Citation
Anderson, J. Patton to mother – Aug. 2, 1872 – Beersheba Springs, TN

Material Information

Title:
Anderson, J. Patton to mother – Aug. 2, 1872 – Beersheba Springs, TN
Creator:
Anderson, J. Patton
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- Tennessee -- Beersheba
North America -- United States of America -- Florida
North America -- United States of America -- Tennessee
North America -- United States of America

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
97jc

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Beersheba Springs
Grundy Co. Tenn.
Aug. 2nd 1872

My dear Mother,
Your letter of the 29th touched me very deeply indeed. If I did not know that it
would be painful to you for me to so, I would decline to accept it. I am not willing to let
my dear old mother gratify her every wish, but I feel that you are no better able to spare it
than I am.
I regret to report that the Sulphur spring which the proprietor (ignorant fellow)
averred was Sulphur, turns out to be no Sulphur at all. I knew if it was Sulphur, the
general geological formations of these mountains must have found an exception right
there.
But the air is so perfectly delicious, the fare is so unexceptionable, the company is
so refined, and the freestone water is so perfectly pure, that I have concluded to remain
here at least month, say till 16th Aug., & if by that time I have materially improved, I
shall stay longer. To give you some idea of the climate I may state that I have worn
woolen drawers, cloth coat, pants & vest every day since my arrival; & have slept under a
sheet, two light blankets & a calico spread every night! Of course it would be unfair in
me to say that I do not feel better than when I reached Beersheba, and even better than
when I left Memphis (for the trip pulled me down considerably) but whether the
improvement intends to be permanent I have my doubts. My liver has at last been
aroused to feeble action, and my bowels respond favorably to that change, but my cough
is about the same. The medicine Dr. Williams sent me by mail has had a happy effect &
there may be some ground to hope for ultimate good from its use.
The company here is composed almost entirely of Nashville people. The
McGavocks, Craigheads, Porters, Winstons, etc. Many of them have their private
vehicles here & scarcely a day passes that some of them do not offer me a seat for a short
ride. Of course I accept. The rich widow of a Middle Tenn. man (Armfield) resides here
the year round. She is most pleasantly situated in sight of the Hotel Has all the fruits,
from currants up to apples, pears & peaches of the best quality & in the greatest
abundance. Judge Sharkey & wife from Miss. & my Genl. Polk & daughter are her
guests. She shows me some kindness nearly every day. But I intend to take the morning
& evening horseback rides as you suggest. I only have room to say much love to Caro &
all. Also to B. & One [?]. I do not write to Et by this mail.
Yr own son Patton Anderson


Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Beersheba Springs Grundy Co. Tenn. Aug. 2nd 1872 My dear Mother, Your letter of the 29th touched me very deeply indeed. If I did not know that it would be painful to you for me to so, I would decline to accept it. I am not willing to let my dear old mother gratify her every wish, but I feel that you are no better able to spare it than I am. I regret to report that the Sulphur spring which the proprietor (ignorant fellow) averred was Sulphur, turns out to be no Sul phur at all. I knew if it was Sulphur, the general geological formations of these mount ains must have found an exception right there. But the air is so perfectly delicious, the fare is so unexceptionable, the company is so refined, and the freestone water is so perf ectly pure, that I have concluded to remain here at least month, say till 16th Aug., & if by that time I have materially improved, I shall stay longer. To give you some idea of the climate I may state that I have worn woolen drawers, cloth coat, pa nts & vest every day since my arrival; & have slept under a sheet, two light blankets & a calico spread every night! Of c ourse it would be unfair in me to say that I do not feel better than wh en I reached Beersheba, and even better than when I left Memphis (for the trip pulle d me down considerably) but whether the improvement intends to be permanent I have my doubts. My liver has at last been aroused to feeble action, and my bowels respond favorably to that change, but my cough is about the same. The medicine Dr. Willia ms sent me by mail has had a happy effect & there may be some ground to hope for ultimate good from its use. The company here is composed almost entirely of Nashville people. The McGavocks, Craigheads, Porters, Winstons, etc. Many of them have their private vehicles here & scarcely a day passes that some of them do not offer me a seat for a short ride. Of course I accept. The rich widow of a Middle Tenn. man (Armfield) resides here the year round. She is most pleasantly situated in sight of the Hotel Has all the fruits, from currants up to apples, pears & peaches of the best quality & in the greatest abundance. Judge Sharkey & wife from Mi ss. & my Genl. Polk & daughter are her guests. She shows me some kindness nearly ev ery day. But I intend to take the morning & evening horseback rides as you suggest. I only have room to say much love to Caro & all. Also to B. & One [?]. I do not write to Et by this mail. Yr own son Patton Anderson Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.