• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The sculptor boy
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Truthful boys
 Faithful boys
 Dilligent boys
 Honest boys
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Boys wanted
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085973/00001
 Material Information
Title: Boys wanted
Physical Description: 139, 1 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Nye, J. L
George Stoneman ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Stoneman
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Boys -- Religious life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
short story   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by J.L. Nye.
General Note: Pictorial front cover and spine signed by J.L. Nye.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085973
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235043
notis - ALH5484
oclc - 237792549

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    The sculptor boy
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Introduction
        Page 8
    Truthful boys
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
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        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Faithful boys
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
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        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Dilligent boys
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
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        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Honest boys
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
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        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
    Back Cover
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Spine
        Page 143
Full Text















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The Baldwin Library

fPm BUO


I











































THE GUIDE OF YOUTH.






Boys


Wanted.


BY
J. L. NYE,
Author of "Stories illustrative of the Book of Proverbs," &c.




LONDON:
GEORGE STONEMAN, 39, WARWIoC LANE, E.C.
1897.










The Sculptor Boy.


CHISEL in hand stood a sculptor boy,
With his marble block before him;
And his face lit up with a smile of joy,
As an angel dream passed o'er him;
He carved it then on the yielding stone,
With many a sharp incision ;
With heaven's own light the sculpture shone;
He had caught that angel-vision.

Sculptors of life are we, as we stand,
With our souls, uncarved, before us,
Waiting the hour when, at God's command,
Our life-dream shall pass o'er us.
If we carve it then, on the yielding stone,
With many a sharp incision,
Its heavenly beauty shall be our own,
Our lives, that angel-vision.
BIsHOr DOANE.









CONTENTS.





CHAPTER I.


Truthful Boys.


The Poet Tennyson's motto-Truth has power
-Abd-el Kadir's love of truth in his childhood-
The robbers repentance -Didn't I Dan-The
truth at all hazards -Demurrage-Untruths cause
sorrow-Died for the want of medicine-Truth
is always triumphant-Beans barrelled and
marked-The missing sixpence-Keepyourhon-
our without stain-Charles Thomson-True Dun-
can-'Truthfulness brings honour-Prize nobly
won--Don't be cowards-Charlie Mann-The
immortal Sydney-Falsehood sure to be found out
-John Kinney's falsehood-The same thing every
time-Uphold the truth-Little Scotch Granite
-Lying is.mean-Tom Quayle's Grandfather-
Robert Burdette's message to boys.







CHAPTER II


Faithful Boys.


Forty generations look down upon you-
Gerhardt the German shepherd boy-Execution
of Thomas Dowry the blind boy-Thomas Croker
burnt-St. Cuthbert-Boy's courage for Jesus-
Robert Moffat's mother's parting request-Three
Good lessons-Joe's first temptation-The lesson
Fido taught-Hold on to the end-Battle of
Gettysburg-Mr. and Mrs. C. Hall's visit to Ire-
land-A boy's influence-George C. Lake faith-
ful to his word-When to say 1o-Diocletian and
young St. Pancras--Zinzendorf, poet and preacher
-Martin Luther.

CHAPTER III.


Diligent Boys.

Franklin's advice-Cressinus accused of witch-
craft-Gounod determined to succeed-Sir Mar-
tin Shee's advice to Millais mother -Fred-
erick D. Maurice's pledge-The Rev. T. Champ-








ness' story-The luckiest fellow in town-One
leisure hour--Giotto's design sent to Pope Boni-
face VIII.-Best boys story-Boy wanted, notice
in Mr Peter's window-A poor Bulgarian boy-
How one boy faced the world-Proudest mom-
ent of Agassiz's life-No yeast-Jared sparks-
Never miss an opportunity to do good-Harold
Robertson-Whistling to some purpose -A little
encouragement-One by one.

CHAPTER IV.


Honest Boys.

Epaminondas refusing bribes-Honesty brings
happiness-Carolo and the count-The best ten-
ant to have-Dear Stanley's story of a match boy
-Reuby and Sandy-Stating the facts-A good
name-Reputation, Love and death-A Counter-
feit-Paul Wallace-Mr. Talmage lend me l-
Thomas Tegg's business enterprise-Old Peter
Schroeder's advice-Fearless and sincere-Home
Tooke at School-The boy I can trust-An hon-
est coloured lad.
















A Boy's Resolve.



I WILL NOT SWEAR,
I WILL NOT DARE,
GOD'S NAME IN VAIN TO TAKE;
I WILL NOT LIE,
BUT I WILL TRY,
THE TRUTH MY GUIDE TO MAKE.











Truthful Boys.

TRUTH HAS POWER. IT IS
RIGHT TO TELL IT.
UNTRUTHS CAUSE SORROW. TRUTH IS
TRIUMPHANT. HELPS TO KEEP
HONOUR WITHOUT STAIN.
FALSEHOOD IS FOUND OUT.
UPHOLD THE TRUTH.
LYING IS MEAN.


HE Poet Tennyson had the motto "Y
T Gwyr yn Erbyn y byd "-the truth
against the world-in incrusted tiles on
the pavement of his entrance-hall. The
motto is an excellent one for boys. A
lie has no legs and therefore cannot stand.
" After a tongue" says a great writer has once
got the knack of lying, 'tis not to be imagined
how impossible almost it is to reclaim it." The
boys that are wanted are the boys that are
Truthful. The
Truth has Power.
How simply and beautifully has Abd-el-Kadir,
of Ghilon, impressed us with the love of truth in
A






BOYS WANTED.


his childhood. After stating the vision which
made him entreat of his mother to go to Bagdad
and devote himself to God, he thus proceeds: I
informed her what I had seen, and she wept;
and taking out eighty dinars she told me that, as I
had a brother, half of that was all my inheritance;
she made me swear when she gave it to me,
never to tell a lie, and afterwards bade me fare-
well, exclaiming: 'Go, my son, I consign thee
to God; we shall not meet until the day of
judgement.' I went on well till I came near
Hamandnai, when our Kafillah was plundered
by sixty horsemen. One fellow asked me what
I had got. 'Forty dinars,' said I, 'are sewed up
under my garments.' The fellow laughed,
thinking I was joking. 'And what have you
got ?' .said another. I gave him the same
answer. When they were dividing the spoil, I
was called to an eminence where the chief stood.
'What have you got my little fellow?' said he,
'I have told two of your people already,' I
replied. 'I have forty dinars sewed in my gar-
ments!' He ordered them to be ripped open,
and found my money. 'And how came you,' he
said, in surprise, 'to declare so openly what had
been so carefully concealed ?' Because I will not
be false to my mother, to whom I have promised
I would never tell a lie.' 'Child;' said the
robber, 'hast thou such sense of duty to thy
mother at thy years, and am I insensible, at my
age, of the duty I owe to God? Give me thy






TRUTHFUL BOYS.


hand, innocent boy,' he continued, 'that I may
swear repentance upon it.' He did so. His
followers were all alike struck with the scene.
'You have been our leader in guilt,' said they,
to their chief; 'be the same in the path of virtue,'
and they instantly, at his order, made restitution
of their spoil, and vowed repentance on his hand."
The boy who always speaks the truth has no
need to seek confirmation from another.
"JIMMY, have you watered my horse this
morning?"
Yes uncle, I watered him; didn't I, Dan?"
he added, turning to his younger brother.
Of course you did," responded Dan.
The gentleman looked at the boys a moment,
wondering a little at Jimmy's words; then he
rode away.
This was Mr. Harley's first visit with his
nephews, and thus far he had been pleased with
their bright intelligent faces and kind behaviour.
Still there was something in Jimmy's appeal to
his brother that impressed him unfavourably, he
could hardly tell why; but the cloud of disfavour
had vanished from his mind when, two hours later
he turned his horse's head homeward. Just in
the bend of the road he met his nephews, Jimmy
bearing a gun over his shoulder.
Did your father give you permission to carry
that gun?" he inquired.
Yes, sir," replied Jimmy; didn't he, Dan?"
Of course he did," said Dan.






BOYS WANTED.


"And of course I believe you, Jimmy, without
your brother's word for it," said Mr. Harley.
Jimmy's face flushed, and his bright eye fell
below his uncle's gaze. Mr. Harley noticed his
nephew's confusion, and rode on without further
comment.
"This map of North America is finely ex-
ecuted; did you draw it, Jimmy?" asked Mr.
Harley that afternoon, while looking over a book
of drawings.
"Yes, Sir," replied Jimmy, with a look of con-
scious pride; then turning to his brother he
added,
"Didn't I, Dan?"
Mr. Harley closed the book and laid it on the
table.
"Jimmy," he began, what does this mean?
To every question I have asked you to-day you
have appealed to Dan to confirm your reply. Can-
not your own word be trusted ?"
Jimmy's face turned scarlet, and he looked as
if he would like to vanish from his uncle's sight.
"Not always," he murmured, looking straight
down at his boots.
My dear boy, I was afraid of this," said Mr.
Harley kindly.
Do you mean to go through life always having
to say: "Didn't I, Dan ?"
"No, uncle; I am going to try to speak the
truth so that people will believe me as well as
Dan," said Jimmy, impulsively.







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


Mr. Harley spent the season with his nephews,
and before he left he had the pleasure of hearing
people say, "What's come over Jimmy Page? He
never says lately, "Didn't I, Dan?"
Mr. Harley thought it was because Jimmy
was gaining confidence in himself.
The Truth must always be told, and at all
hazards, because it is
Right.
A story I read the other day in one of the
papers well illustrates this:
SOME time after the beginning of the present
century there were living in a busy country town
in the North a pious couple who had an only
son. For this son they daily prayed to God.
So the foundations of an upright life were laid in
the boy's heart, and among these very especially
a regard for uprightness and truth.
In the course of years the boy's school-days
were ended, and also his apprenticeship to a
business life in the country town, and as there
was no prospect for him there, he went to one
of the great sea-ports, and, by-and-bye, he got a
good position in a merchant's office.
But he was not long in this excellent place
before he was put to the test in a very painful
way with respect to the lessons he had received
about truth. It was part of the business of that
office to have ships coming and going. And it
was the rule when a ship came into port that its







BOYS WANTED.


captain sent word to the office that he had
arrived and was now waiting instructions where
to discharge the cargo; and it was the duty of
the manager of the office to send back instruc-
tions to the captain where and when this was to
be done. A few months after the little lad came
to the office a ship laden with coal came in, and
the usual message from the captain came, but
somehow or other no answer was sent back to
him. The captain waited a week, but still no
word came back. Now, that was very hard on
the captain. Until his ship was free of its cargo
it had to lie idle in the dock, and all who be-
longed to the ship were kept idle too. So at
the end of a week the captain sent word to the
office that his ship had been kept so long waiting
for instructions where to discharge its cargo that
it had missed a good offer of a new cargo, and
the office would have to pay him for the loss.
This payment is called demurragee."
When the manager of the office got this mes-
sage from the captain he was very angry. He
sent for the little lad, and said to him: -
"Didn't I send you down to Captain Smith
with instructions to discharge his cargo?"
The little lad said:
"No, sir; I do not remember being sent
down."
"0, but I did," answered the manager. "You
have forgotten."
And there for a time, so far as the office was







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


concerned, the matter was allowed to rest.
But the captain did not intend to let it rest
there. He applied for his demurrage. And
when that was refused, he took the manager of
the office to law, and by-and-bye his complaint
came before the judges in the court of law.
The day before the trial the manager came to
the little lad and said to him:
"Mind, I sent you to the dock with those
instructions to discharge the coal."
"But I assure you I cannot remember your
doing so," said the boy.
"0, yes, but I did. You have forgotten."
It was a great trouble to the youngster. He
had never been sent to the dock. He could not
say that he had been sent; and he foresaw that
he would have to say before the judges what
would certainly offend the manager, and lead to
the loss of his excellent place.
On the morning of the trial he went to the
court. The manager came up, and the poor
young fellow tried once more to assure him that
he was mistaken, but he would not listen.
"It is all right," he said hastily; "I sent you
on such a day, and you have got to bear witness
that I did-and see you say it clearly."
In a little while he was called into the witness-
box, and almost the first question put to him
was whether he remembered the day when
Captain Smith's ship came in. And then this:
You remember during the day being sent by







BOYS WANTED.


the manager of the office to the dock with a
letter for the captain ?"
"No, sir."
"Were you not sent by the manager of your
office to the coal ship on that day ?"
"I was not, sir."
"Nor the next day ?"
No."
"Nor any other day ?"
"No."
The gentleman who put the question was a
barrister. He had been engaged by the manager
to win the case for them. But when he heard
the little lad's reply he turned to the judge
and said:
My lord, I give up this case. My instruc-
tions were that this witness would prove that a
message to discharge had been sent to Captain
Smith, and it is plain no such proof is to be got
from him."
So the case ended in the captain's favour and
against the office in which the youthful witness
had found so excellent a place.
He went to his lodgings with a sorrowful heart,
and wrote to his father and mother that he was
sure to be dismissed. Then he packed his trunk
to be ready to go home next day; and in the
morning, expecting nothing but dismissal, he
went early to the office. The first to come in
after him was his master. He stopped for a
moment at the lad's desk and said:







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


"We lost our case yesterday."
"Yes, sir," answered the boy, "and I am very
sorry I had to say what I did."
By-and-bye the manager came in; and after a
little time he was sent for to the master's room.
It was a long while before he came out. Then
the young witness was sent for. "I am going
to be dismissed," he thought to himself. But
the master said to him, "I was angry yesterday,
but not with you. You did right to speak the
truth; and to mark my approval of what you
did, I am going to put you in charge of all the
workings and sales of our Glenf.rdel mine."
Then he sent fur the- manager, and told him
what he had said, and added, "And this youth
will make his reports direct to me."
Six months afterwards the manager left the
office, and, young though he was, the hero of
this story was appointed to his place. And
before as many years had passed he was admitted
as junior partner in the firm; and he is now at
the head of the entire business-the managing
partner.
In his case truth was the best. But I want
to say that if things had turned out other than
they did, and he had been dismissed, it would
still have been the best for him to speak the
truth.
Another reason why truthful boys are wanted
is because







BOYS WANTED.


Untruths cause Sorrow,
and the sorrow often lasts a lifetime.
A GENTLEMAN tells us that he had one of the
kindest and best of fathers, and when he was a
little boy, about six years old, his father used to
carry him to school before him on his horse, to
help him in his little plans, and always seemed
trying to make him happy, and he never seemed
so happy himself as when trying to make his lad
happy. When I was six years old says the
gentleman, my father came home one day very
sick. My mother, too, was sick, and thus no-
body but my two sisters could take care of my
father.
In a few days he was worse, very sick, and all
the physicians in the neighbourhood were called
in to see him.
Next Sabbath morning early he was evidently
much worse. As I went into his room he
stretched out his hand to me and said :
My little boy, I am very sick. I wish you
to take that paper on the stand, and run to Mr.
C.'s, and get me the medicine written on that
paper."
I took the paper, -and went to the apothecary's
shop, as I had often done before. It was about
half a mile; but when I got there I found it
shut, and, as Mr. C. lived a quarter of a mile
further off, I concluded not to go to him. So I
set out for home.







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


On my way back I contrived what to say. I
knew how wicked it was to tell a lie; but one sin
always leads to another.
On going into my father, I saw that he was
in great pain, and, though pale and weak, I
could see great drops of sweat standing on his
forehead, forced out by the pain. Oh then I
was sorry I had not gone and found the apothe-
cary.. At length he said to me :
"My son has got the medicine, I hope, for I
am in great pain."
I hung my head and muttered, for my con-
science smote me, "No, sir; Mr. C. says he has
got none." Has got none Is this possible? "
He then cast a keen eye upon me, and seeing
my head hang, and probably suspecting my
falsehood, said in the mildest, kindest tone: "My
little boy will see his father suffer great pain for
the want of that medicine? I went out of the
room and cried. I was soon called back. My
brothers had come, and all the children were
standing round his bed, and he was committing
my poor mother to their care, and giving them
his last advice. I was the youngest, and when
he laid his hand on my head, and told me that
in a few hours I should have no father-that in
a day or two he would be buried-that I must
now seek God to be my father, love Him, obey
Him, and always do right, and speak the truth,
because the eye of God is always upon me-it
seemed as if I should sink; and when he laid his







BOYS WANTED.


hand upon my head again, and prayed for the
blessing of God the Redeemer to rest upon me,
"soon to be a fatherless orphan," I dared not
look at him I felt so guilty. Sobbing, I rushed
from his bedside and wished I could die.
They soon told me he could not speak. Oh,
how much would I have given to go in and tell
him that I had told a lie, and ask him once more
to lay his hand on my head and forgive me!
I crept 'in once more, and heard the minister
pray for the dying man. Oh, how my heart
ached!
I snatched my hat, and ran to the apothecary's
house and got the medicine. I ran home with
all my might, and ran up to my father's bedside
to confess my sin, crying out, Oh, here father!"
but I was hushed; and I then saw he was pale,
and that all in the room were weeping. My
dear father was dead, and the last thing I ever
spoke to him was to tell a lie!
I sobbed as if my heart would break, for
his kindness, his tender looks, and my own sin,
all rushed upon my mind; and, as I gazed upon
his cold, pale face, and saw his eyes shut, and
his lips closed, could I help thinking of his last
words :
"My little boy will see his father suffer great
pain for the want of that medicine ? I could not
but know that he died for the want of it.
It was twelve years after this, while in college
that I went alone to the grave of my father, and







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


as I stood over it I seemed to be at his bedside,
to see his pale face, and hear his voice. Oh, the
thought of that sin and wickedness cut me to the
heart! It seemed as though worlds would not
be too much to give could I then only have
called loud enough to have him hear me and ask
his forgiveness. But it was too late. I must
live and die weeping over the ungrateful false-
hood. May God forgive me!"
Boys, beware of disobedience and lying. One
wrong step leads to others, which are increasing
evil, and thus may go on from bad to worse.
May you be blessed with the fear of the Lord!
I want you to remember that truth is mighty,
and shall prevail.
An old Swiss proverb declares that it takes a
good many shovelfuls of earth to bury the truth.
Those who desert truth in trifles are seldom
trusted in matters of importance, but those who
stick to the truth in the end are
Triumphant.
The following incident from one of the weekly
papers is a case in point:
A youth, who was an earnest Christian, had
a situation in a large commission house. On
one occasion a large quantity of beans that had
been damaged was sent to this firm for them to
sell. When these damaged beans were received,
a lot of beans of first quality was purchased.






BOYS WANTED.


Then they went to work to put up the beans in
barrels. At the bottom and top of each barrel a
lot of the good beans were put, so that whichever
end of any barrel might be opened, the good
beans would be seen, though the rest of each
barrel was filled up with the bad beans. When
the barrels were all closed up, the head of the
firm went to work and marked them thus:
"Beans A-No. 1." On seeing this, the clerk
said to his employer, "Do you think it right,
sir, to mark those beans 'A-No. 1' ?"
"Hold your tongue, sir! it's none of your
business! was the sharp reply. The clerk said
no more. The beans were all barrelled and
marked "A-No. 1," and stowed away in the
upper part of the warehouse. A sample of beans
of the first quality was kept in the office for
examination.
One day a gentleman came into the office, who
wished to buy a large quantity of beans. He
examined the samples there and liked them very
much. "Can I see the beans in the barrels ? "
he asked. Ceftainly, sir," said the head of the
firm, and he told the clerk already spoken of to
take the gentleman upstairs. A barrel was
opened; he looked at them carefully. They were
just like the sample he had seen below. Then
he said to the clerk, Young man, the sample of
beans showed me in the office, and these at the
top of the barrel, are of the first quality. I
cannot get such beans anywhere for so low a






TRUTHFUL BOYS.


price. But answer me honestly one question, are
the beans in these barrels of the same quality all
the way through?" The clerk hesitated for a
moment. He knew his employer would expect
him to say Yes," but his conscience told him
he ought to say No." He resolved to be true
to his conscience, So he answered "No, sir, they
are not." Then I don't want them," said the
gentleman, and he left. The young man return-
ed to the office. Did you sell that man those
beans ? asked his employer. "No, sir," said he.
"Why not?" "Well, sir, the man asked me
to tell him honestly if the beans were the same
quality all through the barrel as they were on
the top. I told him they were not. Then he
said he did not want them, and left."
Well, sir, you can go to the cashier and get
your wages," said the employer. Well, this
was rather a poor reward for his piety and
bravery. But this was not the end of it. A
few days after, he received a note from his late
employers asking him to call on them. He
went to see them.
We have a place of great importance to be
filled," said the head of the firm. We need for
it a person in whose truthfulness and honesty
we can have the utmost confidence. The salary
is a hundred pounds a year more than you
received in your former position. Will you
accept it ? "
"I will, sir, with thankfulness." "Very well,






BOYS WANTED.


then, it is yours."
Here is another story illustrating the point
that truth triumphs:-
HOLDING out his hand for the change, John's
employer said: Well, my boy, did you get
what I sent you for ?"
Yes, sir," said John; "and here is the change,
but I don't understand it. The lemons cost
three shillings, and there ought to be seven
shillings change, and there's only six shillings
and sixpence, according to my count."
"Perhaps I made a mistake in giving you the
money.
No, sir. I counted it over in the hall to be
sure it was all right."
"Then perhaps the clerk made a mistake in
giving you the change."
But John shook his head. "No, sir; I counted
that, too. Father said we must always count
our change before leaving a shop."
Then how in the world do you account for
the missing sixpence? How do you expect me
to believe such a queer story as that ?"
John's cheeks grew red, but his voice was
firm. "I don't account for it, sir; I can't. All
I know is that it is so."
"Well, it is worth a good deal in this world to
be so sure of that. How do you account for
that sixpence that is hiding inside your coat
sleeve ?"
John looked down quickly, and caught the







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


gleaming bit with a cry of ple-sure. "Here you
are! Now it is all right. I couldn't imagine
what hi-l become of that sixpence. I was
certain I had it when I started from the shop to
return."
"There are two things that I know now," Mr.
Brown said, with a satisfied air. "I know you
have been taught to count your money in coming
and going, and to tell the exact truth, whether
it sounds well or not-two important things in
an errand boy. I think I'll try you without
looking farther."
At this John's cheeks grew redder than ever.
He looked down and up, and finally he said in a
low voice: I think I ought to tell you that I
wanted the place so badly I almost made up my
mind to say nothing about the change if you
didn't ask me."
"Exactly," said Mr. Brown; "and if you had
not done it, you would have lost the situation,
that's all. I need a boy about me who can be
honest over so small a sum as sixpence, whether
he is asked questions or not."
Telling the truth will help you to keep your
Honour Without Stain.
Many incidents are told of Quakers in the old
days. One of these has a significance that is
worthy of consideration.
There was a famous school to which the boys
of well-to-do parents were sent. The examin-
B







BOYS WANTED. .


nations were severe, and the lads who failed felt
themselves somewhat disgraced in the eyes of
the whole school. Many of the pupils secretly
used translations, or were helped by scholarly
friends in their studies.
One boy, Charles Thompson, refused to avail
himself of any help or dishonest trick. He was
slow to learn, and timid. His classmates in-
sisted that he appeared at an unjust disadvantage
for these reasons at examinations, and urged him
to use cribs.
"No," he said. "It is a pity if I do not learn
Greek; but it.will be worse if I learn to lie."
He failed, and was sent down to a lower class
for the next term.
Charles Thompson was never, perhaps, first in
his class at school; but among the good and
noble men of a past generation he stood in
the foremost rank as a man whose honour was
stainless.
He became and long held the post of Secretary
to the United States Congress, and on disputed
points his simple statement outweighed the oaths
of noisy disputants. Even the Indians recog-
nised the quality of the man, and received him
into their nation, giving him a name which sig-
nified He who cannot lie."
If he had learned to lie in order to pass a
simple school examination, for what a poor
mess of pottage would he have sold his kingly
birthright.







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


THERE was once a boy named Duncan. The
boys used to call him True Duncan because
he would never tell a lie. One day he was
playing with an axe in the schoolyard. The
axe was used for cutting wood for the schoolroom
fire in winter. While Duncan was chopping a
stick, the teacher's cat, Old Tabby," came and
leaped on to the log of wood where Duncan was
at work. He had raised the axe to cut the wood,
but it fell on the cat and killed her. What to
do he knew not. She was the master's pet cat,
and used to sit on a cushion at his side while he
was hearing the boys their lessons. Duncan
stood looking at poor Tabby. His face grew red
and the tears stood in his eyes. All the boys
came running up and everyone had something
to say.
One of them was heard whispering to the
others, Now, boys, let us see whether Duncan
can't make up a fib as well as the rest of us."
Not he," said Tom Brown, who was Dun-
can's friend, "not he I'll warrant. Duncan will
be as true as gold."
John Jones stepped up and said, Come,
boys, let us fling the cat into the lane, and we
can tell Mr. Cole that the butcher's dog killed
her. You know that he worried her last
week."
Some of them thought that would do very
well. But Duncan looked quite angry, his cheek
swelled and his face grew redder than before.






BOYS WANTED.


"No, no," said he. Do you think I would say
that. It would be a lie-a lie Each time he
used the word his voice grew louder. Then he
took up the poor thing and carried her into the
master's room. The boys followed to see what
would happen.
The master looked up and said, What is
this my poor Tabby killed ? Who could have
done me such an injury ? "
All were silent for a little while. As soon as
Duncan could get his voice he said, Mr. Cole,
I am very sorry I killed poor Tabby. Indeed,
sir, I am very sorry, I ought to have been more
careful, for I saw her rubbing herself against the
log. I am Inore sorry than I can tell, sir."
Everyone expected to see Mr. Cole get very
angry, take down his cane, and give Duncan a
sound thrashing. But instead of that he put on
a pleasant smile and said, Duncan, you are a
'brave boy. I saw and heard all that passed in
the yard from my window above. I am glad to
see such an example of truth and honour in my
school."
Duncan took out his handkerchief and wiped
his eyes. The boys could not keep silence any
longer, and when Tom Brown cried, Three
cheers for True Duncan they all joined and
made the schoolhouse ring with a mighty hurrah.
The teacher then said, "My boys, I am glad you
know what is right and that you approve it,
though I am afraid some of you could not have







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


done it. Learn from this time that nothing can
make a lie necessary.. Suppose Duncan had
taken evil advice and come to me with a lie, it
would have been instantly detected, and instead
of the honour of truth he would have had only
the shame of falsehood."
Truthfulness brings honour, while lying brings
disgrace.
Two country lads came at an early hour to a
market town, and, arranging their little stands,
sat down to wait for customers. One was fur-
nished with fruits and vegetables of the boys
own raising, and the other supplied with clams and
fish. The market hours passed along, and each
little merchant saw with pleasure his store
steadily decreasing, and an equivalent in silver
bits shining in his little money cup, The last
melon lay on Harry's stand when a gentleman
came by, and placing his hand upon it, said:-
"What a fine, large melon! What do you ask
for it, my boy ?"
The melon is the last I have, sir; and though
it looks very fair, there is an unsound spot in it,"
said the boy, turning it over.
So there is," said the man, "IT think I will
not take it. But,-" he added, looking into the
boy's fine, open countenance, is it very business-
like to point out the defects of your fruit to
customers ?"
"It is better than being dishonest, sir," said
the boy modestly.







BOYS WANTED.


"You are right; always remember that prin-
ciple, and you will find favour with God and
with man also. I shall remember your little
stand in future. Are those clams fresh ? he con-
tinued, turning to Ben Wilson's stand.
Yes, sir, fresh this morning. I caught them
myself." was the reply; and, a purchase being
made, the gentleman went away.
"Harry, .what a fool you were to show the
gentleman that spot in the melon! Now you
can take it home for your pains or throw it away.
How much wiser is he about those clams I
caught yesterday? Sold them for the same
price as I did the fresh ones. He would never
have looked at the melon until he had gone
away."
Ben, I would not tell a lie, or act one either,
for twice what I have gained this morning. Be-
sides, I shall be better off in the end, for I have
gained a customer, and you have lost one."
And so it proved, for the next day the gentle-
man bought nearly all his fruits and vegetables
of Harry, but never spent another penny at the
stand of his neighbour. Thus the season passed;
the gentleman, finding he could always get a
good article of Harry, constantly patronised him
and sometimes talked to him about his future
prospects. To become a merchant was Harry's
great ambition! and when the winter came on,
the gentleman wanting a trusty boy for his
warehouse, decided on giving the place to Harry.













- I~I


" BEHIND THE OTHER BOYS."


~1~;~?1'11111"







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


PRIZES were to be given in Willie's school,
and he was very anxious to merit one of them.
Willie had never had much opportunity to learn,
and he was behind the other boys in all his
studies except writing. As he had no hope to
excel in anything except writing, he made up his
mind to try for the special prize for that. And
he did try; his copy-book would have done
credit to a boy twice his age. When the prizes
were awarded the chairman of the committee
held up two copy-books and said, 'It would be
difficult to say which of these two books is better
than the other, but for one copy in Willie's
which is not only superior to Charlie's, but to
every other copy in the same book. This, there-,
fore gains the prize.' Willie's heart beat high
with hope, which was not unmixed with fear.
Blushing to his temples, he said, 'Please, sir, may
I see that copy?' Willie glanced at the page,
and then, handing the book back, said, 'Please,
sir, that is not my writing. It was written by
an upper-class boy, who took my book by
mistake one day instead of his own. The two
books went back to the committee, and they
awarded the prize to Charlie. The boys laughed
at Willie, but he felt that he was right. I
would rather hold fast the truth,' he said than
have a -prize, for truth is better than gold.'
'Hurrah for Willie!' 'Well done Willie!'
shouted the boys ; and the truthful fellow went
home happier than he could have done if by







BOYS WANTED.


means of a silent untruth he had won the prize."
It is cowardly not to tell the truth. Don't be
cowards.
Charles Mann smashed a large pane of glass in
a chemist's shop, and ran away at first; but he
quickly thought: Why am I running ? It was
an accident. Why not tell the truth ? "
No sooner thought than done. Charlie was a
brave boy. He told the whole truth; how the
ball with which he was playing slipped out of his
hand, how frightened he was, how sorry, too, at
the mischief done, and how willing to pay if he
had the money.
Charlie did not have money, but he could
,work; and to work he went at once in the very
shop where he had broken the glass. It took
him a long time to pay for the large and expen-
sive pane he had shattered; but when he was done
he had endeared himself so much to the shop-
keeper by his fidelity and truthfulness that he
could not hear of his going away.
"Ah, what a lucky day that was when I broke
that window!" he used to say.
"Charlie," his mother would respond, "what
a lucky day it was when you were not afraid to
tell the truth!"
Boys, do not forget that, lying lips are an
abomination to the Lord, but they that deal truly
are his delight."
Truthful boys are wanted everywhere. The
only thing to be gained by telling a falsehood is







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


" Never to be credited when you speak the
truth." Falsehood is fire in stubble (declares
Coleridge); it likewise turns all the light stuff
around it into its own substance for a moment-
one crackling, blazing moment-and then dies;
and all its contents are scattered in .the wind,
without place, or evidence of their existence-as
viewless as the wind which scatters them."
When the immortal Sidney was told that he
might save his life by telling a falsehood by
denying his hand-writing, he answered, When
God hath brought me into a dilemma in which I
must assert a lie, or lose my life, He gives me a
clear indication of my duty; which is to prefer
death to falsehood."
All boys should ponder the text Be sure
your sins will find you out." A good reason
why boys should be truthful is, because
Falsehood is sure to be found out.
Some time ago The Chicago News contained a
remarkable narrative of John Kinney, of the firm
of Kinney & Ransome. Mr. John Kinney told
the story about himself.
WHEN I was a young chap," says he, "I got
the Pike's Peak fever along with a lot more of
the men and boys of our town, and as I was
pretty hard to manage around home, and as some
staid old friends of my father's were going to the
new gold country, it was concluded that I should
go with them. When we were all ready to shut







BOYS WANTED.


my trunk and lock it, my mother, who, bless her,
was more than half afraid to have me go out into
that rough country, brought a handsome clasp
Bible out of her bedroom and laid it in my trunk
on top of the other things.
'Now, Johnnie,' said she, 'I want you to
promise that you will read this Bible every
day.'
'Of course I will, mother,' I said; 'I will read
it every chance I have.'
'And Johnnie,' said she, 'I want you to study
well the Sermon on the Mount. It will do you
good. You will find it in St. Matthew and St.
Mark and St. Luke and St. John, but the best is
in St. Matthew. You will read it often, won't
you, Johnnie ?'
I promised everything, and I meant to keep
my promise, too. But somehow I never did.
I never opened the Bible; never even undid the
clasp. After I had been at Pike's Peak some
time, and spent nearly all the money that my
father had given to one of his old friends for me,
I started with what was left to come home. I
joined a party that was coming home, but they
left me at the Missouri crossing and I had a
terrible time from that hour. I ran out of money
and then spent all I could borrow on such
valuables as I could pawn. I would have sold
that Bible a dozen times if I could have found
anybody to buy it. Well, after a heap of walking
and all sorts of hardship, I finally reached home.







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


After the kissing and the talking was over, my
mother began unpacking the little handbag I had
brought back in the place of the trunk I took
away. In the bottom of it she found the little
clasp Bible.'
Your Bible looks as if you hadn't used it
much,' she said.
'Yes,' said I, I took very good care of it.'
'Did you read it, Johnnie ?' she asked.
SOf course I did; read it every day.'
You read the Sermon on the Mount, then,
did you ?' she asked with a kind of peculiar ex-
pression in her eyes.
SYes, very often.'
SThen she opened the Bible to St. Matthew
and there lay the twenty-dollar bill she had put
between the leaves. There was a ten dollar bill
in each St. Mark, St. Luke and St. John-fifty
dollars in all, and I would have given every cent
of it to have been out of that room.
'I told you St. Matthew had the best account
of the Sermon on the Mount,' was all my mother
said about the matter."
TRUTH is beautiful, as well as safe and mighty.
A boytwelve years old, with onlytruth as weapon
conquered a smart and shrewd lawyer, who was
fighting for a bad cause. "Truth is the highest
thing that man may keep," and the noblest child
or man is he who keeps the truth ever between
his lips.
Walter was the important witness in a lawsuit.







BOYS WANTED.


One of the lawyers, after cross-questioning him
severely, said : Your father has been talking to
you and telling you how to testify, hasn't he?"
" Yes," said the boy. "Now," said the lawyer,
"just tell us how your father told you to testify."
" Well," said the boy, modestly, father told me
that the lawyers would try and tangle me in my
testimony ; but, if I would just be careful and
tell the truth, I could tell the same thing every
time. The lawyer didn't try to tangle up that
boy any more.
Boys who hate the false and love the true will
Uphold the Truth.
BERT and Johnnie Lee were delighted when
their Scotch cousin came to live with them. He
was little, but very bright and full of fun. He
could tell curious things about his home in Scot-
land and his voyage across the ocean.
He was as far advanced in his studies as they
were, and the first day he went to school they
thought him remarkably good. He wasted no
time in play when he should have been studying,
and he advanced finely.
Before the close of the school, the teacher
called the roll, and the boys began to answer,
" Ten,"
When Willie understood that he was to say
"ten if he had not whispered during the day,
he replied,
"I have whispered."







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


"More than once ? "
"Yes, sir."
"Then I shall mark you zero," said the teacher
sternly, and that is a great disgrace."
"Why I did not see you whisper once," said
Johnnie after school.
Well,-I did," said Willie. "I saw others doing
it, and so I asked to borrow a book; then I lent a
slate pencil, and asked a boy for a knife, and did
several things, I supposed it was allowed."
Oh, we all do it," said Bert, reddening.
"There isn't any sense in the old rule, and nobody
could keep it, and nobody does."
I will, or else I will say I haven't," said
Willie. Do you suppose I will tell ten lies in
one heap ?"
"Oh,we don't call them lies," muttered Johnnie
"There wouldn't be a credit amongst us at night
if we were so strict."
What of that, if you told the truth ? laughed
Willie brayly.
In a short time they all saw how it was with
him. He studied hard, played with all his
might in playtime, but, according to his account,
he lost more credit than any of the rest. After
some weeks the boys answered "Nine" and
" Eight" oftener than they used to. Yet the
school-room seemed to have grown quieter.
Sometimes, when Willie Grant's mark was even
lower than usual, the teacher would smile pecu-
liarly, but said no more of disgrace. Willie







BOYS WANTED.


never preached at them or told tales; but some
how it made the boys ashamed of themselves,
just the seeing that this sturdy, blue-eyed boy
must tell the truth. It was putting the clean
cloth by the half-soiled one, you see, and they
felt like cheats and story-tellers. They talked
him all over, and loved him, if they did nick-
name him Scotch Granite," he, was so firm
about a promise.
Well, at'the end of the term, Willie's name
was very low down on the credit list. When it
was read he had hard work not to cry, for he
was very sensitive, and he had tried hard to be
perfect. But the very last thing that day was a
speech by. the teacher, who told of seeing a man
muffled up in a cloak. He was passing him
without a look, when he was told that the man
was General- the great hero.
The signs of his rank were hidden, but the
hero was there just the same," said the teacher.
"And now, boys, you will see what I mean
when I give a little gold medal to the most faith-
ful boy, the one really most conscientiously per-
fect in his deportment' among you. Who shall
have it ?"
"Little Scotch Granite!" shouted forty boys at
once; for the child whose name was so low on
the credit list had made truth noble in their
eyes.
Some boys speak the truth because they are
afraid of being punished if they tell a lie. You







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


must speak the truth because it is right.
Lying is Mean
and the liar seldom goes unpunished.
ToM QUAYLE had come to spend his holidays
with his grandfather. Grandfather Quayle lived
in a pretty cottage, to which he and his good old
wife often welcomed their children and grand-
children. Grandfather Quayle had a good many
strong feelings, and perhaps one of his strongest
feelings was his hatred of anything like a lie.
One day Tom was telling him a story of a
scrape that some of his school-fellows had got
into before the holidays, and how they had es-
caped punishment by making an excuse which
the master understood (as they intended he
should) in one sense in which it was not true,
though the actual words could bear another
meaning which was true.
Tom chuckled over this cleverness, as he
thought it, of his companions, but his grand-
father looked grave and said: Tom, my boy,
never laugh at a lie, and remember that the
essence of a lie is to wish to deceive. If you
purposely use words which you know others will
take in a meaning that misleads them, that is as
much a lie as if you spoke a plain falsehood.
There are no such things as "white lies"; all
lies are black, and stain your soul. Believe the
words of an old soldier, Tom; no really brave
man will stoop to tell a lie. It is a mean, cow-






BOYS WANTED.


ardly vice, which is very displeasing to God, and
which all good men hate. Speak the truth, what-
ever happens to you, and you will please God
and gain the favour of your neighbours. I re-
member long ago when I was a little boy-less
than you are, Tom-my mother taught me some
verses, about this that I have always tried to
act upon myself, and have often repeated to little
children. They are not very fine poetry, but
they teach a very good lesson:
Once there was a little boy,
With curly hair and pleasant eye-
A boy who always told the truth,
And never, never told a lie.
And when he trotted off to school
The children all about would cry,
There goes the curly-headed boy-
The boy who never told a lie,"
And everybody loved him so,
Because he always told the truth;
But every day as he grew up,
'Twas said, "There goes the honest youth."
And when the people that stood near
Would turn to ask the reason why,
The answer would be always this,
Because he never told a lie."
"I hope, Tom, you will try to be such an
honest youth, and always speak the truth, boy."
Mr. Robert Burdette's message to boys is
worth repeating.







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


He says my boy, the first thing you want to
learn-if you haven't learned how to do it
already-is to tell the truth. The pure, sweet,
refreshing, wholesome truth. The plain, unvar-
nished, simple, everyday, manly truth, with a
little "t,"
For one thing, it will save you so much
trouble. Oh, heaps of trouble. And no end of
hard work. And a terrible strain upon your
memory. Sometimes-and when I say some-
times, I mean a great many times-it is hard to
tell the truth the first time. But when you have
told it, there is an end of it. You have won
the victory; the fight is over. Next time you
tell the truth you can tell it without thinking.
Your memory may -be faulty, but you tell your
story without a single lash from the stinging
whip of that stern old task-master-Conscience.
You don't have to stop and remember how you
told it yesterday. You don't get half through
with it and then stop with the awful sense upon
you that you are not telling it as you did the
other time, and cannot remember just how you
did tell it then. You won't have to look around
to see who is there before you begin telling it.
And you won't have to invent a lot of new lies
to reinforce the old one. After Ananias told a
lie, his wife had to tell another just like it. You
see, if you tell lies you are apt to get your whole
family into trouble. Lies always travel along
in gangs with their co-equals.







BOYS WANTED.


And then, it is so foolish for you to lie. You
cannot pass a lie -off for the truth, any more
than you can get counterfeit money into circu-
lation. The leaden coin is always detected
before it goes very far. When you tell a lie it is
known. Yes, you say, God knows it." That's
right; but He is not the only one. So far as
God's knowledge is concerned, the liar doesn't
care very much. He doesn't worry about what
God knows-if he did he wouldn't be a liar; but
it does worry a man or boy who tells lies to
think that everybody else knows it. The other
boys know it; your teacher knows it; people
who hear you tell whoppers," know it; your
mother knows it, but she won't say so. And all
the people who know it, and don't say anything
about it to you, talk about it to each other, and-
dear! dear! the things they say about a boy who
is given to telling big stories If he could only
hear them it would make him stick to the truth
like flour to a miller.
And, finally, if you tell the truth always, I
don't see how you are going to get very far out
of the right way. And how people trust a truth-
ful boy. We never worry about him when he is
out of our sight. We never say, I wonder where
he is ? I wish I knew what he is doing ? I
wonder who he is with? I wonder why he
doesn't come home ? Nothing of the sort. We
know he is all right, and that when he comes
home we will know all about it and get it







TRUTHFUL BOYS.


straight. We don't have to ask him
going and how long lie will be gone
I Ii I I 1 IJ lln //// M'/.\ll I ,""[I


where he is
every time


CAUSE OF SUCCESS."
he leaves the house. We don't have to call him
back and make him solemnly promise" the






46 BOYS WANTED.

same thing over and over two or three times.
When he says "Yes, I will," or "No, I won't"
just once, that settles it. We don't have to cross-
examine him when he comes home to find out
where he has been. He tells us once and that is
enough. We don't have to say Sure ? Are
you sure now" when he tells anything.
But, my boy you can't build up that repu-
tation by merely telling the truth about half the
time, nor two-thirds, nor three-fourths, nor nine-
tenths of the time; but all the time. If it brings
punishment upon you while the liars escape; if it
brings you into present disgrace, while the
smooth-tongued liars are exalted; if it loses you a
good position; if it degrades you in the class; if
it stops a week's pay-no matter what punish-
ment it may bring upon you, tell the truth.












Faithful Boys.

FIRMNESS NEEDED.
ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR BELIEF.
IN LITTLE THINGS.
TEMPTED.
HOLD ON TO THE END.
FAITHFUL TO THEIR WORD.
UNTO DEATH.
LOVE THE LORD.

HERE are few better reasons for faithful-
ness than that given by Bonaparte. On
catching the first sight of the Mamelukes
drawn up in order of battle on the banks
of the Nile, in view of the Pyramids,
he said, riding before the ranks, Soldiers! from
the summits of yonder Pyramids, forty gener-
ations look down upon you."
Generations of men look down upon the boys
of to-day, and the command is Be Faithful."
Firmness is needed.
IN these days, when so many people are false
to the trusts committed to them, the following,







BOYS WANTED.


though often told, is worth repeating:-
Gerhardt was a German shepherd boy, and a
noble fellow he was, although he was very poor.
One day he was watching his flock, which was
feeding in a valley on the borders of a forest,
when a hunter came out of the woods and asked:
" How far is it to the nearest village ?" Six
miles, sir answered the boy; "but the road is
only a sheep track, and very easily missed."
The hunter looked at the crooked track, and said:
" My lad, I am very hungry and thirsty; I have
lost my companions and missed my way. Leave
your sheep and show me the road; I will pay
you well." I cannot leave my sheep, sir,"
rejoined Gerhardt. They will stray into the
woods, and may be eaten by wolves or stolen by
robbers."
Well, what of that?" queried the hunter.
" they are not your sheep. The loss of one or
two wouldn't be much to your master, and I'll
give you more than you have earned in a whole
year."
"I cannot go, sir," rejoined Gerhardt, very
firmly. My master pays me for my time, and
he trusts me with his sheep. If I were to sell
my time, which does not belong to me, and the
sheep should get lost, it would be the same as if
I had stolen them."
Well," said the hunter, you will trust your
sheep with me while you go to the village and
get me some food, drink, and a guide ? I will






FAITHFUL BOYS.


take care of them for you." The boy shook his
head.
The sheep," said he, "do not know your
voice, and- He stopped speaking. And
what ? Can't you trust me ? Do I look like a
dishonest man ?" asked the hunter, angrily.
Sir," said the boy, you tried to make me
false to my trust, and tried to make me break
my word to my master; how do I know that
you would keep your word."
The hunter laughed, for he felt that the lad
had fairly cornered him. He said: I see, my
lad, that you are a good, faithful boy. I will
not forget you. Show me the road, and I will
try to make it out myself."
Gerhardt then offered the contents of his scrip
to the hungry man, who, coarse as it was, ate it
gladly. Presently his attendants came up ; and
then Gerhardt, to his surprise, found that the
hunter was the Grand Duke, who owned all the
country around. The duke was so pleased with
the boy's honesty that he sent for him shortly
after that, and had him educated. In after
years Gerhardt became a very great and power-
ful man; but he remained honest and true to his
dying day.
It is also necessary that boys should
Acknowledge their belief.
In the reign of Mary of England, when the
good Bishop Hooper was about to be burned to







BOYS WANTED.


death, a blind boy, by much importunity, pre-
vailed on the guard to bring him to the bishop.
This boy had lately suffered imprisonment in
Gloucester for confessing the truth. After the
bishop had examined him concerning his
faith and the cause of his imprisonment, he
looked on him steadfastly, tears standing in his
eyes, and said, "Ah, poor boy, God hath taken
from thee thy outward sight, for what reason He
best knoweth; but he hath endued thy soul with
the eye of knowledge and faith. God give thee
grace continually to pray unto Him, that thou
lose not that sight, for thou shouldst then be
blind both in body and soul."
The boy's name was Thomas Dowry. How
often or how long he had endured imprisonment
for the truth's sake is not known; but on his
final examination he was brought before Dr.
Williams, Chancellor of Gloucester, sitting ju-
dicial with the register of the diocese in the
consistory, near the south door of the cathedral
church, who administered the usual articles,
chiefly urging that on transubstantiation, and
saying,-
Dost thou not believe that after the words
of consecration, spoken by the priest, there re-
maineth the very real body of Christ in the
sacrament of the altar ?"
"No," answered the blind boy, "that I do
not."
Then," said the chancellor, thou art a







FAITHFUL BOYS.


heretic, and shalt be burned. But who taught
you this heresy ? "
You, master Chancellor."
Where, I pray thee ? "
Even in yonder place," replied the boy,
turning and pointing with his hand towards
where the pulpit stood.
The chancellor again inquired, When did I
teach thee so ? "
Dowry answered, When you preached there
(naming a day) a sermon to all men as well as
to me, upon the sacrament. You said the sac-
rament was to be received spiritually, by faith,
and not carnally and really, as the Papists have
heretofore taught."
The shameless apostate answered,-
Then do as I have done, and thou shalt live,
as I do, and escape burning."
The blind boy said,-
"Though you can so easily dispense with
yourself, and mock God, the world, and your
conscience, yet will I not do so."
Then God have mercy upon thee," rejoined
the chancellor, "for I will read the condemnation
sentence against thee."
God's will be fulfilled !" answered the young
martyr.
Hereupon the register, being moved with the
scene, stood up and said to the chancellor,-
"Fie, for shame, man will you read the
sentence against him and condemn yourself?







BOYS WANTED.


Away, away, and substitute some other to give
sentence and judgement."
"No, register," said the fearfully hardened
man; I will obey the law, and give sentence
according to mine office."
He did so; delivered him to the secular power,
who on the very same day led the blind boy to
the place of execution at Gloucester, together
with one Thomas Crocker, a poor bricklayer,
condemned also for the like testimony of the
truth; when both, in one fire, most constantly
and joyfully yielded their souls into the hands
of the Lord Jesus.
SOME time ago several hundred Roman Cath-
olics made a pilgrimage to Lindisfarne, or Holy
Island, in honour of St. Cuthbert. It was a
very foolish thing for them to do, especially as
Cuthbert was not a Roman Catholic, but taught
the Gospel of Christ in its purity and simplicity.
He lived when the country was wild, and the
people were rude and savage. He was named
Cuthbert, or Guthbert, which meant "worthy of
God," and Cuthbert tried to deserve his name
and to walk worthy of the Lord, being fruitful
in every good work.
He was a shepherd lad, and tended his flock
on the high, bleak uplands. There in the night
he watched the meteors shine in the darkness.
To this boy-shepherd, as to those men who, some
hundred years before, "kept their flocks by
night" in Judean fields, came the knowledge of







FAITHFUL BOYS.


" a Saviour which is Christ the Lord." Like
the shepherd-king of Israel, Cuthbert might have
said that the Lord took him from the sheep
folds."
A few Irish missionaries had come from
Lindisfarne, and were living in some log houses
in the wilderness. To these men Cuthbert went.
They became his teachers; but at last he almost
outstripped them in his missionary zeal for the
people of the surrounding country. He went
out among the men of Northumbria and preached
to them.
He knew their language, and could more easily
make himself understood than could the Irish
missionaries. Into the lonely little villages -of
the mountains where other missionaries could
not go, into boggy tracks where danger lurked
and where travellers always carried spears to
defend themselves with, into wide, desolate
tracts of country that had only here and there
some clusters of wooden huts, Cuthbert went.
The poor had the Gospel preached to them by a
man whose hardy frame was equal to the task of
enduring all the hardships of travel in such a
country.
Some of the incidents of his journeys have been
recorded for us.
It is said that once, on a snowy day, he and
his companions had their boat driven ashore on
a lonely coast of Fife. Cuthbert's companions
murmured at their miserable plight.






BOYS WANTED.


The snow closes the road along the shore,"
said they and the storm bars our way over
the sea."
But Cuthbert was not in despair. He was
ready with a comforting answer.
There is still the way of heaven, that lies
open," said he.
But the thing best to remember about this "Ap-
ostle of the Lowlands," as he has been called, is
his faith in the One who said: "Take no thought,
saying, What shall we eat ? or, What shall we
drink ? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed ?
for your Heavenly Father knoweth that ye have
need of all these things."
Sometimes night would come upon the mission-
aries when they were off in the wilderness with-
out food.
But Cuthbert said: "Never did man die of
hunger who served God faithfully."
Once when he was without food in such a
place, it is said that an eagle flew overhead, and,
frightened at something, let a fish that it was
carrying fall to the ground, and so a meal was
furnished to the needy man of God. Cuthbert
must have felt that He who giveth food to all
flesh," had seen and remembered him and sent
him food from the sky, even as He sent it to
Elijah the Tishbite, in that eastern country by
the brook Cherith.
But the time came at last when the painful
journeys of the old missionary must cease. He







FAITHFUL BOYS.


could no longer endure the "perils of the wil-
derness." He retired to a little island, one of the
group of the seventeen small Fame, or Fern
Islands, off the east coast of Northumberland.
It is said to have been a barren place without
food or water, but Cuthbert toiled till he made
it fit for a home. On that lonely island he died,
when probably nearly eighty years old. After-
ward a tower was erected on that island to his
memory, and, as the years went by, many
traditions arose about the work of this good
man.
Mn. HAMMOND, the evangelist, in Children
and Jesus," tells of a stern father who one day,
when he came home from his business, heard a
noise, as if someone were talking in his little
boy's room. He asked his wife what it was.
She told him it was Johnnie praying. This
made him angry. He told his little son in a
decided tone, that if he dared to do it again, he
must leave the house and find another home.
Like Daniel, dear Johnnie knew all he must
suffer; but he determined to keep on praying.
The next day his father came home and found
him praying again. He went at once to his little
room, and in a gruff voice said, 'Pack up your
things and be off. I'll not have any of your
praying in my house. You shall not live with
me.' and so the poor fellow packed up the
little that was his, and took his bundle and
walked downstairs to say good-bye.' He went






BOYS WANTED.


first to his mother and sister, and gave them the
' good-bye' kiss : and then, with a full heart he
leaned over the cradle and pressed his quivering
lips to those of the little one he loved so much.
His mother stood by weeping. How could he
part with her? At last, throwing his, arms
around ler neck, and with tears in his eyes, he
sobbed, 'Good-bye, mother And then the
little hero turned kindly to his stern father, and,
holding out his hand, said, '(ood-bye, father.'
But the father could not bear it any longer. He
could not keep the hot tears from his eyes. No,
he could not, after all, drive away his noble boy.
'Johnnie, you need not go now. Pray for me.
I have been a wicked man to try and keep you
from praying. 0, pray for me was all he
could say. And Johnnie did pray. Yes, and
the father prayed too. He became a converted
man, and loved, with his family, to bow before
the mercy-seat."
Boys are wanted to be faithful
In little things.
The Rev. Robert Moffat once begun an address
with these words: I knew a little boy exceed-
ingly well, and he had a very pious mother, and
that mother was wont to talk to him of heavenly
things, and pray for him, too; and when that
boy grew up I believe he loved his mother. But
he was about to leave her and go to another part
of the country at a great distance; and when the






FAITHFUL BOYS.


time for parting came the little boy felt the
separation very keenly, and his mother embraced
that opportunity of asking him a favour. hT,
walked with him a long way on the road in
order that she might be the last to see him Iit.e-_-ir
he got into the boat to cross the river. And
just before the time for parting came, and .A -'..:1
his heart was softened at leaving her, his mother
took that occasion for making her request; and
what do you think it was ? If I ri'-.:i1' ,r. it
was this:-" My boy, my son," she said, 7--i
are going away from a mother's eye, and .on
will no more, perhaps never more, hear a mother's
voice. My son, before we part, let me ask of
you one favour; it is but a small one. Oh, help
me," she said, "my son, to return home, -re' I
have parted with you, with a heart filled r-kL
hope and joy." The son said, What do you
want, mother?" The mother said, "It is a
very small thing; but you must promise me that
you will grant it before I tell you what I want."
" No," said the naughty boy, I am not going
to promise anything before I know -whi; i. i.
" Oh, my son,", said the mother, do you Etiik
a mother would ask anything which was not
right of her own child ? No, he would not
promise his mother till she had first told him
what she wanted. Well, the mother pleaded and
pleaded, and at last the tears began to ,.ri over
her cheeks, and the son could not stand that,
and he said in a great hurry, Oh, tell me what
D






BOYS WANTED.


you want-ask of me what you like, my mother."
Then the mother said to him, Only promise
me that you will read in the Bible every day,
that you will read in the Old and NewTestament.
Oh," she said, read much in the Gospels you
cannot go astray there, young as you are."
Well, young friends, the boy made the promise,
and he went to another part of the country,
where there was no mother's eye to watch over
him, no-mother's voice to warn him; and there
he did what he liked, naughty boy that he was.
He was very fond of music and could play the
fiddle, and he liked to go to balls to dance, for
he was fond of those nonsensical fooleries of the
world; but mark well, for I know his history-
that boy when he came home, sometimes from a
dance, and from playing the fiddle to large
dancing parties, would then think about fulfilling
the promise which he had made to his mother,
and he would sit down and read the Testament,
and, perhaps, after coming from a dance, he
would read the 16th, 17th, 18th or 19th chap-
ters of St. John. Now what an awful thing it
was to unite dancing with the reading of these
chapters giving an account of the Saviour's death
on the cross, and the crucifixion of the Lord of
Glory! It made him very unhappy, and he
thought he would not keep his promise to his
mother, and he went to bed once and again and
tried to forget his promise; but no, his mother's
face and his mother's tears were before him, and







FAITHFUL BOYS.


he was obliged to get up in the dark and light a
candle and read a chapter. Well, that was the
means in time of saving that little boy from
destroying himself; for he had almost done this
-he had almost gone into the gulf of suicide,
and then he rejoiced in God and prayed for his
mother; and glorified God that he had a praying
mother.
This young man (for he had now grown up)
became very zealous and went about talking to
everyone that would hear him and thought to
convert them all. It was hard work, but he did
what he could. One day, while visiting in a
town about seven miles distant, he happened to
see a placard on the walls announcing a mission-
ary meeting, and he began to think within
himself what kind of a meeting it was; and as
he returned home he still kept thinking about
it; and he called it to mind so, that there was a
resurrection of all he had once heard from his
dear mother by the fireside; for his mother used
to keep him at home and taught him to knit
stockings rather than let him run about in the
streets and get into mischief; and he remembered
what his mother told him about Greenland and
the South Sea Islands, and other parts of the
world; and by the time he got home he was
another boy altogether. He began to think and
pray for the heathen, and in his exhortations to
others he desired them to pray for the perishing
heathen. In the course of time a wonderful







BOYS WANTED.


providence brought that youth into a position in
which he was himself sent out to be a missionary.
He was at first afraid that his parents would not
allow him to go, and he thought of leaving them
without letting them know anything about it;
but when at length his mother heard of it she
rejoiced very much, and she said, I wish all my
other sons were missionaries too." Well that
boy went out as a missionary, and laboured
among the heathen for a quarter of a century,
and learned languages, and saw hundreds con-
verted to a knowledge of God, and saw schools
established, and people taught to read in their
own language the wonderful works of God.
And that missionary came back and saw his
mother ; and he was one time preaching a mis-
sionary sermon in a chapel where his mother
was, and when he came down from the pulpit he
found his mother in tears, and he said to her,
" Mother, you seem to feel what I have been
saying," and she replied, Oh yes, my son, my
heart rejoices at the spread of the Redeemer's
Kingdom."
Now that boy is going to see his mother
again, and here he is-I am that boy; and he is
come to tell you this day something of what he
he has seen in Africa.
One of my first lessons," said Mr. Sturgis,
an American merchant, was in 1813, when I
was eleven years old. My grandfather had a fine
flock of sheep, which was carefully tended during







FAITHFUL BOYS.


the war of those times. I was the shepherd boy,
and my business was to watch the sheep in the
fields. A boy more fond of his book than the
sheep was sent with me, but left the work to.me
while he lay under the trees and read. Went
to my grandfather and complained of it. I shall
never forget the kind smile of the old gentleman
as he said 'never mind, Jonathan, my boy; if
you watch the sheep you will have the sheep."
"'What does grandfather mean by that?'
I said to myself; 'I don't expect to have a
sheep.' I could not exactly make out in my
mind what it was, but I had great confidence in
him, for he was a judge, and had been in Con-
gress in Washington's time; so I concluded it
was all right, and went back contentedly to the
sheep. After I got into the field I could not
keep his words out of my head. Then I thought
of Sunday's lesson, Thou hast been faithful
over a few things, I will make thee ruler over
many things.' I began to see through it;
'Never you mind who neglects his duty; be you
faithful, and you will have your reward.'
I received a second lesson soon after I came
to the city as a clerk to the late Lyman Reed.
A merchant from Ohio who knew me came to
buy goods and said: Make yourself so useful
that they cannot do without you.' I took his
meaning quicker than I did that of my grand-
father.
Well, I worked upon these two ideas until






BOYS WANTED.


Mr. Reed offered me a partnership in the business.
The first morning after the partnership was made
known, Mr. James Geery, the old tea-merchant,
called in to congratulate me, and he said: You
are right now. I have only one word of advice
to give you, Be careful who you walk the streets
with.' That was lesson number three."
And what valuable lessons they are: Fidelity
in all things; do your best for employers ; be
careful about your associates.
Take these lessons and study them well.
They are the foundation-stones of character and
honourable success.
Boys are wanted who will be faithful when
Tempted.
Temptation comes to us in various ways.
Deacon Jones kept a little fish market.
"Do you want a boy to help you ? asked
Joe White one day. I fancy I can sell fish."
Can you give good weight to my customers
and take good care of my pennies."
Yes, sir," answered Joe: and forthwith he
took his place in the market, weighed the fish,
and kept the room in order.
A whole day for fun, fireworks, and crackers
to-morrow exclaimed Joe, as he buttoned his
white apron about him. A great trout was flung
down on the counter.
Here's a royal trout, Joe. I caught it my-
self. You may have it for fivepence. Just







FAITHFUL BOYS.


hand over the money, for I'm in a hurry to
buy my fire-crackers," said Ned Long, one of
Joe's mates.
The deacon was out, but Joe had made pur-
chases for him before, so the money was thrown
across to Ned, who was off like a shot. Just
then Mrs. Martin appeared. "I want a nice
trout for my dinner to-morrow. This one will
do. How much is it ? "
One shilling, ma'am," and the fish was
transferred to the lady's basket and the silver
piece to the money-drawer.
But here Joe paused.. Fivepence was very
cheap for that fish. If I tell the deacon it cost
eightpence he'll be satisfied, and I shall have
threepence to invest in fireworks."
The deacon was pleased with Joe's bargain,
and when the market closed each went his way
for the night. But the silver in Joe's pocket
burned like a coal he could eat no supper, and
was cross and unhappy. At last he could stand
it no longer, but, walking rapidly, tapped at the
door of Deacon Jones's cottage.
A stand was drawn out, and before the open
Bible sat the old man. Joe's heart almost failed
him; but he told his story, and with tears of
sorrow laid the coin in the deacon's hand.
Turning over the leaves of the Bible, the old
man read:-
"' He that covereth his sins shall not prosper,
but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall







BOYS WANTED.


have mercy.' You have my forgiveness, Joe.
Now go home and confess to the Lord; but,
remember, you must forsake as well as confess.
And keep this little coin as long as you live to
remind you of this first temptation."
Sometimes dogs are more faithful than boys.
Now, Dick, see if you cannot carry father's
dinner to him to-day. It is time he had it, and
Mary has not come home from school yet."
Dick looked very proud at being entrusted
with his father's dinner, and he promised
willingly that he would not stop to play on the
way, but would walk steadily along until he had
given the pail to his father, who was working
about half a mile from his home.
Bareheaded and barefooted he trudged along,
his brown, tangled hair making a thatch over
his head to shield him from the sun, and no
thought of stopping for a moment entered his
mind till he passed the cottage where his friend
Tim was at play in the yard, prancing up and
down upon a stick which did duty for a horse.
"I'll tell you a secret if you come here a
minute," Tim shouted; and so Dick turned aside
to hear his friend's secret, although he knew he
ought to have waited till he was on his home-
ward way.
Down in the orchard, back of our house,
there is a bird's-nest in the bushes, and there
are eggs in it," said Tim. "Now, mind, you







FAITHFUL BOYS.


must not tell anybody of it. Come down and
I'll show them to you."
Forgetting all about his hungry father waiting
for his dinner, Dick followed down to the bushes.
It was quite a long walk across the orchard, and
the dinner-pail grew heavy.
Leave it here under the shed until we come
back," suggested Tim.
I'm afraid something will happen to it," said
Dick.
Fido'll guard it-here, Fido, watch and
the faithful dog crouched down beside the pail,
prepared to guard it faithfully.
Tim showed. Dick the nest with its dainty
treasures, and the two boys spent some minutes
in looking at it, to the great alarm of the mother-
bird, who fluttered about and chirped and scolded
at the intruders.
Hello Here comes Uncle Jack ex-
claimed Tim, looking up as a waggon came
rattling down the lane that ran behind the
orchard. "I'm going to ask him to give me a
ride."
Dick started for his pail as Tim scrambled into
the waggon, but he was dismayed to find that
Fido had no idea of giving up the trust which
his master had committed to him. Whenever
Dick extended his hand toward it, the dog
snarled so angrily that he was afraid to touch
it. What should he do? Father would be so hun-
gry, and it must be so long after his dinner-time.







BOYS WANTED.


He was standing looking at the dog, with
tears in his eyes, when Tim's mother looked out
of the window, and guessed that something was
wrong. Putting on her bonnet, she went to the
boy's assistance. Fido felt that he could hon-
ourably relinquish his charge when his mistress
bade him do so; so, to Dick's delight, he regained
his pail again.
And what were you doing here with your
father's dinner ?" asked Tim's mother. "Didn't
your mother tell you to take it as straight as you
could carry it ?"
Yes," faltered Dick.
I thought so. Now, see if Fido can teach
you how to do what you're told. Tim told him
to watch that pail, and he did it so well that you
couldn't coax or frighten him away from it, and
yet you couldn't be trusted as well as a little
dog. Now, see if you can't go straight along
the rest of the way, and show that you can be
trusted too."
It was a good lesson of faithfulness that Fido
taught Dick that morning, and the boy remem-
bered it well.
Faithful boys will
Hold on to the end.
In the battle of Gettysburg, a young colour-
bearer of the Sixteenth Regiment of Vermont
Volunteers fell mortally wounded. Holding on
firmly to his colour-staff, he felt some one. taking







FAITHFUL BOYS.


hold, and heard a voice saying, Give us the
flag." Death was already blinding his eyes,and
he was unable to see who it was.
"Are you friends or enemies ? he asked.
We are friends," they replied.
"Then, if you are friends," the dying boy
continued, let me hold the flag till I die."
And uttering these words he fell back and
expired.
That was the impulse and act of a brave and
true heart. The flag had been entrusted to his
keeping. He could not and would not yield it
to an enemy. He could not yield it to a friend,
because he would cling to his trust to the end.
His example, though but that of a boy, is one of
the noblest and truest in history. Have you a
trust committed to you? Yes. God has en-
trusted you with gifts, and opportunities, and
duties. And Jesus says, Be thou faithful unto
death, and I will give thee a crown of life."
Paul, just before his martyrdom, wrote to
Timothy, I have fought a good fight, I have
finished my course, I have kept the faith; hence-
forth there is laid up for me a crown of right-
eousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge,
will give me at that day."
Every boy has influence of some kind, and by
remaining faithful may influence others to do
noble deeds.
Many, many years since, Mr. and Mrs. S. C.
Hall visited Ireland, previous to writing their






BOYS WANTED.


well-known work descriptive of its scenery and
customs. On the occasion of their visit to Glen-
dalough, the far-famed district of the Seven
Churches, they observed a young lad seated on
one of the tombstones, who, immediately on their
approach, doffed his cap, and offered his services
as guide over the district.
A bargain was soon struck, and the party drove
off. The lad, full of the quaint old legends of
the place, did the work well, and to the entire
satisfaction of his employers. Returning home
after a day's thorough enjoyment, Mr. Hall took
a flask from his pocket, and after partaking of
the contents, offered some to the lad. To his
utter astonishment, the offer was firmly but
politely declined.
To Mr. Hall such a thing was inexplicable.
An Irish boy who would not even taste whisky
was, indeed, a stranger sight than any he had
seen during the day. He could not understand
it. Resolved to test the lad's principles, he
offered him a shilling, then half-a-crown, then
five shillings, if he would drink the poisonous
drug ; but the lad was firm. Under the ragged
jacket there throbbed a true heart. Mr. Hall
determined, however, to conquer, if possible, and
finally offered him half a sovereign, a coin not
often seen by lads of his class in these parts.
It was a wicked act, and proved too much for
the politeness even of an Irish boy.
Drawing himself up in something well-nigh







FAITHFUL BOYS.


akin to indignation, and pulling a temperance
medal from the folds of his ragged jacket, he
firmly told Mr. Hall that for all the money his
honour might be worth he would not break his
pledge."
The history was soon told. It had belonged to
the lad's father, who had spent the prime of his
days in the service of the cruellest of task-
masters,-Drink. Until the advent of the gen-
uine Apostle of Temperance, happiness had been
unknown in yon home on the hill-side. But
with his advent, peace and joy prevailed. The
medal was now round the lad's neck-a father's
dying legacy to his son. Hence his noble and
firm resolve. Nor was his heroism in vain. It
was too much for Mr. Hall, who there and then
screwed the top on to the flask, and threw it into
the lake by the side of which they stood. That
day, and entirely through the influence of that
lad, Mr. and Mrs. Hall became staunch teetotalers,
aiding the movement by tongue and pen.
Under all circumstances in life boys are wanted
to be
Faithful to their Word.

An interesting circumstance is related of
George G. Lake, the benevolent merchant of
New York. Like so many others, he came to
the great city from Connecticut a poor lad, and
obtained employment as an errand-boy in a store







BOYS WANTED.


in Catherine Street, a narrow thoroughfare
leading to the East River.
He was an errand-boy of the old-fashioned
kind, one who received two dollars a week wages,
slept on or under the counter of the store, and
lived chiefly on crackers and cheese. But he
was a good boy, attended to his business and
made friends. In a year or two he obtained a
better place, in a better store, in a better street,
where he. advanced rapidly from one post to
another, until at nineteen he was placed in
charge of the silk department, the highest
position in the store.
Salaries at this period were so small that this
smart young man thought himself well off in
getting 400 dollars a year, and he engaged to
remain four years in the service of the firm at
that rate of wages.
At the head of the silk counters, he had fre-
quently to visit a great importing house, to re-
plenish the stock of his own firm, and there he
attracted notice by his excellent taste in selecting
silks and his sound judgement as to what. pat-
terns would be likely to please people.
One day he was asked to step into the counting-
room of the importing house, where one of the
partners invited him to enter their service at
1,000 dollars the year, 2,000 dollars the second,
and 3,000 dollars afterward. The young man
replied that he had just made a contract with his






FAITHFUL BOYS.


employers for four years at eight dollars per
week.
That contract was only verbal, I suppose,"
said the merchant.
I don't break contracts," replied the clerk,
"whether verbal or not."
So he went back to his silks in the old store,
and to his eight dollars a week. He served out
his four years faithfully. At the end of the period
he made himself the indispensable man" to his
employers, who offered him 10,000 dollars a year
or a partnership, He accepted the salary, and
after some years entered the firm, of which in due
time, by the retirement of his partners, he became
the head.
He made large property in the business, from
which he retired at an early age, and spent the
remainder of his days in happy and honourable
retirement, a good patriot, a good Christian, and
a wisely benevolent man. The solace and charm
of his old age was music, of which he was a
warm lover and munificent patron.
All boys that are faithful to their employers
do not become partners, neither do they all
succeed in life, in fact, some faithful servants are
very badly treated by their masters, but all may
be heroes.
Can a boy be a hero ? Of course he can, if
he has courage, and opportunity to show it.
The boy who will stand up for the right, stick







BOYS WANTED.


to the truth, resist temptation, and suffer rather
than do wrong, is a true hero. Here is an ex-
ample of a true hero. A drummer-boy, who had
become a great favourite with his officers, was
asked by the captain to drink a glass of rum.
The boy declined, saying, I am a Temperance
boy, and do not touch strong drink:" "But
you must take some now," said the captain, "you
have been on duty all day, beating the drum and
marching, and now you must not refuse: I insist
upon it." But the boy stood firm. The captain
then turned to the major and said, our little
drummer is afraid to drink: he will never make
a soldier." How is this ? said the major, in
a playful manner, do you refuse to obey orders ?"
" Sir," said the boy, I have never refused to
obey orders, and have tried to do my duty as a
soldier faithfully; but I must refuse to drink
rum, for I know it would do me harm." "Then,"
said the major, in a stern tone of voice, in order
to test his sincerity, I command you to take
a drink; and you know it is death to disobey
orders !" The little hero, fixing his clear blue
eyes on the face of the officer, said, 1" Sir, my
father died a drunkard; and when I entered the
army I promised my mother I would not taste
a drop of rum, and I mean to keep my promise.
I am sorry to disobey your orders, sir,; but I
would rather suffer anything than disgrace my
mother, and break my pledge." Was not that
boy a hero? He had learned when to say NO.







FAITHFUL BOYS.


Few have learned to speak this word
When it should be spoken;
Resolution is delayed,
Vows to virtue broken.
More of courage is required
This one word to say,
Than to stand where shots are fired
In the battle fray."
The officers could not help admiring the con-
duct of the boy, and ever afterwards treated him
with great kindness.
Boys are wanted that will be faithful
Unto death.
"Diocletian was at Rome, wielding the sword
of persecution with all the fury of fanaticism.
In the blindness of his zeal he saw in the mur-
dered Christians an acceptable offering to the
gods, and the imperial city was red with slaughter.
The property of the wealthier victims, too, was
a prize worth having, and it is therefore not sur-
prising that a rumour soon reached the ears of
Diocletian that young Pancratius was rich,
friendless, and a follower of Jesus. The lad was
instantly summoned to the palace. And there
they met, the purple-faced emperor and the
Christain youth; the former in all the pride and
pomp of supreme dominion, the latter in the
calm dignity of truth and innocence. Struck
E






BOYS WANTED.


with the noble bearing of the boy, Diocletian
spoke to him of his father Cleonius, who never
failed in his allegiance to the gods. And was it
true, he asked, that Pancratius had dared to
become a Christian in defiance of the imperial
edict ? Instant death should be his portion
unless he at once consented to sacrifice to
Jupiter.
In that awful moment the courage of Pan-
cratius failed not. Strengthened by Him who
had thus far directed his path, he at once avowed
himself a Christian, and, fired with holy indig-
nation, demanded of his accuser how he dared to
commit such deeds of wickedness and cruelty as
were then daily perpetrated in Rome. A
Christian he was, and a Christian he would die;
for Christ, our Master in Heaven," said he,
" Inspires the soul of his servants, even young
as I with a courage which is able to defy the
cruelty of all the emperors in the world."
Enraged at this bold reply, Diocletian ordered
him to be immediately beheaded, as a warning to
the Roman youths, how they presumed to trifle
with the imperial mandate.
Forth the soldiers lead that heroic boy; they
pass along the streets of Rome, and enter the
Aurelian way; there, with the courage of a Paul,
and the meekness of a Stephen, the youthful
martyr bends his neck to the fatal stroke and
yields up his soul to God.
Boys are wanted who







FAITHFUL BOYS.


Love the Lord,

and mean to be faithful to Him.
Zinzendorf was the son of rich and noble
parents, and would have had many temptations,
but when he was four years old he began to love
to talk with God. He was only a little fellow
when he made this covenant with Jesus : Be
thou mine, dear Saviour, and I will be Thine."
The window is still shown in an old castle where
Zinzendorf dropped out letters addressed to
Jesus. In those little notes he told his Saviour
how dearly he loved Him, and he never doubted
that Jesus saw them.
When we remember that Christ has said,
"They that seek Me early shall find Me," we
cannot doubt either that God saw and answered
those letters. Do you ask how God could answer
them ? By sending His Holy Spirit to the little
boy, and pouring more love and grace into his
young heart. One day when Zinzendorf was
only six years old, he was praying aloud in his
room. A party of soldiers, belonging to an
invading army, forced their way into the castle,
and entered the little Counts room. When they
saw how earnestly he was praying, they stood
quietly aside, and watched him, and then went
away without touching him.
What text does that remind you of? "He
shall give His angels charge over thee, to keep
thee in all thy ways." As Zinzendorf grew older,







BOYS WANTED.


he worked more for God, and was noted at school
for his earnest piety. He was not content to
know that his own soul was saved. but he worked
hard among his schoolfellows to make them, too,
feel the need of a Saviour; and when he left, he
had founded seven different societies for prayer.
You must not imagine, that, because Zinzendorf
loved and prayed to God, he was backward in
his lessons. He was a hard-working boy, and
at sixteen-was far ahead of those of his own age
in Latin and Greek. When he became a -man he
was a poet, a preacher, and a missionary.
There is nothing sweeter on earth than the
heart of a woman in which piety dwells." This
beautiful utterance is Luther's. It was born of
a touching experience of his childhood. John
Luther, his father, a miner and smelter of ores,
conceived a strong desire" to educate his son.
Too poor to pay for young Martin's education,
he yet ventured to send him to a celebrated school
at Eisenach, trusting for his support to the
occasional help of friends and the charity which,
according to the custom of those times, was be-
stowed more or less freely upon poor students.
Our generation has improved upon the old
method, indeed, but it is quite as true to-day as
three centuries ago that education, especially all
higher education, is beneficiary.
Young Martin Luther, driven forth by hunger,
would join his school-fellows in singing from
door to door, hoping thus to gain food. Instead





































MARTIN LUTHER

SINGING IN

THE STREETS AT

EISENACH.
]y






FAITHFUL BOYS.


of bread" he not rarely received "a stone"-
harsh and insulting words. Often he left the
streets hungry and weeping. One evening, when
a high wind was abroad, and snow filled the air,
he found himself, after three successive repulses,
before the door of Conrad Cotta, on St. George-
square. He was on his way to his lodgings, to
spend the night fasting. Who shall doubt what
Hand it was that held him there a little space,
and touched his heart to sing one song more?
These are the words he sang:-
Foxes to their holes have gone,
Every bird unto its nest;
But I wander here alone,
And for me there is no rest.
Inside the house Conrad Cotta played his flute,
while Ursula, his wife, prepared the evening
meal. Perhaps the strains of the flute-Martin's
favourite instrument-had arrested his footsteps
and awakened his song. The flute was silent
within while the sweet child voice filled the air
with melody.
A fine, sweet voice said Conrad; pity
it should be spoiled by use in such ill weather."
"A child's voice, too," said Ursula, whose
heart was tender by the recent loss of her
own beloved child. The door was thrown open.
The light streamed forth upon the snow and re-
vealed the young singer.







BOYS WANTED.


Charity, for Christ's sake, charity? said
the youth.
He was bidden to enter. The sudden change
to the warm room threw him into a faint. The
care of Ursula-" the pious Shunamite," as the
Eisenach people used to call her-revived him.
Kind words fed his heart, while good food
nourished his body. He was put away in bed,
and as the good people looked upon his sleeping
face they were won by it, and in the morning
offered the boy a home. In that home the
scholar's mind awoke, grew, blossomed forth like
winter verdure under the touch of spring.
Thus again, as so often, "man's extremity "
was "God's opportunity." The eagle-wings
were spread beneath the fledgling. God pro-
vided for His child. God opened the door to that
way over which, in after years, Luther was to
walk, leading with him a host of God's elect.
GoD ?-let the weary, the discouraged, the
doubting, the sore afflicted, be comforted in the
thought that God is, and that He is the Ever-
lasting Father!
The following is the whole of the song which
Luther sung on that memorable night:-
Lord of heaven lone and sad,
I would lift my heart to thee;
Pilgrim in a foreign land,
Gracious Father, look on me;
I shall neither faint nor die
While I walk beneath Thine eye.







FAITHFUL BOYS.


I will stay my faith on Thee,
And will never fear to tread
Where the Saviour Master leads;
He will give me daily bread.
Christ was hungry, Christ was poor-
He will feed me from His store.
Foxes to their holes have gone,
Every bird unto its nest:
But I wander here alone,
And for me there is no rest.
Yet I neither faint nor fear,
For the Saviour, Christ, is here.
If I live, He'll be with me;
If I die, to Him I go;
He'll not leave me, I will trust Him,
And my heart no fear shall know.
Sin and sorrow I defy,
For on Jesus I rely.













Diligent Boys.


DETERMINED TO SUCCEED.
INDEPENDENT OF BAD COMPANY.
LUCK IS NOT THE CAUSE OF SUCCESS.
INTERESTED IN THEIR BUSINESS.
GAIN KNOWLEDGE. ALWAYS
ENERGETIC.
NEVER MISS OPPORTUNITY TO DO GOOD.
TAKE TIME.


ILIGENCE is said to be the mother of
good luck, and God gives all things to
Industry. Franklin's advice is Plough
T deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall
have corn to sell and to keep. Work
while it is called to-day; for you know not how
much you may be hindered to-morrow. One to-
day is worth two to-morrow, as poor Richard
says; and, further, never leave that till to-morrow
which you can do to-day."
Pliny relates that Cressinus gathered so much






DILIGENT BOYS.


more wealth from a small piece of ground than
his neighbours could from a much larger piece,
that they accused him of witchcraft. To defend
himself, he brought into court his servants, with
their instruments of labour, and said, My
witchcrafts, 0 ye Romans! are these. These
servants and these tools are all the witchcraft
that I know of. I say not to my servants, 'Go
do this or do that,' but, Come, let us go do it.'
and so the work goes on." Industry and dili-
gence make any man excellent and glorious, and
chief in any condition, calling or profession.
The world wants diligent boys, boys who are
Determined to succeed.
In the autobiography of Gounod, appears the
following incident of that great musician's early
career. As a boy at school he neglected his
essays to write music. The teacher tore up the
music, but that was not the end of the matter.
Gounod writes:-
This first persecution, far from curing me,
only inflamed my musical ardour, and I promised
myself hereafter that I would assure myself of
my pleasure by putting it behind the regular
accomplishment of my school duties. In this
conjuncture I decided to put forth a sort of pro-
fession of faith, in which I should formally
declare to my mother that I was absolutely
determined to be an artist; I had a momentary
hesitation between painting and music; but






BOYS WANTED.


finally I felt more inclination to express my ideas
in music, and I decided on this latter choice.
My poor mother was distressed. This may
easily be understood. She had seen an artist's
life from the inside, and probably she foresaw
for me a second edition of the scarcely successful
life that she had shared with my father. So she
ran in great distress to tell her woes to my
teacher, M. Poirson. He reassured her.
"Fear nothing," he said to her, "your son
will never be a musician. He is a good little
scholar; he works well; his teachers are satisfied
with him; I will undertake to see him entered
at the normal school, I will make this my
business; calm yourself, Mme Gounod, your son
will never be a musician."
My mother left, entirely reassured. The
principal summoned me to his room.
Well," said he, what is this, my child ?
You want to be a musician ? "
Yes, sir."
"Ah, but you mustn't 'think of it! A
musician has no position "
What Had Mozart, Rossini, no position ?"
And I felt, as I answered him, my little
thirteen-year-old head throw itself back a trifle.
On the instant the face of my interlocutor
altered.
Ah," said he, "it is that kind of a musician
you mean ? Well, well, that is good ; we will
see if you can make one. I have had my box at






DILIGENT BOYS.


the opera ten years, and I am a good judge."
He opened a desk and took out a sheet of
paper on which he began to write verses. Then
he said:
Take that and set it to music for me."
I was jubilant. I left him and returned to
my study, where I ran with feverish anxiety
over the verses that he had given me. It
was the romance from "Joseph," beginning,
" Scarcely had I left my childhood."
I knew neither Joseph" nor Mdhul (its
composer). I was thus restrained or intimidated
by no recollection. The ardour that I felt for
my Latin lesson at this moment of musical in-
toxication may be imagined. At the following
recreation-hour my romance was done. I ran in
haste to the principal.
What is it, my boy ?" "My romance is
finished, sir." What! already Yes, sir."
" Let us see; sing it to me." But, sir, I must
have a piano to accompany myself."
[M. Poirson had a daughter who took piano
lessons, and I knew that he had a piano in the
adjoining room.]
"No, no, that is useless; I don't want a
piano." But I do, sir, for my harmonies."
" What! your harmonies And where are they,
pray ? Here, sir," said I, putting a finger
on my forehead. Ah, well; sing all the same;
I shall understand without the harmonies."
I saw that it was necessary to do as he bade,







BOYS WANTED.


and I sang. I had hardly reached the middle of
the first verse when I saw that my judge was
regarding me intently. This look encouraged
me; I began to feel victory on my side. I went
on confidently, and when I had finished, the
principal said to me:
Now go to the piano."
Thus I triumphed. I had now all my weapons
in hand. I began my little exercise again, and
at the end, poor M. Poirson, vanquished, tears in
his eyes, took my head in his two hands and
kissed me, saying:
Go, child; be a musician! "
JOHN MILLAIS was one of those prodigies who,
having real genius, fulfil the promise of their
youth. When he was a boy, so little that his
friends used to pile books on a chair to make a
seat high enough for him to sit on while he
worked, he was always sketching, hoping some
day to be a painter.
His mother was an acquaintance of Sir Martin
Shee, then president of the Royal Academy, and
she told him that her little boy had a great gift
in the line of drawing.
Don't encourage it said Sir Martin.
" Many children show this sort of proclivity, and
the end of it all is failure. It is not once in a
thousand times that success is achieved. Bring
him up to any profession but mine."
She then asked him at least to gratify a
mother's pride by looking at some of her darling's







DILIGENT BOYS.


sketches. He glanced at them and exclaimed,
delightedly: "It is your duty, Mrs. Millais to
encourage this boy! He is a marvel."
,. The result of this advice was that the child
was sent to the finest schools of art, and when
the prize for the best historical drawing in pencil
was awarded, at one of the Royal Academy
assemblies, the name of Mr. Millais was called.
A child in short dresses was presented, and the
Duke of Sussex, who was in the chair, called out
in amazement: Is this Mr. Millais ? Put him
on the table And standing there he received
his prize.
At the age of seventeen his first picture was
hung in the Royal Academy. In 1854, at the
age of twenty-five, he became A.R.A., being the
youngest Associate ever admitted except Sir
Thomas Lawrence, and in 1873, he became a
Royal Academician. He was one of the founders,
in 1848, of the Pre-Raphaelite School, with
Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and
others, but abandoned the style of this school
about 1860. He rapidly achieved fame, and was
made a baronet. Some of Sir John's best-known
works are 'Bubbles,' 'Cherry Ripe,' and 'The
Huguenot.' Of late years he had devoted him-
self to portrait painting.
The grave of Sir John Millais adjoins that
of Lord Leighton in the crypt of St. Paul's
Cathedral.
FREDERICK D. MAURICE, was not, says the







BOYS WANTED.


writer of his life, what, perhaps, would be re-
garded as the model schoolboy of the present
day-for though naturally strong and robust in
body as he was active in mind, he took little
part in games or athletic exercises, and he had a
great dislike to what is called sport, more
especially looking upon anything which involved
the torture or death of dumb creatures as cruel
and inhuman. He was full of aspirations as
regarded his own future career.
Returning home full of enthusiasm after one of
these conversations he drew up the following re-
solutions, which we both signed, and which many
years after I rejoiced to show him, and to prove
how nobly he had fulfilled his share of the
agreement. It ran thus:-
We pledge each other to endeavour to dis-
tinguish ourselves in after life, and to promote
as far as lies in our power the good of mankind."
Neither of us was fifteen years old at the time.
The writer continues :-"We were rambling
with another friend one summer evening at a
distance from home, when we found ourselves in
the presence of an angry bull, who drove us to
take refuge upon an embankment in the middle
of a large field.
There we were safe enough, but completely be-
sieged, the savage beast continuing to pace round
us, apparently ready to rush upon anyone who
came within his reach.
Time wore on, and the night approaching, we







DILIGENT BOYS.


began to feel that his mother would grow un-
easy at our absence-a matter about which he
was always exceedingly sensitive. It was re-
solved, therefore, that one of us should make an
attempt to procure assistance, whilst the others
endeavoured to divert the bull's attention.
Drawing lots was talked of, but Frederick
insisted on his right as the eldest to lead the for-
lorn hope.
The scheme was successful; but the quiet un-
daunted way in which he retired, facing the bull
(who followed him all the while), and slowly
bowing to it with his hat at intervals-according
to the theory he had on the subject-till he
could make a final rush for the gate, was worthy
of all admiration.
The boyhood's character was seen in man-
hood's action breaking through everywhere on
to the surface. Whatever, then, you would like
manhood to be, make the boyhood now. Dreams
of future greatness or goodness are worthless
unless they can now lead to action, and to
laying the foundations strong and deep.
A Swedish boy fell out of a window and was
badly hurt, but with quenched lips he kept back
the cry of pain. The king, Gustavus Adolphus,
who saw him fall, prophesied that the boy
would make a man for an emergency. And so
he did, for he became the famous General
Bauer.
A boy used to crush the flowers to get their
F







BOYS WANTED.


colour, and painted the white side of his father's
cottage in Tyrol with all sorts of pictures,
which the mountaineers gazed at as wonderful.
He was the great artist Titian.
An old painter watched a little fellow who
amused himself making drawings of his pot and
brushes, easel and stool, and said: That boy
will beat me one day." So he did, for he was
Michael Angelo.
A German boy was reading a blood and thun-
der. novel. Right in the midst of it he said to
himself: "Now, this will never do. I get too
much excited over it. I can't study so well
after it. So here it goes!" and he flung the
book out into the river. He was Fichte, the
great German philosopher.
The world wants boys who will be diligent
and
Independent of bad company.

The REV. THOMAS CHAMPNESS writing in the
Christain, Oct. 8th, 1891, says: My story is
of a man I knew very well. I knew him when
he was a boy. He was a little boy when I was
a big boy, and now he is a great man and I am
a little man. He is a member of the (Ecumenical
Conference, has gone to America and will tell
stories that will make the Yankees wonder. He
went to the same Sunday school as I did, and
was serving his apprenticeship in one of the







DILIGENT BOYS.


Manchester warehouses. One day, boy as he was,
he went into a public-house, and he had a glass
of something. When he came out he felt him-
self going round, and as soon as he felt himself
the worse for drink he said, Never any more "
In God's name he put the drink from his lips
from that day. Then he listened to what his
teachers said, and he gave his young heart to
God.
In the place where he worked were many.
drinking and swearing men, and when they
found out that this lad had become good they
persecuted him. He was the youngest appren-
tice, and it was the custom there for the youngest
apprentice to brush out the shop. When the
other men put on their jackets and went home
the young apprentice had to stay behind and
make the place fit for the next day. It was the
rule that when a new apprentice came the pre-
ceding apprentice should go home when the men
did, and that the new apprentice should brush
out the shop. My friend determined to be good;
so the men boycotted him, and they did it in
this way. When the new apprentice came they
made Tom still stick to the long brush; he was
not allowed to put his jacket on. They said to
the new apprentice, Thou can come home with
us, but Tom must stop." He did not retort but
he stuck to the brush. And with the next
apprentice it was still the same; Tom stuck to
the brush. But he had got his head on, and







BOYS WANTED.


he picked up the business ; he was not muddling
his brain with drink.
One day the master said to him, Thomas,
when you come to-morrow, come in your Sunday
clothes, you are going to be foreman here." So
the next night, when time had come to go home,
Tom went to get his jacket; but the men said,
" Get to thy brush." Nay," he replied, "never
any more." His name is over the warehouse
door; he is master where he used to brush the
shop out. He has now gone to America. He
is established to be a prophet of the Lord,"
for he has done a work within seven miles of
where I live that has made the angels sing.
The world wants boys to be diligent, and
refuse to believe that
Luck is the cause of success.
FRED DIXON is the luckiest fellow in town;
everything he wants he gets; everything -he
undertakes prospers. Did you hear he has the
place at Kell's, that so many have been trying
to get ? "
You don't say so! Why, he is a very
young man to fill so responsible a position."
Yes," added the first speaker, He always
would stand on the top of the ladder in school.
Though not the brightest scholar, he managed
to carry off the honours upon quitting school,
which he did at an earlier age than his class-
mates, because he had to help to support a







DILIGENT BOYS.


widowed mother and younger brothers and
sisters. He only had to ask for a situation, and
lo! all other applicants were ruled out, and
Fred had the preference."
Boys, do you know any Fred Dixon? If
you do, don't think it is luck that helps him
along, gives him the laurels at school, aids him
to obtain first-class situations, puts him in places
of trust and honour, where a good name or un-
tarnished character is required. Look back in
the pages of his life. See if he was not studious
at school, fair and square in all boyish games,
gentlemanly and obliging, honest in all his deal-
ings. Ask his friends if truthfulness, faithful-
ness to his duty, steadfastness of purpose are not
his characteristics. Find out whether he has
ever been known to frequent tippling shops,
gambling dens and kindred places of vice;
whether he spends his spare time in filling his
mind with trashy literature, such as is thrown
broadcast over our land, in the shape of cheap
novels. Depend upon it, boys, you will never
be 'the luckiest fellow in town,' unless you earn
it by honesty, and integrity of character, and
fidelity to all your undertakings.
Giotto was of humble origin, and had no early
education in the modern sense of the term, and
at ten years of age was employed in tending
sheep upon the hill-side. The tradition is that
one day when the little boy was thus occupied,
or supposed to be occupied, he was busily






BOYS WANTED.


amusing himself by drawing one of his flock,
using a sharp piece of slate as a pencil, and the
bare face of the rock as his canvas. Cimabue, the
famous Florentine painter, then at the height of
his reputation, happened to be riding over the
plain, and his attention being attracted by the
shepherd lad, he came near to see what he was
doing. We may suppose," says Mr. Quilter,
" that there was something in the work which
the painter knew to be genius, for, according to
all the legends, he does not appear to have
hesitated in the least, but after asking the boy if
he would like to go with him, and receiving a
glad answer in the affirmative, he obtained his
father's permission, took him to Florence, and
installed him in his own studio." As to the
way in which those years were spent by the
young pupil we are left to inference and con-
jecture. But when next we see him, by the
light of historical record, the boy has become a
painter whose power has received recognition,
and who possesses the confidence of conscious
strength. This was exemplified by the famous
incident, given by Mr. Quilter, which has been
often described, and is known as the incident
of the 0." The Pope, Boniface VIII, we are
told, wanted to add to the decorations of St.
Peter's, and he sent one of his courtiers to see
what kind of painter Giotto might be. On the
way the messenger called at Sienna, and received
from artists there several designs of an elaborate







DILIGENT BOYS.


character. Giotto, however, when he was applied
to, simply drew, with one sweep of his arm, a
circle in red ink, of perfect accuracy, and gave it
to the messenger, refusing to send any other
design." The story goes that this evidence of
the painter's skill was accepted, for "the Pope,
and such of his courtiers as were well versed in
the subject, perceived how far Giotto surpassed
all the other painters of his time." Whether
the details of the incident be literally true or
not, the anecdote illustrates an independence and
force which were manifested by Giotto in many
ways, both in his character and in his work as
an artist.
The world wants boys to be diligent and
Interested in their Business.
This narrative from Wide-Awake will en-
courage and stimulate.
The best boy story I ever heard."
*That was what a lawyer said of this story I
am going to relate to you: It is the best boy's
story that I ever heard."
We have had a good many boys with us
from time to time,' said Mr. Alden, the senior
member of a large hardware establishment in
Philadelphia, "as apprentices, to learn the
business. What may surprise you is that we
never take country boys, unless they live in the
city with some relative who takes care of them
and keeps them home at night, for when a coun-






BOYS WANTED.


try boy comes to the city to live everything is
new to him, and he is attracted by every shop
window and unusual sight. The city boy who
is accustomed to these things cares little for
them, and if he has a good mother he is at home
and in bed in due season. And we are very par-
ticular about our boys-and before accepting one
as an apprentice we must know that he comes of
honest and industrious parents.
But the Jest boy we ever had is now with
us, and a'member of the firm. He is the one
man in the establishment that we couldn't do
without. He was thirteen years old when he
was apprenticed to us, and he was with us for
eleven years, acting for several years as salesman.
When he first came we told him that for a long
time his wages would be very small, but that if
he proved to be a good boy his salary would be
increased at a certain rate each year, and as it
turned out, when, according to agreement, we
should have been paying him five hundred dollars
a year, we paid nine hundred and he never said
a word himself about an increase of salary. From
the very outset he showed an interest in the
business. He iwas prompt in the morning, and
if kept a little overtime at night it never seemed
to make any difference with him. He gradually
came to know where everything was to be found,
and if information was wanted it was to this boy,
Frank Jones that everyone applied. The entire
establishment seemed to be mapped out in his







DILIGENT BOYS.


head and everything in it catalogued and num-
bered. His memory of faces was equally as re-
markable. He knew the name of every man
who came to the store to buy goods, what he
bought, and where he came from. I used often
to say to him, 'Jones,' your memory is worth
more than a gold mine How do you manage
to remember ?'
"' I make it my business to remember,' he
would say, 'I know that if I can remember a
man and can call him by name when he comes
into the store, and can ask him how things are
going on where he lives, I will be very likely to
keep him as a customer.'
And that was the exact case. He made
friends of buyers. He took the same interest in
their purchases as he did in the store, and would
go to no end of trouble to suit them, and to fulfil
to the letter everything he promised.
Well, affairs went on in this way until he
had been with us eleven years, when we con-
cluded to take him into the firm as a partner.
We knew that he had no extravagant habits, that
he neither used tobacco, nor beer, nor went to
the theatre. He continued as at the beginning
to board at home, and even when his salary was
the very lowest he paid his mother two dollars a
week for his board. He was always neatly
dressed, and we thought it was very probable
that he had laid up one or two thousand dollars,
as his salary for the last two years had been







BOYS WANTED.


twelve hundred dollars. So when we made him
the offer to become a partner in the business, and
suggested that it would be more satisfactory if
he could put some money into the firm, he
replied:
If ten thousand dollars will be any object I
can put in that much. I have saved out of my
salary nine thousand four hundred dollars, and
my sister will let me have six hundred.'
"I can tell you that I was never more as-
tonished in my life than when that fellow said
he could put in ten thousand dollars, and the
most of it his own money. He had never spent
a dollar, or twenty-five cents or five cents fbr an
unnecessary thing, and he had kept his money in
the bank where it gathered a small interest. I am
a great believer in the Bible, you know, and
I always kept two placards in big letters up in
the tore. On one was this text: 'He that is
faithful in that which is least, is faithful also in
that which is much'; and on the other, 'He
that is diligent in business, shall stand before
kings, and not before mean men.' And Frank
Jones' success was the fulfilment of those two
texts. He had been faithful in the smallest
things as in the greater ones, and diligent in
business. That kind of a boy always succeeds,"
concluded Mr. Alden.
A small boy of ten, who had listened to the
story with eager eyes, as well as ears, said:
But we don't have any kings in this country,






DILIGENT BOYS.


Mr. Alden, for diligent boys to stand before "
"Yes, we do," laughed Mr. Alden. We
have more kings here than in any other country
in the world. We have money kings, and bus-
iness kings, and railroad kings, and land kings,
and merchant kings, and publishing kings, and
some of them wield an enormous power. This
is a great country for kings."
In this book I have inserted stories of boys in
many parts of the world.
Here is a story of a Bulgarian boy. It goes
to show that the diligent are anxious to
Gain knowledge.
While up in the Balkan Mountains, caring for
his sheep, a poor Bulgarian boy in some way
heard of Robert College and the education that
was given there, and he resolved to go and ask
for admittance.
He travelled alone on foot all the distance,
and at last appeared before the gates of that
institution. He stated what he had come for,
but was refused admittance, as the college was
already full.
He could not have presented a very encourag-
ing appearance, as he stood there, that.ignorant
boy of fifteen. His dress consisted of trousers
and vest of sheep-skin, with a large garment of
the. same material, which was worn over the
head, forming a peaked cap, which also came
down over his shoulders and served as a cloak.




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