Citation
Anderson, J. Patton to Etta A. Anderson – May 19, 1864 – Camp Milton

Material Information

Title:
Anderson, J. Patton to Etta A. Anderson – May 19, 1864 – Camp Milton
Creator:
Anderson, J. Patton
Baker, Christopher A. ( Transcriber )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
North America
North America -- United States of America -- Florida
North America -- United States of America -- Tennessee
North America -- United States of America

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
55jc

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Camp Milton, May 19th 1864


Dear Et,
I write a short note to inform you that I go up to Lake City today, where we will
make Hd. qrs. for a short time, and will then go on to Middle Fla. unless something
happens to prevent it.
Everything in the way of troops has been sent off except the cavalry. I feel utterly
powerless but I think it is right. The great struggle is to be in Va. We should have every
man capable of bearing arms in the Confederacy at that place. If we succeed there,
Florida is safe; if not, then it will hardly be worse off than it is now. I have every
confidence in the result. God will give us the victory.
Now that I feel powerless to accomplish anything here, the separation from my
dear Et, seems more insupportable than ever. As long as I could feel that my presence in
the Army was of any use at all to the cause, it was consoling to reflect that duty was
being performed but when I feel that I am of no use whatever where I am, I feel like it
was impossible for me to stay away from you any longer.
I shall remain in Lake City but a short time and will then proceed to Middle
Florida where my Headquarters will have to be established, for the purpose of organizing
the Reserves for they are our dependence now.
I am so much disappointed about not getting to see you tomorrow, that I am
almost in the blues. But I hope to see you soon anyhow. In the meantime you must be
cheerful. Do not repine. The very anticipation of the pleasure it will afford me to be with
you, is some comfort the reality will be earthly happiness in perfection.
Kiss Willie, & The, & Pat & Lilly for me. Bless their hearts! How I do want to
see them too! Remember me to the servants.
Love to Aunt & Mol and [Sizgie?], Annetta, & Adair.
A bushel of kisses for yourself from
Your
Patton


Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Camp Milton, May 19th 1864 Dear Et, I write a short note to inform you that I go up to Lake City today, where we will make Hd. qrs. for a short time, and will th en go on to Middle Fla. unless something happens to prevent it. Everything in the way of troops has been se nt off except the cavalry. I feel utterly powerless but I think it is right. The great struggle is to be in Va. We should have every man capable of bearing arms in the Confeder acy at that place. If we succeed there, Florida is safe; if not, then it will hardly be worse off than it is now. I have every confidence in the result. God will give us the victory. Now that I feel powerless to accomplish anything here, the separation from my dear Et, seems more insupportable than ever. As long as I could feel that my presence in the Army was of any use at all to the cause, it was consoling to reflect that duty was being performed but when I feel that I am of no use whatever where I am, I feel like it was impossible for me to stay away from you any longer. I shall remain in Lake City but a sh ort time and will then proceed to Middle Florida where my Headquarters will have to be established, for the purpose of organizing the Reserves for they are our dependence now. I am so much disappointed about not getting to see you tomorrow that I am almost in the blues But I hope to see you soon anyhow In the meantime you must be cheerful. Do not repine. The very anticipation of the pleasure it will afford me to be with you, is some comfort the reality will be earthly happiness in perfection. Kiss Willie, & The, & Pat & Lilly for me. Bless their hearts! How I do want to see them too! Remember me to the servants. Love to Aunt & Mol and [Sizgie?], Annetta, & Adair. A bushel of kisses for yourself from Your Patton Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.