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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Poem
 Back Cover






Title: Bugville life for big and little folk
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085964/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bugville life for big and little folk
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Munkittrick, Richard Kendall
Dirks, Gus ( Illustrator )
Judge Company ( Publisher )
Donor: Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher: Judge Company
Place of Publication: s.l.
Publication Date: c1902
 Subjects
Subject: Insects -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1902   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1902
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: pictures by Gus Dirks ; verses by R. K. Munkittrick.
General Note: Paper cover printed in colors.
Funding: Dr. Robert L. Egolf Collection.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085964
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 004216681
oclc - 241300527

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Poem
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
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        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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    Back Cover
        Page 69
Full Text

IUGV LLE LIF
FOR BIG AND LITTLE FOLK











ILLUSTRATED BY
GUS DIRKS
VERSES BY
R. K.MJUNKIT TRICK
..~ajtj RC.




-C_
'i


JIMMY'S PREFERENCE.

I'd hate to be the elephant
That over there is shaking,
Not when he eats the sugar lump
But when his teeth are aching.


1I


s
:i
















BUGVILLE

LIFE


PICTURES BY GUS DIRKS
VERSES BY R. K. MUNKITTRICK


Ac. .








FOR BIG AND LITTLE FOL


WHEN THEY TURN TO GOLD.
MR. BUG-" Don't bother me now. Don't you see it s autumn and
the leaves must be painted ?"


PICTURES BY


GUS


DIRKS


VERSES


BY


R.K. MUNKIT TRICK


Published by the JUDGE COMPANY.
























































Copyright, 19g2, by Judge Publishing Co.








































AFTER THE BALL WAS OVER.

Fear not the mighty hunter,
He knows us not at all;
While he is there in hiding
Behind the button-ball,

He thinks we're kings in ermine-
Ah, me! if he but knew
That we're two luscious rabbits,
Just ripe for pie and stew!


;F-~3











JOHNNY MOTH'S WISH.


If I to heaven ever go,
Said little Johnny Moth in glee, /\
I trust the kind -
Of light I'll find
Is that which in the cut you see.

For then I'll flutter round and round
The flame, in manner light and gay, j\ "
And of the same, \ N\
Remark the game
sl -DIRKS-
Is worth the candle any day.








A WAY OUT OF IT.
// This flat won't hold my furniture,
I heard the buglet sigh,
Oh, prithee! try a bootjack, did
4 the janitor reply.

'! I have no bootjack to my name, the
buglet answered flat-
I lost it when I threw it at the
yowling Thomas cat.




























SHOCKING.


Hurry! Harry! hurry! Harry!
Let us not around here tarry.

Let us fly, and all elated,
From those frogs uneducated.

That can't read a common sign-board,
Though it's walnut,, oak or pine-board.


A PORCUPINE FANCY.

As all the roses have great thorns,
This fact but finely fills
1 My porcupineship with the thought
SThat that's why I have quills.

Yet I can't fancy, though I try,
In all my boundless glee,
Just why lush roses, white and red,
Don't blow on poor old me.




































(I US- IRKS-$


BEFORE THE FIRST OF MAY.

Well, did you ever, Mary!
He fells our house and never
Has given any notice.
Oh, Mary, did you ever!

And Mary sweetly answered:
"As I am yours forever,
I'll murmur in my wonder,
Serenely, ( Well, I never !' "


































A WISH.


I 'wish that the great Santos-Dumont
Would scare us not out of our lives,
By knocking asunder our chimney
And scraping the roof off our hives.










THE BUG PRINCE'S
S DISCOVERY.
".. That Cinderella Butterfly

a ,^ 'No longer I'll endure.
o \ Her shoe's so big it makes me
,C vsigh-
SShe's from Chicago sure.
S. Oh, yes, she's from Chicago
town,
.,\ Because her shoe 's so big,

\'y That she would shake the city
I\\down
aWere she to dance a jig.





HER LORD'S ADVICE.

'Oh! run, dearest Angeline,
run,
Our house on the hill 's be-
ing struck t\
By the lightning, and down \
comes the rain by the tun, i
And neither of us is a duck! 1/i Il

So run, dearest Angeline, run,
And tumble and stumble / | {\
and roll, u
But would it not simply be -uDIRK
fun by the ton, U 5
If we had a big bumbersole.




























THE RAT'S ADVICE


RETALIATION.


Come, soak him, brother rabbits,
He cannot up and fly,
We've got him in the snow-drift,
That's big and deep and high

He chased us with his bow-wows,
On many days gone by,
So soak him, brothers, soak him,
He's now our own pot-pie.


Be careful, little Willie,
Here comes the kitty cat,
And inside of a-jiffy,
You won't know where you're at.

Be careful, little Willie,
So dimpled and so fat,
Or else you'll be a goner,
Dost hear me warble, "scat! "


































PUSSY'S ADVICE.


Don't sing, oh pretty birdie,
But flit from that old fence.
Oh, quickly put the air-brake
Upon your song intense.

I sang like you and fancied
My song had not a flaw,
Until I caught a bootjack
One midnight on the jaw.

Then close your song, oh, birdie,
And fly this awful place,
Lest you're, like me, sent bootjacked
A-down the realms of space.











THE FLY BURGLAR.
I was a foolish fly
To try
To rob the wary spider.

"*----
He'll gulp me on the spot,
I wot,
His jaws now open wider.
I'd like to flit, oh, dear!
From here,
And light on yonder thistle,
---- And not be bug-juice yet,
a n To wet
'His weary, wistful whistle.




A HOBO WAIL.

Come, Reggie, let's move on- li
alas!
There isn't here a hand which -
A mutton-chop to us will pass,
Or e'en a chicken sandwich.

They're cruel-hearted folk, I
vow,X
While it's as cold as Nor- '

way,
To gand anchor that bow- ... k
wow 'th c d-
Within the cheerful door-
way.












THE WISE OWL.


1,0r/ Said Willie Jones with laugh-
S-' a ming eyes
That no great good the biped
Sboded,
I always thought the owl was
S- / -wise,
Sll But now that theory's ex-

ploded,
ndAs from the gun he never
OM ,flies-
n/ Perhaps he thinks it isn't
W- loaded.






FREE.

I tell you, William Henry Chick,
Said Bessie Butterfly,
'Tis fine to shake the old cocoon,
And! gayly drift on high.


It is a rosy-posy joy '
To flit where breezes sigh ',
And linger, William Henry Chick,
Said Bessie Butterfly. ",,J J































C-S-E-DI RKs-1


THE PORKER'S POINT OF VIEW.

I don't see what the butterflies
And bees can find when they
Bob on those purple, blue and white
Flowers that blow so gay.

Perhaps they're very fine, indeed,
And yet they wake my grins;
For I don't think they're half.as good
As old potato skins.



































THE SNAIL'S PACE.


Oh! time it will never, never wait-
It's always from us skimming;
And I that came out here to skate
Instead must take to swimming.




CAUSE AND EFFECT.

That water isn't deep enough to
drown you,
S Then wherefore do you howl and
Sblubber so.
The little boy responded most
Politely,
A crab has just annexed me by
the toe.











SPOILED HIS WOOING.


_--y_.__ Confound those prying fire-
flies,
---- Oh, yes; I say confound
Them one and all, because
-they
-- -Are always hanging
round.

"//I I/ Confound those prying fire-
flies,
/7/ I wish that they would
stop
,///// I A-hanging round the minute
O// ////j/////;//f////7It///^
// /,/////I/) /'i ,That I'd the question

////i( l//r/ ///H// l ( -'goNl 0





CAPTAIN BUG'S ORDER. .

Into the spider's web the air-ship's run
ker-plump,
Therefore, my compatriots, jump, jump,
jump.

Jump upon the house-top and carom on
the pump, / V, "1'
Jump, jump anywhere, jump, jump, jump!











THE FLOWERS' WAIL.


We shiver in our earthen jars
To think that from the zephyr
h gWe soon must pop


The rapture of the heifer.


I Ah, if the heifer had good sense
She'd shun us as the silk-weed,
SAnd blithely jump
Ar ao-sUS- Around the pump
And eat the juicy milk-weed.







A WAIL FROM BUGVILLE. -

hT b T'n 1 \ -
These gas-bills are outrageous.
The figures must be lies,
And I just think I'll go right back -
At once to fireflies. "


The fireflies so lovely /
Are diamonds in the grass.
Hereafter I'll depend on them
And never more on gas.



































THE FLY'S WARNING.
I tell you what,
You'd best look out
And dodge the tail
That whirls about.

It's dangerous
And shows, of course,
The mean inten-
Tion of the horse,

Which may be to
Knock off your hat
Or land you on
Your spinal flat.

So listen to
And profit by
The words of this
Blue-bottle fly.


BRUIN'S STATEMENT.
I watch the woodpecker
His quarry pursue,
In surtout of purple
And topknot of blue.

The woodpecker 's lively,
I'm certain of that;
I like his staccato
And rat-tat-tat-tat.

When merrily tapping
Away on the bark,
He beams with good humor
.From dawn until dark.

But nothing he cares for
The comfort I know
When blissfully dreaming
Away in the snow,

Or else he would never
Disturb with his gaff
My dreams when I've slept but
A moon and a half.


























PESSIMISTIC BUNNY.
I've rented these chickens, and what do you think!
They gobble my corn while they cluck and they blink,
But lay not an egg, and I feel pretty sure
My name as a rabbit not long can endure.
A blithe Easter rabbit not long can I be,
And that's why I'm weary and sore, don't you see !


FROGGIE'S LAMENT.
I do not like the bumble-bee,
Upon my word, boo-hoo !
For with a knife, ah, me! ah, me!
He's run me through and through.

I never did a thing to make
Him mad at me, boo-hoo !
And yet I thought a big earthquake
Had split me quite in two.

It was the height of cruel-tee
To stab me thus, boo-hoo!
Ere I could up and jump and be
From here to Kalamazoo.

Now if the bees upon the moor
May carry e'er, boo-hoo!
Concealed wea-pons, what is a poor
Old froggie going to do ?



















-: --- ^"'"'.^


















CERTITUDE.
The man who put that sign up here,
That I so plainly see,
Was pretty certain that my dear
Mamma was after me.


THE FIRE-FLY LAMP.
I told you if you opened the lamp
That the fire-fly would fly out,
And now I know you know I know
Just what I'm talking about.




























A WISH.
I wish good folks would kindly shut
Their beasts in box, or coop, or hut,
That they might not our horses block
And scare them up the hollyhock.

BRUIN'S FEAST.
Oh, this is fine imported jam
That wakes my fondest smile !
And to its sweetness I salaam
In Oriental style.
If I were on this mixture fed
With wist I'd never sigh,
But stand all day upon my head
With all the world my pie.
My spirit flits among the stars,
My rapture ne'er will cease;
I e'en love them who'd sell in jars
My bergamotted grease.
This huckleberry jam is quite

It makes my spirits dance as light
As moonbeams on the sea.
Though oft the berry on the vine
Begilds my inner man- *
Or rather bear-it's still more fine eus-o, /
Within the fabled can.





























THERESA'S" THREAT.
Go right away, you noisy geese, or I will up and tell
Old Mother Goose, who 's eating grass and clover in the dell;
And she will send you supperless to bed this very night;:
And when we meet again you'll be more gracious and polite.


THE ANXIOUS MOTHER.
Oh, Doctor Crawfish,
Hurry quick!
--- -- My little Polly
Wog is sick.

SShe's been since yester-
Day in bed,
And both her cheeks are
Rosy red.

Upon her back are
Lots and lots
Of funny little
,. ,',, Spotsy wots.

And she is on the
Very brink
-......'..' Of some thing or other,
Don't you think.
























THE FAKIR'S APPEAL.
Come, ladies and gentlemen, hurry along,
Select a few rings-which will cost but a song;
Then take a good aim, and, as sure as I grin,
I fancy a cane you will certainly win.

You see all the rings that I have on this stick ?
Then step right along on the blithe double-quick,
And purchase a ring and you'll gather to-day
A cane that will help you along on your way.

These canes are most numerous, here that you see.
Oh, now is the time if you'll listen to me.
Then step right along minus worry and fret-
The cane that you ring is the cane that you get.






























THE FUNNY WASHBOARD.
I don't know what's the matter here; I'm sure there's something wrong,
And I don't see just why I should' the agony prolong.
My knuckles all are bleeding now and I am in a huff,
And think I'll stop the washing in the middle of a cuff.

This moonlight soap that's warranted to make the linen shine
As bright as any drift of snow, when hanging on the line,
Is of no help to me at all, for all the bubbling suds
It makes won't take a speck of dirt from all these blooming duds.

Now Mr. Percy Montague Fitz lMontmorency Mouse,
I never felt much madder since we moved into this house
Than at the present moment, and I wish you, sir, to know
That after this our linen to the Chinaman will go.

Alas! I'm utterly undone because I cannot see,
To save my dear and precious life, throw ugh all the myster-ree
Connected with this washboard, which my patience quite beheads,
And tears the mousseline de soie and chiffi:n into shreds.








A LOUD LAMENTATION.
SWe'll have no ice,
I am afraid,
Next summer for
SOur lemonade.

SIt's just our luck
To have old Bet-
Sey, on our lake-
n y Let dump her ket-

Tle of hot wat-
Er, don't you see,
And that convin-
Ces little me

That when the dai-
Sies deck the glade,
No ice will cool
HIS FATE. ;Our lemonade.
I've hit that snowman
pretty hard,
And yet he hasn't mov-
ed a yard.

He doesn't seem to
move at all,
But stands stock still
upon the mall

As if quite rooted to the -
spot;
Perhaps he is, perhaps //,
he's not.

Now if he doesn't move V

His frame in two I'll
quickly split,

And make him with the \ \ _--,
zephyrs skim,
And that will be the
last of him.







TOWSER'S HOMILY.


Pray, Tommy dear, don't foolish be,
---- but listen while I sing:
You're wasting powder when you fire
at such a little thing.

You might as well save all that charge
to bring an eagle down,
Or endways knock the turkey wild
that's luscious, roasted brown.

Then o'er your shoulder shift your
S9F :gun and let the squirrel go;
" \ \/ 'Tis easier to miss him than to miss
a buffalo.

.I. And when you e'er go forth to hunt
Ji i' for fortune and for fame,
1fIIIII)lu/11 '/ Remember that the smallest charge
will land the biggest game.


WHY THEY RAN.
What a funny,
Funny thing
On this sunny
Day in Spring!

See them scatter
On pell mell;
What's the matter,
Who can tell ?

From Catullus,
Sophocles,
And Lucullus
Each one flees.

Reggie, Lucy, '"
Maude, and Clare
For the juicy
Camembert.



































BELINDA BUG'S
I can't see why
Good folks will buy
Oak, hickory, yew, beech,
Pine,. maple, sas-
Safras, elm, bass-
Wood, willow, plum or peach,
At two dol-lars
A cord-my stars !
They must have quite a heap
Of gold, if they
That price will pay
When
matches
are


BALLAD.
Oh, why! oh, why
Will people buy
Ash, apple, cedar, black
Wal-nut, birch, but-
Ton-ball, chestnut,
Dogwood and tamarack ?
Oh, goodness, me!
They all must be
Financially asleep,
To go and pay
That price to-day
When
matches
are


cheap.


cheap.







SAFEGUARDED.
That pesky woodpecker
Keeps pegging away;
I hear his brisk solo
That turns my hair gray.

Six portals he's broken
SWithin a brief moon-
/ He thinks in my parlor
He'll perch pretty soon,

And eat in a jiffy,
Z Joy-fraught and care-free,
My six little babies,
My husband and me.

P / I But we are safeguarded
SAgainst him, because
Tom's policy 's primed with
A woodpecker clause.

SUSAN'S SORROW.
No more my spirit 's glad and blithe,
In deepest anguish now I writhe. i -

Oh, sorrow cuts me like a knife,
Despair's grim shadow 's on my life.

I feel a pain in each bright scale,
Right from my topknot to my tail.

For some one 's hooked that wealthy
swell,
George H. Adolphus Pick-e-rel,

Who'll come to see me never more, ~u .
And say good-night till half-past four.






























THE GRATEFUL
GOBBLER.
I'll remember long how you,
In the fall of 1902,
Ere old winter played his fife,
Saved my throatie from the knife,

And so gently guided me
To your happy fami-lee-
Lulu, Mary, Isabel,
Theodore and Muriel.

It will be a while before
All the greeting at your door
Will be rudely wiped off the
Tablets of my memo-ree.

I'll remember fondly you
And the fall of 1902,
When you brought me, Mister
Fox,
To your home among the rocks.


SOLVED.
The mower 's low,
The crop is high,
And I don't know
Whatever I

Can do, alas!
Alack to cut
This funny grass
Around my hut.

The mullein stalk
And iron weed
Along my walk
Have gone to seed.

But, vanquished not
In any way,
I'll tell you what
I'll do to-day.

I'll mount yon hill
On footsteps blithe,
And borrow Will-
lam Beetle's scythe.


UD,


C-s-~





































THE NEW TIDY.
I've waxed a-weary of the old-time web
That hung before my pumpkin palace door
And snared the dewdrops neathh the drifting moon.
I've cast it out ; no more 'twill ripple in
The light and airy zephyr of the morn
That danced athwart its dainty gossamer.
A new one have I planned that stretches now
From stalk to stalk, and soon the fay and gnome
Will marvel at its lace-like mystery.
'Twill be a pin-wheel made of silver strands
Most deftly crossed and interwoven, till
'Twill seem in arabesque, and filigree,
A fantasy of moonbeams fine as air
That dreams and dreams within the lily bell.








BRUIN'S REGRET.
Oh, dear! my hands
Are full, and that
Is why I can't
Pursue yon fat

Small boy, who is,
I'm very sure,
Quite fit for a-
Ny epicure.

My hands are full
Of Tom and Lize,
And I can't run
To catch the prize.

Which makes me kick
And loudly sing:
That's what I get
For marry-ing.


A LESSON.
William Henry Lobster, did
I not you this morn forbid
To crack hard clams with
your teeth ?
And, my very eyes beneath,
You have gone and done the
thing
Which now causes you to
sing
With a sharp toothache that
will
Keep your pincers all a-thrill.
This, you see, is but the price
Of not heeding my advice.
Next time you will better
know-
Quick, now, to the dentist go.






























DOING HIS BEST.
Be patient, sweet Priscilla Bug; resign not to despair.
For while there's life there's hope, I am most happy to declare.
Oh, do not lose your head, for though there's danger in delays,
Be patient, dear ; I'll reach your side in six or seven days.

THE MERRY MOTHS.
Oh, Christmas is
A merry time,
With jingling bell.
And minster chime. .

With painted toy
And gem of snow,
And holly wreath
And mistletoe.

We fondly love
The Christmastide,
And on enchan-
Ted winglets glide,

And dance and frisk -
In boundless glee
Around the can-
Dles on the tree.


'K"`
r
e us- DIR~S -Pf~3


---------
----






























MRS. COON'S MISTAKE.
Prithee, mister, please excuse me,
For you know I'm quite near sighted,
And when I observed you crawling
Through my doorway on your fingers
And your most elastic kneepans,
I imagined in my anger,
Boiling like the old tin kettle,
Whose hot water I have emptied
On you, broidering your spinal
Column in a most artistic
Manner, that you were my scapegrace
Husband coming home to beat me,
And to break my finest china-
Haviland, Limoges and Wedgwood-
That as dainty wedding presents
Still begild my rosy fancy.
Pardon me, oh, kindly mister,
And I'll ask you while the kettle's
Briskly boiling, if you'll have a
Cup of oolong and a cracker.


TOMMY'S GREETING.
Mr. Bear, remember, pray;
I'm the fellow who
Often charmed you with tne gay
Gum-drop in the zoo.

Don't you know I'm Tommy Smith,
Who, when you would wag
Your small tail, approached you with
Peanuts in a bag

While the jealous kangaroo
Showed that he could rant
Like the quagga, cockatoo,
Yak and elephant?

Pop-corn ball and candy stick
Oft I carried there,
To begild, and pretty quick,
All your inner bear.

Prithee recollect that I
Am the fellow who
Tossed you bonbons on the fly
Gayly at the zoo.





































THE FIRST ONES IN.

Oh, goodness me! Oh, goodness me !
What is this awful sight I see?
Three precious little froggies dear.
Are swimming in the icy mere.

Oh, clamber out, and right away,
Or you'll before, the close of day
Have something poured right into you
To cure your wild cachoo, cachoo.









THE WISE BUG.


I'm very much- discouraged
And that is why I talk-
The moment that a flake falls
I shovel off my walk.

Another falls upon it,
I sweep it into space,
And then a new one
us quickly
Pops right into its
place.


X So I'll discard the shovel
:el on aAnd leave the path

--- )undug,
SAnd buy a pair of snow-
shoes
To fit this gay old
bug.




THE HIPPO'S VERDICT.

That I am called a river-horse
I in the school-books find-
The folks that gave me such N
a name N \l
Must surely have been blind. ,

Within the rushing river I -
Belong and pant and blow,
But I'm a sort of horseless horse
If any, don't you know.














MRS. BEAR'S OPINION.


-'/' My poor, dear husband's having
/ .'' An awful time, I feel,
2" M aIn landing from that ice-hole
"W1 & That very lively seal.

But still I'm sure he'll land her
... And soon upon my back,
To make me glad and cumfy,
I'll have a nice new sack.









COON SONGS IN
BUGVILLE.

Won't you teach me some
coon songs, professor,
Ere you'flit from' this- gar-
den aglow? I
All the critical bugs are \\Q "I ,\\
aweary \IA I
Of these ancient spring
songs, don't you know. i











THE BUG BERRY-
7- PICKERS.

V [( The farmer knows we're
1 .I \ I\ coming

'1\ II Ii / Upon the place full well.
a i"/ ( He knows it, oh, he knows it;
^ Ii), / He knows it very well.

S \I h That's why, to disconcert us
And chill the merry push,
He's set a great big bullfrog
Beneath the berry-bush.








THE FLY MISSIONARY'S M, I,. "i
DETERMINATION. \

If I escape unhurt ti \\\XV,
No more will I endeavor 11 II I ,
The heathen spider to con-
vert a .
Forever and forever.

Forever and forever
No more will I endeavor
The heathen spider to con- -
vert
usForever and forever.RS
Forever and forever.










































MR. SPRINGBIRD'S CONCLUSION.


The spring is here,
Oh, Edyth dear,
The limbs are bud-begilt;
And we should go
To work, you know.
Our cottage must be built.






With joy he shines,
Which means that
he
May have designs
'" On poor old me.
He dreams, I wis,
Sdi That I so fat,
\4 Served a la this
/ > '">And la that

'^ h\roll
y/i( AWould make him
,And prank and
1" -l prance,
S. And caracole
And jump and
G 'dance.
Yon eL, ba So loud I'll hum
Beneat hi t With all my soul
A jiglet from
La Perichole,"
And make, him skim
SAnd skip as free
As if abrim
PEGGY PIG'S PLAN. With bliss and me.
Yon nimble bear My spirit thrills And I will roam
Beneath the tree, With thoughts of harm, These happy scenes
A smile most rare His visage fills Till in the can
Bestows-on me. Me with alarm. I wed the beans.


RETALIATION.
Yes, I'll bet a ham-bone, a
Or a beef or ram-bone,
That the ancient tabby, No
Scrawny, sleek and DoG
flabby, A--owi -/
That I chewed up Sun- 'IN& eTHIS-
day,
And again on Monday,
Just to even matters
With old bow-wow :w
Tatters,
Went and had this sign- //
board P .
Mounted on that pine
board.























K


-:-- j


THE CORONATION IN BUGVILLE.
Hurrah for James the Seventh! Hurrah for James the Seventh !
The bugsy-wugsy king. May he, when he departs,
Like William the Eleventh, Like William the Eleventh,
He simply is the thing. Live in all loyal hearts.
































THE MOUSE'S FANCY.

When my Grandmother Mouse tells the story
Of Little Red Riding Hood daily,
All my fancy, in liveliest colors,
The romance thus illustrates gayly.


WILLIE FISH'S DREAM.

I dream I am in heaven,
And all the pathways run
Through argosies of flowers
Of finest fragrance spun,

And of the finest color
That ever yet was seen;
In scarlet and in purple,
In yellow and in green.

All full of worms delicious,
In lilac, mauve and blue-- -US-D
It strikes my happy fancy
This dream is coming true.


I~1ITP~cc~sr










































THE REASON.


Say, Jimmy, don't you think those frogs
Are very coy and shy,
To disappear so suddenly
As we go drifting by ?

No, Mary dear, they are not shy,
They only jump because
They have no airy bathing suits
Of flannel or of gauze.































WM. HENRY'S PRESTIGE.
The girls like William Henry Ham,
Now who can tell the reason?
He seems to be the great I am,
In each and.every season. .

" I'll tell you why," said
Reggie Lee,
A light and airy porker,
Of sunny, sweet philoso- /
phee t
A casual uncorker. 'I

"'Tis that his dad, l\1 \
Lord Tenderloin,
Who loves in ease
to cuddle, l
Owns that which is (
more dear
than coin-
The township's softest puddle.


THE PANTRY
GUARDIAN.
To keep us from these very
Intoxicating pies
That lie upon the table
In every form and size,

SThey've gone and put a scare-
fly,
And there he stands all day
That we may fear to caper
Upon the crust and play.

As he is but a scarefly,
We shouldn't fear to light
Upon the crust so fragile
And eat it left and right,

Arid show these stingy people
That we are not afraid
Of any pie policeman
That ever yet was made.












THE SWORDFISH.


The swordfish is the master
Of arms beneath the sea;
He fences with the mermaid,
And fences dainti-lee.

He dances out of danger
With grace that:all defies;
He e'er avoids thle glances
She 'darts from both her eyes.


And that is why the swordfish
May at the fisher jeer,
And parry in a jiffy
Or less his flying spear.








A MANAGERIAL AUGURY.


Our circus will
Annex a frost;
I feel the chill
And fear we're lost.


'Tis bitter gall
That fills our cup;
Fate has the call-
The jig is up.


For if, you know,
From yak to clown,
We move the show
From town to town,





From Jericho
To Manayunk,
S From Pamrapo
To Kennebunk;




/71 From Lake Ron-
kon-
1 Koma to Saug-
SErties, and on
To Weekapaug,





I know aright
The very dust
We'll shortly bite-
I mean we'll bust.


I'm sure, for that
Bird flies, ah me!
Off with our fat
Worm, don't you see.























OLD KING FROG.
Old King Frog is a merry old soul,
And at trouble he shouts, Oh, fudge !"
As he smokes a ton of hay
In his pipe every day,
And chuckles at the things in "Judge."


THE HUNTER FROG'S CONCLUSION.
These caterpillars three are fine,
And just the very stuff
To make that dear old wife of mine
A lovely sealskin muff.








THEIR PUNISHMENT.
I've told you, Willie,
Maud and Nan,
S. I've told you, Tillie,
Flo' and Fan,

SIn pool or lakelet
Ne'er to play
With duck or drakelet
_--Any day,

Unless each swimmer,
fil Dry or wet,
M y wa aCould brightly glimmer
SIn your set.

SAnd so instanter,
t e Be it said,
You'll cakeless canter
Up to bed.


KITTY'S REMARKS.
Mercy! what a funny
Picture do I see-
Through the endless field of ice /.
Little Tommy Lee -

Cuts a hole that simply
Wakes my sweetest smile,
As I watch him working like .
Any Trojan, while

This small kitty question C-D, V
Bubbles in my soul,
Does he think a mouse will come
Out of such a hole ?










THE WATCH
SBEE.
Sic em, Fido !
Soon the cat
Will know one
thing, IM 7
Which is, that

Not a watch dog ,
On the rug, ,. 0
Shepherd, poodle,
Bull or pug

Is the equal _
Of this fine
Small watch
bumble
Bee of mine.
BRUIN'S REQUEST.
Pray hurry, Mister Waiter
Pray hurry, hurry up,
For I am very hungry
And would instanter sup.

So catch those juicy creatures
.And quickly knock askew
S-My yearning which will only
i Salaam to rabbit stew.

Yea, fetch the unctuous mixture
That stands me on my head,
Anrd never mind the water,
And never mind the bread.








THE VILLAGE BUG-
SMITH.
Once I shod, with vim, indeed,
Caterpillar, centipede,
Beetle, cricket, butterfly,
For my ginger-cake and pie.

Now the bugless cart has come,
And my days no longer hum
SWAs they hummed and set aglow
All my fancies long ago.

SOft I think my apron high-
i J/;J On the willow tree should fly;
'' Which but simply means the gay,
Bugless buggy's come to stay.

Now the shoeless bug is here,
SAnd I think before a year
S Has gone by my sign no more
Will be seen above my door.

Then I'll through the country go
With my kit of tools, and. lo!
I will be a bug-smith tramp
Out to mend. the fire-fly's lamp.
W. FLY'S SUSPICION.
I'm quite afraid,
Said Willie Fly,
That this fair maid,
As sweet as pie,
Intends to flirt;
Because, you see,
First at the dirt
And then at me
And at the rose I
She looks and hums, / .
As her fair nose
Against it comes
And makes it puff
With joy and sigh us---}
And that's enough,
Said Willie Fly.







































THE MOLE'S ULTIMATUM.


I am a very patient mole, To tell you mean, infernal bugs
On that myself I flatter, That you your road are building
And yet I'm coming from my hole Right through my parlor o'er the rugs,
As mad as any hatter, And spoiling all the gilding.


And if your work you do not stop,,
My rage, as it increases,
May cause me on your road to hop
And kick it all to pieces.


- \ s,
N x^

































MRS. SPIDER'S INDIGNATION.
Ah, me! ah, me! what's this I see beneath the silver moon?
Two frogsy-wogs, and, as I live, they spoon and spoon and spoon;
Afid I quite like their impudence, so beautiful to see-
Their hammock is my finest web, oh, goodness gracious me!


OLLIE'S OPINION.
Swimming at this time of year
To my mind is very queer;
Yet that"white. bear simply reeks
With the joy his smile bespeaks.

If I read the stars aright,
He will cough this very night
Till his woolly face is black,.
And he's dosed with ipecac.

If it doesn't make him sick,
I will tell you, very quick,
That I'd never, never care /
If I were a polar bear.

















N-OT I CE E
SALL. TH+E
BIRDS HAVE |1
=GONE SOUTr i


THEIR FIRST SLEIGH-RIDE.
The birds have flown, the leaves have flown, and all the ground is white
With drifted snow, and all the bugs are brimming with delight,
As in their sleigh they glide away beneaththe stars so bright.





























THE MILLER'S REQUEST.
Come, Mister Spider, hurry, please!
Come, hurry up, I say,
And off my mill-wheel pull your web-
This is my busy day !


BUNNY'S SYMPATHY.
Now what's the use in crying and making all this fuss
Because the bird has taken your dolly from the 'bus ?
Oh, dry your tears, Matilda, and just take one of us.


]































Go for him, fellow-bees,
And sting him left and right.
Have lots of fun
And make him run
Till he is out of sight.


A BUMBLE BALLAD.
Oh, sting him on the hands
And sting him on the head
Until he jumps,
A mass of lumps,
Across the garden-bed.


Then round our cherry-tree
He'll nevermore appear
To touch a limb-
Oh, see him skim
The landscape like a deer !

































THE DRIVER SPEAKS.
We want a watchman, who Or else, before we know
Will be here in the nick What's happening to us,
Of time away to shoo Adown his throat we'll go
Our enemy, the, chick. Together with the 'bus.





























FARMER BUG'S THREAT.
I like your birdlike impudence; I do, as sure as fate.
Our caterpillar cattle you ,are using now for bait.
Desist, you wicked fisherbird, or I will up and straight-
Way knock you into smithereens, and do it while you wait !


WHICH?
Shall I study
Now, or eat
All this bugsy
Wugsy sweet?

Study 's lovely
For the mind;
Food is also
Good, I find.

One gives polish, '
And you shine;
One gives pleasure '
Superfine.

Eat or study! t-Us
Who oh who
Will advise me
What to do ?





























AN INVITATION.
Come, humble bugs and. bumble bugs, and buggies low and high,
And see our fine steam-roller like an auto whizz and fly
Across the dough designed to top the thick Thanksgiving pie.

RETALIATION.
How dare you, Mr. Mousie,
Go plowing in that way
Right through my happy house,
That's quite upset to-day.

You've knocked the walls asunder,
And fractured all the glass,
And smashed the roof to thunder,
And I'm undone, alas !

You think it very funny,
And that's the reason why
You smile a smile that's sunny
And heave a joyful sigh. "-"" ,*.

And as you have no pity
On me, I shall not fail
To tell the brindled kitty,
And put her on your trail.





































THE COON'S MISTAKE.
Thank heavens you're a grand lord
Of hunting out to kill.
I thought you were the landlord-
The landlord with the bill !


1 I I "
VIOLA'S VIEW.
Say, Fatty, dear old Fatty,
So happy and so gay,
Now tell me, don't you fancy
I'm right whene'er I say

The king and queen who daily
In fortune's zephyr scud
Must have a purple puddle
Of eighteen-karat mud ?







MISS TOAD'S OPINION.
I cannot see why critics
Will rave about the rose.
They think it very lovely p)
And dainty, I suppose. iI

Its petals may be pretty, /
Its scent may be so sweet ///
That bees will light gladly ///
on it h/i a i _/=
With all their wings // ij
and feet.

And yet with all its beauty
It must be very /' /
sad; I i' ,iiI{\I
To be without a wart- IYe I
let .-
To make it proud u/ -,
and glad.

G. W. BUG'S
CONFESSION.
u, ) A little G.Washington bug
am I,
I' o And I trust that I may
S' not catch it
lIf 1I When I say that I cannot
,I/ I tell a lie,
li'~ l And I did it with my
small hatchet.

I chopped the cherry-tree
down on the -fly;
--.In a jiffy did I dispatchit;
And somehow I never can
Y/ tell a lie-
S/f ) i Oh, I .did it with my
small hatchet.

I know I have ruined the cherry pie- Oh, father, I never can tell a lie !
Oh, where is the pie that, can match it? Oh, I did it with my small hatchet!






















THE FARMER'S
VEXATION.
Now from my stack of
new-mown hay
I wish you'd quickly fly
away.
Alas, alack, a-well-a-day!


Your fine nest building, let me say,
Has spoiled my crop and made my lay:
Alas, alack, a-well-a-day!



SAME OLD STORY.
Mr. Turtle, big and fat,
Have you, sir, an empty flat
Big enough for Jane and me,
And our children sweet and three?
No, I've not a vacant flat,"
.Said the turtle, big and fat,
And if I had twenty-two,
Not a one I'd lease to you.
Do you think I am a goose-
Fancy all those children loose, "\'i
:Smashing wall and chandelier,-
,Children never taken here !"


If you within my meadow play,
You'll make the pot-pie more than gay-
Alas, alack, a-well-a-day!








TICK, TOCK!
Don't let's crack this blooming
house
( Till they're sound asleep;
Now your glim you'd better
douse
iI/,1t As we nearer creep.

For I hear a noise that shakes
All my nerves a bit;
-_ll til f. 'Tis the noise the cricket makes
S"" When his ticker's fit.

Tick it goes, and tock it goes,
With an endless din;
And I really suppose
-- Some one works within.

Sus-,IAnd if we would bag their plate
And their gems galore,
We must wait and wait and wait
Till we hear them snore.

THE DRONE'S APPEAL.
The drone unto the lady said:
I'd like a draught of honey
Fresh from the roses, white and red,
Around your cottage sunny.

" And if no honey from the rose
You have to glad this rover,
Indeed I won't turn up my nose
At some distilled from clover;

" Or even from the hollyhock,
Or blue-and-gold lantana,
The marigold or four-o'clock,
The pansy or the canna."

"Oh, get thee hence from here away
Unto the Bay of Fundy ;
The flowers all are closed to-day,
Because to-day is Sunday." _____________ ____




































SOCIETY NOTE.
Miss Frog has donned her widding-dress of pussy-willow fur
'And fine wasp-paper, which the bugs most cheerfully concur
Is very fine, and that is why their praises they mur-mur.












A MARINE MYSTERY.
Three philosophic angle-worms remarked
one sunny day,
'Tis long enough that we've been bait, so
now across the bay
To fish ourselves with hook and line in
that old can we'll go.
They did, and what became of them
we'll never, never know.
















FIDO'S VIEW.
Well, well as sure as I'm alive
And am a snoring pug,
I see in Bruin, over there,
Our dear old parlor rug.

Perhaps he wandered from the house
To roam the woodland free,
And I am certain he is lost m.
Like poor old little me.


L -.*








THE BEETLE'S REBUKE.
Depart, oh, Mister Towser,
As if upon the wings
That speed the merry mouser
When for his prey he springs.

Beneath our impomopsis,
Our cypress and our yew;
Beneath our ampelopsis,
Our rosemary and rue;

Beneath our honeysuckle
And ivy thickly grown,
You'll bury not a knuckle
Or rib or funny-bone.

So caracole and canter
Unto your rug of rugs,
SAnd leave, oh, leave instanter-
This, graveyard made for bugs.

THE BUG. DIVER.







In point of style and symmetry,

But ne'er did I, until to-day,
Imagneth thte wavetruth to say,de a




dainty sponge, though flat or
A fluffY shape most fair to see ff







round,
Or long or short, could e'er be N


Like this with which my nose I :'
rub, ,g fw a t
A-growing in a big wash-tub.







STHE SQUIRREL
~INN.
/ __ Upon your bill
/A \ _I find, ah, me !
,-No flies to fill-
S0 My soul with glee.
Look as I will
t/\/ I Among these pies
'"1 i- I And cakes, and still
/ t oThe juicy flies

1 So big and fat
SI cannot find-
H E And like the bat
I am not blind.

SI am not sad,
For I am gay,
And also glad,
So let me say:.

My spirit sighs
THE HIPPO'S PREFERENCES. With bated breath,
Though. you fish with great elation, Oh, give me flies
SStill I fancy you do not Or give me death!
Show much kind consideration.
For this poor old hippopot.
You should know my thoughts you jangle
Out of tune whenever you j
O'er my old proboscis dangle
That ground-worm without ado.,
I'd prefer a slice of Jocko
Au gratin just for a change;
Or, a smooth eclair of choco-
Late, within my molars' range,
Would my fancies gayly quicken,
E'en as would the Nesselrode
Pudding, or the potted chicken,
Or the beefy a la mode. ----
Therefore gild my dream with sunshine, 1/7
While I sing with joy red hot:
Let the solid, burnished bun shine
On this poor old hippopot.


S,!




U-"'-* "


v


THE FOX'S OPINION.

The honest happy farmer
SUpon the drift I see,
:, And that. he is cold-hearted
Is very plain to me.




'\ .









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