Title: Hillside Agriculture Project
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00086005/00002
 Material Information
Title: Hillside Agriculture Project
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: x
Publisher: Board of Trustees, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1993
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Jamaica -- Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00086005
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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REPORT ON THE HILLSIDE AGRICULTURE PROJECT (HAP)

MARCH 31, 1993




On completion of the Integrated Rural Development Project

(IRDP), the United States Agency for International Development

(USAID) in consultation with the Government of Jamaica (GOJ)

decided to formulate another, that could still benefit small

hillside farmers but avoid many of the past mistakes. It

commissioned a study which led to the concept of the Hillside

Agriculture Project (HAP). The Project document was prepared more

as a guideline than a blueprint, and gave a Project Coordinating

Committee (PCC) and the Management Unit flexibility to plan and

execute Sub-projects that would have greater agricultural

production emphasis and less attention to infrastructure

development particularly mechanical soil conservation methods.

The Project Grant Agreement was signed on February 27, 1987

between USAID and GOJ to cost an estimated US$13,346.00 (USAID

$10.m, GOJ $3,346.0 m) and to last for seven years. Coming right

after the June 1986 flood rains and devastations caused in

Clarendon and St. Catherine, it was decided to launch HAP in the

Rio Minho and Rio Cobre watershed as pilot areas.

A Project Coordinating Committee was appointed, and a Project

Manager employed in August 1987. An office was established, and

a paper titled "A Guide for Sub-project Application Submission"

(Appendix 1) prepared in September 1987 and circulated. The early

objectives were:












1. Increasing the production and productivity of tree crops

grown by small farmers on erodible hillsides.

2. Improving the living standard of the communities through

increased employment, income, nutrition etc.

3. Conserving the soil and improving the environment.



The first Sub-projects Blackwoods, Elgin and Windsor were

funded in 1988, right before hurricane Gilbert. Since then another

19 have been approved (See Table: 1 Column 1).










Table 1: COST AND BENEFITS OF EACH SUB-PROJECT

SUB-PROJECT TOTAL PROJECT FARMERS ACRES TO

COST BENEFITTING BE TREATED

1. Blackwoods 581,087.00 256 110

2. Elgin 517,988.00 245

3. Windsor 702,736.00 245 107

4. Stewarton 117,000.00 300 0

5. Above Rocks 862,194.00 200 200

6. RMCEP 12,383,736.00 3,000 2,500

7. Manchester 816,770.00 200 220

8. Agro-forestry 2,353,745.00 600 600

9. St. Mary Cocoa 4,872,017.00 800 500

10. Guys Hill 2,450,495.00 300 200

11. N.W.St. Cath. 3,463,315.00 612 300

12. NCPCo 4,133,500.00 700 900

13. MINAG/IICA 15,710,106.91 168 135

14. UNITAS 1,146,923.00 230 200

15. Giblatore 1,112,660.00 300 300

16. Bermaddy 1,349,105.00 300 300

17. Crofts Hill/


Kellits 2,837,352.00

Mammee River 4,332,540.00

Long Road 4,800,636.00

JAS Support 60,000.00

Rural Physical 5,273,450.00

Baseline Survey 541,475.00

TOTAL $70,418,830.00


700

300

700

0

0


700

300

500

0

0


10,156


18.

19.

20.

21.

22.


8,052












ACHIEVEMENTS

The Project maintains an A rating among USAID Projects in

Jamaica, and has caught the attention of not only national

organizations but international ones. It has expanded its

objectives to read

1. To increase fruit trees and lumber production to double

or more.

2. Improve living standards of the people in the

participating communities and others.

3. Provide the farmers with added benefits, such as old-age

pension, ease and comfort.

4. Foster and strengthen cooperatives or the community

spirit.

5. Teach hillside farmers their role in environmental

protection.

6. Educate small farmers in the use of appropriate

technology, affordable inputs and sustainable methods

7. Develop manageable, long lasting soil conservation

methods.

8. Help farmers to appreciate the value of tree crops for

recycling of soil nutrient, windbreak and shade, soil

conservation as well as for produce.

9. Develop or test new farming methods.

10. Reduce land-slippage and road-blocks as well as flooding

and silage.











11. Encourage more young people into tree crops agriculture

12. Assist in finding markets for existing crops and

introduce new crops for existing markets.

13. reduce the serious rural to urban drift.

14. Strengthen community organizations, such as Jamaica

Agricultural Society Branches, Jamaica 4H Clubs, HEART

Trust, Churches and youth groups.

15. Increase the wealth of participants by encouraging

savings generation from increased production to be

used for future farm development.

16. Give more prosperous image to agriculture.

HAP has funded 22 Sub-project (Table 1. Column 1) at a total cost

of $70,418,830.91 (Table 1 Column 2) to benefit 10,156 farmers

(Table: 1 Column 3 on 8,052 acres of land (Table: 1 Column 4). In

doing this we have planted and resuscitated 2,520,613 plants

(Table: 2). The present status of these Sub-projects are given in

Table 3. We presently benefit 175 communities in Jamaica with a

population of nearly 45,000 people. About 30,000 other farmers

will benefit through extension effect. We have revived about 37

Jamaica Agricultural Society Branches, and 6 4H Clubs. We have

established 4 Farm Supply Stores, strengthened 3 cooperatives

(Frankfield, Chapleton, Richmond) and are assisting 3 others. We

established two revolving loan funds at Frankfield and Mangrove

(St. Catherine) and hope to launch others at Richmond and Chapleton

soon.










We are noticing a change in the attitude of the farmers we

treat, and many young persons are becoming interested in tree crops

agriculture. There is also exhibited an increased awareness of the

environment. More funds are being invested in farming some derived

from savings.



TABLE 3: SUB-PROJECTS, THEIR LOCATIONS AND PRESENT STATUS

SUB-PROJECTS LOCATION STATUS

1. Blackwoods JAS Clarendon Phased-out Sept. 30, 1991.

Sustained by Cocoa Industry

Board and Frankfield Cocoa

Growers Co-op Society.


2. 'Elgin JAS

3. Windsor JAS

4. Above Rocks JAS





5. Stewarton JAS





6. Rio Minho Cocoa







7. Manchester RADA


II



St. Catherine





Clarendon





Clarendon







Manchester


II



Phased-out Sept. 1992.

Sustained by HAP via Peace

Corp and JAS Branch Society

Suspended. Will be

completed by RADA

Clarendon.

Phased-out. Sustained by

CoIB Board, Frankfield

Cocoa Growers Co-op

Society.

Phased-out Oct. 7, 1992.

sustained by RADA.










8. Agro-forestry







9. St. Mary Cocoa







10. Guys Hill Coffee


Clarendon/

St. Catherine





St. Catherine/

St. Mary





St. Catherine


11. N.W. St. Catherine


12. N. Clarendon Proc

Company



13. MINAG/IICA FRS



14. UNITAS







15. Giblatore RADA

,J ,


It



St. Cath.



Clarendon







St. Cath.


On-going managed by

Forestry Dept.and

University of Florida.



On-going. Managed by CoIB

and Richmond Cocoa Growers

Co-op Society.

Ongoing. Managed by Coffee

Board and Guy's Hill Coffee

Growers Co-op Society.

On-going. Managed by

Coffee Board and N. W. St.

Catherine Coffee Growers

Co-op Society.



Ongoing. Managed by NCPC

and JAS Branch Societies.

Ongoing. Managed by

MINAG/IICA Farmers Groups.

Phased-out Dec. 31, 1992.

Sustained by Clarendon

RADA, UNITAS and JAS

Branches.

Ongoing. Managed by RADA

and JAS Branches.









Bermaddy RADA "

Crofts Hill Kellits Clarendon

Mammee River St. Andrew


19. Long Roads & Env.


St. Mary


S I


16.

17.

18.


20. JAS Sub-project


Project area

wide


21. Rural Physical


22. Baseline Survey


Ongoing. Pa

Organizers

expenses.

Ongoing. Su

Sub-projects.

Completed. I

Sub-projects.


ys some JAS

travelling



pports other



)ata for all


New. To be managed by

Jacks Hill Community

Council nd JAS Groups.

New. To be managed by St.

Mary Development Project

and JAS Groups.









Successes

The present successes of HAP are predicated on the facts

that:-

1. It was appropriately designed using many Jamaican

experiences, and is relevant to existing needs.

Commencing field work right after the devastations of

hurricane Gilbert was also a blessing in disguise, as we

embarked on field resuscitation which showed quick

positive results and encouraged the beneficiaries to

continue to practices demonstrated.

2. The planning and implementation processes accommodated

significant inputs from the beneficiaries, community

leaders and field staff. This is a fine example of the

bottom-up development approach.

3. Most of the benefits reach the "grass-roots people". The

Management Unit costs about 5%, and field personnel,

transportation rental, utilities etc. cost about 30%.

This allows at least 60% to be spent on inputs (plants,

tools, fertilizer, pesticides etc. for the farmers.

4. The system whereby so cash benefits are give, although

causing some hesitation at the outset, has proven a great

success and is being evaluated by other Projects.

Farmers are now required to provide the land, all the

field labour and some decision making,a nd HAP provides

the technology, training and inputs free of cost to them.











Because the farmers perform the actual practices and

apply the inputs, they experience the activities and know

the reasons for their improved production. They also

compare results with non-HAP farmers and even instruct

them. Farmers have gained great confidence in themselves

to improve their production and productivity.

5. Dramatic increases in production plus new price hikes

have stimulated many more farmers to resuscitate old

field and plant new ones, and the requests to HAP for

assistance are myriad.

6. HAP is now being recognized as a significant agent in

environmental control and development: It is now being

classified as a USAID Environment Project.

7. The initial approach was to resuscitate existing tree

stocks eg. cocoa and coffee, and then to plant new

seedlings to bring field population to an optimum.

Within a year cocoa production was greatly increased

(doubled and tripled in some areas) even from field

devastated by hurricane Gilbert. Within three years

there was vast increases of many crops including coffee,

avocado, mango, ackee and breadfruit. Great interest is

now stimulated in these crops and others.












8. HAP has development a strong cadre of management and

junior management staff, who will be a valuable asset in

the future. It has also trained Field Technicians and

farmers in better farming methods and how to get further

information.

9. The Project is managed by a capable knowledgeable

dedicated Project Coordinating Committee which has used

the stated plans, and the flexibility allowed by HAP to

guide it, and make the changes necessary to ensure great

success.












A A B C D E F G H I K LN P Q R S T U V X Y Z AA
1 HILLSIDE AGRICULTURE PROJECT
2 PLANT LIST UPDATE UP TO THE
3 MONTH OF MAY 1993'
4
5 - - --- --- ------------ -- -- - ---- - --- -- ------ --- ------ -- - -- -- -- --- ------- -- ---------- -- --- ------- -- ---- -- -- -- -- --- ---- ---- ----------- ------------------------- --- ---- -- -------- ---------- ------------- -- -- -----------
6 COCOA COFFEE MANGO
7 ---.-..--...------ --------....-- -----. MISC. TOTAL
8 SUB-PROJECT ACKEE AVOCADO BREAD- SEED- STAKE RESUS PASSION COCONUTS SEED- RESUS GUAVA JACK LUCEANA SEED- RESUS NUTMEG PAWPAW SCURSOP SWEETSOP PINE- TIMBER FRUIT NEW TOTAL
9 FRUIT LINGS FRUIT LINGS FRUIT LINGS APPLE TREES PLANTS RESUS
10 --.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.....-----------------.. .................................
11 BLACKWOCOS 9483 500 24000 -4000 20800 66000 100 450 900 36233 90000
12 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----....---------------------..-- ...................--.............---.......
13 ELGIN 200 500 9217 500 66000 2600 1500 23500 200 14717 89500
14 ------------------------------------------------------.----------------------------------------------------------------------------................------------.......-.-.......................................................
15 WINDSOR 500 300 7000 200 58000 2000 3500 28000 100 250 1500 15350 86000
16 --------------------------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
17 ABOVE ROCKS 50 22550 7000 9500 15600 4850 550 5500 165 53915 11850
18 ---- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
19 AGRO-FORESTRY 945 151 38464 9926 17440 740 161 5 213 20263 227 88535 0
20 ----------... ..-------------------------------------------------------------.--------------------------------- ---------------.............. ...------......-.................................... .........................
21 GUYS HILL COFFEE 1760 32450 146260 900 35110 146260
22 ------------.---------------------------------------.---------------------------------------------.---------------------------------------------------- -------.-... ............ .................................................
23 MANGO TOP 1000 414 1000 414
24 -- - --- -- --- -- ----- --- --- -- --- -- -- --------------- ------ -- -- -- -- -- --- ----- --- ------- -- --- -------- --- --- -- --- - -------- ----- --- -------- ------------------- ------------------ -------- --- -------- ---- --- --------- -------- ---
25 MANCHESTER RADA 35850 12722 60 400 800 37110 12722
26 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
27 MINAG/IICA 410 216 7839 1086 13228 8611 7784 2705 502 70 300 300 17496 44544 16003
28 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
29 N. C. P. Co. 2600 1962 4000 800 700 11900 1100 23062 0
30 ----------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
31 R. M. C. E. P. 3000 204300 4000 765800 37250 400 75 3000 252025 765800
32 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
33 NW ST. CATHERINE 0 3180 42565 118759 45745 118759
34 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
35 ST. MARY COCOA 1928 138 107305 38400 103400 5140 1006 751 1835 156503 103400
36 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
37 UNITAS 1200 20 60 3600 1960 3927 10 39450 45000 1000 5800 3773 56873 48927
38 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
39 GIBLATORE 10200 10200 0
40 ----------------------- ---------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
41 BERMADOY 4713 1333 9800 25 15871 0
42 ------------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
43 KELLITS/CROFT HILL 163 5635 11475 546 6344 11475
44 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
45 LONG ROAD AND ENVIRONS 0 0
46 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------------
47 MAMMEE RIVER 0 0
48 ---------------------------------------------- ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ -----
49 TOTAL 10996 1325 60 420106 46646 1E+06 1962 89310 237339 447796 800 200 1800 2363 484 1786 14900 3314 300 17496 36409 6025 893137 1501110
50 -------------
51
52 PIMENTO, CASHEW, NASEBERRY, APPLE AND CINNAMON
53










HAP'S SUB-PROJECTS MANAGERS AND ADDRESSES
[


Rio Minho Cocoa Expansion Project




SR

Above Rocks FISH/JAS Sub-project


UNITAS of Jamaica Sub-project




IICA/MINAG Farming Systems






Agro-forestry Promotions





Guys Hill Coffee Co-op
North West St. Catherine
Sub-project


St. Mary Cocoa Growers
Support Sub-project



Manchester RADA Sub-project




North Clarendon Processing Co.


Mr. Larry Chung
Sub-project Manager
Rio Minho Cocoa
Expansion Project
Frankfield P.O
Clarendon Ph. 9872274

Mr. A.E. Thompson
Sub-project Manager
St. Mary's College
Above Rocks P.O
St. Catherine Ph.9244836

Mr. Bernard Webber
Sub-project Manager
Mandeville P.O
Manchester Ph.9622846

Dr. R. Baker
Director
Research & Development
Ministry of Agriculture
Hope Gardens
Kingston 6 Ph.9271731-50

Mr. Patrick Virgo
Sub-project Manager
Forestry Department
173 Constant Spring Road
Kingston 8 Ph.9242612

Mr. Alford Williams
Coffee Industry Dev. Co.
Marcus Garvey Drive
Kingston 15 Ph. 9234481

Mr. Dunstan Gaynor
Richmond Cocoa Fermentary
Richmond P.O
St. Mary Ph.9922291

Mr. Derrick Sinclair
Manchester RADA
Mandeville P.O
Manchester Ph. 9622135

Mr. Gladstone Miller
N.C.P. Co.
Morgan's Pass P.O
Clarendon Ph. 9872110









Watershed Inventory Project





Giblatore/Bermaddy Sub-project





Mango Top-working




Crofts Hill/Kellits Hillside
Cocoa Development Sub-project




Baseline Survey




Mammee River Agricultural
& Environmental Development
Sub-project


Long Road & Environs
Hillside Development Sub-project





Elgin JAS Subproject
Windsor JAS Subproject
Blackwoods JAS Subproject


Mr. Vincent Campbell
Rural Physical Planning
Ministry of Agriculture
Hope Gardens
Kingston 6 Ph. 9279828

Mr. Winston A. Armstrong
Parish Agriculture Mgr.
Vanity Fair
Linstead P.O
St. Catherine Ph.9852635

Mr. James Binns
Contractor
Mocho P.O
Clarendon Ph.9862222

Mr. Trevor Martin
Parish Agricultural Manager
Clarendon RADA
May Pen P.O
Clarendon Ph. 9862061

Mr. Roy L. Russell
Managing Director
30 Roosevelt Avenue
Kingston 5 Ph. 9274496

Mr. Douglas Aitken
7J Haining Road
Kingston 5 Tel:926-2250

OR

Jack Hill Community Council
Jack Hill P.O
St. Andrew


Father Jim Webb S.J
St. Mary Rural Development Project
P.O. Box 5, Main Street
Annotto Bay
St. Mary Tel: 996-2378


Mr. Vernal Taylor
project Manager
Thompson Town P.O.
Clarendon.











SUB-PROJECTS


Windsor JAS

Blackwoods JAS

Elgin JAS

Stewarton Mango top

Rio Minho Cocoa Expansion
Project

MINAG/IICA

Above Rocks FISH

Manchester RADA

Unitas Tree Crops

Agro Forestry Promotion

Guys Hill Coffee

N.W. St. Catherine

St. Mary Cocoa Farmers

Rural Physical Planning
Division/HAP

North Clarendon
Processing Company

Bermaddy Area Rio Cobre
Sub-project

Giblatore Area Rio Cobre
Sub-project

Crofts/Hill Kellits

Long Road & Environs
Hillside Development

Mammee River & Environs
Development


STARTING DATE


July 18, 1988

August 24, 1988

August 24, 1988

August 24, 1988


September 30, 1988

November 15, 1988

March 8, 1989

April 18, 1989

June 21, 1989

April 27, 1990

June 18, 1990

June 18, 1990

July 26, 1990


November 16, 1990


February 5, 1991


August 27, 1991


September 23, 1991

January 6, 1992


February 5, 1993


February 15, 1993


CLOSING DATE


October 30, 1992

October 30, 192

October 30, 1992

August 3, 1992


September 30, 1992

December 30, 1993

September 30, 1992

December 31, 1992

December 31, 1992

October 24, 1993

June 30, 1993

June 30, 1993

December 31, 1993


December 31, 1993


February 28,


December 31,


December

December


31,

31,


1994


1993


1993

1993


June 30, 1996


June 30, 1996














PROSPECTIVE HAP SUBPROJECTS


1. West St. Andrew Approved

2. New Longsville Approved

3. North St. Mary

4. Bellfield

5. Wood Hall

6. Hopewell Pen

7. Eastern St. Thomas

8. Western St. Thomas

9. Minto/Penline Castle

10. Buff Bay Valley

11. UNITAS Phase II

12. Trinityville Area Tree Crops Development





















JAMAICA~~~~~~ ~~~~~ 1:0,0 A E{WN SJ-RJ OAIN


CARIBBEAN SEA _


JAhlAICA 1:900,000


MAIZ S HTOWIINGc:


SUIB-FROJE= EOCAIFIO--\T








SUB-PROJECTS N PROGRESS


1 BLACKWOODS JAS
2. ELGN JAS
3. IWNSOR JAS
4. MANGO TOP-WORKING
5. UNIAS OF JAMAICA
6. RKO MIO COCOA EXPANSION
7. ACRO-FORESTRY
8. NORTH CLARENDON PROCESSING
9. MANCHSTER RADA
10. ABOVE ROCKS
11. MNAG/ICA 17,810 ac. (7,200 ha)
12 ST. MARY COCOA SUPPORT 11,608 ac (4,670 ha)
13 CUYS HLL COFFEE
14. NORTH WESTERN ST. CATHILRN
15. GIBLATORF RADA
16. BLRMADDY RADA
17. CROFTS HL/KELLITS
18. MAMMEE RIVER
19 LONG ROAD AND ENVRONS


SUB-PROJECTS APPROVED

1 WEST ST, ANDREW
2. NEW LONGSVLLE ST. MARY


SUB-PROJECTS EXPECTED TO STAR

1. BUFF BAY VALLEY PORTLAND
2. BELFILD ST. MARY
3. ISLINGTON ST. MARY
4. MOUNT AIREY ST. ANDREW
5. PIO CRANE VALLEY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
6 HOPEWELL ST. MARY
7. CASTLETON AND ENVIRONS ST. MARY
8 WOODHALL CLARPrEON
' 9. PENLINE CASTLE ST. ANDREW
10. ST. THOMAS (Weslern and Eastern)




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