type of Operation and Num- Total, As a Including Year (work Employee
Kind of Business ber of Total (in Average at cost per- Payroll (in thou- week (work
Estab- thousands per (in thou- cent- (in thou- sands of ended week
lish- of dollars) establish- sands of age of sands of dollars) nearest ended
ments ment dollars) total dollars) Nov. 15) nearest
sales Nov. 15)

Total --- 5,309 $3,402,041 $640,800 $220,746 6.5 $430,012 $207,427 64,857 $ 63.40
Merchant wholesalers ------- --- 3,699 1,735,809 469,264 161,001 9.3 257,009 131,226 37,590 68.15
Grocery, confectionery, meat wholesalers 572 324,693 567,645 18,434 5.7 35,841 16,955 5,882 57.76
Farm products (edible) distributors _____ 288 144,336 501,167 2,192 1.5 21,842 9,945 3,789 49.61
Beer, wine, distilled spirits wholesalers ----- 147 186,087 1,265,898 17,431 9.4 19,781 9,178 2,093 85.28
Tobacco distributors -- 56 87,985 1,571,161 3,991 4.5 5,461 3,467 1,049 66.82
Drugs, chemicals, allied products wholesalers ---- 148 60,471 408,588 7,509 12.4 10,707 5,898 1,457 75.79
Dry goods, apparel wholesalers ----______ 85 23,084 271,576 3,122 13.5 3,396 1,724 492 65.85
Furniture, home furnishings wholesalers 107 38,490 359,720 5,337 13.9 7,026 3,473 1,054 66.57
Paper, allied products wholesalers ---- 86 30,892 359,209 4,088 13.2 6,970 3,962 1,024 72.40
Farm products (raw materials) merchants -- 34 15,038 442,294 713 4.7 1,448 567 221 46.52
Automotive wholesalers -------..... - 437 100,761 230,574 15,544 15.4 22,823 12,716 3,634 71.22
Electrical, electronics, appliance distributors -... 208 159,015 764,495 21,615 13.6 20,423 10,972 2,557 82.98
Hardware, plumbing-heating goods wholesalers --. 139 99,941 719,000 15,878 15.9 15,737 8,560 2,217 74.15
Lumber, construction materials distributors . 284 140,926 496,218 9,696 6.9 25,501 12,779 3,450 72.78
Machinery, equipment, supplies distributors -- -- 607 181,021 298,222 23,639 13.1 36,742 19,600 4,921 78.04
Metals, metalwork (except scrap) distributors -- 53 22,813 430,434 3,317 14.5 4,365 2,276 615 69.42
Scrap, waste materials dealers ... .... ... 81 15,828 195,407 1,667 10.5 3,679 1,803 711 44.90
Other merchant wholesalers ....-.... ... 367 104,428 284,545 6,828 6.5 15,267 7,351 2,424 58.94
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices 411 646,136 1,572,107 24,169 3.7 56,438 28,573 6,653 86.48
Food and kindred products --- --------------- 139 246,500 1,773,381 5,605 2.3 25,633 11,583 3,045 75.81
Textile mill products -----------...... 1 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Apparel and related products ----------- 1 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Furniture and fixtures ------------ ---- 6 2,298 383,000 213 9.3 224 145 40 64.58
Paper and allied products ............... 1 n.a. n.a. --_-. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Chemicals and allied products -------------- 29 44,999 1,551,690 3,436 7.6 3,469 1,216 267 85.30
Rubber products ----- 8 24,539 3,067,375 1,583 6.4 1,927 727 148 98.22
Leather and leather goods .. . .. ... .. ... ------.... ---- -- ---
Stone, clay, and glass products --- .- -- 17 26,839 1,578,765 1,260 4.7 2,099 1,387 364 85.20
Primary metal products -------- .. 11 27,735 2,521,364 98 .4 979 413 105 78.47
Fabricated metal products ------ ---- --... 21 64,938 3,092,286 556 .9 1,256 759 137 100.15
Machinery (except electrical) ------ 93 37,814 406,602 3,229 8.5 9,790 6,498 1,215 112.73
Electrical machinery _- ______-_ ............ 20 44,241 2,212,050 2,297 5.2 2,321 1,393 297 92.30
Transportation equipment ----- ----- 13 90,112 6,931,692 4,477 5.0 5,036 2,539 542 92.30
Instruments and related products - -17 3,161 185,941 295 9.3 1,041 615 185 61.56
Other manufacturers' products 34 31,725 933,088 1,113 3.5 2,517 1,186 296 81.55
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities- 557 421,910 757,469 28,545 6.8 36,909 14,258 3,854 74.20
Gasoline, distillates, residuals 522 411,441 788,021 27,946 6.8 33,205 12,413 3,392 73.89
Wholesale LP gas facilities -- -- -- 35 10,469 299,114 599 5.7 3,704 1,845 462 76.51
Merchandise agents, brokers ...........- 379 392,413 1,035,390 1,858 .5 18,412 7,805 2,448 64.09
Grocery, confectionery, meats -------------- 93 128,441 1,381,086 576 .4 3,646 1,792 409 77.52
Farm products (edible) -- ... ...-------- 74 117,410 1,586,622 70 .1 6,624 2,581 1,122 55.06
Drugs, chemicals, paints -------------___ 12 6,080 506,667 11 .2 527 230 52 87.08
Apparel, (including footwear) ..... ------- 10 6,083 608,300 33 .5 257 98 25 74.40
Dry goods, piece goods ---- --... .. 3 1,312 437,333 ----- -- 77 13 4 n.a.
Furniture, home furnishings ...---- ..... 12 4,261 355,083 6 .1 355 119 37 70.49
Paper, allied products -------- ... 8 5,721 715,125 -- 286 119 20 74.40
Farm products (raw materials) ----- 23 29,775 1,294,565 -----....- -- 793 350 260 19.07
Automotive -------- ------------------- ....... 6 8,161 1,360,167 15 .2 494 271 39 123.90
Electrical-electronic apparatus, equip. appliances _. 16 8,232 514,500 771 9.4 615 279 50 109.26
Hardware, plumbing-heating goods .......-- ...--------........ 13 8,825 678,846 5 .1 450 143 31 55.03
Lumber, construction materials -----...------ ... 23 12,372 537,913 46 .4 813 344 74 92.72
Machinery, equipment, supplies ..-- ----------------43 21,026 488,976 228 1.1 1,592 604 141 82.07
Metals, metalwork (except scrap) -- 4 1,869 467,250 --. 111 35 6 105.00
Other merchandise agents, brokers 39 32,845 842,179 97 .3 1,772 827 178 93.39
Assemblers of farm products ------- 263 205,773 782,407 5,178 2.5 61,224 25,565 14,812 32.15
Dairy, poultry products -----------------... 14 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Fresh fruits, vegetables -- 233 183,541 787,730 3,507 1.9 57,372 24,166 13,601 36.92
Farm products (raw materials) ------- 15 15,237 1,015,800 1,605 10.5 2,690 1,001 593 36.40
Farm supplies ----------------- .....- ... 1 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Other farm products assemblers .---- .... .- ----------- ---



Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
n.a. Not available.
__.. Zero.


-40-








TABLE 30.-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, PAYROLLS, AND PAID EMPLOYEES
IN FLORIDA CITIES OF 5,000 INHABITANTS OR MORE, 1954

Amount of Sales of-
Number of Paid Employees
Establishments Amount of Sales Merchant Other operating Payrolls, Entire Year (work week ended
wholesalers types nearest Nov. 15) Average
Annual
Cities Percent- Percent- Percent- Percent- Percent- Percent- Sales per
age Total (in age Total (in age Total (in age Total (in age age Establish-
Total change,' thousands change,a thousands change,a thousands change,a thousands change,a Total change,- ment
1948 to of dollars) 1948 to of dollars) 1948 to of dollars) 1948 to of dollars) 1948 to number 1948 to
1954 1954 1954 1954 1954 1954

Bartow --..-- 10 ---- $ 2,845 46.1 $ 1,085 n.a. $ 1,760 n.a. $ 95 44.8 33 77.1 $ 284,500
Belle Glade -. 11 15.4 4,591 44.3 1,984 144.3 2,607 64.9 74 75.1 27 80.7 417,360
Bradenton ... 29 52.6 6,994 55.8 2,938 6.5 4,056 134.4 492 63.5 192 58.7 241,170
Chattahoochee 2 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Clearwater ... 33 43.5 8,268 88.4 4,281 59.6 3,987 133.6 891 228.8 292 210.6 250,545
Coral Gables 36 140.0 15,420 110.9 12,664 n.a. 2,776 n.a. 948 201.9 272 149.5 428,330
Crestview --. 8 n.a. 2,180 n.a. 600 n.a. 1,580 n.a. 71 n.a. 40 n.a. 272,500
Daytona Beach 57 7.5 17,999 61.9 12,642 48.2 5,357 106.9 1,218 54.2 347 11.6 315,770
DeLand --- 15 25.0 3,905 71.6 1,045 n.a. 2,860 n.a. 212 43.2 90 13.5 260,330
Delray Beach 13 62.5 1,973 11.2 1,117 1,451.4 856 60.2 153 146.8 42 162.5 151,770
Fort Lauder-
dale ---------...... 128 204.8 58,007 128.8 39,328 184.9 18,679 61.7 3,859 248.6 972 176.1 453,180
Fort Myers .... 57 72.7 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Fort Pierce -. 46 76.9 32,397 72.3 5,139 n.a. 27,258 n.a. 2,211 19.4 994 4.4 704,280
Gainesville -- 51 54.5 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Haines City -, 11 83.3 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Hialeah ---- 38 850.0 16,601 n.a. 14,998 n.a. 1,603 n.a. 1,422 n.a. 415 n.a. 436,870
Hollywood --. 24 118.2 20,189 1,624.1 7,358 n.a. 12,831 n.a. 1,094 1,693.4 294 1,030.8 841,210
Jacksonville 661 5.1 790,398 28.1 313,437 21.0 476,961 33.2 38,422 32.6 9,777 4.2 1,195,760
Jacksonville
Beach ...--- 3 1,372 1,372 8 3 457,330
Key West --.. 26 52.9 12,657 196.8 9,856 n.a. 2,801 n.a. 734 148.8 185 71.3 486,810
Lake City ...... 18 5.9 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Lake Wales 15 5,535 16.9 1,487 7.0 4,048 21.1 654 58.0 353 46.5 369,000
Lake Worth 10 100.0 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Lakeland ----- 83 72.9 36,813 122.6 24,196 107.5 12,617 158.6 2,071 50.6 624 71.9 443,530
Leesburg --- 27 107.7 9,611 225.5 1,837 217.8 7,774 227.3 791 285.9 430 437.5 355,960
Marianna --. 26 85.7 12,400 n.a. 3,313 n.a. 9,087 n.a. 550 n.a. 267 n.a. 476,920
Miami 1,019 58.7 666,372 77.4 463,567 72.3 202,805 90.4 43,547 59.5 10,831 28.7 653,950
Miami Beach- 61 134.6 36,382 287.7 20,744 297.9 15,638 275.0 1,501 147.3 368 105.6 596,430
Miami Shores 1 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. -- n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Miami Springs 9 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
New Smyrna
Beach 8 60.0 1,643 53.8 321 n.a. 1,322 n.a. 152 192.3 58 152.2 205,375
North Miami 20 900.0 4,787 n.a. 2,393 n.a. 2,394 n.a. 881 n.a. 86 n.a. 239,350
Ocala 47 51.6 23,726 138.0 13,239 100.2 10,487 216.4 1,193 107.1 339 37.2 504,595
Opa Locka -- 4 n.a. 318 n.a. 318 n.a. -- n.a. 40 n.a. 24 n.a. n.a.
Orlando -- 243 19.7 132,784 67.8 93,487 98.1 39,297 23.1 10,146 45.9 2,933 16.0 79,500
Palatka ---- 14 50.0 3,352 28.3 909 n.a. 2,443 n.a, 144 51.0 61 61.6 239,430
Panama City 56 75.0 34,820 n.a. 14,161 n.a. 20,659 n.a, 1,988 n.a. 610 n.a. 621,785
Pensacola ---. 103 32.1 69,087 35.5 47,276 49.1 21,811 13.2 4,030 47.2 1,170 15.3 670,750
Plant City 20 53.8 6,763 68.4 2,274 299.6 4,489 30.2 343 24.3 140 57.8 338,150
Pompano
Beach _--- 26 8.3 19,066 209.2 1,505 17,561 184.8 308 396.8 51 45.7 733,310
Quincy ---- 21 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
St. Augustine 27 --- 7,856 n.a. 4,101 n.a. 3,755 n.a. 454 n.a. 155 n.a. 290,960
St. Petersburg 150 44.2 62,712 111.1 38,622 124.1 24,090 93.1 4,139 104.8 1,207 41.0 418,080
Sanford ...... 33 26.7 15,273 n.a. 4,605 n.a. 10,668 n.a. 1,349 n.a. 664 n.a. 462,820
Sarasota ---- 43 104.8 10,201 147.0 7,602 n.a. 2,599 n.a. 677 161.4 219 135.5 237,230
Sebring ---- 13 18.2 5,987 335.1 3,046 1,174.5 2,941 158.7 660 432.3 226 39.5 460,540
Tallahassee .... 76 94.9 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Tampa 605 50.1 492,533 65.2 266,069 59.9 226,464 71.9 27,063 66.6 7,160 28.3 814,100
West Palm
Beach -- 108 22.7 42,304 29.9 27,865 28.5 14,439 32.7 3,230 21.1 889 2.4 891,700
Winter Haven 31 55.0 50,029 781.4 8,650 507.9 41,379 872.9 1,926 82.4 806 13.5 1,613,840
Winter Park 7 133.3 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.

Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
a Although the 1948 data have not been adjusted by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages computed are deemed adequate
to show the approximate change between the years 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
Zero.
n.a. Not available.
None in 1948.


-41-







TABLE 31.-WHOLESALE TRADE: ESTABLISHMENTS, SALES, PAYROLLS, AND PAID EMPLOYEES, BY TYPE OF OPERATION, IN FLORIDA'S METROPOLrrAN AREAS AND SELECTED COUNTIES, 1954
Number of Establishments Amount of Sales Payroll, Entire Year Average Paid Employees
Salary (work week ended
& Wages nearest Nov. 15)
As a Percent- As a Total Percent- Total Percent- per Paid
Area and Type of Operation percent- age percent- amount age amount age Employee Percent-
age of Total change,a age of (in thou- change,a Per (in thou- change,a (work age
area number 1948 to area sands of 1948 to capital sands of 1948 to week Total change,a
total 1954 total dollars) 1954 dollars) 1954 nearest number 1948 to
Nov. 15) 1954

Florida 100 5,309 56 100 $3,402,041 76 $ 965 $207,427 74 $ 63.40 64,857 36
Merchant wholesalers ---------- ------ --------- ........ 70 3,699 76 51 1,735,809 84 492 131,226 83 68.15 37,590 55
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices .-------- ----- --... ... 8 411 46 19 646,136 n.a. 183 28,573 n.a. 86.48 6,653 n.a.
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities 10 557 3 12 421,910 62 120 14,258 92 74.20 3,854 39
Merchandise agents, brokers ---__-_ - 7 379 94 12 392,413 147 111 7,805 100 64.09 2,448 60
Assemblers of farm products ..........-- ...... ... 5 263 9 6 205,773 n.a. 58 25,565 n.a. 37.15 14,312 n.a.
Jacksonville Metropolitan Area (Duval County) 100 715 18 100 822,238 n.a. 2,167 40,478 41 76.14 10,391 11
Merchant wholesalers ___--------- --------. 71 506 20 41 334,276 31 881 24,854 36 71.03 6,857 17
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices ......... .... 16 115 6 40 325,695 n.a. 859 11,376 n.a. 89.10 2,468 n.a.
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities .. ..... 3 24 9 10 83,609 52 220 2,778 174 77.31 756 94
Merchandise agents, brokers .........-------- ....... .. 9 64 33 9 75,964 59 200 1,338 71 85.17 275 39
Assemblers of farm products ----------........ ....------ ........ .. 1 6 -- *1 2,694 n.a. 7 117 n.a. 65.97 35 n.a.
Miami Metropolitan Area (Dade County) . ..100 1,324 92 100 842,031 n.a. 1,311 54,398 91 77.48 13,646 53
Merchant wholesalers ---------------____---- --- 80 1,058 97 67 567,534 101 884 41,991 87 75.77 10,764 53
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices --..... ....... 8 106 74 14 118,044 n.a. 184 7,095 n.a. 90.42 1,609 n.a.
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities ......... 2 28 3 6 48,582 21 76 2,475 44 82.85 566 11
Merchandise agents, brokers ---------- -----. -..... ........ 9 115 140 12 99,041 267 154 2,032 186 79.71 469 182
Assemblers of farm products ---...----....._-- 1 17 31 1 8,830 n.a. 14 805 n.a. 49.84 238 n.a.
Orlando Metropolitan Area 100 307 44 100 175,058 n.a. 989 15,706 69 54.31 5,435 33
Merchant wholesalers -_.............. ........... 72 223 56 61 105,897 128 598 9,308 112 66.37 2,762 81
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices ---- 8 25 32 10 17,241 n.a. 97 1,103 n.a. 87.27 257 n.a.
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities 7 20 18 10 18,182 n.a. 103 612 n.a. 65.61 159 n.a.
Merchandise agents, brokers ____-------- ---- 5 15 25 4 7,863 246 44 242 178 65.57 67 86
Assemblers of farm products ----__--....... ... 8 24 9 15 25,875 76 146 4,441 22 34.07 2,190 1
Tampa-St. Petersburg Metropolitan Area 100 866 49 100 598,412 72 1,145 34,332 72 70.54 9,516 25
Merchant wholesalers .-.................-.... 75 650 65 53 316,265 72 605 23,751 72 68.70 6,591 35
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices ----- 8 72 26 18 107,621 n.a. 206 4,822 n.a. 81.35 1,164 n.a.
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities 6 48 2 11 67,126 92 128 2,554 127 82.23 646 59
Merchandise agents, brokers ---------- ------- -. 8 70 100 16 93,765 224 179 1,570 157 113.29 350 90
Assemblers of farm products---- ----------- _- 3 26 -46 2 13,635 n.a. 26 1,635 n.a. 40.55 765 n.a.
Broward County ----- 100 204 168 100 108,451 165 718 6,420 410 79.62 1,640 280
Merchant wholesalers --....--------........-..-.. 76 155 308 48 52,820 292 349 4,390 385 77.56 1,138 282
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices 2 5- 2 2,472 16 361 105.038 105
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities 7 14 29 30 32,091 103 213 1,159 472 94.81 247 275
Merchandise agents, brokers ------ ..----- --- 10 20 14 14,936 99 143 73.07 301
Assemblers of farm products --... ..---- 5 10J 6 6,132 41 367 47.37 120
Escambia County _-- 100 127 41 100 82,101 46 545 4,70 49 69.08 1,390 13
Merchant wholesalers ------------- - 74 931 55 69 56,970 69 378 3,583 85 66.74 1,067 46
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices .....__...---- 9 12 14 11,852' 79 623 73.63 1791
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities .... 11 14 13 11 9,393. 11 62 431 8 81.89 123 -36
Merchandise agents, brokers -------------__- 6 8 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Assemblers of farm products .........---------- -----.... ...-------------- n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.J
Hillsborough County __--.-------------____ ___ 100 641 44 100 516,997' 66 1,650 28,36 63 73.22 7,617 17
Merchant wholesalers -__-- __-........-______......_ ... .... 75 472 62 52 269,633 64 860 19,824 63 70.00 5,392 28
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices ------- -- 9 60 19 96,904' 309 3,98 84.59 928
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities 5 33 11 11 55,980 68 179 2,176 62 84.48 535 3
Merchandise agents, brokers ---------------................ .....-----.........-------- 9 60 16 85,200 272 1,476 115.12 328
Assemblers of farm products ---.-----........ ... -........... 2 16J 2 9,280 30 9081 43.32 434'
Orange County (see Orlando Metropolitan Area)
Palm Beach County -- 100 187 54 100 74,743 58 493 4,714 78 62.25 1,424 59
Merchant wholesalers --------------............... ..... 73 137 88 60 45,150 127 298 3,245 102 61.35 974 78
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices---_ ____ 9 171 13 9,546 63 83 75.68 1971
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities -_---- 12 22 4 16 11,620 8 77 385 97 78.59 107 A8
Merchandise agents, brokers ------- ----------- ---- 3 6n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Assemblers of farm products ......-------------.................. ..........-------- 3 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.J


continued . .









TABLE 31.--(CONTINUED)


Area and Type of Operation


Pinellas County -___-----------
Merchant wholesalers --. -------.... ---...- --
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices --_ -------------
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities --------
Merchandise agents, brokers ..--. ------------... ---- .--
Assemblers of farm products ..---------- ---------------------- ---- --
Polk County ------ -------
Merchant wholesalers --.---------------.-- ------
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices -- --.--- --___-- -
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities -------- -
Merchandise agents, brokers ---------------- --------------------- -
Assemblers of farm products ---. ----- ------------- -------------- ----
Volusia County ----------------- -------------
Merchant wholesalers ---- ---------------------------------------- ---
Manufacturers' sales branches, sales offices -------- -----
Petroleum bulk plants, terminals and LP gas facilities --------
Merchandise agents, brokers -- ---------------- -- --
Assemblers of farm products ...-- --- ----------- -------------


Number of Establishments


Amount of Sales


______________ I. ,. ______________


As a
percent-
age of
area
total


Total
number


Percent-
age
change,a
1948 to
1954


As a
percent-
age of
area
total


Total
amount
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


Percent-
age
change,a
1948 to
1954


Per
capital


_________________ I- I


$ 81,415
46,632
10,717
11,146
8,565
4,355
161,782
62,505
41,422
12,592
10,813
34,450
30,662
18,686
n.a.
8,679
n.a.
1,549


129 $ 389
139 223
51
116 53
41
21
218 1,037
238 400
266
207 81
69
221
107 350
113 213
n.a.
98 99
n.a.
18


Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954 and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
a Percentage changes in total sales and total number of establishments in Florida are computed on the basis of 1948 figures which have been adjusted by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 19-54 Census.
Although other data for Florida, the metropolitan areas, and the counties for 1948 have not been adjusted to the new basis, the percentages computed are deemed adequate to show the approximate change between
the years 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
__ Zero.
Less than one per cent.


-
I


Payroll, Entire Year Average Paid Employees
Salary (work week ended
& Wages nearesst Nov. 15)
Total Percent- per Paid
amount age Employee Percent-
(in thou- change,a (work age
sands of 1948 to week Totaul change,
dollars) 1954 nearest number 1948 to
Nov. 15) 1954

$ 5,964 129 $ 59.81 1,8919 69
3,927 137 62.84 1,19!9 78
838 68.64 236
378 116 71.36 111i 57
94 86.09 232
727 36.91 3311
10,945 48 46.73 4,874 5
4,537 160 54.30 1,6741 184
625 85.46 147r
205 14 60.50 78: -29
209 71.98 56;
5,369 39.58 2,919'
2,297 123 52.74 834 50
1,459 114 61.82 447 62
n.a. n.a. n.a.
266 141 62.64 75 36
n.a. n.a. n.a.
354 25.05 238








PART FIVE


SERVICE TRADES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
CARTER C. OSTERBIND, Research Professor
ELISE C. JONES, Assistant in Research
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH


BUSINESS establishments primarily engaged in rendering
a wide variety of services both to individuals and to other
businesses fall in the category known as service trades.
These trades form an important segment of Florida busi-
ness and include services supplied specifically for tourists
and other visitors by Florida's many hotels, motels, and tour-
ist courts.
In 1954, hotels, motels, and tourist courts, and sporting
and recreational camps grossed almost $3 billion in the
United States. Of this total, $2.4 billion were receipts of
hotels. Among the states, Florida with 6.1 per cent of the
national total receipts by hotels was outranked by only three
states-New York, California, and Illinois. The total re-
ceipts in the nation from motels and tourist courts was $457
million in 1954. Florida with 9.4 per cent of these receipts
was exceeded in the nation only by California. Florida's
increase over 1948 in total hotel, motel, and tourist court
receipts of 69.7 per cent, representing a change of $78 mil-
lion, was outranked only by Nevada's increase of 83.5 per
cent.
Although all services are not covered in the 1954 Census
of Business, it does include, in addition to hotels, motels,
and tourist courts, trailer parks and recreational camps;
personal services such as laundries and laundry services,
cleaning and dyeing plants, photographic studios, barber
and beauty shops, shoe repair shops, and others; miscella-
neous business services; automotive repair services and
garages; miscellaneous repair services; motion picture
theaters, and amusement and recreation services. Excluded
are radio broadcasting and television; medical and other
health services; legal services; educational services; muse-
ums, art galleries, and botanical or zoological gardens; non-
profit membership organizations; private households; and
certain miscellaneous services.
SERVICE TRADES COMPARED TO WHOLESALE AND
RETAIL TRADES
Receipts of establishments in all types of trade activities
in Florida, including retail and wholesale trades in addition
to service trades, increased 76 per cent between 1948 and
1954. In the latter year total receipts reached over $8
billion. Of this amount, retail trade accounted for 50 per
cent; wholesale trade, 42 per cent; and service trades, 8
per cent. Although service trades form the smallest com-
ponent of Florida's total trade activity, receipts of these
establishments in the state totalled $656.3 million in 1954.
Payrolls of business establishments engaged in the three
types of trade activities increased 69 per cent between


1948 and 1954, reaching $783 million in the latter year. Of
this total, retail trade establishments accounted for 52 per
cent; wholesale trade, 26 per cent; and service trades, 22
per cent. From these summary statistics it is evident that
the payrolls are a much greater proportion of receipts in the
service trades than in the wholesale or retail trades.
The number of paid employees engaged in all trade activi-
ties in Florida increased 30 per cent between 1948 and 1954.
By 1954 this employment figure had reached 302,984. Of
this number 56 per cent were employed in retail trade, 21
per cent in wholesale trade, and 23 per cent in service trade.
The proportion in service trade establishments represents
a total employment of 68,214 people.
The number of business establishments engaged in all
types of trade increased 38 per cent and in 1954 numbered
69,896. Fifty-nine per cent of these were engaged in retail
trade, 8 per cent in wholesale trade, and 33 per cent in serv-
ice trades. Summary statistics showing approximate in-
creases of 76 per cent in sales of all trades and only 38 per
cent in number of establishments indicate a substantial in-
crease in the average sales per establishment. It should be
pointed out, however, that approximately one-third of this
increase is attributable to the increase of 12 per cent in
the general level of prices between the respective census
periods. Some of the increase may be attributable also to
the fact that the 1948 and 1954 censuses differed in a few
respects which affect their comparability. For the present
purpose of broad comparisons, however, it is probable that
the differences between the censuses do not materially
affect the general character of the changes noted.

FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES
Receipts of service trade establishments in the United
States in 1954 of $23.5 billion represented an increase of 77
per cent over the amount of such receipts in 1948. In Flor-
ida, the receipts from such establishments were $656.3 mil-
lion in 1954, or an increase of 99 per cent over 1948. This
increase placed Florida among the top nine states in the
nation in total service trade receipts. In percentage in-
crease between 1948 and 1954, Florida was exceeded by
only Nevada, New York, and New Mexico which had re-
spective increases of 158, 110, and 103 per cent. The
nine leading states in total service trade receipts included,
in addition to Florida, three Eastern States-New York, New
Jersey, and Pennsylvania; three North Central States-Ohio,
Illinois, and Michigan; Texas in the southwest, and Cali-
fornia in the far west.
The Bureau of the Census divides the United States into


-44-






four major geographical regions designated as the North-
east, the South, the North Central, and the West. A com-
parison of these broad geographic regions indicates that
between 1948 and 1954, the Northeastern States with an
increase of 84 per cent, had experienced the greatest per-
centage increase in service trade receipts, followed by the
West with 81 per cent. The north central and southern
regions, with respective increases of 74 and 66 per cent, were
below the national average increase. The rise in the North-
eastern States would have been very small had it not been
for the substantial increase in New York State. With the
exception of New York, the majority of the states in this
region fell far behind the other states of the nation in per-
centage increases. Service trade receipts in California ac-
counted for over 64 per cent of the receipts in the western
region.
In the North Central States the variations of individual
states from the percentage increase for the region were not
'very great; however, the three large states of Ohio, Illinois,
and Michigan largely influenced the average rise for the
area. In the Southern States the increases between 1948
and 1954 ranged from a low of 39 per cent in West Vir-
ginia to a high of 99 per cent in Florida. The southern
region, embracing 16 states and the District of Columbia,
does not have any particular state or small group of states
that dominate the service trade activity, as is true of other
regions. In general, the regional increase is more repre-
sentative of the individual states than is the case in the other
regions.
A division of the total receipts from all service trade
establishments in the United States according to these four
major regions reveals that the Northeastern States had
receipts of $8.2 billion, the North Central States, $6.6 bil-
lion, the South, $4.8 billion, and the West, $3.9 billion.

FLORIDA AND THE OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES
In the Southeastern States there are included in addition
to Florida the states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mis-
sissippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and
Virginia. Among this group, Florida's increase of 99 per
cent in receipts of service trade establishments, between
1948 and 1954, was not only considerably greater than the
percentage increase experienced in any other state in the
group, but Florida's aggregate receipts of $656.3 million
were more than twice the amount received in any other
southeastern state. Georgia was in the second position with
$318.6 million, followed by North Carolina with $306.5
million.
When the service trade receipts are classified according
to the three broad classes of business services-namely, per-
sonal services, automotive repair services, and all other
selected services-the receipts in Florida from each of these
classes of service activities were far above those in the com-
parable classes in any other southeastern state. The per-
sonal services category includes establishments primarily
engaged in providing services generally involving care of the
person and of apparel, such as laundries, dyeing plants,
photographic studios, barber and beauty shops and clean-
ing and pressing shops. In Florida the receipts from
personal services amounted to $132.7 million in 1954. North


Carolina was next with receipts of $111.1 million, followed
by Virginia with $100.2 million. The receipts of automotive
repair services in Florida amounted to $65.7 million. North
Carolina was next with receipts of $37.9 million, followed
by Georgia with $37.3 million. Other selected services in-
clude principally hotels, motels, tourist courts, miscellaneous
business services, amusement and recreation services, and
motion pictures. In 1954 total receipts from these groups
amounted to $457.8 million in Florida, $184.9 million in
Georgia, and $164.9 million in Tennessee. The increase in
Georgia's receipts from other services, between 1948 and
1954, was 116 per cent, in Florida's, 115 per cent, and in
North Carolina's, 106 per cent.
In the number of establishments engaged in the service
trades, Florida also led the Southeastern States with 23,284
in 1954. North Carolina was next with 14,244, followed
by Georgia with 12,109. A division of establishments in
Florida on the basis of the three classes of services shows
that 7,676 provided personal services; 2,402, automobile
repair and garage services; and 13,206, other selected serv-
ices. Thus in both receipts and number of establishments
the category of other selected services was highest in Florida.
This is to be expected inasmuch as most of the services
embraced in this classification are oriented to the tourist
and recreational activities of the state.
The payrolls derived from service trade activities in Flor-
ida in 1954 amounted to $169.6 million. This figure repre-
sents an increase of 80 per cent between 1948 and 1954.
This was the largest increase experienced in the South-
eastern States over the period. All of the Southeastern States
showed significant increases in the payrolls derived from
service trade activities, the lowest increase having been the
26 per cent registered by Mississippi.

SERVICE TRADES IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
On the basis of total receipts from service trade, Florida
counties may be divided into four groups: (1) $30 million
to $250 million, (2) $10 million to $30 million, (3) $30 million
to $10 million and, (4) less than $1 million. In the first group
there were 6 counties which accounted for 71 per cent of
the service trade receipts in 1954. These counties were
Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, Pinellas, Broward, and Palm
Beach. Within this group Dade had by far the largest
receipts with $249.0 million or about 38 per cent of the total
receipts by service trade establishments in Florida. Duval
and Hillsborough were in second and third place with
receipts of $58.3 million and $44.1 million, respectively.
Among these counties, Dade also led in per capital receipts
with a figure of $388. Second among this group was
Broward with $261, followed by Palm Beach with $225.
Dade led also in the percentage change in receipts between
1948 and 1954 with an increase of 100 per cent compared to
the state-wide increase of 99 per cent. The other counties
in the group fell below the state average increase. In Dade
the payrolls for the entire year amounted to $69.0 million,
and there were 23,878 people employed in the service trades.
In payrolls the next two counties in order of importance
were Duval with $15.6 million and Hillsborough with $12.3
million. The number of employees in Duval was 7,391 and
in Hillsborough, 4,970. The percentage increase in pay-


--45-






rolls between 1948 and 1954 was 92 per cent in Dade, 73
per cent in Palm Beach, and 71 per cent in Pinellas. These
are to be compared to a state-wide increase of 80 per cent.
The increase in number of paid employees over the same
period was 43 per cent in Dade, 20 per cent in Pinellas,
and 9 per cent in Hillsborough.
There are five counties having had total receipts of from
$10 million to $30 million. These, ranked in order of the
amount of receipts, are Orange, Volusia, Polk, Sarasota, and
Escambia. In 1954, as in 1948, Sarasota led, not only the
counties in the group, but all the counties in the state in
receipts per capital. In 1954 this figure for Sarasota was
$419. Polk, with a percentage change in receipts over
1948 of 146 per cent, led the second group. Polk's increase
in per capital sales of 84 per cent was also the largest for
this group of counties. Orange led in the number of paid
employees, having had 2,648 engaged in service trade
activities in 1954. The payroll in Orange for the entire
year amounted to $6.1 million. This payroll was an in-
crease of 82 per cent over that of 1948. The percentage
change in the number of paid employees in Orange was 29
per cent.
There were 25 counties with service trade receipts of
more than $1 million, and less than $10 million in 1954.
These counties combined had total receipts of $87.1 million
and accounted for 14 per cent of the total receipts in Florida.
Among this group, Monroe, St. Johns, and Bay had the
highest total receipts with respective amounts of $7.0 mil-
lion, $6.9 million, and $6.2 million. On the basis of receipts
per capital, St. Johns was first with $235, Lee second with
$198, and Martin third with $182. For some of the counties
information is not available for 1948, but for those counties
for which total receipts are given in both 1948 and 1954,
Okaloosa with a percentage increase of 654 per cent led
not only the counties in this group but all of the counties in
the state. Okaloosa also led all the counties in the per-
centage change in per capital receipts with a change of 297
per cent. Total receipts in this county in 1948 were $.7
million, while in 1954 they were $5.5 million. The other
two counties in this group with sizeable percentage changes
in total receipts in 1954 over 1948 were Monroe with 308 per
cent and Brevard with 202 per cent. Among this group there
were nine with payrolls in excess of $1 million. These
included Monroe, St. Johns, Bay, Lee, Leon, Okaloosa,
Alachua, Marion, and Manatee. St. Johns and Okaloosa
with payrolls of $1.7 million each were first, followed by Bay
with payrolls of $1.6 million. The three counties in this
group with the largest number of paid employees in 1954
were St. Johns with 837, Leon with 805, and Bay with 777.
The county showing the most rapid change between 1948
and 1954 in both payrolls and employees was Okaloosa with
a 936-per-cent increase in payrolls and a 272-per-cent in-
crease in number of paid employees. Such phenomenal in-
creases have probably been brought about by activities on
Eglin Field Military Reservation, the major portion of which
is located in Okaloosa. All of the counties for which data
were published showed increases in payrolls between 1948
and 1954. Although there were some declines in the number
of paid employees, most of the counties showed increases in
employment as well.


There were 31 counties with selected service trade re-
ceipts of less than $1 million in 1954. There were five of
these counties that closely approached $1 million with sales
ranging from over $750,000 almost up to $1 million. These
included Hernando, Citrus, Hendry, Walton, and Bradford.
There are only a few of these counties for which informa-
tion was published in 1948, thus it is not possible to
determine the changed status of counties in this group. The
three counties highest in receipts per capital were Charlotte
with $172, Citrus with $139, and Hendry with $138. The
per capital receipts of most of these counties fall considerably
below those for the counties with a large volume of service
trade. Payrolls in a few of these counties were above
$150,000; however, most of them fell below this mark. The
number of paid employees for those reported ranged from
a high of 115 down to 2. The three counties in this group
with the largest number of paid employees were Bradford
with 115, Walton with 108, and Hendry with 92.
Included in the foregoing discussion of counties are two,
Flagler and Gilchrist, for which 1954 information on total
receipts was withheld by the Census to avoid disclosure.
The two counties together, however, accounted for receipts
of a little over $1.6 million. Since receipts from other ser-
vices and automobile repairs totaled almost $1.6 million in
Flagler, this county falls within the group of counties in
which total receipts ranged between $1 million and $10
million. This leaves Gilchrist, with sales of less than $0.1
million, to fall in the group with sales below $1 million.

ToUmSM AND SERVICE TRADE RECEIPTS IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
It has been noted that service trade receipts in Florida
are much greater than in any of the other Southeastern
States primarily because of Florida's large tourist industry.
When Florida's service trade receipts in 1954 of $656.3
million are broken into broad categories, it may be seen
that the group composed of hotels, motels, tourist courts,
and camps accounts for 31 per cent of total receipts from
service trade. If receipts from amusement and recreation
services are added, the two groups together account for a
little over half of the total receipts. This relationship bears
out the attributed influence of tourist activity on service
trade receipts.
The Census reports offer two readily available ways to
examine the impact of tourist spending on service trade
receipts. The first is to examine the proportion of service
trade receipts obtained by those establishments important
in the tourist industry. The second method is to examine
the receipts of these establishments on a per capital basis.
An examination of hotels, motels, tourist courts, and camps
on the latter basis reveals that among the counties for which
this information is available, receipts in nine were in excess
of the state per capital of $57. The three leading counties
were Dade with $143, St. Johns with $133, and Palm Beach
with $106. In the remaining counties in this group per
capital receipts ranged from a high of $98 in Volusia down
to $69 in Monroe. In terms of the percentage of service
trade receipts of these establishments, St. Johns was high
with 56 per cent. In Dade, the leading county in per capital
returns from hotels, motels, tourist courts, and camps, 37
per cent of service trade receipts came from this source.


-46-







Receipts per capital of $38 or more from amusement and
recreation services were received in six counties. With the
exception of Duval and Marion these are the counties in
which per capital receipts from hotels, motels, tourist courts,
and camps also were highest. The three counties leading
in receipts per capital from amusement and recreation serv-
ices were Sarasota with $211, Broward with $65, and Dade
with $62. (Although there is no detail to support the
assumption, it is reasonable to assume that the very high
receipts per capital in Sarasota County are due to the activi-
ties of the circus which winters there.) In proportion of
service trade receipts from amusement and recreation serv-
ices, Sarasota County again led with 50 per cent.


With the exception of Marion, each county having had
high per capital receipts from the establishments important
in the tourist industry is a coastal county, and the majority
are in Central and South Florida. On the Atlantic Coast,
from north to south are Duval, St. Johns, Volusia, Palm
Beach, Broward, and Dade. Monroe, which takes in the
Florida Keys, is on both the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.
Located on the Gulf Coast are Lee, Sarasota, Pinellas, and
Hillsborough. All of these counties lie within important
tourist areas of the state where it would be expected that
the receipts from hotels, motels, tourist courts, and camps
and from recreational facilities would be important com-
ponents of the service trade receipts.


-47-








TABLE 32.--SELECTED SERVICES: ESTABLISHMENTS AND RECEIPTS, BY MAJOR GROUP, IN THE UNITED STATES, FLORIDA, OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954.

Number of Establishments Amount of Receipts (dollar figures are in thousands)
Total By major group Total By Major Group
Automobile repair e ercsb Total
Auto- Personal services services, garages All other selected serviceb Receipts
Percentage mobile All other Percentage per
State change,a Number Personal repair selected Amount change,a Percentage Percentage Percentage Capita
1948 to services services, serviceSb 1948 to change,- change,a change,a
1954 garages 1954 Amount 1948 to Amount 1948 to Amount 1948 to
1954 1954 1954

United States -....___ 18 785,589 348,843 94,342 342,404 $23,487,419 77 $ 5,772,869 30 $ 2,222,672 42 $15,491,878 112 $146
Florida --.----- ---- ------ 59 23,284 7,676 2,402 13,206 $ 656,281 99 $ 132,726 57 $ 65,711 99 $ 457,844 115 $186
Other Southeastern States
Alabama -........ 9 8,882 4,299 1,226 3,357 $ 180,974 43 $ 62,558 21 $ 24,334 22 $ 94,082 71 $ 58
Georgia ._ .... 14 12,109 5,627 1,762 4,720 318,561 72 96,311 33 37,319 40 184,931 116 87
Kentucky--- --- 13 9,181 4,170 1,143 3,174 211,998 49 73,713 29 24,218 25 114,067 75 71
Mississippi --._ ......____ 5 5,260 2,483 598 2,179 101,656 42 37,454 25 10,011 24 54,191 61 46
North Carolina ...--____. 25 14,244 6,546 2,096 5,602 306,542 67 111,077 32 37,893 62 157,572 106 72
South Carolina ----.------. 18 6,432 2,967 1,036 2,429 123,440 51 47,620 29 17,717 40 58,103 81 55
Tennessee ... ... 16 11,068 4,848 1,463 4,757 286,217 61 89,537 21 31,766 36 164,914 104 85
Virginia -------------------........... 23 11,872 5,425 1,437 5,010 287,783 51 100,184 33 31,881 30 155,718 71 80
Selected Vacation States
Arizona ............._ 59 5,606 1,782 746 3,078 $ 120,506 81 $ 30,206 54 $ 14,805 101 $ 75,495 91 $121
California __-...____. 34 77,862 30,964 10,528 36,370 2,497,975 87 548,355 41 274,357 50 1,675,263 119 199
Nevada --.........- 58 1,878 496 172 1,210 172,140 158 12,170 96 5,651 96 154,319 167 790

[ Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954 and U. S. Census of Business, 1948.
Sa Although the 1948 figures used in computing percentage changes have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages are deemed adequate to show approximate changes
o over the period. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
b Includes business services, miscellaneous repair services, amusement and recreation services, motion pictures, hotels, tourist courts, motels, and camps.







TABLE 33.-SELECTED SERVICES: ESTABLISHMENTS, BY KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUP, AND PAYROLLS, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954
Number of Establishments
Payroll, Entire Year
Total By kind-of-business group

Business
Percentage services Hotels, County Percent-
State and County County of total (exclud- Auto- Amuse- motels, total Total age
as a per- number Personal ing ac- mobile Miscel- meant, tourist as a amount changes
centage Number with services counting, repair laneous recrea- courts, percent- (in thou- in total,
of state payrolls auditing, services, repairs, tional and age of sands of 1948 to
book- garages services services camps state dollars) 1954
keeping) total

State -------------- 100.0 23,284 48 7,676 2,513 2,402 3,055 2,461 5,177 100.0 $169,573 80
Alachua ------.... 1.0 235 56 89 18 28 34 21 45 .7 1,262 n.a.
Baker ----.-..-... .1 16 50 8 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 26 n.a.
Bay .--------.-------.. 1.3 299 54 78 17 40 30 42 92 .9 1,598 n.a.
Bradford ------- .2 41 71 14 n.a. 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 194 n.a.
Brevard .. 1.4 315 44 84 20 20 35 22 134 .5 928 147
Broward ----- 5.4 1,259 49 416 170 115 157 114 287 5.5 9,358 n.a.
Calhoun .---.-- .1 27 63 11 n.a. 2 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 49 n.a.
Charlotte ----.... .2 51 45 17 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 130 n.a.
Citrus ------. .3 74 49 14 n.a. 1 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 125 11
Clay ..--------------.................-.. .2 53 43 19 n.a. 6 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 251 n.a.
Collier ...........-- .4 86 44 14 n.a. 8 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 399 198
Columbia ----.... .4 83 54 25 n.a. 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 394 18
Dade ---...--- ... 24.8 5,778 52 2,059 806 510 806 659 938 40.7 69,032 92
De Soto --- -.-- .1 27 70 14 n.a. ..... n.a. n.a. n.a. 80 n.a.
Dixie ----..----..------ .1 26 54 7 n.a. 3 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 129 n.a.
Duval --- -------------- 7.5 1,739 55 689 224 220 272 164 170 9.2 15,615 41
Escambia .------------ 2.1 488 57 198 40 63 66 47 74 2.2 3,685 n.a.
Flagler _---------- .1 28 21 3 n.a. 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Franklin ---------. .2 37 51 7 n.a. 1 n.a. n.a. n.a. 67 n.a.
Gadsden ------. .4 87 49 40 n.a. 10 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 275 n.a.
Gilchrist ---- -- .1 18 11 5 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Glades --.-.--- 10 40 2 n.a. --- n.a. n.a. n.a. 13 n.a.
Gulf --------------- .1 23 91 9 n.a. 2 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 108 n.a.
Hamilton ------------ .1 22 64 9 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 104 n.a.
Hardee ...---------.. .3 63 37 25 n.a. 6 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 94 n.a.
Hendry .-------- .2 45 51 13 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 158 n.a.
Hernando .2 57 40 12 n.a. 10 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 148 n.a.
Highlands -------- .4 104 44 26 n.a. 8 n.a. n.a. n.a. .3 438 23
Hillsborough ......---.. 8.0 1,872 44 657 183 275 268 248 241 7.2 12,292 71
Holmes --------------- .1 19 68 9 n.a. --- n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 54 n.a.
Indian River ........--- .5 128 39 24 n.a. 24 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 371 n.a.
Jackson .------- .4 99 54 47 n.a. 11 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 338 n.a.
Jefferson ----.. .1 32 38 5 n.a. 7 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 53 n.a.
Lafayette 11 9 9 n.a. --- n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Lake ------- 1.2 270 47 71 25 27 39 20 88 .5 852 44
Lee ------------ 1.4 317 44 66 20 30 37 44 120 .8 1,351 74
Leon ---------- 1.0 237 54 87 37 23 38 17 35 .9 1,508 67
Levy -- - --. .2 50 32 11 n.a. 6 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 53 21
Liberty 11 9 ..... n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Madison -- .2 35 60 11 n.a. 6 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 79 n.a.
Manatee -------- 1.5 340 42 96 27 38 40 26 113 .6 1,053 n.a.
Marion ---__-- 1.2 287 49 75 15 26 40 36 95 .9 1,463 82
Martin -------- .4 94 38 23 n.a. 8 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 361 n.a.
Monroe ------ 1.4 322 39 68 10 20 30 72 122 .9 1,457 260
Nassau ...-..........-.. .3 59 49 20 n.a. 3 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 108 61
Okaloosa ------------- .6 151 43 52 n.a. 10 n.a. n.a. n.a. 1.0 1,741 936
Okeechobee ...- .1 24 50 4 n.a. 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. 52 n.a.
Orange .-__ ... 4.3 1,012 50 350 136 146 144 84 152 3.6 6,084 82
Osceola -- ---_ .3 80 40 36 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 129 n.a.
Palm Beach -- ... 5.1 1,195 48 410 133 108 143 121 280 5.2 8,757 73
Pasco - .7 161 35 57 n.a. 20 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 211 58
Pinellas -------------- 8.8 2,057 44 616 237 167 259 154 624 5.8 9,851 71
Polk --------------- 3.3 774 51 265 89 111 96 67 146 2.1 3,482 61
Putnam -- .5 125 46 41 n.a. 14 n.a. n.a. n.a. .2 402 60
St. Johns - 1.0 232 52 50 14 17 34 21 96 1.0 1,733 n.a.
St. Lucie -_ .8 177 44 55 n.a. 21 n.a. n.a. n.a. .4 712 71
Santa Rosa --... .2 52 38 15 n.a. 8 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 78 n.a.
Sarasota -- --- 2.3 542 44 137 40 40 63 67 195 2.6 4,341 48
Seminole ......-- .6 149 38 45 n.a. 27 n.a. n.a. n.a. .4 634 n.a.
Sumter -- -- .2 40 25 17 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. 42 16
Suwannee -..-.- .2 54 44 25 n.a. 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 125 n.a.
Taylor .... .......-.. .2 58 48 15 n.a. 3 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 179 n.a.
Union ------- 8 50 5 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 5 25
Volusia --- --- 4.4 1,025 46 260 67 91 127 81 399 2.5 4,318 67
Wakulla .....-..___ .1 15 33 5 n.a. 3 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 20 n.a.
Walton ........------- .2 52 46 21 n.a. 4 n.a. n.a. n.a. .1 168 n.a.
Washington ---..... .1 27 56 9 n.a. 2 n.a. n.a. n.a. 0 46 n.a.

Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census ol Business, 1948.
a Although the 1948 figures have not been revised by the Bureau of the Census to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages computed on this basis are deemed
adequate to show approximate changes between 1948 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
0 Less than one-tenth of one per cent.
n.a. Not available.
... Zero.


-49-







TABLE 34.-SELECTED SERVICES: RECEIPTS, BY KIND-oF-BusINESS Gnour, AND PERSONNEL IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954
Amount of Receipts (dollar figures are in thousands) Paid Employees
By kind-of-business group Receipts per Capita (work week ended
Total nearest Nov. 15) Number
Automobile repair All other selected of Propri-
Personal services services, garages serviceSb etors (un-
State and incorpor-
County County Percent- Perent- Percent- ated
as per- age Percent- Percent- Percent- age age busi-
centage change,* age age age Total change," Total change," nesses
state Amount 194t Amount change,a Amount change,. Amount change,' amount 1948 number 1948 only)
to 1954 1948 1948 1948 to 1954 to 1954
to 1954 to 1954 to 1954

State -------- 100.00 $656,281 99 $132,726 57 $65,711 99 $457,844 115 $ 186 46 68,214 30 23,661
Alachua .80 5,249 n.a. 1,807 12 879 126 2,563 n.a. 90 n.a. 726 n.a. 231
Baker .03 185 n.a. 47 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 27 n.a. 19 n.a. 14
Bay .95 6,245 113 1,649 55 1,056 371 3,540 116 112 47 777 40 301
Bradford .12 787 n.a. 294 70 75 n.a. 418 n.a. 68 n.a. 115 n.a. 38
Brevard -- .72 4,700 202 1,317 186 251 57 3,132 234 99 41 458 62 337
Broward 5.99 39,344 n.a. 6,810 146 3,061 177 29,473 n.a. 261 n.a. 3,117 n.a. 1,304
Calhoun --- .05 342 n.a. 63 16 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 46 n.a. 40 n.a. 32
Charlotte --_ .11 738 n.a. 129 119 78 n.a. 531 n.a. 172 n.a. 42 n.a. 55
Citrus -o.---- .13 821 24 117 80 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 139 28 75 34 81
Clay ...-- .. -- 16 1,077 n.a. 116 41 156 103 805 n.a. 63 n.a. 179 n.a. 56
Collier --------- .27 1,773 197 135 n.a. 103 36 1,535 n.a. 163 70 145 81 86
Columbia .24 1,592 20 577 9 88 n.a. 927 n.a. 81 9 219 15 94
Dade -.--.--- 37.94 248,977 100 38,676 46 24,127 117 186,174 115 388 41 23,878 43 5,669
De Soto 05 335 n.a. 158 21 .-- -100 177 n.a. 38 n.a. 48 n.a. 28
Dixie .... .06 406 n.a. 40 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 110 n.a. 62 n.a. 24
Duval 8.88 58,282 82 15,587 39 6,700 46 35,995 122 154 38 7,391 8 1,701
Escambia 1.90 12,445 n.a. 4,386 65 1,383 72 6,676 n.a. 83 n.a. 1,870 n.a. 491
F lagler n.a. n.a. n.a. 22 n.a. n.a. n.a. 1,393 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Franklin .08 515 n.a. 67 91 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 94 n.a. 41 n.a. 32
Gadsden .18 1,202 n.a. 550 38 73 265 579 n.a. 36 n.a. 158 n.a. 96
Gilchrist n.a. n.a. n.a. 22 22 14 .a. n.a n.a. n.a n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Glades .02 105 n.a. n.a. n.a .a na 44 na 13 n.a. 15
Gulf e.--- .08 528 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n75 n.a. 22
Hamilton .06 420 n.a. 172 48 36 n.a. 212 n.a. 46 n.a. 58 n.a. 28
Hardee .11 715 n.a. 175 23 79 80 461 n.a. 63 n.a. 49 n.a. 64
Hendry .12 800 n.a. 152 334 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 138 n.a. 92 n.a. 47
Hernando -- .14 895 n.a 111 63 275 958 509 n.a. 113 n.a. 86 n.a. 63
highlands .31 2,061 52 270 1 301 143 1,490 55 137 29 183 24 115
Hillsborough 6.72 44,095 82 10,781 59 6,725 96 26,589 91 141 38 4,970 9 1,895
Holmes .05 309 n.a. 117 102 -100 192 n.a. 24 n.a. 37 n.a. 17
ndian River .27 1,783 n.a. 361 79 267 n.a. 1,.a. 213 n.a. 131
Jefferson --- .05 332 n.a. 62 16 53 n.a. 217 n.a. 34 n.a. 28 n.a. 31
Lafayette 29 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 9 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Lake __ .59 3,869 59 94 25 497 2 2,468 n.a. 87 23 402 1 297
Lee ----- .90 5,929 121 1,306 63 581 81 4,042 159 198 64 561 31 331
Leon -- .89 5,815 84 1,870 44 759 236 3,186 95 101 53 805 19 229
Levy .08 513 26 111 26 62 58 340 n.a. 52 41 39 33 51
Liberty .02 102 n.a. -100 .- -100 102 n.a. 41 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.
Madison .07 434 n.a. 98 17 80 26 256 n.a. 30 n.a. 63 n.a. 31
Manatee .74 4,881 n.a. 1,349 67 547 84 2,985 n.a. 114 n.a. 556 n.a. 351
Marioni 1.01 6,600 86 1,081 39 465 48 5,054 105 154 59 806 51 297
Martin 2.. 25 1,656 n.a. 246 86 58 n.a. 1,352 n.a. 182 n.a. 186 n.a. 100
Monroe 1.06 6,955 308 1,268 261 334 n.a. 5,353 n.a. 147 130 602 125 310
Nassau .11 745 182 187 n.a. 48 n.a. 510 262 51 143 90 58 67
Okaloosa 84 5,497 654 871 150 269 1,181 4,357 1,114 119 297 521 272 166
Okeechobee .05 296 n.a. 14 128 73 154 n.a. 74 n.a. 23 n.a. 25
Orange .. 3.43 22,508 105 6,501 60 4,517 143 11,490 127 127 22 2,648 29 1,040
Osceola .10 675 n.a. 269 48 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 54 n.a. 81 n.a. 75
Palm Beach 5.20 34,154 88 6,738 80 1,997 88 25,419 91 225 34 3,340 50 1,217
Pasco .19 1,262 81 334 58 188 7 740 161 50 39 125 32 173
Pinellas 6.18 40,540 85 9,671 78 2,796 87 28,073 87 194 35 4,393 20 2,151
Polk ------ 2.81 18,450 146 4,211 51 2,580 104 11,659 239 118 84 1,764 24 799
Putnam .29 1,884 87 580 21 212 141 1,092 n.a. 68 51 224 18 129
St. Johns 1.05 6,876 n.a. 1,242 73 280 109 5,354 n.a. 235 n.a. 837 n.a. 233
St. Lucie .44 2,885 95 849 50 259 11 1,777 161 110 38 325 37 184
Santa Rosa .08 521 n.a. 229 106 54 48 238 n.a. 24 n.a. 58 n.a. 65
Sarasota ---- 2.47 16,239 57 2,172 48 774 170 13,293 55 419 5 1,853 11 546
Seminole .46 3,023 n.a. 514 15 347 55 2,162 n.a. 92 na. 234 n.a. 152
Sumter ... .06 363 29 79 5 20 -57 264 66 34 36 35 27 43
Suwannee ..10 657 n.a. 389 151 38 51 230 n.a. 42 n.a. 90 n.a. 57
Taylor ...-- .18 1,213 n.a. 136 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 99 n.a. 103 n.a. 63
Union 23 48 16 --- ---- -100 7 n.a. 4 -33 2 50 6
Volusia 3.09 20,257 108 3,581 78 1,203 100 15,473 117 231 66 1,809 16 1,102
Wakulla ..02 163 n.a. 18 350 25 178 120 n.a. 33 n.a. 3 n.a. 16
Walton ------ .12 797 n.a. 238 24 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 55 n.a. 108 n.a. 54
Washington -- .04 277 n.a. 76 3 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. 26 n.a. 38. n.a. 23
Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954 and U. S. Census of Business, 1948; see source note to table 18 for
source of county population figures used in computing per capital receipts.
Although the 1948 figures used in computing precentage changes have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the per-
centages are deemed adequate to show approximate changes over the period. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
b Includes business services, miscellaneous repair services, amusement and recreation services, motion pictures, hotels, tourist courts, motels and camps.
n.a. Not available.
.___ Zero.
Less than one-hundredth of one per cent.
t None in 1948.




TABLE 35.--SELECTED SERVICEs: EsTABLIsHMENTS, RECEIPTS, PAYROLLS, AND PERSONNEL, BY KIND OF BUSINEss, IN FLORIDA, 1954


Kind of Business



TOTAL
Personal Services
Total -
Barber, beauty shops ---------- --
Funeral service, crematories ---- ---
Photographic studios (including commercial photography)-_
Shoe repair shops, shoeshine parlors, hat cleaning shops-
Cleaning, pressing, dyeing, garment repair
Laundries, laundry services ..........---.
Miscellaneous personal services .....--- -------- -- ----
Business Services (exc. Accounting, Auditing, Bookkeeping)
Total
Advertising -- ------------ ------------
Consumer, mercantile credit; adjustment, collection agencies-
Private employment agencies ....-.....----------
News syndicates -------- -- -----
Duplicating, addressing, mailing, stenographic services ......---
Blueprinting, photocopying services .....
Services to dwelling, other buildings ------ ------....... ....
Business services, not otherwise classified ----
Automobile Repair Services, Garages
Total ---- --------------
Automobile repair -------
Automobile storage, parking ......... ....-..----
Automobile, truck rentals (without drivers) .........------
Automobile services (except repair) -
Miscellaneous Repair Services
Total
Watch, clock, jewelry repair ---_---------
Upholstery, furniture repair -.. .. ----------.
Electrical repair shops
Blacksmith shops
Miscellaneous repair shops
Amusement, Recreational Services (inc. Motion Pictures)
Total ...........---- -------- ----. .
Motion picture theaters ---
Motion picture production, distribution, services .......
Billiard and pool parlors, bowling alleys ----- ------ --
Race track operation (including racing stables) --------
Sports promoters, commercial operators ----.-- .
Theatrical presentations and services ...- .......--
Bands, orchestras, entertainers -- ....--. -----------------
Dance halls, studios, schools (exc. children's, professional) ----
Membership golf, country clubs ....--------......------ ---- -
Amusement, recreation services, not otherwise classified _-...
Hotels, Motels, Tourist Courts, Camps
Total ... ..... .-- -- . . . .. .
Hotels -- ------ --- --
Motels, tourist courts, trailer parks
Sporting, recreational camps -------- --------------


Number of Establishments Amount of Receipts Payroll, Entire Year Paid Employees
S(work week ended Average Numaber
As a per- nearest Nov. 15) Weekly of Iro-
Percent- Percent- centage Wages & prietors
Kind of age Kind of Total age Total of total Salaries of Uain-
business as Total With change,a business amount change,a amount receipts of Kind of (work corpor-
percentage number payroll m total, as per- (in thou- in total, (in thou- establish- Total business week ated
of total number, centage sands of 1948 to sands of ments number as a per- ended Busi-
1948 to of total dollars) 1954 dollars) with centage of nearest nesses
1954 payrolls total Nov. 15)


100.0


33.1
15.5
1.2
2.0
2.0
7.4
3.7
1.3

10.8
.9
.4
.4
0
.9
.1
1.5
6.5

10.2
8.4
.9
.5
.4

13.1
1.8
1.6
4.0
.2
5.5

10.6
2.0
.1
1.1
.6
1.6
.2
1.0
.3
.2
3.5

22.2
6.3
14.3
1.6


23,284

7,676
3,591
275
467
455
1,725
859
304

2,513
209
94
96
9
214
27
351
1,513

2,402
1,961
217
126
98

3,055
425
374
933
40
1,283

2,461
461
29
267
129
363
42
235
71
55
809

5,177
1,464
3,339
374


11,292

4,222
2,121
207
155
177
871
607
84

983
99
56
60
1
60
19
189
499

1,182
935
117
84
46

939
77
142
245
4
471

1,327
441
19
121
67
115
22
157
49
53
283

2,639
1,146
1,399
94


n.a.
35.2
25.0
75.6
- 17.7
43.2
63.6
210.2

n.a.
n.a.
118.6
71.4
n.a.
412.8
n.a.
338.8
n.a.

n.a.
23.7
60.7
110.0
366.7

n.a.
42.1
106.6
n.a.
166.7
133.3

n.a.
28.1
600.0
- 13.0
n.a.
77.1
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
334.9

n.a.
8.0
160.2
n.a.


20.1
4.4
2.2
.9
.6
4.6
7.1
.3

10.3
3.4
.4
.2
*
.4
.2
1.1
4.6

9.9
5.9
.9
2.9
.2

8.8
.4
.7
2.0
*
5.7

20.3
6.4
1.6
.5
4.9
1.2
.2
.4
.3
1.1
3.7

30.6
22.5
7.5
.6


132,726
28,895
14,467
6,100
4,198
30,360
46,867
1,839

67,185
22,213
2,757
1,181
142
2,598
991
7,355
29,948

65,711
39,005
6,165
19,131
1,410

57,584
2,473
4,417
13,028
306
37,360

132,728
41,877
10,719
2,961
31,866
7,901
1,003
2,741
2,052
7,464
24,144

200,347
147,081
49,456
3,810


n.a.
70.7
48.8
111.7
15.8
51.5
n.a.
203.5

n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
205.2
n.a.
527.4
n.a.
284.9
n.a.

n.a.
43.3
202.4
445.7
584.5

n.a.
36.1
151.4
n.a.
157.1
211.6

n.a.
53.1
923.5
26.3
n.a.
106.9
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
90.1

n.a.
47.4
338.3
n.a.


46,377
10,166
3,072
1,014
723
10,826
20,287
289

17,674
3,255
1,752
389
n.a.
702
n.a.
3,038
8,302

13,640
9,018
1,492
2,732
398

17,118
282
1,001
2,187
20
13,628

28,576
7,764
740
588
7,102
2,033
283
1,308
664
2,501
5,593

46,188
39,316
6,529
343


40
42
23
23
27
41
45
32

31
15
67
41
n.a.
38
n.a.
46
36

23
27
27
15
35

37
27
31
25
21
41

23
19
7
28
23
32
n.a.
61
35
n.a.
27

25
27
17
17


21,932
4,341
982
425
341
5,662
10,038
143

5,996
829
662
194
n.a.
286
n.a.
1,060
2,867

4,508
2,857
690
716
245

4,658
107
474
773
12
3,292

10,014
4,421
216
491
690
358
108
417
376
915
2,022

21,106
17,483
3,458
165


n.a.


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
* Change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
* Less than one-tenth of one per cent.


32.2
6.4
1.4
.6
.5
8.3
14.8
.2

8.8
1.2
1.0
.3
n.a.
.4
n.a.
1.6
4.2

6.6
4.2
1.0
1.0
.4

6.8
.2
.7
1.1
0
4.8

14.7
6.5
.3
.7
1.0
.5
.2
.6
.6
1.3
3.0

30.9
25.6
5.1
.2


01 0.0 $656,281 n.a. $169,578 29 68,214 100.0


$47.98 23,661

41.92 7,902
48.18 3,625
61.23 264
52.06 475
42.54 463
40.00 1,853
37.95 901
46.56 321

64.84 2,434
85.26 182
62.42 82
49.74 83
n.a. n.a.
59.69 220
n.a. n.a.
60.85 347
62.41 1,516

61.03 2,511
61.38 2,131
48.95 2C2
79.21 71
34.18 107

72.22 3,22)
52.43 42$
55.72 400
63.26 1,02q
48.22 31
77.35 1,33(

48.91 2,183
36.72 171
64.66 14
29.22 304
79.95 111
51.15 350
71.84 30
67.41 238
48.13 88
60.13 9
54.00 862

41.02 5,372
41.95 1,248
36.16 3,694
39.51 430










TABLE 36.-SELECTED SERVICES: HOTELS, MOTELS, TOURIST COURTS, AND CAMPS, AND AMUSEMENTS IN FLORIDA COUNTIES AND CITIES WITH 200 SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS OR MOIE, 1954

______ Hotels, Motels, Tourist Courts, and Camps Amusement, Recreation Services (including Notion Pictures)


Number of establishments


Florida ---------...... 5,177 1,464
Alachua ..-------------- 45 14
Bay -..............----------------- 92 12
Panama City ...... 52 9
Brevard ---------------.... 134 17
Broward --.. ...... 287 81
Ft. Lauderdale -- 98 36
Hollywood ------... 82 30
Dade --- ......... 938 587
Coral Gables --. 17 11
Hialeah -- -------- 21 7
Miami -------------........... 355 193
Miami Beach -----. 370 336
Duval ......-- ...... 170 48
Jacksonville -.... 100 43
Escambia ---.----... 74 7
Pensacola --...... 49 6
Hillsborough --.- 241 36
Tampa -.........------- 194 32
Lake ----------------------- 88 21
Lee ----------------............. 120 26
Ft. Myers ---- 69 10
Leon -........ ...... 35 7
Tallahassee --... 25 6
Manatee -- -- 113 9
Bradenton --.... 67 7
Marion -------------------- 95 6
Monroe ------------------- 122 12
Orange ---.- ......... 152 27
Orlando .............. 67 25
Palm Beach ---..... 280 77
West Palm Beach 62 25
Pinellas -- -..... 624 214
Clearwater -.....- 109 20
St. Petersburg ....- 337 153
Polk -- ............ 146 26
Lakeland ...... 33 8
St. Johns -..------------........ 96 16
Sarasota ...............-------------- 195 33
Sarasota -....-...... 143 25
Volusia -------------------........ 399 55
Daytona Beach -. 208 41


Receipts (dollar figures are in thousands)


State, County,
and City


Payroll,
entire
year
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


Number
of paid
em-
ployees
(work
week
ended
nearest
Nov.
15)


15) only
only
I. I I- I I- I- -I I I


Percentage change,* 1948 t


In re-
ceipts
by
hotels
only


In re-
ceipts by
motels,
tourist
courts,
trailer
parks,
camps
only


In total
pay-
rolls


$147,081 $53,266 1 $ 57


Total Hotels


877


21,106 47


Motels,
tourist
courts,
trailer
parks,
camps


Total
As a
percent-
age of
receipts Amount
from all
service
trades

31 $200,347
17 887
26 1,625
20 1,041
40 1,882
35 13,886
35 6,448
60 4,806
37 91,748
4 423
n.a. n.a.
14 15,165
76 62,596
13 7,840
12 6,369
15 1,850
15 1,584
10 4,634
11 4,242
33 1,264
40 2,373
27 1,199
25 1,451
23 1,205
28 1,368
27 954
27 1,802
47 3,245
14 3,195
13 2,176
47 16,040
15 1,794
36 14,573
35 2,162
29 7,568
15 2,693
7 689
56 3,876
21 3,436
17 2,438
42 8,600
42 4,627


3,713
31
80
43
117
206
62
52
351
6
14
162
34
122
57
67
43
205
162
67
94
59
28
19
104
60
89
110
125
42
203
37
410
89
184
120
25
80
162
118
344
167


$46,188
167
364
257
307
3,059
1,549
997
23,040
87
n.a.
4,005
15,887
1,945
1,735
533
486
1,174
n.a.
241
446
183
353
316
217
n.a.
366
599
751
617
3,883
417
3,142
432
1,646
523
161
1,014
586
380
1,488
877


n.a.
37
n.a.
81
n.a.
141
n.a.
65
10
n.a.
14
73
- 11
- 7
n.a.
n.a.
8
10
31
53
67
39
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
- 16
130
2
n.a.
49
32
28
68
6
18
25
n.a.
39
49
29
8


335
358
148
n.a.
349
292
n.a.
n.a.
567
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
165
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
220
n.a.
291
368
n.a.
116
n.a.
314
n.a.
519
890
246
n.a.
152
n.a.
240
n.a.
n.a.
734
n.a.
285
347
n.a.
245


By
hotels
only


By
motels,
tourist
courts,
trailer
parks,
camps
only


As a
per-
cent-
age of
receipts
rom all
service
trades


20 $132,728 $ 38


Total receipts



Amount
(in thou- Per
sands of capital
dollars)


Total
receipts
per
capital


147
201
161
152
1,201
660
348
9,503
37
n.a.
1,970
6,503
1,352
1,230
308
277
772
n.a.
75
179
105
219
191
143
n.a.
215
275
454
342
1,561
224
1,476
227
874
282
97
486
257
161
726
455


383
808
645
755
10,926
5,598
n.a.
79,997
183
n.a.
12,279
60,652
5,606
5,393
n.a.
n.a.
3,163
3,114
650
1,208
448
854
n.a.
444
n.a.
334
1,235
1,849
n.a.
13,989
1,344
10,032
1,367
5,497
1,084
472
2,469
1,445
1,176
4,110
2,559


71
n.a.
72
n.a.
96
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
94
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
- 5
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
28
n.a.
91
59
n.a.
59
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
147
294
28
n.a.
37
n.a.
61
n.a.
n.a.
101
n.a.
n.a.
73
n.a.
35


8 n.a. n.a.


504
817
396
1,127
2,960
850
n.a.
11,751
240
119
2,886
1,944
2,234
976
n.a.
n.a.
1,471
1,128
614
1,165
751
597
n.a.
924
n.a.
1,468
2,010
1,346
n.a.
2,051
450
4,541
795
2,071
1,609
217
1,407
1,991
1,262
4,490
2,068


15
29
n.a.
40
92
n.a.
n.a.
143
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
21
n.a.
12
n.a.
15
n.a.
28
79
n.a.
25
n.a.
32
n.a.
42
69
18
n.a.
106
n.a.
70
n.a.
n.a.
17
n.a.
133
89
n.a.
98
n.a.


n.a. n.a.


Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954, and U. S. Census of Business, 1948; see source note to Table 18 for source of county population figures used in computing per capital
receipts.
a Although the 1948 figures used in computing percentage changes have not been revised by the Census Bureau to the basis of the 1954 Census, the percentages are deemed adequate to show approximate changes over the
period. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.


o 1954


In total I
number
of paid
em-
ployees



25
n.a.
42
n.a.
14
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
52
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
26
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
12
n.a.
15
49
n.a.
18
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
81
113
10
n.a.
39
n.a.
13
n.a.
n.a.
16
n.a.
n.a.
35
n.a.
2
n.a.


Number
of
estab-
lish-
ments f



2,461
21
42
28
22
114
44
26
659
28
25
347
148
164
123
47
33
248
202
20
44
20
17
15
26
10
36
72
84
45
121
39
154
20
84
67
22
21
67
51
81
50


Percentage
change,a
1948 to 1954


In In
total receipts
receipts per
capital


86 41

23 13
103 33
n.a. n.a.
296 80
108 3
87 n.a.
29 n.a.
73 22
732 n.a.
n.a. n.a.
42 n.a.
93 n.a.
278 175
278 n.a.
62 18
72 n.a.
56 16
64 n.a.
57 20
122 65
66 n.a.
84 50
n.a. n.a.
164 110
29 n.a.
36 18
443 218
112 27
36 n.a.
168 94
117 n.a.
64 15
2 n.a.
52 n.a.
64 29
46 n.a.
139 100
1 33
2 n.a.
n.a. n.a.
115 n.a.


18 968
18 1,135
17 891
18 847
25 9,840
8 1,562
6 444
16 40,110
50 6,021
n.a. n.a.
16 17,226
8 6,620
29 16,837
28 14,866
24 2,961
23 2,427
26 11,399
23 9,304
14 538
14 837
13 565
15 860
n.a. n.a.
19 907
11 374
34 2,272
24 1,639
15 3,385
12 1,900
15 5,235
18 2,107
16 6,436
12 748
17 4,491
15 2,736
9 867
13 873
50 8,185
57 7,924
23 4,669
20 2,222


13
20
n.a.
18
65
n.a.
n.a.
62
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
44
n.a.
20
n.a.
36
n.a.
12
28
n.a.
15
n.a.
21
n.a.
53
35
19
n.a.
35
n.a.
31
n.a.
n.a.
18
n.a.
30
211
n.a.
53
n.a.


















TABLE 37.-SELECTED SERVICES: HOTELS, MOTELS, TOURIST COURTS, TRAILER PARKS, AND SPORTING AND RECREATIONAL CAMPS
IN THE UNITED STATES, FLORIDA, OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES, AND SELECTED VACATION STATES, 1954


Number of Establishments


Hotels Motels and tourist
courts
Percent-
age Percent-
Total change,* Total age
number 1948 to number change,a
1954 1948 to
1954


United States ..- 24,778 15
Florida --- __ 1,464 8


1 Other Southeastern
.5 States
I Alabama ------....
Georgia -___-
Kentucky ----
Mississippi --------
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee ----
Virginia ----
Selected Vacation
States
Arizona --------
California -__-.-
Nevada _---------


177
272
238
160
304
169
292
354


226
2,922
166


- 17
- 21
- 23
- 16
- 25
- 14
- 10
- 21


29,432
2,778


257
500
384
235
605
298
556
620


26
95


55
57
73
58
102
65
54
94


- 15 781 11
- 18 3,136 -15
8 350 26


Total
number
of
trailer
parks


4,360
561


26
60
39
14
25
33
35
60


168
856
78


Total
number
of
sporting
and rec-
reational
camps


TABL 37 SE~t ED SRVIES:HOTLS, OTES, OURSTmounTS of mRecit (PolKS, figuSeO arei huands I aOLCMS
!N T U~rED TATE, FLnlDA OTHR SOTHEATEB_ STAES, ND SLECTD VAATIO STE,15


By hotels


Total


Amount


As a per-
centage
of the
United
States


Percent-
age
change,a
1948 to
1954


By motels and tourist courts


Total
As a per-
centage
Amount of the
United
States


Percent-
age
change,a
1948 to
1954


By trailer
parks


1* 1- I- -1 -I I- -I-


8,392 $2,404,541 100.0
374 147,081 6.1


13,751
29,282
20,010
10,949
22,386
8,801
23,085
32,688


16,423
224,144
48,844


.6
1.2
.8
.5
.9
.4
1.0
1.4


.7
9.3
2.0


11 $457,065 100.0 134 $48,273
47 43,122 9.4 252 6,334


4
17
4
- 4
2
- 9
- 2
2


5,989
11,585
7,901
6,145
10,027
6,622
10,690
14,238


1.3
2.5
1.7
1.3
2.2
1.4
2.3
3.1


198
276
303
279
324
340
187
233


12 12,220 2.7 77
9 55,023 12.0 60
138 10,398 2.3 164


197
494
468
49
224
232
242
990


1,081
10,000
1,343


By sport-
ing and
recrea-
tional
camps



$117,032
3,810


777
751
597
247
2,002
103
921
493


1,727
7,730
368


Number of Paid Employees,
Work Week Ended Nearest Nov. 15


Motels Sporting
and Trailer and rec-
Hotels tourist parks rational
courts camps


377,230 36,015 2,077 5,030
17,483 3,080 378 165


3,266 687 11 23
6,010 1,294 32 57
4,282 761 17 52
2,397 n.a. n.a. 8
4,636 919 5 90
2,039 692 11 7
5,742 1,041 10 62
6,696 1,337 40 24


2,464 1,007 47 187
31,816 3,834 503 343
4,945 659 60 18


Source: Basic material is from the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Business, 1954.
a The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.





PART SIX


MANUFACTURING IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
CARTER C. OSTERBIND, Research Professor
FELIX MUEHLNER, Associate Research Professor
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH


A MONG the Census reports the one that perhaps holds
the greatest interest for many Floridians is the report on
manufactures in Florida. When the 1954 results in Florida
and the nation are compared with those reported in the
Census of 1947, the recent remarkable development in Flor-
ida's manufactures is evident. While during the seven-year
period the number of manufacturing employees increased
13 per cent in the nation, the increase in Florida was 57 per
cent. In manufacturing payrolls, Florida's increase was 128
per cent against 66 per cent for the nation.
A useful measure of the level of manufacturing activity is
"value added by manufacture." This is a measure of the ap-
proximate value created in the process of manufacture. Value
added is calculated by subtracting the cost of materials, sup-
plies, and containers, fuel, purchased electric energy, and
contract work, from the total value of shipments.
A comparison of the value added by manufacture in 1947
with that in 1954 shows an increase in Florida of 128 per
cent, while the same comparison for the nation shows an in-
crease of 56 per cent. Since 1954 many companies, including
several large national corporations, have established or an-
nounced plans to establish new plants in Florida. Thus, while
the present analysis focuses attention on the growth in manu-
facturing by comparing activity in 1947 and 1954, it is rea-
sonable to assume that the manufacturing development is
continuing at a rapid pace.

CHANGES IN FLORIDA MANUFACTURING
To indicate the level of manufacturing activity, the Census
reports the number of establishments engaged in manufac-
turing, the number of employees, the value of payrolls, and
the value added by manufacture. In Florida in 1954 there
were 4,792 such establishments; the value added by manu-
facture amounted to $797.7 million; there were 123,368 em-
ployees engaged in manufacturing; and the payrolls amount-
ed to $385.3 million.
The Census reports also show for major industry groups in
Florida the value added by manufacture, the number of em-
ployees, and the amount of payrolls. Thus it is possible to
compare the changes in the different types of industries in
Florida in terms of these measures of activity and to compare
Florida's changes with the changes that have taken place in
these industries in the nation as a whole. As might be expect-
ed in view of Florida's rather sizeable increase in population,
the most important manufacturing industry in the state, in
terms of all of the measures noted above, is the food and kin-
dred products industry. In 1954 this industry produced a
value added of $212.3 million, employed 30,391 people, and
provided a payroll of $91.8 million. The industry's increase


in value added was 130 per cent in Florida in comparison to
the nationwide increase of 49 per cent. Florida's second in-
dustry in importance in terms of value added was the pulp,
paper, and products industry which in 1954 had a value
added of $139.2 million. This was an increase of 150 per
cent over the 1947 figure compared to a nationwide increase
of 56 per cent. Third in the order of importance in Florida
was the chemical and products industry with $80.7 million.
This industry experienced an increase of 180 per cent in value
added between the two census periods in comparison to an
increase of 71 per cent in the United States as a whole.
Altogether there were eight major industries in Florida
which in 1954 had a value added in excess of $30 million. In
addition to the three mentioned these were, in the order of
importance, the printing and publishing industry with $62.7
million; the lumber and wood products industry with $56.9
million; the fabricated metal products industry with $56.1 mil-
lion; the stone, clay, and glass products industry with $36.8
million; and tobacco manufactures with $33.7 million.
The rank of the industries according to value added does
not always accord them the same position as does a ranking
on the basis of the number of employees or the value of pay-
rolls. On the basis of the number of employees, the six most
important industries were the food and kindred products in-
dustry with 30,391 employees; the lumber and wood products
industries with 16,033; the pulp, paper, and products indus-
tries with 11,622; chemicals and products with 9,449; printing
and publishing with 9,420; and tobacco manufactures with
8,959. The amount of payrolls likewise failed to rank the in-
dustries on the same basis as value added. Food and kindred
products had a total payroll for the year 1954 of $91.8 million;
pulp, paper, and products, $47.5 million; printing and pub-
lishing, $36.8 million; lumber and wood products, $36.0 mil-
lion; chemicals and products, $33.9 million; and fabricated
metal products, $27.2 million.
In addition to rank and leadership in terms of value added,
number of employees, and value of payrolls, another interest-
ing aspect of the developments relate to the changing relative
importance of these various types of industrial activities
throughout the state. The industries with the greatest per-
centage changes in value added were mainly those that were
relatively unimportant in 1947. However, this is not true in
all cases. The industry with the greatest percentage change
was the petroleum and coal products industry with an in-
crease of 810 per cent. However, in 1954 this industry's value
added amounted to only $2.4 million. Next in percentage
change was the textile mill products industry with 495-per-
cent increase and a value added in 1954 of $1.9 million. This
was followed by a 485-per-cent increase in the leather and
leather goods industries which had a value added in 1954 of


-54--







$2.4 million. Other industries which had in 1954 a value
added below $30 million, but showed substantial percentage
increases over 1947, were the primary metals industries with
an increase of 386 per cent and a value added of $5.0 million;
the electrical machinery industry with an increase of 332 per
cent and a value added of $4.4 million; the apparel industry
with an increase of 236 per cent and a value added of $19.9
million; the furniture and fixtures industry with an increase
of 228 per cent and a value added of $23.2 million; the mis-
cellaneous manufactures industries with an increase of 178
percent and a value added of $10 million in 1954; and the
machinery, except electrical, industry with an increase of 169
per cent and a value added of $18.2 million.
Among the larger industries, in terms of value added, the
fabricated metal products was the leader in 1954 with an in-
crease of 385 per cent and a value added of $56.1 million, fol-
lowed by the stone, clay, and glass products industry with an
increase of 188 per cent and a value added of $36.8 million.
In terms of absolute change the industries with the three
greatest changes in value added were the food and kindred
products industry with an increase of $120.0 million, (about
$35 million of this increase is accounted for by the addition
in 1954 to this classification of the plants processing and dis-
tributing fluid milk); the pulp, paper, and products industry
with an increase of $83.5 million; and the chemical and prod-
ucts industry with an increase of $51.9 million.
REGIONAL LOCATION AND PATTERNS OF CHANGE
Before considering the manufacturing developments in in-
dividual counties or groups of counties, it is desirable to ex-
amine the development of manufacturing within geographic
areas of Florida. The significant development of manufactur-
ing raises the interesting question: Where is this develop-
ment taking place? Using the criterion of a value added in
excess of $10 million in 1954 as a basis for selecting the coun-
ties which lead in manufacturing, the three contiguous coun-
ties in the southern part of the state-Palm Beach, Broward
and Dade-represent one important area; five contiguous
counties in the central part of the state-Pinellas, Hillsbor-
ough, Pasco, Polk, and Orange-represent another area; and
in the northern part of the state there are five widely scat-
tered counties which account for the largest manufacturing
development in this area. These are, in the extreme west,
Escambia and Bay, and in the extreme east, Duval, Nassau,
and Putnam. The five counties in the northern part of the
state had a total value added of $273.1 million, followed by
the five counties in the central part of the state with $244.0
million and the three southernmost counties with $169.3
million.
Although there are many counties in Florida in which there
has been very little manufacturing development, nevertheless,
there are practically no counties in Florida that do not lie
near to a region in which a substantial development in manu-
facturing has taken place. An across-the-board comparison of
the development of manufacturing in various counties with
the developments in their population growth, in retail, whole-
sale, and service trades sales, and in income indicates, as
would be expected, that manufacturing is predominant in
those areas experiencing rapid growth in population, trades,
and income.
When the value added by manufacture is compared to per-
sonal income or to aggregate sales by other types of business


activity, some indication of the relative importance of manu-
facturing in various regions and counties is obtained. For ex-
ample, although the total value added by manufacture is
small in certain counties and thus appears insignificant in the
total for the state, the importance of this value in relation to
the total personal income in the county is very significant. It
is true also that the important economic position of some of
the counties in the state may be largely traceable to manufac-
turing activity. Among the counties which have been singled
out as important manufacturing counties on the basis of hav-
ing a value added in excess of $10 million, there are several in
which value added is a very high proportion of the total per-
sonal income. Putnam County, for example, had a value
added of $21.2 million which equalled 68 per cent of the per-
sonal income for 1954. In Escambia County, a value added
of $69.0 million equalled 31 per cent of the income in the
county. In Hillsborough County, a value added of $114.9 mil-
lion equalled 26 per cent of the income in 1954. On the other
hand, in Dade County where the value added was $141.2 mil-
lion, this figure was equal to only 11 per cent of the personal
income; and in Broward, which had a value added of $16.0
million, it was equal to about 7 per cent.
It appears that in certain counties manufacturing is moving
in as a somewhat secondary development because of the fa-
vorable conditions other developments have created. Where-
as in other counties such as in some where agricultural and
industrial centers have developed and where tourism has been
of somewhat secondary importance, manufacturing is also
making great strides and appears to be a primary factor in the
economic development of these counties. As is pointed out
later, counties with a high rate of manufacturing growth since
1947 often tend to be clustered around those counties which
have achieved a high level of manufacturing activity.
MANUFACTURING IN FLORIDA'S COUNTIES
A comparison of the 1954 Census figures with those of 1947
affords a good measure of manufacturing developments in in-
dividual Florida counties during the seven-year period. Based
on the census data a tabulation has been prepared by the
ranking of Florida's 67 counties according to the size of the
value added by manufacture as reported for the year 1954.
(See table 40.) Shown also are the total number of establish-
ments, the number by three employment size-classes, and the
percentage changes in the number of employees, in payrolls,
and in value added by manufacture. For two counties the
latter data were not disclosed separately by the Census, but
their combined totals, $10.6 million, are included in the state
totals.
In 1954 Florida's manufacturing establishments numbered
4,792 of which 3,726 or 78 per cent were small plants employ-
ing from 1 to 19 people; 839 or 17 per cent were medium-
sized plants with from 20 to 99 employees; while 227 or 5 per
cent were large plants having 100 or more employees. In ex-
amining the distribution of these plants among the 67 counties
it was found that less than half of the number of small plants
were located in the five counties in group one, and about one-
fifth were located in the eight counties in group two. Togeth-
er, these thirteen counties had 2,556 out of 3,726 small plants,
or 69 per cent, while the remaining 54 counties had 1,170, or
31 per cent. Of the medium-sized plants more than three-
fourths were located in the thirteen counties forming groups
one and two, and slightly less than one-fourth were in the 54


-55-








remaining counties. Nearly two-thirds of all medium-sized
plants were in the five counties of Dade, Duval, Hillsborough,
Escambia, and Polk. Florida's large plants, representing only
about 5 per cent of the total number of manufacturing estab-
lishments, were also concentrated in these thirteen counties.
These two groups had 78 per cent of the large plants.
The importance of manufacturing in the five counties hav-
ing value added in excess of $50 million is further evidenced
by the fact that they had, in comparison to the total manufac-
turing in the state, 63 per cent of the employees, 65 per cent
of the payrolls, and 62 per cent of value added by manufac-
ture. The corresponding shares of the eight counties in group
two were 18 per cent, 19 per cent, and 23 per cent. The 52
counties in group three had 13 per cent of the value added,
18 per cent of the number of employees, and 14 per cent of
payrolls; while the 2 counties for which only combined totals
are available had one per cent of the value added, one per
cent of the employees, and 2 per cent of the value of payrolls.
For the state as a whole, from 1947 to 1954 manufacturing
employment increased 57 per cent. Among the five counties
in group one, Dade, Escambia, and Polk showed increases
above the state average; Dade's was 161 per cent; Escambia's,
132 per cent; and Polk's, 72 per cent. The increases in the
other two counties were well below the state average-Duval
had 36 per cent and Hillsborough, 14 per cent.
Among the eight counties ranging in value added from $10
million to $50 million, substantial increases in employment
were reported for Broward with 265 per cent, Putnam with
170 per cent, Pinellas with 123 per cent, Nassau with 75 per
cent, and Palm Beach with 72 per cent. Orange with an in-
crease of 50 per cent and Pasco with 45 per cent were below
the state average.
The counties falling in the group with less than $10 million
in value added showed the widest variations in the percent-
age change in number of employees. Eighteen reported in-
creases in employment above the state average; Flagler and
Bradford, with respective increases of 635 and 462 per cent,
were far in the lead among this group. Thirteen counties in
this group showed increases in employment below the state
average, ranging from 54 per cent in Marion to 5 per cent in
St. Lucie, while eighteen counties had decreases in employ-
ment. (For three counties this information was not avail-
able.) As would be expected, the percentage changes in pay-
rolls followed closely the percentage changes in the number
of employees.
To determine manufacturing development in the various
counties, the useful measure of the change in value added by
manufacture is employed. For the state, value added in-
creased from 1947 to 1954 by 128 per cent. Among the coun-
ties in group one only Escambia with 228 per cent, Dade with
210 per cent, and Polk with 136 per cent had increases above
the state average, while Duval with 86 per cent and Hillsbor-
ough with 92 per cent were below the state average. In group
two all the counties, for which this information was available,
except Palm Beach showed increases larger than the state
average. Putnam had an increase of 577 per cent; Broward,
320 per cent; Pasco, 240 per cent; Orange, 213 per cent; and
Pinellas, 202 per cent; while Palm Beach's increase was 113
per cent. Flagler and Bradford not only led all of the coun-
ties in group three, but they were above all of the counties in
the state. Flagler had an increase of 4,738 per cent and Brad-
ford, 797 per cent. Thirteen other small counties in group


three reported increases above the state average. Twenty-two
counties had increases below the state average, ranging from
Alachua with 123 per cent to Liberty with 3 per cent. Eleven
of the counties in group three declined in value added.
The highest rates of growth were in counties which were
clustered around counties where manufacturing activity was
high, such as in the contiguous counties of Flagler, Bradford,
Putnam, Baker, and Columbia which are around Duval; in
Broward next to Dade, and in Pasco and Pinellas bordering on
Hillsborough.
PLANNING FOR FUTURE GROWTH
Accompanying the significant development in manufactur-
ing is Florida's rapid increase in population and personal in-
come, and the growth in trade and agriculture. In a state ex-
periencing such rapid growth, it is only natural that there
should emerge out of this growth many types of growing
pains that should command the attention of all those interest-
ed in the best type of economic and social development for
the state. Rapid growth in population directs attention not
only to economic opportunities, but to the increasing utiliza-
tion by the population of the resources of the state. The addi-
tional utilization of the resources and the additional economic
opportunities often bring about different attitudes upon the
part of the citizens as to what measures should be taken
either to encourage or to discourage certain types of business
development within the state.
The tourist industry has long been one of Florida's major
attractions. It is to be expected that those who have focused
their attention principally upon the expansion and develop-
ment of this significant segment of the state's economy should
be continually concerned about any possible developments in
manufacturing that would conflict with the continuing devel-
opment and expansion of the tourist industry. On the other
hand, many businessmen and other leaders in the state have
recognized that the increasing population and its accompany-
ing increased number of employable people pose both prob-
lems and opportunities to be considered and analyzed to as-
sure that the needed developments in the state's industrial
growth are planned for. Thus, in recent years, government
leaders and leaders in community and business life through-
out the state have been devoting a great deal of attention and
study to the matter of sound economic development in Flor-
ida communities and counties. Many of those who have been
working on programs of economic development hold to the
view that careful forethought to economic, industrial, and
manufacturing development can result in the minimization of
the economic conflicts that might emerge if such planning and
consideration to the problems of growth were not present. It
is felt by many that careful attention, by proper zoning or the
development of organized industrial districts, should be given
to the matter of the precise location of manufacturing indus-
tries and to the types of manufacturing industries that are not
in conflict with the best development of the tourist and rec-
reational facilities of the state.
The good showing in a number of small counties, as for
example in Flagler and Bradford, gives an indication that the
small counties can draw suitable industries if they are needed.
To this end the counties would do well to take inventory of
what they can contribute to the development of the state, and
plan accordingly for their benefit as well as for the benefit of
the state in rapidly growing Florida.


-56-







TABLE 38.-MANUFACTURING: CHANGES wN VALUE ADDED AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES IN FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES BY
MAJOR INDUSTRIAL GROUPS, AND PAYROLLS AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES IN FLORIDA, 1954


_____________________ _____________ r .. 5 f T ~~4p1La1


Industry Group


All industries, total-...-
Food and kindred products-
Meat products -------
Dairy products ....-
Canned and frozen foods ---
Grain mill products -_ -
Bakery products .- -----
Candy and related products --
Beverages __----
Miscellaneous foods -- --
Tobacco manufactures ......--
Textile mill products .....--.
Knitting mills __- ______
Apparel and related products
Men's and boys' furnishings--
Women's and misses' outerwear
Women's undergarments --_
Children's outerwear ...-..-...
Fabricated textiles, n. e. c._ --
Lumber and wood products-.
Lumber and basic products --
Millwork and related products-
Wooden containers ..-- -_...... -
Miscellaneous wood products-...
Furniture and fixtures-...-.....
Household furniture -
Screens, shades, and blinds --.
Pulp, paper, and products .--
Pulp, paper, and board ----
Paper board containers --
Pulp, paper, and
products, n. e. c..-----
Printing and publishing ..
Printing trade services --- -
Chemicals and products --
Inorganic chemicals -----
Drugs and medicines ----
Soap and related products -
Paints and allied products --
Gum and wood chemicals --
Fertilizers ......


Value Added I Number of Employees


Percentage
change,&
1947 to
1954, in-
Fla. I U.S.


Florida


Percentage
change,a
1947 to
1954 in-
Fla. I U.S.


Florida
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


Payroll in
Florida (in
thousands
of dollars)


I* I I*-I*~1 I.


$797,721
212,319
13,618
n.a.
75,130
4,127
26,276
867
22,542
27,466
33,730
1,923
1,077
19,869
4,678
9,975
871
1,274
n.a.
56,866
21,924
9,418
9,853
4,661
23,197
16,240
4,123
139,238
112,222
8,837

1,649
62,710
1,365
80,684
4,295
1,647
858
n.a.
5,224
31,551


123,368
30,391
2,775
n.a.
11,277
867
4,319
256
3,545
2,094
8,959
471
231
5,847
1,772
2,734
246
291
n.a.
16,033
7,092
2,076
2,835
1,028
4,696
3,417
780
11,622
7,399
1,526

311
9,420
239
9,449
336
177
132
n.a.
820
3,688


$385,291
91,821
8,352
n.a.
30,687
2,823
14,327
564
11,128
5,752
21,238
1,247
653
12,942
3,236
6,551
553
745
n.a.
35,959
14,378
6,342
6,077
2,755
13,959
9,376
2,543
47,512
32,837
5,498

1,020
36,758
862
33,911
1,275
583
404
n.a.
3,030
14,395


Capital
Expendi-
tures, New,
in Florida
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


$104,631
19,376
1,099
n.a.
5,995
274
1,472
26
2,154
4,438
753
312
n.a.
595
95
215
9
28
n.a.
4,103
1,589
324
406
691
1,414
1,073
n.a.
25,260
18,751
4,785

34
3,490
109
n.a.
300
191
87
n.a.
1,712
16,624


Industry Group (continued)


Chemicals and products
(continued)
Vegetable and animal oils_-
Chemical products, n. e. c. -
Petroleum and coal products
Paving and roofing materials---
Rubber products
Leather and leather goods
Footwear except rubber --__
Purses and small leather goods
Stone, clay, and glass
products -- ------
Structural clay products __
Concrete and plaster products-
Nonmetallic mineral products,
n. e. c. ______
Primary metal industries
Iron and steel foundries ...
Nonferrous rolling and drawing
Fabricated metal products _
Cutlery, tools, and hardware
Structural metal products ---
Metal stamping and coating -
Machinery, except electrical
Tractors and farm machinery _
Metal working machinery -.
Special-industry machinery,
n. e. c. ---_______- .....- -__
General industrial machinery -
Service and household machines
Miscellaneous machine parts_
Electrical machinery -
Communication equipment --
Electrical products, n. e. c. _
Transportation equipment-
Aircraft parts ---- --
Ships and boats -----
Instruments and related
products -__-_---.-
Miscellaneous manufactures __
Toys and sporting goods
Costume jewelry and notions --
Miscellaneous manufactures _


Value Added
Percentage
Florida change,
(in thou- 1947 to
sands of 1954, in-
dollars) Fl.- US.
Fla. U.S.


$ 3,446
n.a.
2,429
2,271
950
2,400
1,149
763

36,843
882
23,575

933
4,974
1,260
820
56,085
889
31,168
2,537
18,199
1,897
921

4,994
3,965
1,904
n.a.
4,417
2,237
1,000
29,395
987
27,132

1,426
10,059
1,795
975
5,288


Number of Employees
Percentage
change,a
Florida 1947 ta
1954 in-
Fla. | U. S.


524
n.a.
284
267
281
504
253
163

5,325
196
4,095

144
805
286
115
7,510
102
4,709
410
2,648
281
128

643
651
112
n.a.
906
487
137
5,712
201
5,235

285
2,211
466
246
1,078


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, 1954 U. S. Census of Manufactures and 1947 U. S. Census of Manufactures.
Although the 1954 and 1947 totals for "All industries," "Food and kindred products," and "Lumber and wood products" are not strictly comparable because the 1947 figures exclude loggers and fluid milk distributors,
the percentages computed are deemed adequate to show approximate changes between 1947 and 1954. The percentages for the U. S. are computed on the basis of preliminary figures for 1954. The change is an increase
unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
Less than one per cent.


Payroll in
Florida (in
thousands
of dollars)


1,571
n.a.
1,092
1,024
808
1,366
675
382

16,359
505
12,445

390
2,407
870
276
27,241
356
16,294
1,083
9,499
807
558

2,358
2,591
464
n.a.
2,567
1,406
431
21,866
787
20,230

735
5,996
997
552
3,321


Capital
Expendi-
tures, New,
in Florida
(in thou-
sands of
dollars)


579
n.a.
663
634
57
44
9
19

5,495
50
3,084

40
266
137
30
6,178
96
2,435
269
925
35
59

n.a.
142
62
n.a.
220
90
84
1,221
27
1,152

75
n.a.
84
28
211








TABLE 39.-MANUFACTURING: FLORIDA AND THE OTHER SOUTHEASTERN STATES, BY SELECTED MAJOR INDUSTRIAL GROUPS, 1954

Employees Value Added
All Selected industries Selected industries
Estab-
State lish- All Food Pulp, Chemi- Printing Fabri- All Food Pulp, mials Printing Fabri-
ments industries and paper, cals and cated industries and paper, Chemals Printing cate
kindred and and pub- metal kindred and and and metal
products* products products lishing products productsa products products publishing products

Number Amount (in thousands of dollars)

Florida 4,792 123,368 30,391 11,622 9,449 9,420 7,510 $ 797,721 $ 212,319 $139,238 $ 80,684 $ 62,710 $ 56,085
Other South-
eastern States
Alabama 3,893 217,084 16,073 8,668 7,410 4,769 8,716 $1,319,192 $ 95,528 $ 77,069 $ 82,930 $ 35,296 $ 68,191
Georgia 5,654 301,290 34,595 13,803 10,084 7,964 5,504 1,592,411 263,797 155,088 79,500 56,213 29,787
Kentucky 2,651 146,434 26,403 1,134 9,653 7,100 12,824 1,236,260 299,389 7,143 143,673 46,611 94,354
Mississippi 2,252 90,641 10,782 8,094 5,378 2,003 1,876 467,625 60,206 85,735 49,975 10,897 12,122
N. Carolina __ 6,645 430,001 24,993 9,731 11,414 7,489 4,673 2,210,643 155,557 91,441 107,032 45,497 32,690
S. Carolina 2,720 219,447 9,062 6,213 19,264 2,871 n.a. 1,040,936 51,417 68,672 148,166 17,468 n.a.
Tennessee 4,058 260,599 27,362 7,925 42,885 10,067 16,528 1,678,786 187,173 64,516 454,064 66,606 102,057
Virginia -- 4,398 239,733 28,651 10,897 34,977 8,016 7,007 1,629,041 167,103 102,124 435,655 48,209 44,856
Selected States
California 24,509 1,027,784 143,958 20,703 31,579 52,682 72,131 $8,597,453 $1,400,857 $182,701 $424,136 $416,442 $578,995
Illinois -- 17,628 1,177,933 140,151 30,760 50,403 93,944 118,663 9,668,752 1,337,344 229,403 663,699 756,506 934,353
Louisiana 3,020 144,757 30,734 17,099 17,479 4,736 4,875 1,181,649 214,983 163,187 250,238 34,571 35,162
Texas ..--------8,890 410,364 67,862 8,126 36,976 22,537 18,805 3,501,706 533,060 68,224 722,056 154,672 131,543

Percentage Change in Number, 1947 to 1954 Percentage Change in Amount, 1947 to 1954

Florida 71 57 55 104 100 50 248 128 130 150 180 81 385
Other South-
eastern States
Alabama 17 5 34 52 -10 27 18 50 72 93 80 79 78
Georgia 19 20 29 89 -9 28 59 57 98 186 3 73 99
Kentucky 18 13 7 53 102 15 13 66 4 52 200 62 85
Mississippi 14 17 34 68 12 25 322 55 79 135 41 62 377
N. Carolina 25 13 50 24 20 41 68 34 98 93 83 79 178
S. Carolina 27 16 16 6 430 42 n.a. 31 52 86 793 94 n.a.
Tennessee --.. 21 17 17 64 52 8 12 75 41 80 179 42 94
Virginia -__ 21 11 33 2 4 37 21 55 89 42 99 61 68
Selected States
California 39 55 20 71 16 26 39 115 64 126 51 60 105
Illinois ___ 10 1 1 9 6 3 3 45 32 45 51 40 52
Louisiana 26 9 7 21 36 19 30 70 54 64 120 50 120
Texas 25 38 17 74 57 27 43 103 58 107 208 67 97
Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, 1954 U. S. Census of Manufactures.
a Although the 1954 and 1947 "All industries" and "Food and kindred products" totals are not strictly comparable because the 1947 figures exclude loggers and
fluid milk distributors, the percentages computed are deemed adequate to show approximate changes between 1947 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as
a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.


-58-








TALE 40.-MANUFACTURING: EMPLOYEES, PAYROLLS, AND ESTABLISHMENTS BY EMPLOYMENr SIZE CLASS,
BY MAJOR INDUSTRY GROUP, IN FLORIDA, 1954

Establishments
Total Payroll, Number by employment size class
Number Entire Year-------------__________-___
Industry Group of (in thou- Total 1,000 to 2,500
Employees sands of number 1 to 4 5 to 9 10 to 19 20 to 49 50 to 99 100 to 250 to 500 to ,499 employ-
dollars) employ- employ- employ- employ- employ- 249 em- 499 em- 999 em- employ- ees and
ees ees ees ees ees ployees ployes ployees ees over

Total __-- ..... 123,368 $385,291 4,792 2,110 965 651 576 263 152 48 19 7 1
Food and kindred products __ 30,391 91,821 797 222 162 132 136 68 56 16 4 1
Tobacco manufactures 8,959 21,238 59 27 4 2 4 6 9 3 1 3 --
Textile mill products 471 1,247 27 8 7 6 3 3 -- -
Apparel and related products 5,847 12,942 269 98 49 42 54 18 5 3 --- -
Lumber and wood products 16,033 35,959 1,022 513 242 107 94 34 26 5 1 -
Furniture and fixtures ----- 4,696 13,959 324 149 68 46 41 16 3 1 -
Pulp, paper products - 11,622 47,512 65 9 3 5 12 10 9 9 7 1
Printing and publishing -- 9,420 36,758 567 328 117 64 30 15 7 3 2 1 -
Chemicals and products ----- 9,449 33,911 225 90 34 29 40 19 8 3 1 -- 1
Petroleum and coal products --- 284 1,092 19 4 7 2 5 1 -- -- --
Rubber products ----.- 281 808 17 9 4 2 2 ..--- --
Leather and leather goods -- 504 1,366 24 8 4 7 2 2 1 -- -- --
Stone, clay, and glass products 5,325 16,359 337 134 76 63 44 14 5 1 .
Primary metal industries 805 2,407 40 13 9 10 3 3 2 -
Fabricated metal products 7,510 27,241 332 143 59 50 42 25 10 2 1 .
Machinery, except electrical -- 2,648 9,499 166 78 36 23 18 7 3 1 ..
Electrical machinery __ 906 2,567 59 31 7 9 6 5 1
Transportation equipment 5,712 21,866 168 83 24 25 18 8 6 1 2 1
Instruments and related products ... 285 735 27 16 6 3 2 -. .. .
Miscellaneous manufactures 2,211 5,996 248 147 47 26 22 5 1 --


Source: Bureau of the Census, 1954 U. S. Census of Manufactures.
. ... Zein.


-59-








TABLE 41.-MANUFACTURING: ESTABLISHMENTS, VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE, PAID EMPLOYEES, PAYROLL, AND
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1954


State and
County


Florida ---



Dade ----.-
Duval- -
Hillsborough __
Escambia ---
Polk ------


Orange ----
Bay ---
Nassau ----.- -
Pinellas
Putnam -
Pasco ------
Broward
Palm Beach -


Alachua
Marion --_--
Volusia -
Leon
Lake ----
Gadsden ---
Jackson
St. Johns ---
Flagler -_--
Sarasota ---.
St. Lucie ---.
Manatee ---.
Madison .----.
Lee -----
Columbia --
Seminole -....
Bradford -
Brevard --
Taylor ----
Clay- .--
Hamilton --..
Indian River _
Collier
Levy ----.
Baker ----
Osceola
Washington --
Suwannee --
Okaloosa ---.
Dixie - --
Monroe --.
Okeechobee -
Calhoun --
Walton .--.--
Highlands --.
De Soto --- -
Franklin -.-
Holmes --.
Hardee ------
Liberty -
Jefferson -,
Hernando --.-
Charlotte
Union -----
Wakulla ----
Sumter -----
Martin ----
Santa Rosa ---
Citrus ---_
Lafayette ---
Gilchrist -----
Glades -----.


Gulf ----__
Hendry -


Total
Number of
Establish-
ments


4,792


Number of Establishments with-


1-19 20-99 100 or more
employees employees employees


3,726 839 227


Value Added
by Manufac-
ture (in
thousands
of dollars)


$797,721


Number of
Employees


Payroll (in
thousands
of dollars)


Capital Ex-
penditures,
New (in
thousands
of dollars)


123,368 $385,291 $104,631


Percentage Change,'
1947 to 1954


In value
added by In number of In payroll
manufacture employees


128


Group 1-Value added: Over $50 million
1,238 945 260 33 $141,213 24,229 $ 79,470 $ 9,775 210 161 219
423 288 99 36 124,330 17,343 57,854 10,728 86 36 105
458 320 101 37 114,875 18,509 57,503 8,432 92 14 67
90 58 23 9 68,958 7,955 28,138 23,453 228 132 248
151 85 47 19 53,316 8,744 27,449 17,284 136 72 167
Group 2-Value added: $10 million to $50 million
210 173 27 10 $ 34,107 4,125 $ 14,450 $ 4,385 213 50 131
41 29 9 3 31,659 2,342 8,949 4,721 n.a. 38 n.a.
56 45 6 5 26,983 1,988 7,160 3,210 n.a. 75 n.a.
295 262 24 9 25,131 4,364 13,247 1,563 202 123 186
57 45 7 5 21,192 2,312 8,051 1,244 577 170 386
27 20 4 3 16,562 2,202 5,479 1,396 240 45 184
191 162 24 5 16,031 2,862 9,409 1,374 320 265 364
150 124 24 2 12,039 2,080 6,891 1,511 113 72 120
Group 3-Value added: Under $10 million
71 52 14 5 $ 8,030 1,748 $ 4,214 $ 334 123 43 115
65 46 13 6 7,786 1,634 4,123 604 113 54 128
122 100 19 3 7,716 1,714 4,866 504 65 34 78
54 37 16 1 7,222 1,559 4,089 374 37 16 74
56 48 5 3 7,163 978 2,596 800 253 45 128
40 25 9 6 4,950 1,712 3,201 294 42 9 67
47 37 8 2 3,944 820 1,820 249 140 92 168
45 39 6 -- 3,492 453 1,456 425 242 52 157
11 9 1 1 3,193 272 935 1,094 4,738 635 1,632
64 57 7 -. 3,071 586 1,791 391 279 150 256
26 21 4 1 3,011 482 1,340 239 75 5 36
49 44 4 1 2,894 616 1,498 434 5 35 4
36 26 8 2 2,884 760 1,716 168 183 69 190
54 46 8 2,861 634 1,725 157 177 124 216
41 35 4 2 2,755 704 1,379 256 277 183 254
30 25 4 1 2,734 418 1,023 475 104 35 64
21 17 2 2 2,314 641 1,839 482 797 462 1,134
26 23 2 1 1,998 452 1,200 36 92 91 125
26 20 4 2 1,928 932 2,270 2,819 71 41 14
29 26 3 --.. 1,730 300 790 169 237 75 161
16 12 3 1 1,489 413 877 48 79 35 92
17 14 2 1 1,410 247 759 141 253 76 142
7 5 .-- 2 1,334 420 1,049 55 84 80 127
30 26 4 --. 1,086 327 678 93 6 23 1
32 31 1 .-. 1,070 240 505 39 325 75 189
21 17 4 -- 1,018 258 614 53 39 43 33
24 21 3 970 234 410 44 59 8 27
31 29 2 954 257 509 59 80 6 51
22 19 2 1 951 396 665 47 70 44 96
11 9 1 1 880 180 438 56 n.a. n.a. n.a.
23 21 2 859 162 434 141 87 42 90
6 4 1 1 714 137 235 22 131 83 94
17 16 -- 1 620 214 424 34 13 36 24
19 18 1 .. 559 142 286 29 11 44 17
13 11 2 506 124 294 84 10 17 3
8 7 1 --.. 473 99 240 23 77 77 70
12 11 1 440 92 204 8 43 28 5
21 19 2 .-..- 425 138 237 38 110 77 87
13 11 2 --. 388 191 333 50 47 10 29
12 10 2 --. 375 118 209 26 3 23 2
16 16 306 88 141 47 51 70 59
14 13 1 _. 304 85 149 41 45 52 49
12 12 ---- 256 60 126 10 175 186 193
12 12 233 69 119 23 n.a. n.a. n.a.
7 6 1 --- 232 74 141 25 n.a. n.a. n.a.
9 8 1 ---. 220 73 169 25 57 64 47
5 4 1 ...... 213 44 149 n.a. 142 4 51
12 10 2 .... 205 111 161 15 46 141 182
12 12 .... ..... 164 44 103 7 119 159 178
11 11 --- 153 44 74 11 n.a. 10 n.a.
5 5 ---- 140 28 91 9 17 66 27
3 3 -- ...... 64 17 29 n.a. 31 89 26

Group 4-Value added: Not available


3 n.a. 1,302 n.a.
1 n.a. 440 n.a.


n.a. n.a. 118
n.a. n.a. 8


Source: Basic data are from the Bureau of the Census, 1954 U. S. Census of Manufactures and 1947 U. S. Census of Manufactures.
Although the 1954 and 1947 figures are not strictly comparable because the 1947 figures exclude loggers and fluid milk distributors, the percentages computed are
deemed adequate to show approximate changes between 1947 and 1954. The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
n.a. Not available.
.. Zero.


I








TABLE 42.-ESTIMATED EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES IN NONAGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS
IN SELECTED FLORIDA COUNTIES, JANUARY, 1957

Broward Dade Duval Escambia Hillsborough Orange Palm Beach Pinellas Polk
Major Industrya County County County County County County County County County


Estimated Number of Employees

Total -.. -----------.......---- 59,200 284,100 131,150 46,400 95,450 60,100 47,550 64,800 50,700
Manufacturing -- -. 4,800 34,600 19,800 10,500 21,950 7,400 3,000 6,350 12,250
Food and kindred products ..-- 5,100 3,200 600 5,350 2,900 800 8,350
Tobacco manufacture --- 5,000
Apparel and other finished products 5,850
Lumber and wood -__--.. 750 1,400 850 750
Furniture and fixtures ._. 4,000
Printing and publishing ----- 3,800 1,550 1,200 900 1,100
Chemical and allied products .. 1,300 5,400 1,850 1,300
Stone, clay, and glass --- 2,300 1,450 500 600
Fabricated metal products -._ 5,100 1,800 900
Machinery, except electrical -- 550
Transportation equipment -._ 1,100 3,250
Other manufacturing 6,600 9,100 3,650 4,550 2,200 4,450 1,450
Mining ------- --------__ -- --- 4,550
Contract construction ----- 13,000 24,500 9,400 5,050 8,100 7,050 7,000 9,050 3,100
Transportation, communication, and
public utilities 3,550 35,300 15,000 2,600 8,900 2,850 2,950 3,100 1,850
Interstate railways ---------- 3,000 5,200 2,500
Local bus lines and railways .... 950
Trucking and warehousing ---_ 3,450 3,100 1,650
Other transportation, except water 17,050 1,850 800
Services allied to transportation 2,300 1,250
Other transportation, communica-
tion, and utilities .- 8,550 3,600 3,950
Trade -------_ ___-- 17,950 85,400 40,150 11,400 30,850 24,750 15,750 21,350 15,900
Wholesale ------------------- 2,050 17,250 14,050 2,250 10,150 11,150 2,600 3,500 6,800
Full service and limited function 12,500 7,900 6,400
Wholesale distribution other than
full service -. .- --__ 4,750 6,150 3,750
Retail trade --- __ ... 15,900 68,150 26,100 9,150 20,700 13,600 13,150 17,850 9,100
General merchandise ----- 1,450 8,900 3,850 1,800 3,950 2,150 1,550 3,700 1,150
Foods and liquors __ 3,100 11,250 5,550 1,950 4,100 2,150 3,100
Automotive ----_---__ 4,800 2,750 2,250 1,350 1,150 1,450 "1,800
Apparel and accessories ---- 6,150 1,600 1,250
Eating and drinking establish-
ments ..---..---.... ..... 4,550 20,250 5,150 1,600 3,600 2,100 3,000 3,900 1,650
Gasoline service stations 3,450 1,050 1,050
Retail trade, n.e.c.. 13,350 6,150 4,500 3,800
All other retail trade .-- 6,800 3,800 8,000 5,300 1,900 4,500
Finance, insurance, and real estate -- 3,500 15,300 10,500 1,450 3,600 3,700 3,150 4,300 1,800
Service __ -__ ---- 9,150 59,900 16,200 4,000 11,100 7,850 9,700 11,850 5,600
Hotels -. - -- 3,500 20,600 1,600 800 3,700 3,100
Personal services 7,400 3,900 2,400 1,400 2,250
Business services --- --- 5,800 2,250
Motion pictures 1,400
Amusement and recreation ---- 3,900
Nonprofit organizations ----- 1,450
Medical and other health services 1,750
Other services 5,650 19,350 8,450 7,900 4,700 6,000 6,500
Government -----_-- -- - 6,700 27,800 19,800 11,100 10,350 6,350 5,500 8,600 5,650
Other nonmanufacturing -------- 550 1,300 300 300 600 150 500 200

Average Weekly Earningsb

All manufacturing ....-..--- $65.25 $70.93 $ 63.96 $71.46 $63.99 $65.04
Food and kindred products 57.59 67.70 62.31 70.42 63.57 61.91
Tobacco manufacture ---- --- 48.25 47.74
Apparel ---....-- ...... 53.02
Lumber and wood products ---- 52.78
Furniture and fixtures ._ 61.75
Printing and publishing 102.96 90.29
Chemical and allied products 63.22 82.72 79.38 86.52
Transportation equipment 86.30
Other manufacturing ___... 71.44
Nonmetallic mining 79.49

Source: Florida Industrial Commission, Florida State Employment Service, Labor Market Trends, February, 1957.
a Manufacturing industries are classified according to Standard Industrial Classification Manual. Nonmanufacturing industries, except governments, are classified
according to the Social Security Board Classification Code. All employees on government payrolls, except those in nonappropriated funds activities of the Defense
Department, are classified as government" regardless of industrial activity. Employees of these nonappropriated funds activities are included in estimates of private
employment, primarily in trade and service industries. All data are adjusted to first quarter 1956 benchmark levels.
b Estimates are for full-time and part-time production and related workers employed week ending nearest January 15. Average earnings include premium pay for
overtime and late shift work.
Automotive and gasoline service stations.


--61-







PART SEVEN


AGRICULTURE: CHANGE AND GROWTH IN FLORIDA COUNTIES
C. C. MOXLEY, Associate Economist
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE


T HE publication by the U. S. Department of Commerce
of data gathered in the 1954 Census of Agriculture reveals the
occurrence of many important changes since the census in
1949. These changes and trends become apparent when the
recent data are compared with 1949 data or, in some cases,
with earlier data.
While partly following national trends, Florida has experi-
enced many changes not common to all states. The changes
in Florida agriculture have varied widely both as to kind and
magnitude. Even for different sections within the state, dif-
ferences in climate, land, people, and amounts of available
capital have contributed to the creation of extremely different
agricultural conditions. The growth of agriculture in Florida
can be traced largely to technological improvements resulting
from research. Florida income derived from producing, pro-
cessing, and distributing farm products now rivals tourist dol-
lars for top place as a source of revenue.
Practically all crops and livestock in Florida are now being
produced in much greater quantity than previously, but the
fact that some enterprises have expanded at faster rates than
others has changed their relative importance in terms of the
value of farm products sold. (The term total value of all farm
products sold is used by the Census Bureau to represent the
total sales from each farm. In this discussion the term is used
interchangeably with total farm receipts.) In Florida, live-
stock and livestock products now provide 23 per cent of total
farm receipts compared to 17 per cent twenty years ago. The
rapidly growing beef cattle industry has been a strong influ-
ence here. Increases in receipts from other livestock and live-
stock products have been little different from the rate of in-
crease in farm receipts. Oranges and tangerines now account
for nearly 30 per cent of total receipts instead of 26 per cent
as in the period from 1935 to 1939, while grapefruit has fallen
from 10 per cent to 5 per cent. Likewise, receipts from truck
crops have declined from about 32 per cent to 24 per cent of
the total. Field crops as a group now furnish almost exactly
the same percentage of total receipts as they did twenty years
ago. In general, the shifting of emphasis between enterprises,
on the basis of value of products sold, has been small com-
pared to the over-all increase in the value of all major
commodities.
Since 1940, Florida farm receipts have increased at an aver-
age rate of more than $25 million a year, rising from about
$80.4 million in 1940 to more than $466 million by 1954. This
represents a gain of more than 500 per cent in total value of
all farm products sold, although a part of this apparent gain
is accounted for by an increase in the general price level.
While total farm receipts have been increasing tremendous-
ly in Florida, there has been considerable change in the rela-
tive receipts of large farming operations. The lower-income


farmers now account for a much smaller percentage of total
farm receipts than in 1949. The number of farms in the state
grossing from $250 to $2,499 per farm declined 26 per cent
between 1949 and 1954. The number of farms with receipts
in this class now is about 36 per cent of the total number of
commercial farms, whereas more than half of Florida's com-
mercial farms fell in this category in 1949. During the same
period the number of farms grossing from $2,500 to $9,999 in-
creased 40 per cent, moving from 31 per cent to about 41 per
cent of the total number of commercial farms. Farms gross-
ing more than $10,000 a year increased in number from 5,188
in 1949 to 7,384 in 1954. This 42-per-cent increase means that
more than one farm out of five falls in the highest economic
group. Receipts of nearly half of the farms in this group were
in excess of $25,000 a year per farm.
From 1949 to 1954 the number of commercial farms in-
creased more than 6 per cent. By 1954 there were 32,122 com-
mercial and 25,421 non-commercial farms in Florida. The
latter category includes small residential holdings and plots
operated by part-time farmers.
The changes taking place in Florida have not been uniform
for the different sections of the state, and in some cases op-
posite changes have somewhat offset each other. To the ex-
tent that this has occurred, data for the state as a whole may
conceal rather than reveal some changes that are important to
certain areas. For a closer inspection of different parts of the
state, Florida can be divided roughly into four major sec-
tions: Northwest Florida, including Leon and Wakulla coun-
ties and all counties westward; Northeast Florida, bounded
on the south by (and including) Levy, Marion and Volusia;
Central Florida, extending thence southward to Lake Okee-
chobee; and South Florida, comprising the rest of the state.


NORTHWEST FLORIDA

While the total number of farms in all Florida increased
one per cent from 1949 to 1954, the number in Northwest
Florida declined more than 15 per cent. The greater decrease
occurred in non-commercial farms. The reduction in the
number of commercial farms was limited to those whose re-
ceipts totaled less than $2,500 a year. Farms with higher re-
ceipts had gained in number but at a lesser rate than for the
state as a whole.
Although the land area in farms increased more than 50 per
cent from 1940 to 1954, the gain from 1949 to 1954 was only 4
per cent. Increased acreage coupled with the declining num-
ber of farms has resulted in an increase in the average farm
size of from 91.5 acres in 1940 to 156.5 acres in 1954. Despite
this 71-per-cent increase, farms in Northwest Florida still


-62-







average less than half the size of farms for the state as a
whole.
The size of farms appears to be closely related to the trends
in numbers of farms. In Northwest Florida, from 1940 to
1954 the sharpest reduction was in farms containing 30 to 50
acres. Numbers were also slightly reduced in the groups con-
taining 10 to 30 acres and 50 to 100 acres. During the same
period the number of farms containing 100 to 140 acres re-
mained almost constant, while small increases were evident in
groups below 10 acres and over 140 acres.
Since World War II there has been a slight tendency to-
ward an increase in the number of dairy, other livestock, and
general type farms in Northwest Florida, but a considerable
decrease has occurred among fruit and nut, vegetable, and
field crop farms. In general, the reduction in the number of
farms in this section has come about through consolidation of
acreages. Many units too small for economic operation have
gone out of business. These were principally farms falling in
the lower economic classes, between 10 and 100 acres in size,
and producing fruits and nuts, vegetables, and field crops.

NORTHEAST FLORIDA
Although the total number of farms in Northeast Florida
declined in each census period from 1940 to 1954, the total
acreage of land in farms almost doubled and the average farm
size more than doubled.
Northeast Florida's reductions in numbers of both commer-
cial and non-commercial farms represented an over-all de-
crease of 11 per cent between 1949 and 1954 which was less
drastic than the 15-per-cent cut in Northwest Florida. The
reduction in numbers of commercial farms occurred in the
groups whose receipts totaled less than $2,500. In Northwest
Florida 90 per cent of the loss occurred in numbers of farms
showing receipts from $250 to $1,200, as compared to 60 per
cent within this range for Northeast Florida. Both areas now
have a larger number of farms grossing $2,500 and up, than
five years ago, but the gain in this economic class in North-
east Florida has tripled that in Northwest Florida.
Reductions in numbers of farms in Northeast Florida have
not been limited to so narrow a range of size groups as was
the case in the northwestern part of the state. Since 1940, in
Northeast Florida all size groups from 3 acres up to 200 acres
have shown considerable declines. The number of farms hav-
ing 200 to 250 acres has remained fairly constant, while there
has been a substantial increase in the number containing
more than 250 acres and a small increase in the number of
residential units of less than 3 acres.
Unlike any other section of Florida, Northeast Florida ex-
perienced a decline in number of farms that was spread
among all types of farms. The greatest decreases were in gen-
eral farms and fruit and nut farms. The number of dairy
farms remained fairly constant, with a reported loss of only
eight farms in the area from 1945 to 1954. In general, the
census data indicate that low farm receipts is the one im-
portant characteristic common to farms that went out of busi-
ness in Northeast Florida.

CENTRAL FLORIDA
Although the total number of farms in Central Florida de-
clined 10 per cent from 1940 to 1950, a gain from 1949 to


1954 of 4,800 farms brought the total number in 1954 to 11
per cent above 1940. This 24-per-cent increase over 1949 in-
cludes increased numbers of both commercial and non-com-
mercial farms. The increase was largely due to increases in
the number of farms of less than 3 acres and of farms contain-
ing more than 100 acres. The only size classes showing de-
creased numbers were the 10-to-29-acre class and the 30-to-
49-acre class.
From 1940 to 1949 the average size of farms in Central
Florida more than doubled, but from 1949 to 1954 the in-
crease in number of farms was proportionately greater than
the increase in land in farms. Hence, during the latter period
the average was slightly reduced-from 347 acres per farm to
335 acres. This reduction occurred in spite of the tremendous
increase in the amount of land in farms containing 1,000 acres
or more.
The only economic class of farms having fewer numbers in
1954 than in 1949 was the group having gross receipts of less
than $1,200 annually. The greatest increase in number was in
the group ranging in receipts of from $10,000 to $25,000.
A considerable reduction in the number of vegetable farms
in Central Florida occurred within the last decade, but the
decline was small in the number of field crop, poultry, and
general farms. There was a slight increase in number of fruit
and nut and livestock farms, while an enormous increase ap-
peared in the number of "miscellaneous and unclassified"
farms. The latter category includes commercial farms receiv-
ing 50 per cent or more of gross receipts from horticultural
products, horses, fur animals, forest products, or sale of bees
and honey. Miscellaneous and unclassified farms also include
part-time and residential farms.

SouTH FLORIDA
Since 1940 the total number of farms in South Florida has
undergone a net decline of about 5 per cent. Within this
period the numbers have varied both higher and lower than
in either 1940 or 1954. From 1949 to 1954 the number of com-
mercial farms remained almost constant, while the number of
non-commercial farms increased by nearly 19 per cent. With-
in the past 15 years, substantial reductions in numbers have
occurred only in farms ranging in size from 3 to 29 acres.
Due to the rapid expansion of acreage in farms during the
period from 1940 to 1954, the average size of farms in South
Florida more than tripled. Averaging 731 acres in 1954, this
was more than twice the average size of farms in Central
Florida and nearly five times that in Northwest Florida.
When classified in terms of value of products sold, the num-
ber of farms in each class has varied moderately during the
past five years. The number grossing less than $1,200 declined
while an increased number reported annual receipts exceed-
ing $25,000. There was a gain in farms grossing from $2,500
to $5,000 of about the same number as was reported lost in
the $5,000-to-$10,000 class. The gain in number of farms in
the $2,500-to-$5,000 class may have been the result of farms
moving in from either the lower or higher brackets. Regard-
less of the reason, the changes in the intermediate economic
classes of farms in South Florida appear to be inconsistent
with data from other areas of the state.
There were nearly 1,300 fewer vegetable farms in South
Florida in 1954 than in 1945. Much smaller declines were re-


-63-








TABLE 43.-AGRIcuLTURE: CHANGES IN FLORIDA FARMS AND FAM RECEIPTS, IN FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1949 TO 1954
(Value figures are in thousands of dollars)

Total of All Farm All Livestock and Livestock Products Sold
Products Sold
All Farms (Livestock and Live-
stock Products, Total all livestock Value of livestock Value of poultry
Crops, and Forest and livestock Value of and livestock and poultry
Products) products dairy products products' products
Per cent Per cent
State and County Per cent change' change
Number change' Value in total Value in in total
in 1954 in number, in 1954 value, 1954 value, In 1949 In 1954 In 1949 In 1954 In 1949 In 1954
1949 1949 1949
to 1954 to 1954 to 1954

State --------- 57,543 1.1 $466,116 37.6 $107,375 25.7 $34,667 $43,101 $37,109 $46,463 $13,611 $17,810
Alachua 1,610 10.8 6,395 24.8 2,675 36.9 500 528 1,289 1,647 166 501
Baker 390 9.5 1,345 76.8 275 59.9 102 162 145 11 28
Bay 264 20.5 520 52.9 390 65.7 93 164 92 92 51 134
Bradford 617 19.7 1,257 65.9 618 130.1 29 22 158 225 81 372
Brevard 1,017 44.3 5,307 18.9 1,243 95.8 74 113 412 966 148 163
Broward 408 3.5 16,238 14.5 9,115 18.0 6,713 7,420 506 1,098 502 597
Calhoun 523 15.9 1,195 55.1 571 46.7 37 131 322 368 31 71
Charlotte -- 148 31.0 1,478 139.7 715 97.8 67 169 287 524 7 23
Citrus 278 24.7 778 26.7 362 28.2 27 56 233 265 23 41
Clay 188 6.2 2,793 109.1 2,409 154.8 687 1,426 161 287 98 696
Collier - 116 39.9 4,473 25.7 518 75.5 -_ 2,107 516 4 2
Columbia 987 12.7 2,856 59.2 1,055 37.7 97 128 447 618 222 309
Dade 1,527 17.4 31,673 65.0 7,308 5.5 5,740 5,097 516 1,197 673 1,013
De Soto 505 1.8 4,241 62.5 949 5.4 60 57 740 711 203 181
Dixie - 214 23.7 428 58.4 251 24.1 21 162 191 20 60
Duval 475 51.3 8,372 34.7 7,320 35.9 3,722 5,673 529 788 1,137 859
Escambia 1,334 12.5 2,315 33.9 1,284 19.5 536 733 382 441 157 110
Flagler 100 9.9 2,055 14.8 386 37.4 67 101 120 132 94 153
Franklin 36 2.9 69 33.1 66 63.5 3 5 30 47 8 14
Gadsden 1,024 20.3 13,170 16.3 2,023 89.0 139 207 763 1,501 168 314
Gilchrist 369 13.4 1,089 22.5 454 29.3 21 20 302 412 28 21
Glades 103 21.2 2,826 13.4 1,579 0.7 92 185 1,478 1,358 20 37
Gulf __ 98 26.3 78 21.4 57 27.9 18 16 49 37 12 3
Hamilton -. 747 1.8 2,842 73.9 427 31.1 19 16 283 379 23 32
Hardee 1,114 6.2 7,186 89.9 857 5.0 60 168 663 610 93 80
Hendry -- 188 27.0 10,510 52.3 1,145 34.5 69 143 763 985 20 17
Hernando 387 8.3 2,246 56.2 816 17.5 57 9 200 280 438 527
Highlands 583 47.2 10,295 107.0 1,238 10.4 258 119 829 1,105 35 13
Hillsborough -. 4,492 19.7 22,956 39.7 9,318 39.9 3,398 4,946 1,801 2,659 1,459 1,712
Holmes 1,481 18.2 2,121 17.1 885 7.9 83 107 574 625 163 153
Indian River 683 53.1 6,722 33.4 771 59.0 247 228 175 433 63 111
Jackson 2,997 18.2 7,286 22.7 3,377 86.7 372 503 1,314 2,387 123 488
Jefferson 924 14.7 2,712 40.2 651 21.9 78 165 431 466 25 21
Lafayette ---- 483 10.0 1,964 107.7 584 129.5 7 283 226 281 22 20
Lake 2,920 70.7 32,042 80.6 1,085 14.3 227 240 386 499 336 346
Lee -- 458 15.9 5,648 8.1 689 98.1 66 147 232 383 49 159
Leon -. 910 25.3 1,835 28.9 906 1.6 450 366 327 366 115 174
Levy .... .- 498 14.7 1,722 5.1 1,046 15.0 28 11 846 942 36 93
Liberty 285 19.7 553 140.4 522 162.9 140 128 58 394
Madison 1,104 9.0 3,575 46.4 1,074 38.2 108 198 501 774 168 102
Manatee 804 3.2 6,514 1.7 1,342 13.1 671 641 362 540 154 161
Marion 1,853 2.8 9,093 30.8 2,731 8.1 261 314 1,799 1,674 468 744
Martin 186 9.3 2,730 125.0 850 157.7 67 345 241 499 22 5
Monroe 11 120.0 5 53.1 -- -100.0 -- ...... 1 -
Nassau .._ 205 50.8 1,274 12.1 1,177 6.6 102 151 194 183 964 843
Okaloosa 863 13.5 1,047 30.7 537 24.9 48 107 332 331 50 99
Okeechobee ----- 242 92.1 1,248 12.7 1,053 18.0 14 38 874 1,004 4 11
Orange _- 2,726 53.1 37,907 45.4 3,390 16.8 1,805 2,072 642 870 457 448
Osceola -- 527 32.1 3,167 47.3 1,258 1.8 129 191 1,075 925 31 141
Palm Beach 874 2.7 34,615 64.8 7,541 61.6 2,121 3,068 2,152 3,933 393 539
Pasco 1,036 5.8 8,378 6.6 1,831 32.7 141 173 504 736 736 922
Pinellas 758 1.4 6,816 8.1 2,813 2.2 1,866 1,981 309 220 577 612
Polk 4,020 23.5 64,468 26.0 4,069 22.3 1,038 1,110 1,932 2,532 356 427
Putnam ----- 622 14.8 4,635 50.9 1,514 65.2 65 136 397 491 454 887
St. Johns 350 3.6 7,124 69.3 820 70.7 220 284 172 344 89 193
St. Lucie 735 42.7 11,697 136.7 890 14.8 61 80 562 731 153 79
Santa Rosa _- 1,202 14.4 2,654 29.3 934 21.1 106 291 626 530 39 113
Sarasota ..-- 349 30.2 2,450 3.7 748 18.7 117 181 473 490 40 78
Seminole 789 45.8 7,277 25.8 919 52.0 248 539 188 224 168 156
Sumter _--- 761 23.8 2,490 14.5 961 19.0 56 121 991 631 138 210
Suwannee 1,705 15.1 5,475 55.9 1,206 26.2 48 79 830 1,004 77 123
Taylor 323 14.6 663 37.0 314 26.7 56 39 176 251 15 23
Union -__ 385 4.5 1,055 19.8 336 1.7 79 104 232 200 30 31
Volusia . 1,173 10.0 7,246 9.5 1,414 19.0 896 717 343 356 507 341
Wakulla 242 29.4 182 5.9 124 2.2 8 13 103 86 11 25
Walton 1,214 4.3 1,705 23.0 950 1.8 116 184 342 411 508 355
Washington 1,003 16.1 1,036 38.7 636 40.2 53 141 321 396 79 99

continued . .


-64-








TABLE 43.-( CONTINUED)
(Value figures are in thousands of dollars)

All Crops Sold Average Size
. of Farm
Total all crops Value of Value of Value of Value of horticul-
State and County Per cent field cropsb vegetables fruits and nuts tural specialties Per cent
State and County Per cent Numb-- cha--
c hanged Number changes
Value in value of acres in acres,
in 1954 1949 to In 1949 In 1954 In 1949 In 1954 In 1949 In 1954 In 1949 In 1954 in 1954 1949 to
1954 1954

State --------- $355,235 42.4 $42,467 $60,539 $59,743 $78,267 $129,931 $188,828 $17,373 $27,601 315.7 8.7
Alachua -.- 3,583 22.8 1,346 2,109 1,350 1,161 183 214 40 99 246.1 23.5
Baker ------- 993 97.6 141 243 13 37 2 1 347 713 262.9 62.7
Bay 105 20.2 19 11 4 12 1 52 63 30 167.4 28.7
Bradford 546 25.9 91 258 165 203 175 84 2 2 124.9 18.5
Brevard 4,011 5.0 12 10 61 15 3,672 3,409 73 578 420.3 6.6
Broward -- 7,121 10.2 9 263 5,638 5,235 512 904 303 720 318.3 3.3
Calhoun ... 568 60.4 255 420 63 70 35 77 1 205.0 23.6
Charlotte 762 244.4 2 29 3 313 109 195 107 224 2,569.5 28.6
Citrus 407 32.4 33 18 24 38 250 351 0 714.9 18.3
Clay 218 13.6 11 21 99 120 3 3 139 74 855.8 81.6
Collier ---- 3,953 172.8 4 82 1,437 3,743 8 5 1 123 3,634.4 50.2
Columbia 1,711 90.2 840 1,509 56 188 2 11 2 4 265.5 1.2
Dade 24,362 98.6 2,843 4,256 6,837 12,261 1,257 4,103 1,332 3,741 129.3 77.4
De Soto 3,284 107.3 5 77 40 126 1,481 3,043 58 37 913.7 17.1
Dixie -.--.--- 157 165.6 55 122 4 35 -... 789.0 37.4
Duval 981 34.2 23 4 146 128 16 17 546 833 169.6 47.0
Escambia -- 972 61.8 460 781 51 38 44 37 46 115 117.6 37.4
Flagler 1,562 30.8 836 1,216 307 328 51 2 15 1,680.4 9.4
Franklin-- 2 62.6 -- 1 1 0 1 652.3 18.2
Gadsden ---- 10,952 7.9 9,957 10,768 133 165 40 19 16 1 193.4 5.6
Gilchrist 632 21.2 157 343 364 283 6 -..... --- 292.8 9.5
Glades -- 1,239 38.2 499 635 397 604 1 .._- 2,862.7 54.2
Gulf 8 -7.2 4 3 2 1 2 1 1 4 448.2 141.5
Hamilton 2,389 100.0 1,094 2,305 100 83 1 2 1 237.2 18.2
Hardee --- 6,319 118.1 31 7 733 1,208 2,119 4,955 15 150 360.5 12.2
Hendry 9,226 52.5 5,533 6,622 397 2,456 119 148 -- 3,441.3 20.0
Hernando ---- 1,423 116.9 47 39 44 55 564 1,324 1 5 307.9 14.9
Highlands 9,032 134.6 19 18 182 538 3,550 8,006 99 471 917.6 7.9
Hillsborough 13,619 39.8 277 241 4,006 3,431 4,789 8,965 668 983 192.2 81.1
Holmes --_ 1,188 32.7 825 1,091 51 91 19 5 --- 124.2 15.5
Indian River 5,948 30.7 570 1,270 683 254 3,155 4,012 143 412 333.5 3.0
Jackson .. 3,828 5.0 3,539 3,170 130 215 140 200 221 243 144.4 17.4
Jefferson -- 1,986 51.2 464 645 202 175 507 685 141 481 245.4 18.1
Lafayette 1,347 102.3 563 1,272 101 70 2 5 --- 219.4 6.8
Lake ------ 30,902 84.2 56 28 691 1,022 15,097 28,829 932 1,022 109.4 25.1
Lee 4,958 1.8 490 712 888 1,388 711 299 2,783 2,559 480.2 7.0
Leon 765 50.5 228 413 54 54 117 212 109 85 201.0 28.8
Levy -- 588 8.7 175 280 438 227 31 81 -. 641.7 5.9
Liberty 12 15.0 12 10 1 1 1 1 --. 169.5 5.1
Madison 2,448 56.1 1,407 2,253 151 180 7 8 3 8 215.1 18.1
Manatee 5,156 1.0 16 18 1,730 1,976 1,334 1,383 2,130 1,780 384.5 34.3
Marion ....- 6,169 44.9 223 290 1,251 1,984 2,738 3,616 44 278 368.7 13.1
Martin .------ 1,871 120.7 34 51 611 967 98 136 105 716 1,079.6 3.2
Monroe .. 5 48.6 ---- 0 9 2 0 2 44.1 44.5
Nassau ----- 69 42.0 34 40 23 12 1 1 61 16 342.2 78.6
Okaloosa 460 37.0 290 445 10 7 35 4 1 4 120.3 16.1
Okeechobee --- 186 10.0 4 4 155 127 10 55 ---- 1,936.8 34.0
Orange 34,496 49.1 40 61 1,716 2,752 19,528 29,140 1,852 2,543 159.3 19.9
Osceola 1,846 105.5 8 2 36 88 853 1,746 1 10 1,584.4 17.6
Palm Beach 27,071 65.7 1,247 2,779 13,572 20,952 191 436 1,324 2,904 510.9 10.8
Pasco -- 6,441 14.8 114 161 179 220 7,256 6,018 6 42 388.4 19.5
Pinellas 3,987 14.4 6 17 34 11 3,943 3,015 677 946 75.1 4.8
Polk ..---- --- 60,339 26.3 79 13 442 346 47,025 59,082 228 898 310.4 11.4
Putnam ...-- 2,913 59.1 657 1,231 278 213 828 1,337 68 132 479.2 16.3
St. Johns -- 6,164 68.4 2,403 4,545 882 1,057 142 54 233 508 521.7 4.0
St. Lucie 10,794 159.5 4 132 2,693 4,884 1,339 5,300 124 478 506.2 30.3
Santa Rosa 1,684 35.6 1,139 1,597 43 35 47 21 13 30 100.7 15.5
Sarasota ----- 1,682 12.0 9 3 1,070 1,047 642 437 191 195 563.9 12.9
Seminole 6,341 31.1 46 16 6,787 3,121 1,531 2,400 841 804 231.1 19.6
Sumter ---..- 1,515 10.1 98 70 1,453 1,248 128 184 6 13 287.0 1.1
Suwannee 4,225 72.1 2,066 3,852 366 311 13 57 9 4 184.7 15.9
Taylor -.. ---. 245 13.0 197 229 19 7 1 3 0 5 1,345.6 120.0
Union -.- 623 61.9 266 517 115 99 4 6 0 2 259.9 20.2
Volusia --- --- 5,748 18.4 20 7 186 136 3,389 4,052 1,259 1,554 211.5 6.9
Wakulla 46 19.5 34 44 1 1 3 __ 150.6 46.5
Walton 718 91.5 308 631 10 16 55 70 3 2 137.2 27.6
Washington 336 37.1 191 231 38 102 14 1 2 2 177.5 89.6


Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.
I Other than dairy and poultry products.
b Other than vegetables, fruits, and nuts.
c The change is an increase unless noted as a decrease by a minus sign.
o Less than $1,000.
Not reported.


-65-





,orted in the number of poultry and fruit and nut farms. The
numbers of field crop, dairy, and general farms remained
practically constant for the period, while in other livestock


farms there was a moderate increase. The large decline in
number of vegetable farms was offset by an equally large gain
in miscellaneous and unclassified farms.


-66-




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs