<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Queer little people
 Little Pussy Willow
 The minister's watermelons
 A dog's mission
 Lulu's pupil
 The daisy's first winter
 Our Charley and the stories told...
 Little Captain Trott
 Christmas; or, The good fairy
 Little Fred, the canal boy
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine


BLDN CCLC ICDL NEH UFSPEC



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mods:title Stories and sketches for the young
mods:name type personal
mods:namePart Stowe, Harriet Beecher
date 1811-1896
mods:role
mods:roleTerm authority marcrelator Creator
Riverside Press (Cambridge, Mass.)
Printer
H.O. Houghton and Company.
Eletrotyper ; Printer
Houghton, Mifflin and Company.
Contributor
mods:originInfo
mods:place
mods:placeTerm text Boston ; New York
mods:publisher Houghton, Mifflin and Company
mods:dateIssued 1897
mods:language
mods:languageTerm English
mods:identifier ALEPH 002238052
OCLC 237051504
NOTIS ALH8547
mods:note Title page printed in red and black.
The frontispiece of Mrs. Stowe and her daughters is from a daguerreotype taken in 1850.
mods:genre Children's stories -- 1897.
mods:subject
mods:topic Children -- Juvenile fiction. -- Conduct of life
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction.
Children's stories.
Bldn -- 1897.
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processing.instr
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UF00085619_00001.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 mixed
METS:div DMDID Stories and sketches for the young ORDER 0 main
D1 1 Front Cover
P1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
P2 2
D2 Matter
P7 i
D3 Frontispiece
P8 ii
D4 4 Title
P9 iii
P10 iv
D5 5 Table of Contents
P11 v
P12 vi
D6 6 Introduction
P13 vii
D7 Queer little people 7 Chapter
P15
D8 The hen that hatched ducks Subdivision Level
P15_repeat
P16
P17
P18
P19
P20
P21
P22 8
P23 9
P24 10
D9 Nutcrackers Nutcracker Lodge
P25
P26 12
P27 13
P28 14
P29 15
P30 16
P31 17
P32 18
D10 history Tip-Top
P33 19
P34 20
P35 21
P36 22
P37 23
P38 24
P39 25
P40 26
P41 27
P42 28
D11 Miss Katy-did Cricket
P43 29
P44 30
P45 31
P46
P47 33
P48 34
P49 35
D12 Mother Magpie's mischief
P50 36
P51 37
P52 38
P53 39
P54 40
P55 41
D13 squirrels lived in a house
P56 42
P57 43
P58 44
P59 45
P60 46
P61 47
P62 48
D14 Hum, son Buz
P63 49
P64 50
P65 51
P66 52
P67 53
P68 54
P69 55
P70 56
P71 57
D15 Our country neighbors
P72 58
P73 59
P74 60
P75 61
P76 62
P77 63
P78 64
P79 65
D16 dogs
P80 66
P81 67
P82 68
P83 69
P84 70
P85 71
P86 72
P87 73
P88 74
P89 75
P90 76
P91 77
P92 78
P93 79
P94 80
P95 81
P96 82
P97 83
P98 84
P99 85
P100 86
P101 87
P102 88
P103 89
P104 90
P105 91
P106 92
P107 93
P108 94
P109 95
P110 96
P111 97
P112 98
P113 99
P114 100
P115 101
D17 Dogs cats
P116 102
P117 103
P118 104
P119 105
P120 106
P121 107
P122 108
P123 109
D18 Aunt Esther's rules
P124 110
P125 111
P126 112
P127 113
D19 stories
P128 114
P129 115
P130 116
P131 117
P132 118
P133 119
P134 120
D20 Sir Walter Scott his
P135 121
P136 122
P137 123
P138 124
P139 125
P140 126
D21 Country again
P141 127
P142 128
P143 129
P144 130
P145 131
P146 132
P147 133
D22 diverting Whiskey
P148 134
P149 135
P150 136
P151 137
P152 138
D23 Little Pussy Willow
P153 139
P154 140
P155 141
P156 142
P157 143
P158 144
P159 145
P160 146
P161 147
P162 148
P163 149
P164 150
P165 151
P166 152
P167 153
P168 154
P169 155
P170 156
P171
P172 158
P173 159
P174 160
P175 161
P176 162
P177 163
P178 164
P179 165
P180 166
P181 167
P182 168
P183 169
P184 170
P185 171
P186 172
P187 173
P188 174
P189 175
P190 176
P191 177
P192 178
P193 179
P194 180
P195 181
P196 182
P197 183
P198 184
P199 185
P200 186
P201 187
P202 188
P203 189
P204 190
P205 191
P206 192
P207 193
P208 194
P209 195
P210
P211 197
P212 198
P213 199
P214 200
P215 201
P216 202
P217 203
P218 204
P219 205
P220 206
P221 207
P222 208
P223 209
P224 210
P225 211
P226 212
P227 213
P228 214
P229
P230 216
P231 217
P232 218
P233 219
P234 220
P235 221
P236 222
P237 223
P238 224
P239 225
P240 226
P241 227
P242 228
P243 229
P244 230
P245 231
P246 232
D24 minister's watermelons
P247 233
P248 234
P249 235
P250 236
P251 237
P252 238
P253 239
P254 240
P255 241
P256 242
P257 243
P258 244
P259 245
P260 246
P261 247
P262 248
P263 249
P264 250
P265 251
P266 252
P267 253
P268 254
P269 255
P270 256
P271 257
D25 A dog's mission
P272 258
D26 old woman
P272_repeat
P273 259
P274 260
P275 261
P276 262
P277 263
D27 dog takes refuge with
P278 264
P279 265
P280 266
P281 267
D28 She discovers he is Providence
P282 268
P283 269
P284 270
D29 He makes himself agreeable
P285 271
P286 272
P287 273
P288 274
D30 Blue Eyes comes to see him
P289 275
P290 276
P291 277
P292 278
D31 who hates
P293 279
P294 280
P295 281
D32 pursues her advantage
P296 282
P297 283
P298 284
D33 bright Saturday afternoon
P299 285
P300 286
P301 287
P302 288
P303 289
D34 joyful Sunday
P304 290
P305 291
D35 Where
P306 292
P307
P308 294
P309 295
D36 Thanksgiving dinner
P310 296
P311 297
P312 298
P313 299
D37 Lulu's pupil
P314 300
P315 301
P316 302
P317
P318 304
P319 305
D38 daisy's first winter
P320 306
P321 307
P322 308
P323 309
P324 310
P325 311
P326 312
D39 Charley told
P327 313
D40
P327_repeat
P328 314
P329 315
P330 316
P331 317
P332
P333 319
P334 320
P335 321
P336 322
D41 Take care hook
P337 323
P338 324
P339 325
D42 talk about birds
P340 326
P341 327
P342 328
P343 329
P344 330
P345 331
P346
P347 333
D43 nest orchard
P348
P349 335
P350 336
P351 337
P352 338
D44 happy child
P353 339
P354 340
P355 341
P356 342
P357 343
P358 344
P359 345
D45 Captain Trott
P360 346
P361 347
P362 348
P363 349
P364 350
P365 351
P366 352
P367 353
P368 354
D46 Christmas; or, good fairy
P369 355
P370 356
P371 357
P372 358
P373
P374 360
P375 361
P376 362
P377 363
P378 364
D47 Fred, canal boy
P379 365
P380 366
P381 367
P382 368
P383 369
P384 370
P385 371
P386 372
P387 373
P388 374
P389 375
P390 376
P391 377
P392 378
P393 379
P394 380
P395 381
P396 382
P397 383
D48 Back
P400 384
D49
P401
P402
D50 Spine
P403


Stories and sketches for the young
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085619/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories and sketches for the young
Physical Description: vi, 1, 383 p. : ill., port. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896
Houghton, Mifflin and Company ( Publisher )
Riverside Press (Cambridge, Mass.)
H.O. Houghton & Company
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin and Company
Riverside Press
Place of Publication: Boston
Cambridge
Manufacturer: Electrotyped and printed by H.O. Houghton & Co.
Publication Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Children's stories
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Harriet Beecher Stowe.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black.
General Note: The frontispiece of Mrs. Stowe and her daughters is from a daguerreotype taken in 1850.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238052
notis - ALH8547
oclc - 237051504
System ID: UF00085619:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page vii
    Queer little people
        Page 1
        The hen that hatched ducks
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
        The Nutcrackers of Nutcracker Lodge
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
        The history of Tip-Top
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
        Miss Katy-did and Miss Cricket
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
        Mother Magpie's mischief
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
        The squirrels that lived in a house
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Hum, the son of Buz
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Our country neighbors
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
        Our dogs
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Dogs and cats
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
        Aunt Esther's rules
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
        Aunt Esther's stories
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Sir Walter Scott and his dogs
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
        Country neighbors again
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
        The diverting history of little Whiskey
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
    Little Pussy Willow
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
    The minister's watermelons
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
    A dog's mission
        Page 258
        The old house and the old woman
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
        The dog takes refuge with the old woman
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
        She discovers that he is a Providence
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
        He makes himself agreeable
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
            Page 274
        Blue Eyes comes to see him
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
        The woman who hates dogs
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
        Blue Eyes pursues her advantage
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
        A bright Saturday afternoon
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
        A joyful Sunday
            Page 290
            Page 291
        Where is Blue Eyes?
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
        The Thanksgiving dinner
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
    Lulu's pupil
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
    The daisy's first winter
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
    Our Charley and the stories told him
        Page 313
        Our Charley
            Page 313
            Page 314
            Page 315
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
        Take care of the hook
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
        A talk about birds
            Page 326
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
        The nest in the orchard
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
        The happy child
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
    Little Captain Trott
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
    Christmas; or, The good fairy
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
    Little Fred, the canal boy
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
    Back Matter
        Page 384
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text





































The Baldwin Libraxy

~m93~


LI I L ---~CIIIIS -ILr Ll I~IPIII~LIII~Sdl
























t' L-'









6' 9




/












*toriet a0nb trche

FOR THE YOUNG

BY

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
















BOSTON AND NEW YORK
HOUGHTON, MIFFlIN AND COMPANY
(e fibteribe Pre1 eCambribge
1897




























Copyright, 1855,
BY PHILLIPS, SAMPSON & CO.

Copyright, 1867,
BY TICKNOR & FIELDS.

Copyright, 1881, 1883, 1895,
BY HARRIET BEECHER STOWE.

Copyright, 1896,
BY HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO.

All rights reserved.


The Riverside Press, Cambridge, Mass., U. S. A.
Electrotyped and Printed by H. O. Houghton & Co.





















CONTENTS


INTRODUCTORY NOTE ii
QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE.
THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS 1
THE NUTCRACKERS OF NUTCRACKER LODGE 11
THE HISTORY OF TIP-TOP .. 19
MISS KATY-DID AND MISS CRICKET 29
MOTHER MAGPIE'S MISCHIEF 36
THE SQUIRRELS THAT LIVED IN A HOUSE 42
HuM, THE SON OF BUZ .. 49
OUR COUNTRY NEIGHBORS 58
OUR DOGS 66
DOGS AND CATS 102
AUNT ESTHER'S RULES 110
AUNT ESTHER'S STORIES 114
SIR WALTER SCOTT AND HIS DOGS 121
COUNTRY NEIGHBORS AGAIN 127


THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF LITTLE WHISKEY .
,LITTLE PUSSY WILLOW .
THE MINISTER'S WATERMELONS .
,~A DOG'S MISSION.
CHAP. I. THE OLD HOUSE AND THE OLD WOMAN
II. THE DOG TAKES REFUGE WITH THE OLD WOMAN
III. SHE DISCOVERS THAT HE IS A PROVIDENCE
IV. HE MAKES HIMSELF AGREEABLE
V. BLUE EYES COMES TO SEE HI .
VI. THE WOMAN WHO HATES DOGS
VII. BLUE EYES PURSUES HER ADVANTAGE
VIII. A BRIGHT SATURDAY AFTERNOON .
IX. A JOYFUL SUNDAY .
X. WHERE IS BLUE EYES? .
XI. THE THANKSGIVING DINNER .
LULU'S PUPIL .
THE DAISY'S FIRST WINTER .


134
S139
233

S258
264
S268
271
S275
279
282
285
S290
292
296
300
S306








VI CONTENTS

OUR CHARLEY AND TIE STORIES TOLD HIM.
OUR CHARLEY
STAKE CARE OF THE HOOK .
_.A TALK ABOUT BIRDS .
,THE NEST IN THE ORCHARD
I THE HAPPY CHILD .
LITTLE CAPTAIN TROTT .
SCHRISTMAS; OR, THE GOOD FAIRY
LITTLE FRED, TIE CANAL BOY .


S 313
S323
326
334
339
346
355
365


The frontispiece (Mrs. Stowe and her daughters) is from a daguerreotype
taken in 1850.














INTRODUCTORY NOTE


HE would be an inattentive reader of Mrs. Stowe's
writings who did not see how irresistibly she would be
drawn not only to the portraiture of children but to stories
for their pleasure. She was distinctly a domestic woman;
and she was, moreover, so acutely sensible of the world of
nature, loving its flowers, trees, and all animate and inani-
mate objects, that her active mind and intelligent sympathy
could scarcely fail to seize upon this material when she
came to write for the instruction or the diversion of that
part of humanity which lives nearest the earth.
The -Mayflower, which has yielded so many evidences of
Mrs. Stowe's native proclivities in her early life, is drawn
upon here for two stories, the last in the volume ; but a
good many of the most characteristic creature stories, those
included under Queer Little People, were first contributed
to Our Young Folks and afterward gathered in a volume,
which was published in 1867. The other stories were for
the most part contributed to periodicals before being col-
lected in book form, Little Captain Trott being a study of
child life first published in The Atlantic Monthly. It is
after all a somewhat loose classification which sets these all
apart as stories and sketches for the young. Some of them
might readily have been grouped with the stories, sketches,
and studies comprised in the fourteenth volume of this
series, just as some pieces there printed might have found
as suitable a place in this volume. In truth, Mrs. Stowe
was naturally a companion for young and old, without too
nice a calculation of adaptation to either class.













STORIES AND SKETCHES FOR
THE YOUNG


QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS

ONCE there was a nice young hen that we will call Mrs.
Feathertop. She was a hen of most excellent family, being
a direct descendant of the Bolton Grays, and as pretty a
young fowl as you should wish to see of a summer's day.
She was, moreover, as fortunately situated in life as it was
possible for a hen to be. She was bought by young Mas-
ter Fred Little John, with four or five family connections
of hers, and a lively young cock, who was held to be as
brisk a scratcher and as capable a head of a family as any
half-dozen sensible hens could desire.
I can't say that at first Mrs. Feathertop was a very sen-
sible hen. She was very pretty and lively, to be sure, and
a great favorite with Master Bolton Gray Cock, on account
of her bright eyes, her finely shaded feathers, and certain
saucy dashing ways that she had, which seemed greatly to
take his fancy. But old Mrs. Scratchard, living in the
neighboring yard, assured all the neighborhood that Gray
Cock was a fool for thinking so much of that flighty young
thing, that she had not the smallest notion how to get
on in life, and thought of nothing in the world but her own
pretty feathers. Wait till she comes to have chickens,"
said Mrs. Scratchard. "Then you will see. I have brought













STORIES AND SKETCHES FOR
THE YOUNG


QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS

ONCE there was a nice young hen that we will call Mrs.
Feathertop. She was a hen of most excellent family, being
a direct descendant of the Bolton Grays, and as pretty a
young fowl as you should wish to see of a summer's day.
She was, moreover, as fortunately situated in life as it was
possible for a hen to be. She was bought by young Mas-
ter Fred Little John, with four or five family connections
of hers, and a lively young cock, who was held to be as
brisk a scratcher and as capable a head of a family as any
half-dozen sensible hens could desire.
I can't say that at first Mrs. Feathertop was a very sen-
sible hen. She was very pretty and lively, to be sure, and
a great favorite with Master Bolton Gray Cock, on account
of her bright eyes, her finely shaded feathers, and certain
saucy dashing ways that she had, which seemed greatly to
take his fancy. But old Mrs. Scratchard, living in the
neighboring yard, assured all the neighborhood that Gray
Cock was a fool for thinking so much of that flighty young
thing, that she had not the smallest notion how to get
on in life, and thought of nothing in the world but her own
pretty feathers. Wait till she comes to have chickens,"
said Mrs. Scratchard. "Then you will see. I have brought







2 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

up ten broods myself, as likely and respectable chickens
as ever were a blessing to society, and I think I ought
to know a good hatcher and brooder when I see her; and I
know that fine piece of trumpery, with her white feathers
tipped with gray, never will come down to family life.
She scratch for chickens Bless me, she never did any-
thing in all her days but run round and eat the worms
which somebody else scratched up for her."
When Master Bolton Gray heard this he crowed very
loudly, like a cock of spirit, and declared that old Mrs.
Scratchard was envious, because she had lost all her own
tail-feathers, and looked more like a worn-out old feather-
duster than a respectable hen, and that therefore she was
filled with sheer envy of anybody that was young and
pretty. So young Mrs. Feathertop cackled gay defiance at
her busy rubbishy neighbor, as she sunned herself under
the bushes on fine June afternoons.
Now Master Fred Little John had been allowed to have
these hens by his mamma on the condition that he would
build their house himself, and take all the care of it; and,
to do Master Fred justice, he executed the job in a small
way quite creditably. He chose a sunny sloping bank cov-
ered with a thick growth of bushes, and erected there a
nice little hen-house, with two glass windows, a little door,
and a good pole for his family to roost on. He made,
moreover, a row of nice little boxes with hay in them for
nests, and he bought three or four little smooth white china
eggs to put in them, so that, when his 'hens did lay, he
might carry off their eggs without their being missed. This
hen-house stood in a little grove that sloped down to a
wide river, just where there was a little cove which reached
almost to the hen-house.
This situation inspired one of Master Fred's boy advis-
ers with a new scheme in relation to his poultry enter-
prise. "Hullo! I say, Fred," said Tom Seymour, "you






THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS 3

Sought to raise ducks, you've got a capital place for ducks
there."
Yes, but I 've bought hens, you see," said Freddy,
"so it's no use trying."
"No use Of course there is Just as if your hens
could n't hatch ducks' eggs. Now you just wait till one of
your hens wants to set, and you put ducks' eggs under her,
and you'll have a family of ducks in a twinkling. You
can buy ducks' eggs, a plenty, of old Sam under the hill;
he always has hens hatch his ducks."
So Freddy thought it would be a good experiment, and
informed his mother the next morning that he intended to
furnish the ducks for the next Christmas dinner ; and when
she wondered how he was to come by them, he said, mys-
teriously, "Oh, I will show you how!" but did not further
explain himself. The next day he went with Tom Sey-
mour, and made a trade with old Sam, and gave him a mid-
dle-aged jack-knife for eight of his ducks' eggs. Sam, by the
bye, was a woolly-headed old negro man, who lived by the
pond hard by, and who had long cast envying eyes on Fred's
jack-knife, because it was of extra-fine steel, having been a
Christmas present the year before. But Fred knew very well
there were any number more of jack-knives where that came
from, and that, in order to get a new one, he must dispose
of the old; so he made the trade and came home rejoicing.
Now about this time Mrs. Feathertop, having laid her
eggs daily with great credit to herself, notwithstanding Mrs.
Scratchard's predictions, began to find herself suddenly at-
tacked with nervous symptoms. She lost her gay spirits,
grew dumpish and morose, stuck up her feathers in a bris-
tling way, and pecked at her neighbors if they did so much
as look at her. Master Gray Cock was greatly concerned,
and went to old Doctor Peppercorn, who looked solemn, and
recommended an infusion of angle-worms, and said he would
look in on the patient twice a day till she was better.






4 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

"Gracious me, Gray Cock said old Goody Kertarkut,
who had been lolling at the corner as he passed, "a'n't you a
fool ? cocks always are fools. Don't you know what's the
matter with your wife ? She wants to set, that's all; and
you just let her set! A fiddlestick for Doctor Peppercorn!
Why, any good old hen that has brought up a family knows
more than a doctor about such things. You just go home
and tell her to set, if she wants to, and behave herself."
When Gray Cock came home, he found that Master
Freddy had been before him, and established Mrs. Feather-
top upon eight nice eggs, where she was sitting in gloomy
grandeur. He tried to make a little affable conversation
with her, and to relate his interview with the doctor and
Goody Kertarkut, but she was morose and sullen, and only
pecked at him now and then in a very sharp, unpleasant
way; so after a few more efforts to make himself agreeable,
he left her, and went out promenading with the captivating
Mrs. Red Comb, a charming young Spanish widow, who
had just been imported into the neighboring yard.
Bless my soul said he, "you 've no idea how cross
my wife is."
"Oh, you horrid creature!" said Mrs. Red Comb; "how
little you feel for the weaknesses of us poor hens "
On my word, ma'am," said Gray Cock, "you do me
injustice. But when a hen gives way to temper, ma'am,
and no longer meets her husband with a smile, when she
even pecks at him whom she is bound to honor and
obey "
"Horrid monster talking of obedience I should say,
sir, you came straight from Turkey and Mrs. Red Comb
tossed her head with a most bewitching air, and pretended
to run away, and old Mrs. Scratchard looked out of her
coop and called to Goody Kertarkut, -
"Look how Mr. Gray Cock is flirting with that widow.
I always knew she was a baggage."






THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS


"And his poor wife left at home alone," said Goody
Kertarkut. "It's the way with 'em all "
Yes, yes," said Dame Scratchard, she '11 know what
real life is now, and she won't go about holding her head
so high, and looking down on her practical neighbors that
have raised families."
Poor thing, what '11 she do with a family ? said Goody
Kertarkut.
"Well, what business have such young flirts to get mar-
tied ? said Dame Scratchard. ." I don't expect she '11 raise
a single chick ; and there 's Gray Cock flirting about, fine
as ever. Folks did n't do so when I was young. I'm sure
my husband knew what treatment a setting hen ought to
have, -poor old Long Spur, he never minded a peck or
so now and then. I must say these modern fowls a'n't
what fowls used to be."
Meanwhile the sun rose and set, and Master Fred was
almost the only friend and associate of poor little Mrs.
Feathertop, whom he fed daily with meal and water, and
only interrupted her sad reflections by pulling her up occa-
sionally to see how the eggs were coming on.
At last, "Peep, peep, peep began to be heard in the
nest, and one little downy head after another poked forth
from under the feathers, surveying the world with round,
bright, winking eyes; and gradually the brood were hatched,
and Mrs. Feathertop arose, a proud and happy mother, with
all the bustling, scratching, care-taking instincts of family-
life warm within her breast. She clucked and scratched, and
cuddled the little downy bits of things as handily and dis-
creetly as a seven-year-old hen could have done, exciting
thereby the wonder of the community.
Master Gray Cock came home in high spirits, and com-
plimented her; told her she was looking charmingly once
more, and said, "Very well, very nice i as he surveyed the
young brood. So that Mrs. Feathertop began to feel the






6 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

world going well with her, when suddenly in came Dame
Scratchard and Goody Kertarkut to make a morning call.
Let's see the chicks," said Dame Scratchard.
"Goodness me," said Goody Kertarkut, what a likeness
to their dear papa "
Well, but bless me, what's the matter with their bills ? "
said Dame Scratchard. Why, my dear, these chicks are
deformed! I'm sorry for you, my dear, but it's all the
result of your inexperience ; you ought to have eaten pebble-
stones with your meal when you were setting. Don't you
see, Dame Kertarkut, what bills they have? That 'll
increase, and they '11 be frightful! "
"What shall I do ? said Mrs. Feathertop, now greatly
alarmed.
"Nothing, as I know of," said Dame Scratchard, "since
you did n't come to me before you set. I could have told
you all about it. Maybe it won't kill 'em, but they 'll
always be deformed."
And so the gossips departed, leaving a sting under the
pin-feathers of the poor little hen mamma, who began to
see that her darlings had curious little spoon-bills, different
from her own, and to worry and fret about it.
"My dear," she said to her spouse, do get Dr. Pepper-
corn to come in and look at their bills, and see if anything
can be done."
Dr. Peppercorn came in, and put on a monstrous pair
of spectacles, and said, Hum! Ha Extraordinary case, -
very singular "
"Did you ever see anything like it, Doctor ? said both
parents, in a breath.
"I 've read of such cases. It's a calcareous enlarge-
ment of the vascular bony tissue, threatening ossification,"
said the doctor.
Oh, dreadful! can it be possible ? shrieked both
parents. "Can anything be done ?"






THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS


Well, I should recommend a daily lotion made of mos-
quitoes' horns and bicarbonate of frogs' toes, together with
a powder, to be taken morning and night, of muriate of
fleas. One thing you must be careful about: they must
never wet their feet, nor drink any water."
Dear me, Doctor, I don't know what I shall do, for they
seem to have a particular fancy for getting into water."
Yes, a morbid tendency often found in these cases of
bony tumification of the vascular tissue of the mouth ; but
you must resist it, ma'am, as their life depends upon it ;"
- and with that Dr. Peppercorn glared gloomily on the
young ducks, who were stealthily poking the objectionable
little spoon-bills out from under their mother's feathers.
After this poor Mrs. Feathertop led a weary life of it;
for the young fry were as healthy and enterprising a brood
of young ducks as ever carried saucepans on the end of
their noses, and they most utterly set themselves against
the doctor's prescriptions, murmured at the muriate of fleas
and the bicarbonate of frogs' toes, and took every opportu-
nity to waddle their little ways down to the mud and
water which was in their near vicinity. So their bills grew
larger and larger, as did the rest of their bodies, and fam-
ily government grew weaker and weaker.
You '11 wear me out, children, you certainly will," said
poor Mrs. Feathertop.
"You'll go to destruction, do ye hear ? said Master
Gray Cock.
Did you ever see such frights as poor Mrs. Feathertop
has got ? said Dame Scratchard. I knew what would
come of her family, all deformed, and with a dreadful
sort of madness, which makes them love to shovel mud
with those shocking spoon-bills of theirs."
"It's a kind of idiocy," said Goody Kertarkut. "Poor
things! they can't be kept from the water, nor made to
take powders, and so they get worse and worse."






8 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
"I understand it's affecting their feet so that they can't
walk, and a dreadful sort of net is growing between their
toes; what a shocking visitation! "
"She brought it on herself," said Dame Scratchard.
"Why did n't she come to me before she set ? She was
always an upstart, self-conceited thing, but I 'm sure I pity
her."
Meanwhile the young ducks throve apace. Their necks
grew glossy, like changeable green and gold satin, and
though they would not take the doctor's medicine, and
would waddle in the mud and water, for which they al-
ways felt themselves to be very naughty ducks, yet they
grew quite vigorous and hearty. At last one day the
whole little tribe waddled off down to the bank of the
river. It was a beautiful day, and the river was dancing
and dimpling and winking as the little breezes shook the
trees that hung over it.
Well," said the biggest of the little ducks, "in spite
of Dr. Peppercorn, I can't help longing for the water. I
don't believe it is going to hurt me, -at any rate, here
goes; and in he plumped, and in went every duck after
him, and they threw out their great brown feet as cleverly
as if they had taken rowing lessons all their lives, and
sailed off on the river, away, away among the ferns, under
the pink azalias, through reeds and rushes, and arrow-
heads and pickerel-weed, the happiest ducks that ever were
born; and soon they were quite out of sight.
"Well, Mrs. Feathertop, this is a dispensation !" said
Mrs. Scratchard. "Your children are all drowned at last,
just as I knew they'd be. The old music-teacher, Master
Bullfrog, that lives down in Water-dock Lane, saw 'em all
plump madly into the water together this morning; that's
what comes of not knowing how to bring up a family."
Mrs. Feathertop gave only one shriek and fainted dead
away, and was carried home on a cabbage-leaf, and Mr.







THE HEN THAT HATCHED DUCKS 9

Gray Cock was sent for, where he was waiting on Mrs.
Red Comb through the squash-vines.
"It's a serious time in your family, sir," said Goody
Kertarkut, and you ought to be at home supporting your
wife. Send for Doctor Peppercorn without delay."
Now as the case was a very dreadful one, Doctor Pepper-
corn called a council from the barn-yard of the Squire, two
miles off, and a brisk young Doctor Partlett appeared, in a
fine suit of brown and gold, with tail-feathers like meteors.
A fine young fellow he was, lately from Paris, with all the
modern scientific improvements fresh in his head.
When he had listened to the whole story, he clapped his
spur into the ground, and leaning back, laughed so loud
that all the cocks in the neighborhood crowed.
Mrs. Feathertop rose up out of her swoon, and Mr. Gray
Cock was greatly enraged.
What do you mean, sir, by such behavior in the house
of mourning ?"
My dear sir, pardon me, but there is no occasion for
mourning. My dear madam, let me congratulate you.
There is no harm done. The simple matter is, dear
madam, you have been under a hallucination all along.
The neighborhood and my learned friend the doctor have
all made a mistake in thinking that these children of yours
were hens at all. They are ducks, ma'am, evidently
ducks, and very finely formed ducks I dare say."
At this moment a quack was heard, and at a distance the
whole tribe were seen coming waddling home, their feathers
gleaming in green and gold, and they themselves in high
good spirits.
Such a splendid day as we have had they all cried
in a breath. And we know now how to get our own liv-
ing ; we can take care of ourselves in future, so you need
have no further trouble with us."
Madam," said the doctor, making a bow with an air







10 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

which displayed his tail-feathers to advantage, "let me con-
gratulate you on the charming family you have raised. A
finer brood of young, healthy ducks I never saw. Give
claw, my dear friend," he said, addressing the elder son.
" In our barn-yard no family is more respected than that of
the ducks."
And so Madam Feathertop came off glorious at last; and
when after this the ducks used to go swimming up and down
the river like so many nabobs among the admiring hens,
Doctor Peppercorn used to look after them and say, "Ah !
I had the care of their infancy and Mr. Gray Cock and
his wife used to say, It was our system of education did
that "














THE NUTCRACKERS OF NUTCRACKER LODGE

MR. and Mrs. Nutcracker were as respectable a pair of
squirrels as ever wore gray brushes over their backs. They
were animals of a settled and serious turn of mind, not dis-
posed to run after vanities and novelties, but filling their
station in life with prudence and sobriety. Nutcracker
Lodge was a hole in a sturdy old chestnut overhanging a
shady dell, and was held to be as respectably kept an estab-
lishment as there was in the whole forest. Even Miss
Jenny Wren, the greatest gossip of' the neighborhood,
never found anything to criticise in its arrangements, and
old Parson Too-whit, a venerable owl who inhabited a
branch somewhat more exalted, as became his profession,
was in the habit of saving himself much trouble in his
parochial exhortations by telling his parishioners in short
to look at the Nutcrackers if they wanted to see what
it was to live a virtuous life. Everything had gone on
prosperously with them, and they had reared many suc-
cessive families of young Nutcrackers, who went forth to
assume their places in the forest of life, and to reflect credit
on their bringing-up, -so that naturally enough they began
to have a very easy way of considering themselves models
of wisdom.
But at last it came along, in the course of events, that
they had a son named Featherhead, who was destined to
bring them a great deal of anxiety. Nobody knows what
the reason is, but the fact was that Master Featherhead
was as different from all the former children of this worthy
couple as if he had been dropped out of the moon into






1 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
their nest, instead of coming into it in the general way.
Young Featherhead was a squirrel of good parts and a lively
disposition, but he was sulky and contrary and unreason-
able, and always finding matter of complaint in everything
his respectable papa and mamma did. Instead of assist-
ing in the cares of a family, picking up nuts and learning
other lessons proper to a young squirrel, he seemed to
settle himself from his earliest years into a sort of lofty
contempt for the Nutcrackers, for Nutcracker Lodge, and
for all the good old ways and institutions of the domestic
hole, which he declared to be stupid and unreasonable, and
entirely behind the times. To be sure, he was always on
hand at meal-times, and played a very lively tooth on the
nuts which his mother had collected, always selecting the
very best for himself ; but he seasoned his nibbling with so
much grumbling and discontent, and so, many severe re-
marks, as to give the impression that he considered himself
a peculiarly ill-used squirrel in having to eat their, old
grub," as he very unceremoniously called it.
Papa Nutcracker, on these occasions, was often fiercely
indignant, and poor little Mamma Nutcracker would shed
tears, and beg her darling to be a little more reasonable;
but the young gentleman seemed always to consider himself
as the injured party.
Now nobody could tell why or wherefore Master Feath-
erhead looked upon himself as injured and aggrieved, since
he was living in a good hole, with plenty to eat, and with-
out the least care or labor of his own; but he seemed rather
to value himself upon being gloomy and dissatisfied. While
his parents and brothers and sisters were cheerfully racing
up and down the branches, busy in their domestic toils, and
laying up stores for the winter, Featherhead sat gloomily
apart, declaring himself weary of existence, and feeling him-
self at liberty to quarrel with everybody and everything
about him. Nobody understood him, he said;- he was a.







THE NUTCRACKERS OF NUTCRACKER LODGE 13

squirrel of a peculiar nature, and needed peculiar treatment,
and nobody treated him in a way that did not grate on the
finer nerves of his feelings. He had higher notions of
existence than could be bounded by that old rotten hole in
a hollow tree; he had thoughts that soared far above the
miserable, petty details of every-day life, and he could not
and would not bring down these soaring aspirations to the
contemptible toil of laying up a few chestnuts or hickory-
nuts for winter.
Depend upon it, my dear," said Mrs. Nutcracker sol-
emnly, that fellow must be a genius."
"Fiddlestick on his genius! said old Mr. Nutcracker;
" what does he do ? "
Oh, nothing, of course; that's one of the first marks of
genius. Geniuses, you know, never can come down to
common life."
He eats enough for any two," remarked old Nutcracker,
"and he never helps gather nuts."
"My dear, ask Parson Too-whit; he has conversed with
him, and quite agrees with me that he says very uncom-
mon things for a squirrel of his age; he has such fine feel-
ings, so much above those of the common crowd."
Fine feelings be hanged !" said old Nutcracker.
" When a fellow eats all the nuts that his mother gives
him, and then grumbles at her, I don't believe much in his
fine feelings. Why don't he set himself about something ?
I'm going to tell my fine young gentleman that, if he
does n't behave himself, I'11 tumble him out of the nest,
neck and crop, and see if hunger won't do something
towards bringing down his fine airs."
But then Mrs. Nutcracker fell on her husband's neck
with both paws, and wept, and besought him so piteously
to have patience with her darling, that old Nutcracker, who
was himself a soft-hearted old squirrel, was prevailed upon
to put up with the airs and graces of his young scrapegrace







14 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

a little longer; and secretly in his silly old heart he re-
volved the question whether possibly it might not be that
a great genius was actually to come of his household.
The Nutcrackers belonged to the old established race of
the Grays, but they were sociable, friendly people, and kept
on the best of terms with all branches of the Nutcracker
family. The Chipmunks of Chipmunk Hollow were a very
lively, cheerful, sociable race, and on the very best of terms
with the Nutcracker Grays. Young Tip Chipmunk, the
oldest son, was in all respects a perfect contrast to Master
Featherhead. He was always lively and cheerful, and so
very alert in providing for the family, that old Mr. and
Mrs. Chipmunk had very little care, but could sit sociably
at the door of their hole and chat with neighbors, quite
sura that Tip would bring everything out right for them,
and have plenty laid up for winter. Now Featherhead
took it upon him, for some reason or other, to look down
upon Tip Chipmunk, and on every occasion to disparage
him in the social circles as a very common kind of squirrel,
with whom it would be best not to associate too freely.
"My dear, said Mrs. Nutcracker one day, when he was
expressing these ideas, it seems to me that you are too
hard on poor Tip ; he is a most excellent son and brother,
and I wish you would be civil to him."
Oh, I don't doubt that Tip is good enough," said
Featherhead, carelessly ; "but then he is so very common!
he has n't an idea in his skull above his nuts and his hole.
He is good-natured enough, to be sure, these very ordi-
nary people often are good-natured, but he wants man-
ner; he has really no manner at all; and as to the deeper
feelings, Tip has n't the remotest idea of them. I mean
always to be civil to Tip when he comes in my way, but
I think the less we see of that sort of people the better;
and I hope, mother, you won't invite the Chipmunks at
Christmas, these family dinners are such a bore "







THE NUTCRACKERS OF NUTCRACKER LODGE


But my dear, your father thinks a great deal of the
Chipmunks; and it is an old family custom to have all the
relatives here at Christmas."
And an awful bore it is Why must people of refine-
ment and elevation be forever tied down because of some
distant relationship ? Now there are our cousins the High-
Flyers, if we could get them, there would be some sense
in it. Young Whisk rather promised me for Christmas;
but it's seldom now you can get a flying squirrel to show
himself in our parts, and if we are intimate with the Chip-
munks it is n't to be expected."
Confound him for a puppy !" said old Nutcracker,
when his wife repeated these sayings to him. "Feather-
head is a fool. Common, forsooth! I wish good indus-
trious, painstaking sons like Tip Chipmunk were common.
For my part, I find these uncommon people the most tire-
some; they are not content with letting us carry the whole
load, but they sit on it, and scold at us while we carry
them."
But old Mr. Nutcracker, like many other good old gen-
tlemen squirrels, found that Christmas dinners and other
things were apt to go as his wife said, and his wife was apt
to go as young Featherhead said ; and so, when Christmas
came, the ('il1-ii.,li:. were not invited, for the first time
in many years. The Chipmunks, however, took all pleas-
antly, and accepted poor old Mrs. Nutcracker's awkward
apologies with the best possible grace, and young Tip looked
in on Christmas morning with the compliments of the season
and a few beech-nuts, which he had secured as a great
dainty. The fact was, that Tip's little striped fur coat was
so filled up and overflowing with cheerful good-will to all,
that he never could be made to understand that any of his
.relations could want to cut him ; and therefore Featherhead
looked down on him with contempt, and said he had no
tact, and could n't see when he was not wanted.







16 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
It was wonderful to see how, by means of persisting in
remarks like these, young Featherhead at last got all his
family to look up to him as something uncommon. Though
he added nothing to the family, and required more to be
done for him than all the others put together, though he
showed not the smallest real perseverance or ability in any-
thing useful, -yet somehow all his brothers and sisters,
and his poor foolish old mother, got into a way of regard-
ing him as something wonderful, and delighting in his
sharp sayings as if they had been the wisest things in the
world.
But at last old papa declared that it was time for Feath-
erhead to settle himself to some business in life, roundly
declaring that he could not always have him as a hanger-on
in the paternal hole.
What are you going to do, my boy ?" said Tip Chip-
munk to him one day. We are driving now a thriving
trade in hickory-nuts, and if you would like to join us "
Thank you," said Featherhead; but I confess I have
no fancy for anything so slow as the hickory trade ; I never
was made to grub and delve in that way."
The fact was, that Featherhead had lately been forming
alliances such as no reputable squirrel should even think
of. He had more than once been seen going out evenings
with the Rats of Rat Hollow, a race whose reputation
for honesty was more than doubtful. The fact was, fur-
ther, that old Longtooth Rat, an old sharper and money-
lender, had long had his eye on Featherhead as just about
silly enough for their purposes, engaging him in what he
called a speculation, but which was neither more nor less
than downright stealing.
Near by the chestnut-tree where Nutcracker Lodge was
situated was a large barn filled with corn and grain, besides
many bushels of hazel-nuts, chestnuts, and walnuts. Now
old Longtooth proposed to young Featherhead that he







THE NUTCRACKERS OF NUTCRACKER LODGE


should nibble a passage into this loft, and there establish
himself in the commission business, passing the nuts and
corn to him as he wanted them. Old Longtooth knew
what he was about in the proposal, for he had heard talk
of a brisk Scotch terrier that was about to be bought to
keep the rats from the grain; but you may be sure he kept
his knowledge to himself, so that Featherhead was none
the wiser for it.
"The nonsense of fellows like Tip Chipmunk !" said
Featherhead to his admiring brothers and sisters. "The
perfectly stupid nonsense! There he goes, delving and pok-
ing, picking up a nut here and a grain there, when I step
into property at once."
But I hope, my son, you are careful to be honest in
your dealings," said old Nutcracker, who was a very moral
squirrel.
With that, young Featherhead threw his tail saucily
over one shoulder, winked knowingly at his brothers, and
said, Certainly, sir If honesty consists in getting what
you can while it is going, I mean to be honest."
Very soon Featherhead appeared to his admiring com-
panions in the height of prosperity. He had a splendid
hole in the midst of a heap of chestnuts, and he literally
seemed to be rolling in wealth ; he never came home with-
out showering lavish gifts on his mother and sisters; he
wore his tail over his back with a buckish air, and patron-
ized Tip Chipmunk with a gracious nod whenever he
met him, and thought that the world was going well with
him.
But one luckless day, as Featherhead was lolling in his
hole, up came two boys with the friskiest, wiriest Scotch
terrier you ever saw. His eyes blazed like torches, and poor
Featherhead's heart died within him as he heard the boys
say, "Now we '11 see if we can't catch the rascal that eats
our grain."







18 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
Featherhead tried to slink out at the hole he had gnawed
to come in by, but found it stopped.
"Oh, you are there, are you, Mister ? said the boy.
"Well, you don't get out; and now for a chase "
And, sure enough, poor Featherhead ran distracted with
terror up and down, through the bundles of hay, between
barrels, and over casks; but with the barking terrier ever
at his heels, and the boys running, shouting, and cheering
his pursuer on. He was glad at last to escape through a
crack, though he left half of his fine brush behind him, -
for Master Wasp, the terrier, made a snap at it just as he
was going, and cleaned all the hair off of it, so that it was
bare as a rat's tail.
Poor Featherhead limped off, bruised and beaten and be-
draggled, with the boys and dog still after him ; and they
would have caught him, after all, if Tip Chipmunk's hole
had not stood hospitably open to receive him. Tip took
him in, like a good-natured fellow as he was, and took the
best of care of him; but the glory of Featherhead's tail had
departed forever. He had sprained his left paw, and got a
chronic rheumatism, and the fright and fatigue which he
had gone through had broken up his constitution, so that
he never again could be what he had been; but Tip gave
him a situation as under-clerk in his establishment, and from
that time he was a sadder and a wiser squirrel than he ever
had been before.














THE HISTORY OF TIP-TOP


UNDER the window of a certain pretty little cottage
there grew a great old apple-tree, which in the spring had
thousands and thousands of lovely pink blossoms on it, and
in the autumn had about half as many bright red apples as
it had blossoms in the spring.
The nursery of this cottage was a little bower of a room
papered with mossy-green paper, and curtained with white
muslin ; and here five little children used to come, in their
white nightgowns, to be dressed and have their hair brushed
and curled every morning.
First, there were Alice and Mary, bright-eyed, laughing
little girls, of seven and eight years, and then came stout
little Jamie, and Charlie, and finally little Puss, whose
real name was Ellen, but who was called Puss, and Pussy,
and Birdie, and Toddlie, and any other pet name that came
to mind.
Now it used to happen, every morning, that the five little
heads would be peeping out of the window, together, into
the flowery boughs of the apple-tree; and the reason was
this. A pair of robins had built a very pretty, smooth-
lined nest in a fork of the limb that came directly under
the window, and the building of this nest had been super-
intended, day by day, by the five pairs of bright eyes of
these five children. The robins at first had been rather shy
of this inspection ; but, as they got better acquainted, they
seemed to think no more of the little curly heads in the
window, than of the pink blossoms about them, or the
daisies and buttercups at the foot of the tree.






20 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
All the little hands were forward to help; some threw
out flossy bits of cotton, for which, we grieve to say,
Charlie had cut a hole in the crib quilt, and some threw
out bits of thread and yarn, and Allie raveled out a con-
siderable piece from one of her garters, which she threw out
as a contribution; and they exulted in seeing the skill with
which the little builders wove everything in. "Little
birds, little birds," they would say, you shall be kept
warm, for we have given you cotton out of our crib quilt,
and yarn out of our stockings." Nay, so far did this gen-
erosity proceed, that Charlie cut a flossy, golden curl from
Toddlie's head and threw it out; and when the birds caught
it up the whole flock laughed to see Toddlie's golden hair
figuring in a bird's-nest.
When the little thing was finished, it was so neat, and
trim, and workman-like, that the children all exulted over
it, and called it our nest," and the two robins they, called
" our birds." But wonderful was the joy when the little
eyes, opening one morning, saw in the nest a beautiful pale-
green egg; and the joy grew from day to day, for every
day there came another egg, and so on till there were five
little eggs; and then the oldest girl, Alice, said, There
are five eggs; that makes one for each of us, and each of
us will have a little bird by and by; at which all the
children laughed and jumped for glee.
When the five little eggs were all laid, the mother-bird
began to sit on them; and at any time of day or night,
when a little head peeped out of the nursery window, might
be seen a round, bright, patient pair of bird's eyes content-
edly waiting for the young birds to come. It seemed a
long time for the children to wait; but every day they put
some bread and cake from their luncheon on the window-
sill, so that the birds might have something to eat; but
still there she was, patiently watching!
How long, long, long she waits !" said Jamie, im-
patiently. "I don't believe she's ever going to hatch."






THE HISTORY OF TIP-TOP 21

Oh, yes, she is said grave little Alice. "Jamie, you
don't understand about these things; it takes a long, long
time to hatch eggs. Old Sam says his hens set three
weeks ; only think, almost a month "
Three weeks looked a long time to the five bright pairs
of little watching eyes; but Jamie said the eggs were so
much smaller than hens' eggs, that it would n't take so long
to hatch them, he knew. Jamie always thought he knew
all about everything, and was so sure of it that he rather
took the lead among the children. But one morning, when
they pushed their five heads out of the window, the round,
patient little bird-eyes were gone, and there seemed to be
nothing in the nest but a bunch of something hairy.
Upon this they all cried out, "0 mamma, do come here!
the bird is gone and left her nest! And when they cried
out, they saw five wide little red mouths open in the nest,
and saw that the hairy bunch of stuff was indeed the first
of five little birds.
They are dreadful-looking things," said Mary; I did
n't know that little birds began by looking so badly."
"They seem to be all mouth," said Jamie.
We must feed them," said Charlie.
"Here, little birds, here's some gingerbread for you,"
he said; and he threw a bit of his gingerbread, which for-
tunately only hit the nest on the outside, and fell down
among the buttercups, where two crickets made a meal of
it, and agreed that it was as excellent gingerbread as if old
Mother Cricket herself had made it.
"Take care, Charlie," said his mamma; we do not
know enough to feed young birds. We must leave it to
their papa and mamma, who probably started out bright
and early in the morning to get breakfast for them."
Sure enough, while they were speaking, back came Mr.
and Mrs. Robin, whirring through the green shadows of
the apple-tree; and thereupon all the five little red mouths
flew open, and the birds put something into each.






22 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
It was great amusement, after this, to watch the daily
feeding of the little birds, and to observe how, when not
feeding them, the mother sat brooding on the nest, warm-
ing them under her soft wings, while the father-bird sat on
the tip-top bough of the apple-tree and sang to them. In
time they grew and grew, and, instead of a nest full of
little red mouths, there was a nest full of little, fat, speckled
robins, with round, bright, cunning eyes, just like their
parents; and the children began to talk together about
their birds.
I'm going to give my robin a name," said Mary. "I
call him Brown-Eyes."
And I call mine Tip-Top," said Jamie, because I
know he 'll be a tip-top bird."
"And I call mine Singer," said Alice.
I 'all mine Toddy," said little Toddlie, who would not
be behindhand in anything that was going on.
Hurrah for Toddlie said Charlie, hers is the best
of all. For my part, I call mine Speckle."
So then the birds were all made separate characters by
having each a separate name given it. Brown-Eyes, Tip-
Top, Singer, Toddy, and Speckle made, as they grew big-
ger, a very crowded nestful of birds.
Now the children had early been taught to say in a lit-
tle hymn:-
"Birds in their little nests agree,
And 't is a shameful sight
When children of one family
Fall out, and chide, and fight;"-
and they thought anything really written and printed in a
hymn must be true; therefore they were very much aston-
ished to see, from day to day, that their little birds in their
nests did not agree.
Tip-Top was the biggest and strongest bird, and he was
always shuffling and crowding the others, and clamoring
for the most food ; and when Mrs. Robin came in with a






THE HISTORY OF TIP-TOP 23

nice bit of anything, Tip-Top's red mouth opened so wide,
and he was so noisy, that one would think the nest was all
his. His mother used to correct him for these gluttonous
ways, and sometimes made him wait till all the rest were
helped before she gave him a mouthful; but he generally
revenged himself in her absence by crowding the others
and making the nest generally uncomfortable. Speckle,
however, was a bird of spirit, and he used to peck at Tip-
Top; so they would sometimes have a regular sparring-
match across poor Brown-Eyes, who was a meek, tender lit-
tle fellow, and would sit winking and blinking in fear
while his big brothers quarreled. As to Toddy and Singer,
they turned out to be sister birds, and showed quite a fem-
inine talent for chattering; they used to scold their badly
behaving brothers in a way that made the nest quite lively.
On the whole, Mr. and Mrs. Robin did not find their
family circle the peaceable place the poets represent.
"I say," said Tip-Top one day to them, "this old nest
is a dull, mean, crowded hole, and it's quite time some of
us were out of it; just give us lessons in flying, won't you,
and let us go."
"My dear boy," said Mother Robin, "we shall teach you
to fly as soon as your wings are strong enough."
"You are a very little bird," said his father, and ought
to be good and obedient, and wait patiently till your wing-
feathers grow; and then you can soar away to some pur-
pose."
"Wait for my wing-feathers ? Humbug Tip-Top
would say, as he sat balancing with his little short tail on
the edge of the nest, and looking down through the grass
and clover-heads below, and up into the blue clouds above.
"Father and mother are slow old birds; keep a fellow
back with their confounded notions. If they don't hurry
up, I '11 take matters into my own claws, and be off some
day before they know it. Look at those swallows, skim-






24 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

ming and diving through the blue air That's the way
I want to do."
"But, dear brother, the way to learn to do that is to be
good and obedient while we are little, and wait till our
parents think it best for us to begin."
Shut up your preaching," said Tip-Top ; what do you
girls know of flying ? "
About as much as you," said Speckle. However,
I'm sure I don't care how soon you take yourself off, for
you take up more room than all the rest put together."
"You mind yourself, Master Speckle, or you'll get some-
thing you don't like," said Tip-Top, still strutting in a very
cavalier way on the edge of the nest, and sticking up his
little short tail quite valiantly.
"0 my darlings," said the mamma, now fluttering home,
" cannot I ever teach you to live in love ? "
It's all Tip-Top's fault," screamed the other birds in
a flutter.
My fault ? Of course, everything in this nest that goes
wrong is laid to me," said Tip-Top ; "and I'11 leave it to
anybody, now, if I crowd anybody. I've been sitting out-
side, on the very edge of the nest, and there's Speckle has
got my place."
Who wants your place ? said Speckle. I am sure
you can come in, if you please."
"My dear boy," said the mother, do go into the nest
and be a good little bird, and then you will be happy."
"That's always the talk," said Tip-Top. I 'm too big
for the nest, and I want to see the world. It's full of
beautiful things, I know. Now there's the most lovely crea-
ture, with bright eyes, that comes under the tree every day,
and wants me to come down in the grass and play with her."
My son, my son, beware said the frightened mother;
" that lovely seeming creature is our dreadful enemy, the
cat, a horrid monster, with teeth and claws."






THE HISTORY OF TIP-TOP


At this, all the little birds shuddered and cuddled deeper
in the nest; only Tip-Top, in his heart, disbelieved it.
I'm too old a bird," said he to himself, "to believe
that story; mother is chaffing me. But I'11 show her that
I can take care of myself."
So the next morning, after the father and mother were
gone, Tip-Top got on the edge of the nest again, and looked
over and saw lovely Miss Pussy washing her face among
the daisies under the tree, and her hair was sleek and white
as the daisies, and her eyes were yellow and beautiful to
behold, and she looked up to the tree bewitchingly, and
said, Little birds, little birds, come down; Pussy wants
to play with you."
Only look at her said Tip-Top ; "her eyes are like
gold."
No, don't look," said Singer and Speckle. "She will
bewitch you and then eat you up."
I'd like to see her try to eat me up," said Tip-Top,
again balancing his short tail over the nest. "Just as if
she would. She 's just the nicest, most innocent creature
going, and only wants us to have fun. We never do have
any fun in this old nest! "
Then the yellow eyes below shot a bewildering light into
Tip-Top's eyes, and a voice sounded sweet as silver:
" Little birds, little birds, come down; Pussy wants to
play with you."
Her paws are as white as velvet," said Tip-Top; and
so soft I don't believe she has any claws."
Don't go, brother, don't! screamed both sisters.
All we know about it is, that a moment after a direful
scream was heard from the nursery.window. 0 mamma,
mamma, do come here Tip-Top 's fallen out of the nest,
and the cat has got him! "
Away ran Pussy with foolish little Tip-Top in her
mouth, and he squeaked dolefully when he felt her sharp






26 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

teeth. Wicked Miss Pussy had no mind to eat him at
once; she meant just as she said, to play with him."
So she ran off to a private place among the currant-bushes,
while all the little curly heads were scattered up and down
looking for her.
Did you ever see a cat play with a bird or a mouse ?
She sets it down, and seems to go off and leave it; but the
moment it makes the first movement to get away, pounce !
she springs on it, and shakes it in her mouth; and so she
teases and tantalizes it, till she gets ready to kill and eat it.
I can't say why she does it, except that it is a cat's nature;
and it is a very bad nature for foolish young robins to get
acquainted with.
Oh, where is he ? where is he ? Do find my poor Tip-
Top," said Jamie, crying as loud as he could scream. "I'll
kill that horrid cat, I '11 kill her "
Mr. and Mrs. Robin, who had come home meantime,
joined their plaintive chirping to the general confusion;
and Mrs. Robin's bright eyes soon discovered her poor
little son, where'Pussy was patting and rolling him from
one paw to the other under the currant-bushes; and settling
on the bush above, she called the little folks to the spot by
her cries.
Jamie plunged under the bush, and caught the cat with
luckless Tip-Top in her mouth; and, with one or two good
thumps, he obliged her to let him go. Tip-Top was not
dead, but in a sadly draggled and torn state. Some of his
feathers were torn out, and one of his wings was broken,
and hung down in a melancholy way.
Oh, what shall we do for him? He will die. Poor
Tip-Top said the children.
"Let's put him back into the nest, children," said
mamma. "His mother will know best what to do with
him."
So a ladder was got, and papa climbed up and put poor






THE HISTORY OF TIP-TOP


Tip-Top safely into the nest. The cat had shaken all the
nonsense well out of him; he was a dreadfully humbled
young robin.
The time came at last when all the other birds in the
nest learned to fly, and fluttered and flew about everywhere;
but poor melancholy Tip-Top was still confined to the nest
with a broken wing. Finally, as it became evident that it
would be long before he could fly, Jamie took him out of
the nest, and made a nice little cage for him, and used to
feed him every day, and he would hop about and seem
tolerably contented; but it was evident that he would be
a lame-winged robin all his days.

Jamie's mother told him that Tip-Top's history was an
allegory.
"I don't know what you mean, mamma," said Jamie.
When something in a bird's life is like something in a
boy's life, or when a story is similar in its meaning to reality,
we call it an allegory. Little boys, when they are about
half grown up, sometimes do just as Tip-Top did. They are
in a great hurry to get away from home into the great world;
and then Temptation comes, with bright eyes and smooth
velvet paws, and promises them fun; and they go to bad
places ; they get to smoking, and then to drinking; and,
finally, the bad habit gets them in its teeth and claws, and
plays with them as a cat does with a mouse. They try to
reform, just as your robin tried to get away from the cat;
but their bad habits pounce on them and drag them back.
And so, when the time comes that they want to begin life,
they are miserable, broken-down creatures, like your broken-
winged robin.
"So, Jamie, remember, and don't try to be a man before
your time, and let your parents judge for you while you are
young; and never believe in any soft white Pussy, with
golden eyes, that comes and wants to tempt you to come






28 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

down and play with her. If a big boy offers to teach you
to smoke a cigar, that is Pussy. If a boy wants you to
go into a billiard-saloon, that is Pussy. If a boy wants you
to learn to drink anything with spirit in it, however sweet-
ened and disguised, remember, Pussy is there; and Pussy's
claws are long, and Pussy's teeth are strong; and if she
gives you one shake in your youth, you will be like a
broken-winged robin all your days."














MISS KATY-DID AND MISS CRICKET

Miss KATY-DID sat on the branch of a flowering azalia,
in her best suit of fine green and silver, with wings of
point-lace from Mother Nature's web.
Miss Katy was in the very highest possible spirits, be-
cause her gallant cousin, Colonel Katy-did, had looked in
to make her a morning visit. It was a fine morning, too,
which goes for as much among the Katy-dids as among men
and women. It was, in fact, a morning that Miss Katy
thought must have been made on purpose for her to enjoy
herself in. There had been a patter of rain the night be-
fore, which had kept the leaves awake talking to each other
till nearly morning, but by dawn the small winds had blown
brisk little puffs, and whisked the heavens clear and bright
with their tiny wings, as you have seen Susan clear away
the cobwebs in your mamma's parlor; and so now there
were only left a thousand blinking, burning water-drops,
hanging like convex mirrors at the end of each leaf, and
Miss Kate admired herself in each one.
Certainly I am a pretty creature," she said to herself;
and when the gallant Colonel said something about being
dazzled by her beauty, she only tossed her head and took
it as quite a matter of course.
"The fact is, my dear Colonel," she said, "I am think-
ing of giving a party, and you must help me make out the
lists."
My dear, you make me the happiest of Katy-dids."
"Now," said Miss Katy-did, drawing an azalia-leaf to-
wards her, let us see, whom shall we have ? The






30 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

Fireflies, of course; everybody wants them, they are so
brilliant; a little unsteady, to be sure, but quite in the
higher circles."
"Yes, we must have the Fireflies," echoed the Colonel.
"Well, then, and the Butterflies and the Moths.
Now, there's a trouble. There's such an everlasting tribe
of these Moths; and if you invite dull people they're
always sure all to come, every one of them. Still, if you
have the Butterflies, you can't leave out the Moths."
Old Mrs. Moth has been laid up lately with a gastric
fever, and that may keep two or three of the Misses Moth
at home," said the Colonel.
Whatever could give the old lady such a turn ? said
Miss Katy. I thought she never was sick."
"I suspect it's high living. I understand she and her
family ate up a whole ermine cape last month, and it disa-
greed with them."
For my part, I can't conceive how the Moths can live
as they do," said Miss Katy with a face of disgust. Why,
I could no more eat worsted and fur, as they do -"
That is quite evident from the fairy-like delicacy of
your appearance," said the Colonel. "One can see that
nothing so gross or material has ever entered into your
system."
I 'm sure," said Miss Katy, mamma says she don't
know what does keep me alive; half a dewdrop and a little
bit of the nicest part of a rose-leaf, I assure you, often last
me for a day. But we are forgetting our list. Let's see,
-the Fireflies, Butterflies, Moths. The Bees must come,
I suppose."
The Bees are a worthy family," said the Colonel.
Worthy enough, but dreadfully humdrum," said Miss
Katy. They never talk about anything but honey and
housekeeping; still, they are a class of people one cannot
neglect."







MISS KATY-DID AND MISS CRICKET


"Well, then, there are the Bumble-Bees."
Oh, I dote on them! General Bumble is one of the
most dashing, brilliant fellows of the day."
I think he is shockingly corpulent," said Colonel Katy-
did, not at all pleased to hear him praised; -"don't
you ? "
I don't know but he is a little stout," said Miss Katy;
" but so distinguished and elegant in his manners, some-
thing martial and breezy about him."
Well, if you invite the Bumble-Bees you must have
the Hornets."
Those spiteful Hornets, I detest them "
"Nevertheless, dear Miss Katy, one does not like to
offend the Hornets."
No, one can't. There are those five Misses Hornet,-
dreadful old maids as full of spite as they can live.
You may be sure they will every one come, and be looking
about to make spiteful remarks. Put down the Hornets,
though."
How about the Mosquitoes said the Colonel.
Those horrid Mosquitoes, they are dreadfully plebe-
ian! Can't one cut them ? "
Well, dear Miss Katy," said the Colonel, "if you ask
my candid opinion as a friend, I should say not. There's
young Mosquito, who graduated last year, has gone into
literature, and is connected with some of our leading papers,
and they say he carries the sharpest pen of all the writers.
It won't do to offend him."
"And so I suppose we must have his old aunts, and all
six of his sisters, and all his dreadfully common relations."
It is a pity," said the Colonel, "but one must pay
one's tax to society."
Just at this moment the conference was interrupted by a
visitor, Miss Keziah Cricket, who came in with her work-
bag on her arm to ask a subscription for a poor family of







32 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

Ants who had just had their house hoed up in clearing the
garden-walks.
"How stupid of them," said Katy, not to know better
than to put their house in the garden-walk; that's just like
those Ants "
Well, they are in great trouble; all their stores de-
stroyed, and their father killed, cut quite in two by a
hoe."
"How very shocking I don't like to hear of such dis-
agreeable things, it affects my nerves terribly. Well, I'm
sure I have n't anything to give. Mamma said yesterday
she was sure she did n't know how our bills were to be
paid, and there 's my green satin with point-lace yet to
come home." And Miss Katy-did shrugged her shoulders
and affected to be very busy with Colonel Katy-did, in just
the way that young ladies sometimes do when they wish to
signify to visitors that they had better leave.
Little Miss Cricket perceived how the case stood, and so
hopped briskly off, without giving herself even time to be
offended.
Poor extravagant little thing! said she to herself,
" it was hardly worth while to ask her."
Pray, shall you invite the Crickets ? said Colonel
Katy-did.
Who ? I ? Why, Colonel, what a question! Invite
the Crickets ? Of what can you be thinking ?"
"And shall you not ask the Locusts, or the Grass-
hoppers ? "
"Certainly. The Locusts, of course, a very old and
distinguished family ; and the Grasshoppers are pretty well,
and ought to be asked. But we must draw a line some-
where, and the Crickets why, it's shocking even to
think of! "
I thought they were nice, respectable people."
Oh, perfectly nice and respectable, very good people,







MISS KATY-DID AND MISS CRICKET


in fact, so far as that goes. But then you must see the
difficulty."
My dear cousin, I am afraid you must explain."
"Why, their color, to be sure. Don't you see ? "
Oh said the Colonel. That's it, is it? Excuse
me, but I have been living in France, where these distinc-
tions are wholly unknown, and I have not yet got myself
in the train of fashionable ideas here."
Well, then, let me teach you," said Miss Katy. You
know we republicans go for no distinctions except those
created by Nature herself, and we found our rank upon
color, because that is clearly a thing that none has any hand
in but our Maker. You see ?"
Yes; but who decides what color shall be the reigning
color ? "
I'm surprised to hear the question! The only true
color the only proper one is our color, to be sure. A
lovely pea-green is the precise shade on which to found
aristocratic distinction. But then we are liberal; we as-
sociate with the Moths, who are gray; with the Butterflies,
who ate blue-and-gold-colored; with the Grasshoppers, yel-
low and brown; and society would become dreadfully
mixed if it were not fortunately ordered that the Crickets
are black as jet. The fact is, that a class to be looked
down upon is necessary to all elegant society, and if the
Crickets were not black, we could not keep them down,
because, as everybody knows, they are often a great deal
cleverer than we are. They have a vast talent for music
and dancing; they are very quick at learning, and would
be getting to the very top of the ladder if we once allowed
them to climb. But their being black is a convenience, -
because, as long as we are green and they black, we have a
superiority that can never be taken from us. Don't you
see, now ? "
Oh, yes, I see exactly," said the Colonel.







34 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
Now that Keziah Cricket, who just came in here, is
quite a musician, and her old father plays the violin beau-
tifully; by the way, we might engage him for our or-
chestra."

And so Miss Katy's ball came off, and the performers
kept it up from sundown till daybreak, so that it seemed as
if every leaf in the forest were alive. The Katy-dids, and
the Mosquitoes, and the Locusts, and a full orchestra of
Crickets made the air perfectly vibrate, insomuch that old
Parson Too-whit, who was preaching a Thursday evening
lecture to a very small audience, announced to his hearers
that he should certainly write a discourse against dancing
for the next weekly occasion.
The good Doctor was even with his word in the matter,
and gave out some very sonorous discourses, without in the
least stopping the round of gayeties kept up by these dissi-
pated Katy-dids, which ran on, night after night, till the
celebrated Jack Frost epidemic, which occurred somewhere
about the first of September.
Poor Miss Katy, with her flimsy green satin and point-
lace, was one of the first victims, and fell from the bough
in company with a sad shower of last year's leaves. The
worthy Cricket family, however, avoided Jack Frost by
emigrating in time to the chimney-corner of a nice little
cottage that had been built in the wood that summer.
There good old Mr. and Mrs. Cricket, with sprightly
Miss Keziah and her brothers and sisters, found a warm
and welcome home; and when the storm howled without,
and lashed the poor naked trees, the Crickets on the warm
hearth would chirp out cheery welcome to papa as he came
in from the snowy path, or mamma as she sat at her work-
basket.
"Cheep, cheep, cheep !" little Freddy would say. Mam-
ma, who is it says 'cheep' ?"







MISS KATY-DID AND MISS CRICKET 35

"Dear Freddy, it 's our own dear little cricket, who
loves us and comes to sing to us when the snow is on the
ground."
So when poor Miss Katy-did's satin and lace were all
swept away, the warm home-talents of the Crickets made
for them a welcome refuge.














MOTHER MAGPIE'S MISCHIEF


OLD MOTHER MAGPIE was about the busiest character
in the forest. But you must know that there is a great
difference between being busy and being industrious. One
may be very busy all the time, and yet not in the least in-
dustrious ; and this was the case with Mother Magpie.
She was always full of everybody's business but her own,
--up and down, here and there, everywhere but in her own
nest, knowing every one's affairs, telling what everybody
had been doing or ought to do, and ready to cast her advice
gratis at every bird and beast of the woods.
Now she bustled up to the parsonage at the top of the
oak-tree, to tell old Parson Too-whit what she thought he
ought to preach for his next sermon, and how dreadful the
morals of the parish were becoming. Then, having per-
fectly bewildered the poor old gentleman, who was always
sleepy of a Monday morning, Mother Magpie would take
a peep into Mrs. Oriole's nest, sit chattering on a bough
above, and pour forth floods of advice, which, poor little
Mrs. Oriole used to say to her husband, bewildered her more
than a hard northeast storm.
Depend upon it, my dear," Mother Magpie would say,
" that this way of building your nest, swinging like an old
empty stocking from a bough, is n't at all the thing. I
never built one so in my life, and I never have headaches.
Now you complain always that your head aches whenever I
call upon you. It's all on account of this way of swinging
and swaying about in such an absurd manner."
But, my dear," piped Mrs. Oriole, timidly, the Orioles






MOTHER MAGPIE'S MISCHIEF 37
always have built in this manner, and it suits our consti-
tution."
"A fiddle on our constitution How can you tell what
agrees with your constitution unless you try ?- You own
you are not well; you are subject to headaches, and every
physician will tell you that a tilting motion disorders the
stomach and acts upon the brain. Ask old Dr. Kite. I
was talking with him about your case only yesterday, and
says he, Mrs. Magpie, I perfectly agree with you.' "
But my husband prefers this style of building."
"That 's only because he is n't properly instructed.
Pray, did you ever attend Dr. Kite's lectures on the ner-
vous system ? "
"No, I have no time to attend lectures. Who would
set on the eggs ?"
Why, your husband, to be sure; don't he take his
turn in setting ? If he don't he ought to. I shall speak
to him about it. My husband always sets regularly half
the time, that I might have time to go about and exercise."
0 Mrs. Magpie, pray don't speak to my husband; he
will think I 've been complaining."
"No, no, he won't! Let me alone. I understand just
how to say the thing. I've advised hundreds of young
husbands in my day, and I never give offence."
But I tell you, Mrs. Magpie, I don't want any inter-
ference between my husband and me, and I will not have
it," says Mrs. Oriole, with her little round eyes flashing.
"Don't put yourself in a passion, my dear; the more
you talk, the more sure I am that your nervous system is
running down, or you would n't forget good manners in this
way. You 'd better take my advice, for I understand just
what to do," and away sails Mother Magpie ; and pres-
ently young Oriole comes home, all in a flutter.
I say, my dear, if you will persist in gossiping over our
private family matters with that old Mother Magpie -"






38 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

My dear, I don't gossip; she comes and bores me to
death with talking, and then goes off and mistakes what
she has been saying for what I said."
But you must cut her."
"I try to, all I can; but she won't be cut."
It 's enough to make a bird swear," said Tommy Oriole.
Tommy Oriole, to say the truth, had as good a heart as
ever beat under bird's feathers; but then he had a weakness
for concerts and general society, because he was held to be,
by all odds, the handsomest bird in the woods, and sung like
an angel; and so the truth was he did n't confine himself
so much to the domestic nest as Tom Titmouse or Billy
Wren. But he determined that he would n't have old
Mother Magpie interfering with his affairs.
The fact is," quoth Tommy, I am a society bird, and
Nature has marked out for me a course beyond the range of
the commonplace, and my wife must learn to accommodate.
If she has a brilliant husband, whose success gratifies her
ambition and places her in a distinguished public position,
she must pay something for it. I'm sure Billy Wren's wife
would give her very bill to see her husband in the circles
where I am quite at home. To say the truth, my wife was
all well enough content till old Mother Magpie interfered.
It is quite my duty to take strong ground, and show that I
cannot be dictated to."
So, after this, Tommy Oriole went to rather more con-
certs, and spent less time at home than ever he did before,
which was all that Mother Magpie effected in that quarter.
I confess this was very bad in Tommy ; but then birds are
no better than men in domestic matters, and sometimes will
take the most unreasonable courses, if a meddlesome Mag-
pie gets her claw into their nest.
But old Mother Magpie had now got a new business in
hand in another quarter. She bustled off down to Water-
dock Lane, where, as we said in a former narrative, lived






MOTHER MAGPIE'S MISCHIEF


the old music-teacher, Dr. Bullfrog. The poor old Doctor
was a simple-minded, good, amiable creature, who had played
the double-bass and led the forest choir on all public occa-
sions since nobody knows when. Latterly some youngsters
had arisen who sneered at his performances as behind the
age. In fact, since a great city had grown up in the vicinity
of the forest, tribes of wandering boys broke up the simple
tastes and quiet habits which old Mother Nature had always
kept up in those parts. They pulled the young checker-
berry before it even had time to blossom, rooted up the
sassafras shrubs and gnawed their roots, fired off guns at
the birds, and, on several occasions when old Dr. Bullfrog
was leading a concert, had dashed in and broken up the
choir by throwing stones.
This was not the worst of it. The little varlets had a
way of jeering at the simple old Doctor and his concerts,
and mimicking the tones of his bass-viol. There you go,
Paddy-go-donk, Paddy-go-donk umph chunk," some ras-
cal of a boy would shout, while poor old Bullfrog's yellow
spectacles would be bedewed with tears of honest indignation.
In time, the jeers of these little savages began to tell on
the society in the forest, and to corrupt their simple man-
ners; and it was whispered among the younger and more
heavy birds and squirrels, that old Bullfrog was a bore, and
that it was time to get up a new style of music in the
parish, and to give the charge of it to some more modern
performer. Poor old Dr. Bullfrog knew nothing of this,
however, and was doing his simple best, in peace, when
Mother Magpie called in upon him, one morning.
Well, neighbor, how unreasonable people are! Who
would have thought that the youth of our generation
should have no more consideration for established merit ?
Now, for my part, I think your music-teaching never was
better; and as for our choir, I maintain constantly that it
never was in better order, but Well, one may wear her






40 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

tongue out, but one can never make these young folks lis-
ten to reason."
I really don't understand you, ma'am," said poor Dr.
Bullfrog.
What you have n't heard of a committee that is go-
ing to call on you, to ask you to resign the care of the par-
ish music ? "
Madam," said Dr. Bullfrog, with all that energy of
tone for which he was remarkable, "I don't believe it,- I
can't believe it. You must have made a mistake."
"I mistake! No, no, my good friend; I never make
mistakes. What I know, I know certainly. Was n't it I
that said I knew there was an engagement between Tim
Chipmunk and Nancy Nibble, who are married this blessed
day ? I knew that thing six weeks before any bird or
beast in our parts; and I can tell you, you are going to be
scandalously and ungratefully treated, Dr. Bullfrog."
Bless me, we shall all be ruined said Mrs. Bullfrog;
"my poor husband "
"Oh, as to that, if you take things in time, and listen to
my advice," said Mother Magpie, we may yet pull you
through. You must alter your style a little, adapt it to
modern times. Everybody now is a little touched with the
operatic fever, and there's Tommy Oriole has been to New
Orleans and brought back a touch of the artistic. If you
would try his style a little, something Tyrolean, you
see."
"Dear madam, consider my voice. I never could hit
the high notes."
"How do you know? It's all practice; Tommy Oriole
says so. Just try the scales. As to your voice, your man-
ner of living has a great deal to do with it. I always did
tell you that your passion for water injured your singing.
Suppose Tommy Oriole should sit half his days up to his
hips in water, as you do, his voice would be as hoarse






MOTHER MAGPIE'S MISCHIEF 41

and rough as yours. Come up on the bank, and learn to
perch as -we birds do. We are the true musical race."
And so poor Mr. Bullfrog was persuaded to forego his
pleasant little cottage under the cat-tails, where his yellow
spectacles and honest round back had excited, even in the
minds of the boys, sentiments of respect and compassion.
He came up into the garden, and established himself under
a burdock, and began to practise Italian scales.
The result was, that poor old Dr. Bullfrog, instead of
being considered as a respectable old bore, got himself uni-
versally laughed at for aping fashionable manners. Every
bird and beast in the forest had a gibe at him; and even
old Parson Too-whit thought it worth his while to make
him a pastoral call, and admonish him about courses unbe-
fitting his age and standing. As to Mother Magpie, you
may be sure that she assured every one how sorry she was
that dear old Dr. Bullfrog had made such a fool of him-
self ; if he had taken her advice, he would have kept on
respectably as a nice old Bullfrog should.
But the tragedy for the poor old music-teacher grew even
more melancholy in its termination; for one day as he was
sitting disconsolately under a currant-bush in the garden,
practising his poor old notes in a quiet way, thump came
a great blow of a hoe, which nearly broke his back.
Hullo what ugly beast have we got here ? said Tom
Noakes, the gardener's boy. Here, here, Wasp, my boy."
What a fright for a poor, quiet, old Bullfrog, as little
wiry, wicked Wasp came at him, barking and yelping. He
jumped with all his force sheer over a patch of bushes into
the river, and swam back to his old home among the cat-
tails. And always after that it was observable that he was
very low-spirited, and took very dark views of life; but
nothing made him so angry as any allusion to Mother Mag-
pie, of whom, from that time, he never spoke except as
Old Mother Mischief.














THE SQUIRRELS THAT LIVED IN A HOUSE

ONCE upon a time a gentleman went out into a great
forest, and cut away the trees, and built there a very nice
little cottage. It was set very low on the ground, and had
very large bow-windows, and so much of it was glass that
one could look through it on every side and see what was
going on in the forest. You could see the shadows of the
fern-leaves, as they flickered and wavered over the ground,
and the scarlet partridge-berry and wintergreen plums that
matted round the roots of the trees, and the bright spots
of sunshine that fell through their branches and went danc-
ing about among the bushes and leaves at their roots.
You could see the little chipping sparrows and thrushes
and robins and bluebirds building their nests here and
there among the branches, and watch them from day to day
as they laid their eggs and hatched their young. You could
also see red squirrels, and gray squirrels, and little striped
chip-squirrels, darting and springing about, here and there
and everywhere, running races with each other from bough
to bough, and chattering at each other in the gayest possi-
ble manner.
You may be sure that such a strange thing as a great
mortal house for human beings to live in did not come into
this wild wood without making quite a stir and excitement
among the inhabitants that lived there before. All the
time it was building, there was the greatest possible com-
motion in the breasts of all the older population ; and there
was n't even a black ant, or a cricket, that did not have his
own opinion about it, and did not tell the other ants and






THE SQUIRRELS THAT LIVED IN A HOUSE 43
crickets just what he thought the world was coming to in
consequence.
Old Mrs. Rabbit declared that the hammering and
pounding made her nervous, and gave her most melancholy
forebodings of evil times. "Depend upon it, children,"
she said to her long-eared family, no good will come to
us from this establishment. Where man is, there comes
always trouble for us poor rabbits."
The old chestnut-tree, that grew on the edge of the
woodland ravine, drew a great sigh which shook all his
leaves, and expressed it as his conviction that no good
would ever come of it, a conviction that at once struck
to the heart of every chestnut-burr. The squirrels talked
together of the dreadful state of things that would ensue.
" Why said old Father Gray, "it's evident that Nature
made the nuts for us ; but one of these great human crea-
tures will carry off and gormandize upon what would keep
a hundred poor families of squirrels in comfort." Old
Ground-mole said it did not require very sharp eyes to see
into the future, and it would just end in bringing down the
price of real estate in the whole vicinity, so that every
decent-minded and respectable quadruped would be obliged
to move away ; for his part, he was ready to sell out for
anything he could get. The bluebirds and bobolinks, it is
true, took more cheerful views of matters; but then, as old
Mrs. Ground-mole observed, they were a flighty set, --half
their time careering and dissipating in the Southern States,
- and could not be expected to have that patriotic attach-
ment to their native soil that those had who had grubbed
in it from their earliest days.
This race of man," said the old chestnut-tree, is
never ceasing in its restless warfare on Nature. In our
forest solitudes, hitherto, how peacefully, how quietly, how
regularly has everything gone on Not a flower has missed
its appointed time of blossoming, or failed to perfect its






44 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
fruit. No matter how hard has been the winter, how loud
the winds have roared, and how high the snow-banks have
been piled, all has come right again in spring. Not the
least root has lost itself under the snows, so as not to be
ready with its fresh leaves and blossoms when the sun re-
turns to melt the frosty chains of winter. We have storms
sometimes that threaten to shake everything to pieces, -
the thunder roars, the lightning flashes, and the winds
howl and beat; but, when all is past, everything comes out
better and brighter than before, not a bird is killed, not
the frailest flower destroyed. But man comes, and in one
day he will make a desolation that centuries cannot repair.
Ignorant boor that he is, and all incapable of appreciating
the glorious works of Nature, it seems to be his glory to
be able to destroy in a few hours what it was the work of
ages to produce. The noble oak, that has been cut away
to build this contemptible human dwelling, had a life older
and wiser than that of any man in this country. That tree
has seen generations of men come and go. It was a fresh
young tree when Shakespeare was born; it was hardly a
middle-aged tree when he died; it was growing here when
the first ship brought the white men to our shores; and
hundreds and hundreds of those whom they call bravest,
wisest, strongest, warriors, statesmen, orators, and poets,
- have been born, have. grown up, lived, and died, while
yet it has outlived them all. It has seen more wisdom
than the best of them; but two or three hours of brutal
strength sufficed to lay it low. Which of these dolts could
make a tree ? I 'd like to see them do anything like it.
How noisy and clumsy are all their movements, chop-
ping, pounding, rasping, hammering And, after all, what
do they build ? In the forest we do everything so quietly.
A tree would be ashamed of itself that could not get its
growth without making such a noise and dust and fuss.
Ourlife is the perfection of good manners. For my part,







THE SQUIRRELS THAT LIVED IN A HOUSE 45

I feel degraded at the mere presence of these human beings ;
but, alas I am old; a hollow place at my heart warns
me of the progress of decay, and probably it will be seized
upon by these rapacious creatures as an excuse for laying
me as low as my noble green brother."
In spite of all this disquiet about it, the little cottage
grew and was finished. The walls were covered with pretty
paper, the floors carpeted with pretty carpets ; and, in fact,
when it was all arranged, and the garden walks laid out,
and beds of flowers planted around, it began to be confessed,
even among the most critical, that it was not after all so
bad a thing as was to have been feared.
A black ant went in one day and made a tour of explo-
ration up and down, over chairs and tables, up the ceilings
and down again, and, coming out, wrote an article for the
" Crickets' Gazette," in which he described the new abode
as a veritable palace. Several butterflies fluttered in and
sailed about and were wonderfully delighted, and then a
bumble-bee and two or three honey-bees, who expressed
themselves well pleased with the house, but more especially
enchanted with the garden. In fact, when it was found
that the proprietors were very fond of the rural solitudes
of Nature, and had come out there for the purpose of en-
joying them undisturbed, -that they watched and spared
the anemones, and the violets, and bloodroots, and dog's-
tooth violets, and little woolly rolls of fern that began to
grow up under the trees in spring, that they never allowed
a gun to be fired to scare the birds, and watched the build-
ing of their nests with the greatest interest, -then an
opinion in favor of human beings began to gain ground,
and every cricket and bird and beast was loud in their
praise.
"Mamma," said young Tit-bit, a frisky young squirrel,
to his mother one day, "why won't you let Frisky and me
go into that pretty new cottage to play ?"







46 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

My dear," said his mother, who was a very wary and
careful old squirrel, "how can you think of it ? The race
of man are full of devices for traps and pitfalls, and who
could say what might happen if you put yourself in their
power ? If you had wings like the butterflies and bees,
you might fly in and out again, and so gratify your curi-
osity; but, as matters stand, it 's best for you to keep well
out of their way."
But, mother, there is such a nice, good lady lives there !
I believe she is a good fairy, and she seems to love us all
so ; she sits in the bow-window and watches us for hours,
and she scatters corn all round at the roots of the tree for
us to eat."
"She is nice enough," said the old mother-squirrel, "if
you keep far enough off; but I tell you, you can't be too
careful."
Now this good fairy that the squirrels discoursed about
was a nice little old lady that the children used to call
Aunt Esther, and she was a dear lover of birds and squir-
rels, and all sorts of animals, and had studied their little
ways till she knew just what would please them; and so
she would every day throw out crumbs for the sparrows,
and little bits of bread and wool and cotton to help the
birds that were building their nests, and would scatter corn
and nuts for the squirrels ; and while she sat at her work
in the bow-window she would smile to see the birds flying
away with the wool, and the squirrels nibbling their nuts.
After a while the birds grew so tame that they would hop
into the bow-window, and eat their crumbs off the carpet.
"There, mamma," said Tit-bit and Frisky, "only see !
Jenny Wren and Cock Robin have been in at the bow-win-
dow, and it did n't hurt them, and why can't we go ? "
"Well, my dears," said old Mother Squirrel, "you must
do it very carefully : never forget that you haven't wings
like Jenny Wren and Cock Robin."






THE SQUIRRELS THAT LIVED IN A HOUSE 47

So the next day Aunt Esther laid a train of corn from
the roots of the trees to the bow-window, and then from the
bow-window to her work-basket, which stood on the floor
beside her; and then she put quite a handful of corn in
the work-basket, and sat down by it, and seemed intent on
her sewing. Very soon, creep, creep, creep, came Tit-bit
and Frisky to the window, and then into the room, just as
sly and as still as could be, and Aunt Esther sat just like a
statue for fear of disturbing them. They looked all around
in high glee, and when they came to the basket it seemed to
them a wonderful little summer-house, made on purpose for
them to play in. They nosed about in it, and turned over
the scissors and the needle-book, and took a nibble at her
white wax, and jostled the spools, meanwhile stowing away
the corn in each side of their little chops, till they both of
them looked as if they had the mumps.
At last Aunt Esther put out her hand to touch them,
when, whisk-frisk, out they went, and up the trees, chat-
tering and laughing before she had time even to wink.
But after this they used to come in every day, and when
she put corn in her hand and held it very still they would
eat out of it; and, finally, they would get into her hand,
until one day she gently closed it over them, and Frisky and
Tit-bit were fairly caught.
Oh, how their hearts beat but the good fairy only spoke
gently to them, and soon unclosed her hand and let them go
again. So, day after day, they grew to have more and more
faith in her, till they would climb into her work-basket, sit
on her shoulder, or nestle away in her lap as she sat sewing.
They made also long exploring voyages all over the house,
up and through all the chambers, till finally, I grieve to say,
poor Frisky came to an untimely end by being drowned in
the water-tank at the top of the house.
The dear good fairy passed away from the house in time,
and went to a land where the flowers never fade, and the






48 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

birds never die; but the squirrels still continue to make the
place a favorite resort.
In fact, my dear," said old Mother Red one winter to
her mate, what is the use of one's living in this cold hol-
low tree, when these amiable people have erected this pretty
cottage where there is plenty of room for us and them too ?
Now I have examined between the eaves, and there is a
charming place where we can store our nuts, and where we
can whip in and out of the garret, and have the free range
of the house; and, say what you will, these humans have
delightful ways of being warm and comfortable in winter."
So Mr. and Mrs. Red set up housekeeping in the cottage,
and had no end of nuts and other good things stored up
there. The trouble of all this was that, as Mrs. Red was
a notable body, and got up to begin her housekeeping oper-
ations, and woke up all her children, at four o'clock in the
morning, the good people often were disturbed by a great
rattling and fuss in the walls, while yet it seemed dark
night. Then sometimes, too, I grieve to say, Mrs. Squirrel
would give her husband vigorous curtain lectures in the night,
which made him so indignant that he would rattle off to an-
other quarter of the garret to sleep by himself; and all this
broke the rest of the worthy people who built the house.
What is to be done about this we don't know. What
would you do about it ? Would you let the squirrels live
in your house, or not ? When our good people come down
of a cold winter morning, and see the squirrels dancing and
frisking down the trees, and chasing each other so merrily
over the garden-chair between them, or sitting with their
tails saucily over their backs, they look so jolly and jaunty
and pretty that they almost forgive them for disturbing
their night's rest, and think that they will not do anything
to drive them out of the garret to-day. And so it goes on;
but how long the squirrels will-rent the cottage in this fash-
ion, I 'm sure I dare not undertake to say.














HUM, THE SON OF BUZ


AT Rye Beach, during our summer's vacation, there
came, as there always will to seaside visitors, two or three
cold, chilly, rainy days, days when the skies that long
had not rained a drop seemed suddenly to bethink them-
selves of their remissness, and to pour down water, not
by drops, but by pailfuls. The chilly wind blew and
whistled, the water dashed along the ground, and careered
in foamy rills along the roadside, and the bushes bent
beneath the constant flood. It was plain that there was
to be no sea-bathing on such a day, no walks, no rides;
and so, shivering and drawing our blanket-shawls close
about us, we sat down to the window to watch the storm
outside. The rose-bushes under the window hung dripping
under their load of moisture, each spray shedding a con-
stant shower on the spray below it. On one of these
lower sprays, under the perpetual drip, what should we see
but a poor little humming-bird, drawn up into the tiniest
shivering ball, and clinging with a desperate grasp to his
uncomfortable perch. A humming-bird we knew him to
be at once, though his feathers were so matted and glued
down by the rain that he looked not much bigger than a
honey-bee, and as different as possible from the smart, pert,
airy little character that we had so often seen flirting with
the flowers. He was evidently a humming-bird in adver-
sity, and whether he ever would hum again looked to us
exceedingly doubtful. Immediately, however, we sent out
to have him taken in. When the friendly hand seized
him, he gave a little faint, watery squeak, evidently think-







50 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
ing that his last hour was come, and that grim Death was
about to carry him off to the land of dead birds. What a
time we had reviving him, holding the little wet thing
in the warm hollow of our hands, and feeling him shiver
and palpitate His eyes were fast closed; his tiny claws,
which looked slender as cobwebs, were knotted close to his
body, and it was long before one could feel the least motion
in them. Finally, to our great joy, we felt a brisk little
kick, and then a flutter of wings, and then a determined
peck of the beak, which showed that there was some bird
left in him yet, and that he meant at any rate to find out
where he was.
Unclosing our hands a small space, out popped the little
head with a pair of round brilliant eyes. Then we be-
thought ourselves of feeding him, and forthwith prepared
him a stiff glass of sugar and water, a drop of which we
held to his bill. After turning his head attentively, like a
bird who knew what he was about and did n't mean to be
chaffed, he briskly put out a long, flexible tongue slightly
forked at the end, and licked off the comfortable beverage
with great relish. Immediately he was pronounced out of
danger by the small humane society which had undertaken
the charge of his restoration, and we began to cast about for
getting him a settled establishment in our apartment. I
gave up my work-box to him for a sleeping-room, and it
was medically ordered that he should take ,a nap. So we
filled the box with cotton, and he was formally put to bed
with a folded cambric handkerchief round his neck, to
keep him from beating his wings. Out of his white wrap-
pings he looked forth green and grave as any judge with
his bright round eyes. Like a bird of discretion, he
seemed to understand what was being done to him, and
resigned himself sensibly to go to sleep.
The box was covered with a sheet of paper perforated
with holes for purposes of ventilation ; for even humming-






HUM, THE SON OF BUZ 51

birds have a little pair of lungs, and need their own little
portion of air to fill them, so that they may make bright,
scarlet, little drops of blood to keep life's fire burning in
their tiny bodies. Our bird's lungs manufactured brilliant
blood, as we found out by experience; for in his first nap
he contrived to nestle himself into the cotton of which his
bed was made, and to get more of it than he needed into
his long bill. We pulled it out as carefully as we could, but
there came out of his bill two round, bright, scarlet, little
drops of blood. Our chief medical authority looked grave,
pronounced a probable hemorrhage from the lungs, and gave
him over at once. We, less scientific, declared that we
had only cut his little tongue by drawing out the filaments of
cotton, and that he would do well enough in time, as it
afterward appeared he did, for from that day there was
no more bleeding. In the course of the second day he
began to take short flights about the room, though he seemed
to prefer to return to us, perching on our fingers or heads
or shoulders, and sometimes choosing to sit in this way for
half an hour at a time. These great giants," he seemed
to say to himself, are not bad people after all; they have
a comfortable way with them; how nicely they dried and
warmed me! Truly a bird might do worse than to live
with them."
So he made up his mind to form a fourth in the little
company of three that usually sat and read, worked, and
sketched in that apartment, and we christened him Hum,
the son of Buz." He became an individuality, a character,
whose little doings formed a part of every letter, and some
extracts from these will show what some of his little ways
were.
Hum has learned to sit upon my finger, and eat his
sugar and water out of a teaspoon with most Christian-like
decorum. He has but one weakness, he will occasionally
jump into the spoon and sit in his sugar and water, and






52 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

then appear to wonder where it goes to. His plumage is
in rather a drabbled state, owing to these performances. I
have sketched him as he sat to-day on a bit of Spirma
which I brought in for him. When absorbed in reflection,
he sits with his bill straight up in the air, as I have drawn
him. Mr. A-- reads Macaulay to us, and you should
see the wise air with which, perched on Jenny's thumb, he
cocked his head now one side and then the other, apparently
listening with most critical attention. His confidence in
us seems unbounded; he lets us stroke his head, smooth his
feathers, without a flutter ; and is never better pleased than
sitting, as he has been doing all this while, on my hand,
turning up his bill, and watching my face with great edifi-
cation.
I have just been having a sort of maternal struggle to
make him go to bed in his box; but he evidently considers
himself sufficiently convalescent to make a stand for his
rights as a bird, and so scratched indignantly out of his
wrappings, and set himself up to roost on the edge of the
box, with an air worthy of a turkey, at the very least.
Having brought in a lamp, he has opened his eyes round
and wide, and sits cocking his little head at me reflect-
ively."
When the weather cleared away, and the sun came out
bright, Hum became entirely well, and seemed resolved to
take the measure of his new life with us. Our windows
were closed in the lower part of the sash by frames with
mosquito gauze, so that the sun and air found free admis-
sion, and yet our little rover could not pass out. On the
first sunny day he took an exact survey of our apartment
from ceiling to floor, humming about, examining every
point with his bill, all the crevices, mouldings, each little
indentation in the bed-post, each window-pane, each chair
and stand; and, as it is a very simply furnished seaside
apartment, his scrutiny was soon finished. We wondered,






HUM, THE SON OF BUZ 53

at first, what this was all about; but, on watching him
more closely, we found that he was actively engaged in
getting his living, by darting out his long tongue hither
and thither, and drawing in all the tiny flies and insects
which in summer-time are to be found in an apartment.
In short, we found that, though the nectar of flowers was
his dessert, yet he had his roast beef and mutton-chop to
look after, and that his bright, brilliant blood was not made
out of a simple vegetarian diet. Very shrewd and keen he
was, too, in measuring the size of insects before he attempted
to swallow them. The smallest class were whisked off with
lightning speed ; but about larger ones he would sometimes
wheel and hum for some minutes, darting hither and thither,
and surveying them warily; and if satisfied that they could
be carried, he would come down with a quick, central dart
which would finish the unfortunate at a snap. The larger
flies seemed to irritate him, especially when they inti-
mated to him that his plumage was sugary, by settling on
his wings and tail; when he would lay about him spitefully,
wielding his bill like a sword. A grasshopper that strayed
in, and was sunning himself on the window-seat, gave him
great discomposure. Hum evidently considered him an in-
truder, and seemed to long to make a dive at him; but,
with characteristic prudence, confined himself to threatening
movements, which did not exactly hit. He saw evidently
that he could not swallow him whole, and what might
ensue from trying him piecemeal he wisely forbore to essay.
Hum had his own favorite places and perches. From
the first day he chose for his nightly roost a towel-line
which had been drawn across the corner over the wash-
stand, where he every night established himself with one
claw in the edge of the towel and the other clasping the
line, and, ruffling up his feathers till he looked like a little
chestnut-burr, he would resign himself to the soundest sleep.
He did not tuck his head under his wing, but seemed to







54 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

sink it down between his shoulders, with his bill almost
straight up in the air. One evening one of us, going to
use the towel, jarred the line, and soon after found that
Hum had been thrown from his perch, and was hanging
head downward, fast asleep, still clinging to the line. An-
other evening, being discomposed by somebody coming to
the towel-line after he had settled himself, he fluttered off;
but so sleepy that he had not discretion to poise himself
again, and was found clinging, like a little bunch of green
floss silk, to the mosquito netting of the window.
A day after this we brought in a large green bough, and
put it up over the looking-glass. Hum noticed it before it
had been there five minutes, flew to it, and began a regu-
lar survey, perching now here, now there, till he seemed to
find a twig that exactly suited him; and after that he
roosted there every night. Who does not see in this
change all the signs of reflection and reason that are shown
by us in thinking over our circumstances, and trying to
better them ? It seemed to say in so many words : "That
towel-line is an unsafe place for a bird; I get frightened,
and wake from bad dreams to find myself head downwards;
so I will find a better roost on this twig."
When our little Jenny one day put on a clean white
muslin gown embellished with red sprigs, Hum flew towards
her, and with his bill made instant examination of these
new appearances; and one day, being very affectionately
disposed, perched himself on her shoulder, and sat some
time. On another occasion, while Mr. A was reading,
Hum established himself on the top of his head just over
the middle of his forehead, in the precise place where our
young belles have lately worn stuffed humming-birds, mak-
ing him look as if dressed out for a party. Hum's most
favorite perch was the back of the great rocking-chair, which,
being covered by a tidy, gave some hold into which he
could catch his little claws. There he would sit, balancing






HUM, THE SON OF BUZ 55

himself cleverly if its occupant chose to swing to and fro,
and seeming to be listening to the conversation or reading.
Hum had his different moods, like human beings. On
cold, cloudy, gray days he appeared to be somewhat de-
pressed in spirits, hummed less about the room, and sat
humped up with his feathers ruffled, looking as much like
a bird in a great-coat as possible. But on hot, sunny days
every feather sleeked itself down, and his little body looked
natty and trim, his head alert, his eyes bright, and it was
impossible to come near him, for his agility. Then let
mosquitoes and little flies look about them! Hum snapped
them up without mercy, and seemed to be all over the
ceiling in a moment, and resisted all our efforts at any per-
sonal familiarity with a saucy alacrity.
Hum had his established institutions in our room, the
chief of which was a. tumbler with a little sugar and water
mixed in it, and a spoon laid across, out of which he helped
himself whenever he felt in the mood, sitting on the
edge of the tumbler, and dipping his long bill, and lapping
with his little forked tongue like a kitten. When he
found his spoon accidentally dry, he would stoop over anda
dip his bill in the water in the tumbler, which caused
the prophecy on the part of some of his guardians, that he
would fall in some day and be drowned. For which rea-
son it was agreed to keep only an inch in depth of the
fluid at the bottom of the tumbler. A wise precaution
this proved; for the next morning I was awaked, not by
the usual hum over my head, but by a sharp little flutter,
and found Mr. Hum beating his wings in the tumbler -
having actually tumbled in during his energetic efforts to
get his morning coffee before I was awake.
Hum seemed perfectly happy and satisfied in his quar-
ters, but one day, when the door was left open, made a
dart out, and so into the open sunshine. Then, to be sure,
we thought we had lost him. We took the mosquito net-







56 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

ting out of all the windows, and, setting his tumbler of sugar
and water in a conspicuous place, went about our usual
occupations. We saw him joyous and brisk among the
honeysuckles outside the window, and it was gravely pre-
dicted that he would return no more. But at dinner-time
in came Hum, familiar as possible, and sat down to his
spoon as if nothing had happened; instantly we closed our
windows and had him secure once more.
At another time I was going to ride to the Atlantic
House, about a mile from my boarding-place. I left all
secure, as I supposed, at home. While gathering moss on
the walls there, I was surprised by a little green humming-
bird flying familiarly right towards my face, and humming
above my head. I called out, Here is Hum's very bro-
ther." But, on returning home, I saw that the door of the
room was open, and Hum was gone. Now certainly we
gave him up for lost. I sat down to painting, and in a few
minutes in flew Hum, and settled on the edge of my tum-
bler in a social, confidential way, which seemed to say, O,
you've got back then." After taking his usual drink of
sugar and water, he began to fly about the ceiling as usual,
and we gladly shut him in.
When our five weeks at the seaside were up, and it was
time to go home, we had great questioning what was to be
done with Hum. To get him home with us was our desire,
- but who ever heard of a humming-bird traveling by rail-
road ? Great were the consulting; a little basket of In-
dian work was filled up with cambric handkerchiefs, and a
bottle of sugar and water provided, and we started with him
for a day's journey. When we arrived at night the first
care was to see what had become of Hum, who had not
been looked at since we fed him with sugar and water in
Boston. We found him alive and well, but so dead asleep
that we could not wake him to roost; so we put him to
bed on a toilet cushion, and arranged his tumbler for morn-






HUM, THE SON OF BUZ 57
ing. The next day found him alive and eluxrinL_. explor-
ing the room and pictures, perching now here and now
there ; but, as the weather was chilly, he sat for the most
part of the time in a humped-up state on the tip of a pair
of stag's horns. We moved him to a more sunny apart-
ment; but, alas the equinoctial storm came on, and there
was no sun to be had for days. Hum was blue; the pleas-
ant seaside days were over; his room was lonely, the pleas-
ant three that had enlivened the apartment at Rye no longer
came in and out; evidently he was lonesome, and gave way
to depression. One chilly morning he managed again to
fall into his tumbler, and wet himself through; and not-
withstanding warm bathings and tender nursing, the poor
little fellow seemed to get diphtheria, or something quite as
bad for humming-birds.
We carried him to a neighboring sunny parlor, where ivy
embowers all the walls, and the sun lies all day. There he
revived a little, danced up and down, perched on a green
spray that was wreathed across the breast of a Psyche, and
looked then like a little flitting soul returning to its rest.
Towards evening he drooped; and, having been nursed and
warmed and cared for, he was put to sleep on a green twig
laid on the piano. In that sleep the little head drooped
- nodded fell; and little Hum went where other bright
dreams go, to the Land of the Hereafter.














OUR COUNTRY NEIGHBORS


WE have just built our house in rather an out-of-the-
way place, on the bank of a river, and under the shade
of a patch of woods which is a veritable remain of quite an
ancient forest. The checkerberry and partridge-plum, with
their glossy green leaves and scarlet berries, still carpet the
ground under its deep shadows; and prince's-pine and
other kindred evergreens declare its native wildness, for
these are children of the wild woods, that never come after
plough and harrow has once broken a soil.
When we tried to look out the spot for our house, we
had to get a surveyor to go before us and cut a path
through the dense underbrush that was laced together in a
general network of boughs and leaves, and grew so high as
to overtop our heads. Where the house stands, four or five
great old oaks and chestnuts had to be cut away to let it in ;
and now it stands on the bank of the river, the edges of
which are still overhung with old forest-trees, chestnuts and
oaks, which look at themselves in the glassy stream.
A little knoll near the house was chosen for a garden
spot; a dense, dark mass of trees above, of bushes in mid-
air, and of all sorts of ferns and wild-flowers and creeping
vines on the ground. All these had to be cleared out, and
a dozen great trees cut down and dragged off to a neighbor-
ing saw-mill, there to be transformed into boards to finish
off our house. Then, fetching a great machine, such as
might be used to pull a giant's teeth, with ropes, pulleys,
oxen, and men, and might and main, we pulled out the
stumps, with their great prongs and their network of roots







OUR COUNTRY NEIGHBORS 59

and fibres; and then, alas we had to begin with all the
pretty, wild, lovely bushes, and the checkerberries and ferns
and wild blackberries and huckleberry-bushes, and dig them
up remorselessly, that we might plant our corn and squashes.
And so we got a house and a garden right out of the heart
of our piece of wild wood, about a mile from the city of
H--
Well, then, people said it was a lonely place, and far
from neighbors, by which they meant that it was a good
way for them to come to see us. But we soon found that
whoever goes into the woods to live finds neighbors of a
new kind, and some to whom it is rather hard to become
accustomed.
For instance, on a fine day early in April, as we were
crossing over to superintend the building of our house, we
were startled by a striped snake with his little bright eyes,
raising himself to look at us, and putting out his red forked
tongue. Now there is no more harm in these little garden-
snakes than there is in a robin or a squirrel; they are poor
little, peaceable, timid creatures, which could not do any
harm if they would; but the prejudices of society are so
strong against them, that one does not like to cultivate too
much intimacy with them. So we tried to turn out' of our
path into a tangle of bushes ; and there, instead of one, we
found four snakes. We turned on the other side, and there
were two more. In short, everywhere we looked, the dry
leaves were rustling and coiling with them; and we were
in despair. In vain we said that they were harmless as
kittens, and tried to persuade ourselves that their little
bright eyes were pretty, and that their serpentine move-
ments were in the exact line of beauty ; for the life of us,
we could not help remembering their family name and con-
nections ; we thought of those disagreeable gentlemen, the
anacondas, the rattlesnakes, and the copperheads, and all of
that bad line, immediate family friends of the old serpent







60 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
to whom we are indebted for all the mischief that is done
in this world. So we were quite apprehensive when we
saw how our new neighborhood was infested by them, until
a neighbor calmed our fears by telling us that snakes always
crawled out of their holes to sun themselves in the spring,
and that in a day or two they would all be gone.
So it proved. It was evident they were all out merely
to do their spring shopping, or something that serves with
them the same purpose that spring shopping does with us;
and where they went afterwards we do not know. People
speak of snakes' holes, and we have seen them disappearing
into such subterranean chambers ; but we never opened one
to see what sort of underground housekeeping went on
there. After the first few days of spring, a snake was a
rare visitor, though now and then one appeared.
One was discovered taking his noontide repast one day
in a manner which excited much prejudice. He was, in
fact, regaling himself by sucking down into his maw a small
frog, which he had begun to swallow at the toes, and had
drawn about half down. The frog, it must be confessed,
seemed to view this arrangement with great indifference,
making no struggle, and sitting solemnly, with his great
unwinking eyes, to be sucked in at the leisure of his cap-
tor. There was immense sympathy, however, excited for
him in the family circle; and it was voted that a snake
which indulged in such very disagreeable modes of eating his
dinner was not to be tolerated in our vicinity. So I have
reason to believe that that was his last meal.
Another of our wild woodland neighbors made us some
trouble. It was no other than a veritable woodchuck,
whose hole we had often wondered at when we were
scrambling through the underbrush after spring flowers.
The hole was about the size of a peck-measure, and had
two openings about six feet apart. The occupant was a
gentleman we never had had the pleasure of seeing; but






OUR COUNTRY NEIGHBORS


we soon learned his existence from his ravages in our
garden. He had a taste, it appears, for the very kind of
things we wanted to eat ourselves, and helped himself
without asking. We had a row of fine, crisp heads of
lettuce, which were the pride of our gardening, and out of
which he would from day to day select for his table just
the plants we had marked for ours. He also nibbled our
young beans; and so at last we were reluctantly obliged
to let John Gardiner set a trap for him. Poor old
simple-minded hermit, he was too artless for this world !
He was caught at the very first snap, and found dead in
the trap, the agitation and distress having broken his
poor woodland heart, and killed him. We were grieved to
the very soul when the poor, fat old fellow was dragged
out, with his useless paws standing up stiff and imploring.
As it was, he was given to Denis, our pig, which, without
a single scruple of delicacy, ate him up as thoroughly as he
ate up the lettuce.
This business of eating, it appears, must go on all through
creation. We eat ducks, turkeys, and chickens, though we
don't swallow them whole, feathers and all. Our four-footed
friends, less civilized, take things with more directness and
simplicity, and chew each other up without ceremony, or
swallow each other alive. Of these unceremonious habits
we had other instances.
Our house had a central court on the southern side, into
which looked the library, dining-room, and front hall, as
well as several of the upper chambers. It was designed to
be closed in with glass, to serve as a conservatory in win-
ter ; and meanwhile we had filled it with splendid plumy
ferns, taken up out of the neighboring wood. In the centre
was a fountain surrounded by stones, shells, mosses, and
various water-plants. We had bought three little goldfish
to swim in our basin ; and the spray of it, as it rose in the
air and rippled back into the water, was the pleasantest







62 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

possible sound of a hot day. We used to lie on the sofa
in the hall, and look into the court, and fancy we saw
some scene of fairy-land, and water-sprites coming up from
the fountain. Suddenly a new-comer presented himself, -
no other than an immense bullfrog, that had hopped up
from the neighboring river, apparently with a view to
making a permanent settlement in and about our fountain.
He was to be seen, often for hours, sitting reflectively on
the edge of it, beneath the broad shadow of the calla-leaves.
When sometimes missed thence, he would be found under
the ample shield of a great bignonia, whose striped leaves
grew hard by.
The family were prejudiced against him. What did he
want there ? It was surely some sinister motive impelled
him. He was probably watching for an opportunity to
gobble up the goldfish. We took his part, however, and
strenuously defended his moral character, and patronized
him in all ways. We gave him the name of Unke, and
maintained that he was a well-conducted, philosophical old
water-sprite, who showed his good taste in wanting to take
up his abode in our conservatory. We even defended his
personal appearance, praised the invisible-green coat which
he wore on his back, and his gray vest, and solemn gold
spectacles; and though he always felt remarkably slimy
when we touched him, yet, as he would sit still, and allow
us to stroke his head and pat his back, we concluded his
social feelings might be warm, notwithstanding a cold ex-
terior. Who knew, after all, but he might be a beautiful
young prince, enchanted there till the princess should come
to drop the golden ball into the fountain, and so give him
a chance to marry her, and turn into a man again? Such
things, we are credibly informed, are matters of frequent
occurrence in Germany. Why not here ?
By and by there came to our fountain another visitor, -
a frisky, green young frog of the identical kind spoken of
by the poet: -







OUR COUNTRY NEIGHBORS 63
"There was a frog lived in a well,
Rig dum pully metakimo."
This thoughtless, dapper individual, with his bright green
coat, his faultless white vest, and sea-green tights, became
rather the popular favorite. He seemed just rakish and
gallant enough to fulfil the conditions of the song :-
"The frog he would a courting ride,
With sword and pistol by his side."
This lively young fellow, whom we shall call Cri-Cri, like
other frisky and gay young people, carried the day quite over
the head of the solemn old philosopher under the calla-
leaves. At night, when all was still, he would trill a joyous
little note in his throat, while old Unke would answer only
with a cracked guttural more singular than agreeable; and
to all outward appearance the two were as good friends as
their different natures would allow.
One day, however, the conservatory became a scene of a
tragedy of the deepest dye. We were summoned below by
shrieks and howls of horror. Do pray come down and
see what this vile, nasty, horrid old frog has been doing "
Down we came; and there sat our virtuous old philosopher,
with his poor little brother's hind legs still sticking out of
the corner of his mouth, as if he were smoking them for
a cigar, all helplessly palpitating as they were. In fact, our
solemn old friend had done what many a solemn hypocrite
before has done, swallowed his poor brother, neck and
crop, and sat there with the most brazen indifference,
looking as if he had done the most proper and virtuous
thing in the world.
Immediately he was marched out of the conservatory at
the point of the walking-stick, and made to hop down into
the river, into whose waters he splashed ; and we saw him
no more. We regret to say that the popular indignation
was so precipitate in its results ; otherwise the special artist
who sketched Hum, the son of Buz, would have made a







QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE


sketch of the old villain, as he sat with his luckless vic-
tim's hind legs projecting from his solemn mouth. With
all his moral faults, he was a good sitter, and would prob-
ably have sat immovable any length of time that could be
desired.
Of other woodland neighbors there were some which we
saw occasionally. The shores of the river were lined here
and there with the holes of the muskrats; and, in rowing
by their settlements, we were sometimes strongly reminded
of them by the overpowering odor of the perfume from
which they get their name. There were also owls, whose
nests were high up in some of the old chestnut-trees. Often
in the lonely hours of the night we could hear them gib-
bering with a sort of wild, hollow laugh among the distant
trees. But one tenant of the woods made us some trouble
in the autumn. It was a little flying-squirrel, who took to
making excursions into our house in the night season, com-
ing down chimney into the chambers, rustling about among
the clothes, cracking nuts or nibbling at any morsels of
anything that suited his fancy. For a long time the in-
mates of the rooms were awakened in the night by myste-
rious noises, thumps, and rappings, and so lighted candles,
and searched in vain to find whence they came; for the
moment any movement was made, the rogue whipped up
chimney, and left us a prey to the most mysterious alarms.
What could it be ?
But one night our fine gentleman bounced in at the
window of another room, which had no fireplace; and the
fair occupant, rising in the night, shut the window, with-
out suspecting that she had cut off the retreat of any of
her woodland neighbors. The next morning she was star-
tled by what she thought a gray rat running past her bed.
She rose to pursue him, when he ran up the wall, and
clung against the plastering, showing himself very plainly
a gray flying-squirrel, with large, soft eyes, and wings which






OUR COUNTRY NEIGHBORS 65

consisted of a membrane uniting the fore paws to the hind
ones, like those of a bat. He was chased into the conser-
vatory, and, a window being opened, out he flew upon the
ground, and made away for his native woods, and thus put
an end to many fears as to the nature of our nocturnal
trappings.
So you see how many neighbors we found by living in
the woods, and, after all, no worse ones than are found in
the great world.














OUR DOGS


I

WE who live in Cunopolis are a dog-loving family.
We have a warm side towards everything that goes upon
four paws, and the consequence has been that, taking things
first and last, we have been always kept in confusion and
under the paw, so to speak, of some honest four-footed
tyrant, who would go beyond his privilege and overrun
the whole house. Years ago this begun, when our house-
hold consisted of a papa, a mamma, and three or four noisy
boys and girls, and a kind Miss Anna who acted as a sec-
ond mamma to the whole. There was also one more of our
number, the youngest, dear little bright-eyed Charley, who
was king over us all, and rode in a wicker wagon for a
chariot, and had a nice little nurse devoted to him ; and it
was through him that our first dog came.
One day Charley's nurse took him quite a way to a
neighbor's house to spend the afternoon; and, he being
well amused, they stayed till after nightfall. The kind old
lady of the mansion was concerned that the little prince in
his little coach, with his little maid, had to travel so. far in
the twilight shadows, and so she called a big dog named
Carlo, and gave the establishment into his charge.
Carlo was a great, tawny-yellow mastiff, as big as a calf,
with great, clear, honest eyes, and stiff, wiry hair; and the
good lady called him to the side of the little wagon, and
said, Now, Carlo, you must take good care of Charley,
and you must n't let anything hurt him."






OUR DOGS


Carlo wagged his tail in promise of protection, and away
he trotted, home with the wicker wagon; and when he
arrived, he was received with so much applause by four
little folks, who dearly loved the very sight of a dog, he
was so stroked and petted and caressed, that he concluded
that he liked the place better than the home he came from,
where were only very grave elderly people. He tarried
all night, and slept at the foot of the boys' bed, who could
hardly go to sleep for the things they found to say to him,
and who were awake ever so early in the morning, stroking
his rough, tawny back, and hugging him.
At his own home Carlo had a kennel all to himself,
where he was expected to live quite alone, and do duty by
watching and guarding the place. Nobody petted him, or
stroked his rough hide, or said, Poor dog to him, and
so it appears he had a feeling that he was not appreciated,
and liked our warm-hearted little folks, who told him
stories, gave him half of their own supper, and took him to
bed with them sociably. Carlo was a dog that had a mind
of his own, though he could n't say much about it, and in
his dog fashion proclaimed his likes and dislikes quite a
strongly as if he could speak. When the time came for
taking him home, he growled and showed his teeth danger-
ously at the man who was sent for him, and it was neces-
sary to drag him back by force, and tie him into his ken-
nel. However, he soon settled that matter by gnawing the
rope in two and padding down again and appearing among
his little friends, quite to their delight. Two or three
times was he taken back and tied or chained; but he
howled so dismally, and snapped at people in such a mis-
anthropic manner, that finally the kind old lady thought it
better to have no dog at all than a dog soured by blighted
affection. So she loosed his rope, and said, There,
Carlo, go and stay where you like; and so Carlo came
to us, and a joy and delight was he to all in the house.






68 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
He loved one and all; but he declared himself as more
than all the slave and property of our Prince Charley.
He would lie on the floor as still as a door-mat, and let
him pull his hair, and roll over him, and examine his eyes
with his little fat fingers ; and Carlo submitted to all these
personal freedoms with as good an understanding as papa
himself. When Charley slept, Carlo stretched himself
along under the crib; rising now and then, and standing
with his broad breast on a level with the slats of the crib,
he would look down upon him with an air of grave pro-
tection. He also took a great fancy to papa, and would
sometimes pat with tiptoe care into his study, and sit
quietly down by him when he was busy over his Greek or
Latin books, waiting for a word or two of praise or encour-
agement. If none came, he would lay his rough horny
paw on his knee, and look in his face with such an honest,
imploring expression, that the professor was forced to break
off to say, Why, Carlo, you poor, good, honest fellow, -
did he want to be talked to ? so he did. Well, he shall
be talked to; he's a nice, good dog; and during all
these praises Carlo's transports and the thumps of his rough
tail are not to be described.
He had great, honest, yellowish-brown eyes, not re-
markable for their beauty, but which used to look as if he
longed to speak, and he seemed to have a yearning for
praise and love and caresses that even all our attentions
could scarcely satisfy. His master would say to him some-
times, Carlo, you poor, good, homely dog, how loving
you are "
Carlo was a full-blooded mastiff, and his beauty, if he
had any, consisted in his having all the good points of his
race. He was a dog of blood, come of real old mastiff
lineage; his stiff, wiry hair, his big, rough paws, and great
brawny chest, were all made for strength rather than
beauty; but for all that he was a dog of tender sentiments.






OUR DOGS


Yet, if any one intruded on his rights and dignities, Carlo
showed that he had hot blood in him; his lips would go
back, and show a glistening row of ivories that one would
not like to encounter, and if any trenched on his privileges,
he would give a deep warning growl, as much as to say,
"I am your slave for love, but you must treat me well, or
I shall be dangerous." A blow he would not bear from
any one: the fire would flash from his great yellow eyes,
and he would snap like a rifle ; yet he would let his
own Prince Charley pound on his ribs with both baby fists,
and pull his tail till he yelped, without even a show of
resistance.
At last came a time when the merry voice of little Char-
ley was heard no more, and his little feet no more pattered
through the halls; he lay pale and silent in his little crib,
with his dear life ebbing away, and no one knew how to
stop its going. Poor old Carlo lay under the crib when
they would let him, sometimes rising up to look in with an
earnest, sorrowful face; and sometimes he would stretch
himself out in the entry before the door of little Charley's
room, watching with his great open eyes lest the thief
should come in the night to steal away our treasure.
But one morning when the children woke, one little soul
had gone in the night, gone upward to the angels ; and
then the cold, pale little form that used to be the life of
the house was laid away tenderly in the yard of a neighbor-
ing church.
Poor old Carlo would pit-pat silently about the house in
those days of grief, looking first into one face and then
another, but no one could tell him where his gay little
master had gone. The other children had hid the baby-
wagon away in the lumber-room lest their mamma should
see it; and so passed a week or two, and Carlo saw no
trace of Charley about the house. But then a lady in the






70 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

neighborhood, who had a sick baby, sent to borrow the
wicker wagon, and it was taken from its hiding-place to go
to her. Carlo came to the door just as it was being drawn
out of the gate into the street. Immediately he sprung,
cleared the fence with a great bound, and ran after it. He
overtook it, and poked his nose between the curtains, -
there was no one there. Immediately he turned away, and
padded dejectedly home. What words could have spoken
plainer of love and memory than this one action ?
Carlo lived with us a year after this, when a time came
for the whole family hive to be taken up and moved away
from the flowery banks of the Ohio to the piny shores of
Maine. All our household goods were being uprooted, dis-
ordered, packed, and sold; and the question daily arose,
" What shall we do with Carlo ? There was hard begging
on the part of the boys that he might go with them, and
one even volunteered to travel all the way in baggage cars
to keep Carlo company. But papa said no, and so it was
decided to send Carlo up the river to the home of a very
genial lady who had visited in our family, and who appre-
ciated his parts, and offered him a home in hers.
The matter was anxiously talked over one day in the
family circle while Carlo lay under the table, and it was
agreed that papa and Willie should take him to the steam-
boat landing the next morning. But the next morning Mr.
Carlo was nowhere to be found. In vain was he called,
from garret to cellar; nor was it till papa and Willie had
gone to the city that he came out of his hiding-place. For
two or three days it was impossible to catch him, but after
a while his suspicions were laid, and we learned not to speak
out our plans in his presence, and so the transfer at last was
prosperously effected.
We heard from him once in his new home, as being a
highly appreciated member of society, and adorning his new







OUR DOGS 71
situation with all sorts of dog virtues, while we wended our
ways to the coast of Maine. But our hearts were sore for
want of him; the family circle seemed incomplete, until a
new favorite appeared to take his place, of which I shall
tell you next month.

II

A neighbor, blessed with an extensive litter of Newfound-
land pups, commenced one chapter in our family history by
giving us a puppy, brisk, funny, and lively enough, who
was received in our house with acclamations of joy, and
christened "Rover." An auspicious name we all thought,
for his four or five human playfellows were all rovers, -
rovers in the woods, rovers by the banks of a neighboring
patch of water, where they dashed and splashed, made rafts,
inaugurated boats, and lived among the cat-tails and sweet
flags as familiarly as so many musk-rats. Rovers also they
were, every few days, down to the shores of the great sea,
where they caught fish, rowed boats, dug clams, both
girls and boys, and one sex quite as handily as the other.
Rover came into such a lively circle quite as one of them,
and from the very first seemed to regard himself as part and
parcel of all that was going on, in doors or out. But his
exuberant spirits at times brought him into sad scrapes.
His vivacity was such as to amount to decided insanity, -
and mamma and Miss Anna and papa had many grave looks
over his capers. Once he actually tore off the leg of a new
pair of trousers that Johnny had just donned, and came
racing home with it in his mouth, with its bare-legged little
owner behind, screaming threats and maledictions on the
robber. What a commotion The new trousers had just
been painfully finished, in those days when sewing was sew-
ing and not a mere jig on a sewing-machine ; but Rover, so
far from being abashed or ashamed, displayed an impish






72 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
glee in his performance, bounding and leaping hither and
thither with his trophy in his mouth, now growling and
mangling it, and shaking it at us in elfish triumph as we
chased him hither and thither, over the wood-pile, into
the -.. ...:...il.:., .-, through the barn, out of the stable door, -
vowing all sorts of dreadful punishments when we caught
him. But we might well say that, for the little wretch
would never be caught; after one of his tricks he always
managed to keep himself out of arm's length till the thing was
a little blown over, when in he would come, airy as ever,
and wagging his little pudgy puppy tail with an air of the
most perfect assurance in the world.
There is no saying what youthful errors were pardoned
to him. Once he ate a hole in the bed-quilt as his night's
employment, when one of the boys had surreptitiously got
him into bed with them; he nibbled and variously mal-
treated sundry sheets; and once actually tore up and chewed
off a corner of the bedroom carpet, to stay his stomach dur-
ing the night season. What he did it for, no mortal
knows; certainly it could not be because he was hungry,
for there were five little pairs of hands incessantly feeding
him from morning till night. Beside which, he had a
boundless appetite for shoes, which he mumbled, and shook,
and tore, and ruined, greatly to the vexation of their right-
ful owners, rushing in and carrying them from the bed-
sides in the night-watches, racing off with them to any out-
of-the-way corner that hit his fancy, and leaving them when
he was tired of the fun. So there is no telling of the dis-
grace into which he brought his little masters and mistresses,
and the tears and threats and scoldings which were all
wasted on him, as he would stand quite at his ease, lolling
out his red, saucy tongue, and never deigning to tell what
he had done with his spoils.
Notwithstanding all these sins, Rover grew up to dog-
hood, the pride and pet of the family, and in truth a
very handsome dog he was.







OUR DOGS 73

It is quite evident from his looks that his Newfoundland
blood had been mingled with that of some other races; for
he never attained the full size of that race, and his points
in some respects resembled those of a good setter. He was
grizzled black and white, and spotted on the sides in little
inky drops about the size of a three-cent piece; his hair
was long and silky, his ears beautifully fringed, and his tail
long and feathery. His eyes were bright, soft, and full of
expression, and a jollier, livelier, more loving creature
never wore dog-skin. To be sure, his hunting blood some-
times brought us and him into scrapes. A neighbor now
and then would call with a bill for ducks, chickens, or
young turkeys, which Rover had killed. The last time
this occurred it was decided that something must be done;
so Rover was shut up a whole day in a cold lumber-room,
with the murdered duck tied round his neck. Poor fellow !
how dejected and ashamed he looked, and how grateful he
was when his little friends would steal in to sit with him,
and "poor" him in his disgrace! The punishment so
improved his principles that he let poultry alone from that
time, except now and then, when he would snap up a young
chick or turkey, in pure absence of mind, before he really
knew what he was about. We had great dread lest he
should take to killing sheep, of which there were many
flocks in the neighborhood. A dog which once kills sheep
is a doomed beast, -as much as a man who has committed
murder ; and if our Rover, through the hunting blood that
was in him, should once mistake a sheep for a deer, and
kill him, we should be obliged to give him up to justice, -
all his good looks and good qualities could not save him.
What anxieties his training under this head cost us!
When we were driving out along the clean, sandy roads,
among the piny. groves of Maine, it was half our enjoyment
to see Rover, with ears and tail wild and flying with ex-
citement and enjoyment, bounding and barking, now on






74 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

this side the carriage, now on that, now darting through
the woods straight as an arrow, in his leaps after birds or
squirrels, and anon returning to trot obediently by the car-
riage, and, wagging his tail, to ask applause for his perform-
ances. But anon a flock of sheep appeared in a distant
field, and away would go Rover in full bow-wow, plunging
in among them, scattering them hither and thither in dire
confusion. Then Johnny and Bill and all hands would
spring from the carriage in full chase of the rogue ; and all
of us shouted vainly in the rear; and finally the rascal
would be dragged back, panting and crestfallen, to be ad-
monished, scolded, and cuffed with .salutary discipline,
heartily administered by his best friends for the sake of
saving his life. over, you naughty dog Don't you
know you must n't chase the sheep? You'll be killed,
some of these days." Admonitions of this kind, well
shaken and thumped in, at last seemed to reform him
thoroughly. He grew so conscientious that, when a flock
of sheep appeared on the side of the road, he would imme-
diately go to the other side of the carriage, and turn away
his head, rolling up his eyes meanwhile to us for praise at
his extraordinary good conduct. "Good dog, Rove nice
dog! good fellow he does n't touch the sheep, no, he
does n't." Such were the rewards of virtue which sweet-
ened his self-denial; hearing which, he would plume up
his feathery tail, and loll out his tongue, with an air of
virtuous assurance quite edifying to behold.
Another of Rover's dangers was a habit he had of run-
ning races and cutting capers with the railroad engines as
they passed near our dwelling.
We lived in plain sight of the track, and three or four
times a day the old, puffing, smoking iron horse thundered
by, dragging his trains of cars, and making the very ground
shake under him. Rover never could resist the temptation
to run and bark, and race with so lively an antagonist;






OUR DOGS


and, to say the truth, John and Willy were somewhat of
his mind, so that, though they were directed to catch
and hinder him, they entered so warmly into his own feel-
ings that they never succeeded in breaking up the habit.
Every day when the distant whistle was heard, away would
go Rover, out of the door or through the window no
matter which, race down to meet the cars, couch down
on the track in front of them, barking with all his might,
as if it were only a fellow-dog, and when they came so
near that escape seemed utterly impossible, he would lie
flat down between the rails and suffer the whole train to
pass over him, and then jump up and bark, full of glee, in
the rear. Sometimes he varied this performance more dan-
gerously by jumping out full tilt between two middle cars
when the train had passed half-way over him. Everybody
predicted, of course, that he would be killed or maimed,
and the loss of a paw, or of his fine, saucy tail, was the
least of the dreadful things which were prophesied about
him. But Rover lived and throve in his imprudent
courses notwithstanding.
The engineers, and firemen, who began by throwing
sticks of wood and bits of coal at him, at last were quite
subdued by his successful impudence, and came to consider
him as a regular institution of the railroad, and, if any
family excursion took him off for a day, they would in-
quire with interest, Where 's our dog ? what 's become
of Rover ? As to the female part of our family, we had
so often anticipated piteous scenes when poor Rover would
be brought home with broken paws or without his pretty
tail, that we quite used up our sensibilities, and concluded
that some kind. angel, such as is appointed to watch over
little children's pets, must take special care of our Rover.
Rover had very tender domestic affections. His attach-
ment to his little playfellows was most intense; and one
time, when all of them were taken off together on a week's







76 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
excursion, and Rover left alone at home, his low spirits
were really pitiful. He refused entirely to eat for the
first day, and finally could only be coaxed to take nour-
ishment, with many strokings and caresses, by being fed
out of Miss Anna's own hand. What perfectly boisterous
joy he showed when the children came back careering
round and round, picking up chips and bits of sticks, and
coming and offering them to one and another, in the ful-
ness of his doggish heart, to show how much he wanted to
give them something.
This mode of signifying his love by bringing something
in his mouth was one of his most characteristic tricks.
At one time he followed the carriage from Brunswick to
Bath, and in the streets of the city somehow lost his way,
so that he was gone all night. Many a little heart went
to bed anxious and sorrowful for the loss of its shaggy
playfellow that night,' and Rover doubtless was remembered
in many little prayers; what, therefore, was the joy of
being awakened by a joyful barking under the window the
next morning, when his little friends rushed in their night-
gowns to behold Rover back again, fresh and frisky, bear-
ing in his mouth a branch of a tree about six feet long, as
his offering of joy.
When the family removed to Zion Hill, Rover went
with them, the trusty and established family friend. Age
had somewhat matured his early friskiness. Perhaps the
grave neighborhood of a theological seminary and the re-
sponsibility of being a professor's dog might have some-
thing to do with it, but Rover gained an established char-
acter as a dog of respectable habits, and used to march to
the post-office at the heels of his master twice a day as
regularly as any theological student.
Little Charley the second the youngest of the brood,
who took the place of our lost little Prince Charley was
yet padding about in short robes, and seemed to regard







OUR DOGS 77

Rover in the light of a discreet older brother, and Rover's
manners to him were of most protecting gentleness. Char-
ley seemed to consider Rover in all things as such a model,
that he overlooked the difference between a dog and a boy,
and wearied himself with fruitless attempts to scratch his
ear with his foot as Rover did, and one day was brought
in dripping from a neighboring swamp, where he had been
lying down in the water, because Rover did.
Once in a while a wild oat or two from Rover's old sack
would seem to entangle him. Sometimes, when we were
driving out, he would, in his races after the carriage, make
a flying leap into a farmer's yard, and, if he lighted in a
flock of chickens or turkeys, gobble one off-hand, and be
off again and a mile ahead before the mother hen had re-
covered from her astonishment. Sometimes, too, he would
have a race with the steam-engine just for old acquaintance'
sake. But these were comparatively transient follies; in
general, no members of the grave institutions around him
behaved with more dignity and decorum than Rover. He
tried to listen to his master's theological lectures, and to
attend chapel on Sundays; but the prejudices of society
were against him, and so he meekly submitted to be shut
out, and waited outside the door on these occasions.
He formed a part of every domestic scene. At family
prayers, stretched out beside his master, he looked up re-
flectively with his great soft eyes, and seemed to join in
the serious feeling of the hour. When all were gay, when
singing, or frolicking, or games were going on, Rover barked
and frisked in higher glee than any. At night it was his
joy to stretch his furry length by our bedside, where he
slept with one ear on cock for any noise which it might
be his business to watch and attend to. It was a comfort
to hear the tinkle of his collar when he moved in the
night, or to be wakened by his cold nose pushed against
one's hand if one slept late in the morning. And then he







QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE


was always so glad when we woke; and when any member
of the family circle was gone for a few days, Rover's warm
delight and welcome were not the least of the pleasures of
return.
And what became of him ? Alas the fashion came up
of poisoning dogs, and this poor, good, fond, faithful crea-
ture was enticed into swallowing poisoned meat. One day
he came in suddenly, ill and frightened, and ran to the
friends who always had protected him, but in vain. In
a few moments he was in convulsions, and all the tears and
sobs of his playfellows could not help him ; he closed his
bright, loving eyes, and died in their arms.
If those who throw poison to dogs could only see the
real grief it brings into a family to lose the friend and play-
fellow who has grown up with the children, and shared
their plays, and been for years in every family scene, if
they could know how sorrowful it is to see the poor dumb
friend suffer agonies which they cannot relieve, if they
could see all this, we have faith to believe they never would
do so more.
Our poor Rover was buried with decent care near the
house, and a mound of petunias over him kept his memory
ever bright; but it will be long before his friends will get
another as true.

III

After the sad fate of Rover, there came a long interval
in which we had no dog. Our hearts were too sore to
want another. His collar, tied with black crape, hung
under a pretty engraving of Landseer's, called My Dog,"
which we used to fancy to be an exact resemblance of our
pet.
The children were some of them grown up and gone to
school, or scattered about the world. If ever the question







OUR DOGS


of another dog was agitated, papa cut it short with, I
won't have another ; I won't be made to feel again as I
did about Rover." But somehow Mr. C'1 1 ', the younger
got his eye on a promising litter of puppies, and at last he
begged papa into consenting that he might have one of
them.
It was a little black mongrel, of no particular race or
breed, a mere common cur, without any pretensions to
family, but the best-natured, jolliest little low-bred pup
that ever boy had for a playmate. To be sure, he had the
usual puppy sins ; he would run away with papa's slippers
and boots and stockings; he would be under everybody's
feet, at the most inconvenient moment; he chewed up a
hearth-broom or two, and pulled one of Charley's caps to
pieces in the night, with an industry worthy of a better
cause;-still, because he was dear to (.'lb 1;,, papa and
mamma winked very hard at his transgressions.
The name of this little black individual was Stromion, -
a name taken from a German fairy tale, which the Pro-
fessor was very fond of reading in the domestic circle ; and
Stromion, by dint of much patience, much feeding, and very
indulgent treatment, grew up into a very fat, common-look-
ing, black cur dog, not very prepossessing in appearance
and manners, but possessed of the very best heart in the
world, and most inconceivably affectionate and good-natured.
Sometimes some of the older members of the family would
trouble Charley's enjoyment in his playfellow by suggesting
that he was no blood dog, and that he belonged to no par-
ticular dog family that could be named. Papa comforted
him by the assurance that Stromion did belong to a very
old and respectable breed, that he was a ..- '; and
Charley after that valued him excessively under this head;
and if any one tauntingly remarked that Stromion was only
a cur, he would flame up in his defense,-" He isn't a cur,
he's a mongrel," introducing him to strangers with the







80 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

addition to all his other virtues, that he was a "pure mon-
grel, papa says so."
The edict against dogs in the family having once been
broken down, Master Will proceeded to gratify his own
impulses, and soon led home to the family circle an enor-
mous old black Newfoundland, of pure breed, which had
been presented him by a man who was leaving the place.
Prince was in the decline of his days, but a fine, majestic
old fellow. He had a sagacity and capacity of personal
affection which were uncommon. Many dogs will change
from master to master without the least discomposure. A
good bone will compensate for any loss of the heart, and
make a new friend seem quite as good as an old one. But
Prince had his affections quite as distinctly as a human
being, and we learned this to our sorrow when he had to
be weaned from his old master under our roof. His howls
and lamentations were so dismal and protracted, that the
house could not contain him ; we were obliged to put him
into an outhouse to compose his mind, and we still have a
vivid image of him sitting, the picture of despair, over an
untasted mutton shank, with his nose in the air, and the
most dismal howls proceeding from his mouth. Time, the
comforter, however, assuaged his grief, and he came at last
to transfer all his stores of affection to Will, and to con-
sider himself once more as a dog with a master.
Prince used to inhabit his young master's apartment, from
the window of which he would howl dismally when Will
left him to go to the academy near by, and yelp triumphant
welcomes when he saw him returning. He was really and
passionately fond of music, and, though strictly forbidden
the parlor, would push and elbow his way there with
dogged determination when there was playing or singing.
Any one who should have seen Prince's air when he had a
point to carry, would understand why quiet obstinacy is
called doggedness.






OUR DOGS


The female members of the family, seeing that two dogs
had gained admission to the circle, had cast their eyes ad-
miringly on a charming little Italian greyhound, that was
living in doleful captivity at a dog-fancier's in Boston, and
resolved to set him free and have him for their own. Ac-
cordingly they returned one day in triumph, with him in
their arms, a fair, delicate creature, white as snow, except
one mouse-colored ear. He was received with enthusiasm,
and christened Giglio; the honors of his first bath and
toilette were performed by Mesdemoiselles the young ladies
on their knees, as if he had been in reality young Prince
Giglio from fairyland.
Of all beautiful shapes in dog form, never was there one
more perfect than this. His hair shone like spun glass,
and his skin was as fine and pink as that of a baby; his
paws and ears were translucent like fine china, and he had
great, soft, tremulous dark eyes; his every movement seemed
more graceful than the last. Whether running or leaping,
or sitting in graceful attitudes on the parlor table among
the ladies' embroidery-frames, with a great rose-colored bow
under his throat, he was alike a thing of beauty, and his
beauty alone won all hearts to him.
When the papa first learned that a third dog had been in-
troduced into the household, his patience gave way. The
thing was getting desperate ; we were being overrun with
dogs; our house was no more a house, but a kennel; it
ought to be called Cunopolis, -a city of dogs; he could
not and would not have it so; but papa, like most other
indulgent old gentlemen, was soon reconciled to the chil-
dren's pets. In fact, Giglio was found cowering under the
bedclothes at the Professor's feet not two mornings after his
arrival, and the good gentleman descended with him in his
arms to breakfast, talking to him in the most devoted man-
ner : "Poor little Giglio, was he cold last night ? and
did he want to get into papa's bed? he should be brought






82 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

down stairs, that he should ; all which, addressed to a
young rascal whose sinews were all like steel, and who could
have jumped from the top stair to the bottom like a feather,
was sufficiently amusing.
Giglio's singular beauty and grace were his only merits ; he
had no love nor power of loving; he liked to be petted and
kept warm, but it mattered nothing to him who did it.
He was as ready to turn off with a stranger as with his very
best friend, would follow any whistle or any caller, -
was, in fact, such a gay rover, that we came very near
losing him many times; and more than once lie was brought
back from the Boston cars, on board which he had followed
a stranger. He also had, we grieve to say, very careless
habits; and after being washed white as snow, and adorned
with choice rose-colored ribbons, would be brought back
soiled and ill-smelling from a neighbor's livery stable, where
he had been indulging in low society. For all that, he was
very lordly and aristocratic in his airs with poor Stromion,
who was a dog with a good, loving heart, if he was black
and homely. Stromion admired Giglio with the most evi-
dent devotion; he would always get up to give him the
warm corner, and would always sit humbly in the distance
and gaze on him with most longing admiration, for all of
which my fine gentleman rewarded him only with an occa-
sional snarl or a nip, as he went by him. Sometimes Giglio
would condescend to have a romp with Stromion for the
sake of passing the time, and then Stromion would be per-
fectly delighted, and frisk and roll his clumsy body over
the carpet with his graceful antagonist, all whose motions
were a study for an artist. When Giglio was tired of play,
he would give Stromion a nip that would send him yelping
from the field ; and then he would tick, tick gracefully away
to some embroidered ottoman forbidden to all but himself,
where he would sit graceful and classical as some Etruscan
vase, and look down superior on the humble companion
who looked up to him with respectful admiration.






OUR DOGS 83
Giglio knew his own good points, and was possessed with
the very spirit of a coquette. He would sometimes obsti-
nately refuse the caresses and offered lap of his mistresses,
and seek to ingratiate himself with some stolid theological
visitor, for no other earthly purpose that we could see than
that he was determined to make himself the object of at-
tention. We have seen him persist in jumping time and
again on the hard bony knees of some man who hated
dogs and did not mean to notice him, until he won atten-
tion and caresses, when immediately he would spring down
and tick away perfectly contented. He assumed lofty, fine-
gentleman airs with Prince also, for which sometimes he
got his reward, for Prince, the old, remembered that he
was a dog of blood, and would not take any nonsense from
him.
Like many old dogs, Prince had a very powerful doggy
smell, which was a great personal objection to him, and
Giglio was always in a civil way making reflections upon
this weak point. Prince was fond of indulging himself with
an afternoon nap on the door-mat, and sometimes when he
rose from his repose, Giglio would spring gracefully from
the table where he had been overlooking him, and, picking
his way daintily to the mat, would snuff at it, with his
long, thin nose, with an air of extreme disgust. It was
evidently a dog insult done according to the politest modes
of refined society, and said as plain as words could say, -
" My dear sir, excuse me, but can you tell what makes this
peculiar smell where you have been lying ? At any rate,
Prince understood the sarcasm, for a deep angry growl and
a sharp nip would now and then teach my fine gentleman
to mind his own business.
Giglio's lot at last was to travel in foreign lands, for his
young mistresses, being sent to school in Paris, took him
with them to finish his education and acquire foreign
graces. He was smuggled on board the Fulton, and placed






84 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE
in an upper berth, well wrapped in a blanket; and the
last we saw of him was his long, thin, Italian nose, and
dark, tremulous eyes looking wistfully at us from the folds
of the flannel in which he shivered. Sensitiveness to cold
was one of his great peculiarities. In winter he wore little
blankets, which his fond mistresses made with anxious care,
and on which his initials were embroidered with their own
hands. In the winter weather on Zion Hill he was often
severely put to it to gratify his love of roving in the cold
snows; he would hold up first one leg and then the other,
and contrive to get along on three, so as to save himself as
much as possible; and more than once he caught severe
colds, requiring careful nursing and medical treatment to
bring him round again.
The Fulton sailed early in March. It was chilly, stormy
weather, so that the passengers all suffered somewhat with
cold, and Master Giglio was glad to lie rolled in his blanket,
looking like a sea-sick gentleman. The captain very gen-
erously allowed him a free passage, and in pleasant weather
he used to promenade the deck, where his beauty won for
him caresses and attentions innumerable. The stewards
and cooks always had choice morsels for him, and fed him
to such a degree as would have spoiled any other dog's
figure ; but his could not be spoiled. All the ladies vied
with each other in seeking his good graces, and after din-
ner he pattered from one to another, to be fed with sweet
things and confectionery, and hear his own praises, like a
gay buck of fashion as he was.
Landed in Paris, he met a warm reception at the pension
of Madame B- ; but ambition filled his breast. He
was in the great, gay city of Paris, the place where a hand-
some dog has but to appear to make his fortune, and so
Giglio resolved to seek for himself a more brilliant
destiny.
One day, when he was being led to take the air in the






OUR DOGS


court, he slipped his leash, sped through the gate, and away
down the street like the wind. It was idle to attempt to
follow him; he was gone like a bird in the air, and left the
hearts of his young mistresses quite desolate.
Some months after, as they were one evening eating ices
in the Champs Elysdes, a splendid carriage drove up, from
which descended a liveried servant, with a dog in his arms.
It was Giglio, the faithless Giglio, with his one mouse-
colored ear, that marked him from all other dogs He had
evidently accomplished his destiny, and become the darling
of rank and fashion, rode in an elegant carriage, and had
a servant in livery devoted to him. Of course he did not
pretend to notice his former friends. The footman, who
had come out apparently to give him an airing, led him up
and down close by where they were sitting, and bestowed
on him the most devoted attentions. Of course there was
no use in trying to reclaim him, and so they took their last
look of the fair inconstant, and left him to his brilliant
destiny. And thus ends the history of PRINCE GIGLIO.



IV

After Prince Giglio deserted us and proved so faithless,
we were for a while determined not to have another pet.
They were all good for nothing, all alike ungrateful; we
forswore the whole race of dogs. But the next winter we
went to live in the beautiful city of Florence, in Italy, and
there, in spite of all our protestations, our hearts were
again ensnared.
You must know that in the neighborhood of Florence is
a celebrated vill owned by a Russian nobleman, Prince
Demidoff, and that among other fine things that are to be
found there is a very nice breed of King Charles spaniels,
which are called Demidoffs, after the place. One of these,






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a pretty little creature, was presented to us by a kind lady,
and our resolution against having any more pets all melted
away in view of the soft, beseeching eyes, the fine, silky
ears, the glossy, wavy hair, and bright chestnut paws of the
new favorite. She was exactly such a pretty creature as
one sees painted in some of the splendid old Italian pictures,
and which Mr. Ruskin describes as belonging to the race of
"fringy paws." The little creature was warmly received
among us; an ottoman was set apart for her to lie on; and
a bright bow of green, red, and white ribbon, the Italian
colors, was prepared for her neck ; and she was christened
Florence, after her native city.
Florence was a perfect little fine lady, and a perfect
Italian, sensitive, intelligent, nervous, passionate, and
constant in her attachments, but with a hundred little whims
and fancies that required petting and tending hourly. She
was perfectly miserable if she was not allowed to attend us
in our daily drives, yet in the carriage she was so excitable
and restless, so interested to take part in everything she
saw and heard in the street, that it was all we could do to
hold her in and make her behave herself decently. She was
nothing but a little bundle of nerves, apparently all the while
in a tremble of excitement about one thing or another; she
was so disconsolate if left at home, that she went everywhere
with us. She visited the picture galleries, the museums,
and all the approved sights of Florence, and improved her
mind as much as many other young ladies who do the same.
Then we removed from Florence to Rome, and poor Flo
was direfully seasick on board the steamboat, in company
with all her young mistresses, but recovered herself at Civita
Vecchia, and entered Rome in high feather. There she
settled herself complacently in our new lodgings, which
were far more spacious and elegant than those we had left
in Florence, and began to claim her little rights in all the
sight-seeing of the Eternal City.






OUR DOGS


She went with us to palaces and to ruins, scrambling up
and down, hither and thither, with the utmost show of in-
terest. She went up all the stairs to the top of the Capitol,
except the very highest and last, where she put on airs,
whimpered, and professed such little frights, that her mis-
tress was forced to carry her ; but once on top, she barked
from right to left, now at the snowy top of old Soracte,
now at the great, wide, desolate plains of the Campagna,
and now at the old ruins of the Roman Forum down under
our feet. Upon all she had her own opinion, and was not
backward to express herself. At other times she used to
ride with us to a beautiful country villa outside of the walls
of Rome, called the Pamfili Doria. How beautiful and
lovely this place was I can scarcely tell my little friends.
There were long alleys and walks of the most beautiful
trees; there were winding paths leading to all manner of
beautiful grottos, and charming fountains, and the wide
lawns used to be covered with the most lovely flowers.
There were anemones that looked like little tulips, growing
about an inch and a half high, and of all colors, blue,
purple, lilac, pink, crimson, and white, and there were
great beds of fragrant blue and white violets. As to the
charming grace and beauty of the fountains that were to be
found here and there all through the grounds, I could not
describe them to you. They were made of marble, carved
in all sorts of fanciful devices, and grown over with green
mosses and maidenhair.
What spirits little Miss Flo had, when once set down in
these enchanting fields While all her mistresses were
gathering lapfuls of many-colored anemones, violets, and
all 'sorts of beautiful things, Flo would snuff the air, and
run and race hither and thither, with her silky ears flying
and her whole little body quivering with excitement. Now
she would race round the grand basin of a fountain, and
bark with all her might at the great white swans that were






88 QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE

swelling and ruffling their silver-white plumage, and took
her noisy attentions with all possible composure. Then she
would run off down some long side alley after a lot of
French soldiers, whose gay red legs and blue coats seemed
to please her mightily; and many a fine chase she gave
her mistresses, who were obliged to run up and down, here,
there, and everywhere, to find her when they wanted to go
home again.
One time my lady's friskiness brought her into quite a
serious trouble, as you shall hear. We were all going to
St. Peter's Church, and just as we came to the bridge of
St. Angelo, that crosses the Tiber, we met quite a con-
course of carriages. Up jumped my lady Florence, all
alive and busy, for she always reckoned everything that
was going on a part of her business, and gave such a
spring that over she went, sheer out of the carriage, into
the mixed medley of carriages, horses, and people below.
We were all frightened enough, but not half so frightened
as she was, as she ran blindly down a street, followed by a
perfect train of ragged little black-eyed, black-haired boys,
all shouting and screaming after her. As soon as he could,
our courier got down and ran after her, but he might as
well have chased a streak of summer lightning. She was
down the street, round the corner, and lost to view, with
all the ragamuffin tribe, men, boys, and women, after her;
and so we thought we had lost her, and came home to our
lodgings very desolate in heart, when lo our old porter
told us that a little dog that looked like ours had come
begging and whining at our street door, but before he could
open it the poor little wanderer had been chased away
again and gone down the street. After a while some very
polite French soldiers picked her up in the Piazza di
Spagna, -a great public square near our dwelling, to get
into which we were obliged to go down some one or two
hundred steps. We could fancy our poor Flo, frightened






OUR DOGS


and panting, flying like a meteor down these steps, till she
was brought up by the arms of a soldier below.
Glad enough were we when the polite soldier brought
her back to our doors ; and one must say one good thing
for French soldiers all the world over, that they are the
pleasantest-tempered and politest people possible, so very
tender-hearted towards all sorts of little defenseless pets, so
that our poor runaway could not have fallen into better
hands.
After this, we were careful to hold her more firmly
when she had her little nervous starts and struggles in
riding about Rome.
One day we had been riding outside of the walls of the
city, and just as we were returning home we saw coming
towards us quite a number of splendid carriages with
prancing black horses. It was the Pope and several of
his cardinals coming out for an afternoon airing. The car-
riages stopped, and the Pope and cardinals all got out to
take a little exercise on foot, and immediately all carriages
that were in the way drew to one side, and those of the
people in them who were Roman Catholics got out and
knelt down to wait for the Pope's blessing as he went by.
As for us, we were contented to wait sitting in the carriage.
On came the Pope, looking like a fat, mild, kind-hearted
old gentleman, smiling and blessing the people as he went
on, and the cardinals scuffing along in the dust behind
him. He walked very near to our carriage, and Miss
Florence, notwithstanding all our attempts to keep her
decent, would give a smart little bow-wow right in his face
just as he was passing. He smiled benignly, and put out
his hand in sign of blessing toward our carriage, and
Florence doubtless got what she had been asking for.
From Rome we traveled to Naples, and Miss Flo went
with us through our various adventures there, up Mount
Vesuvius, where she half choked herself with sulphurous






QUEER LITTLE PEOPLE


smoke. There is a place near Naples called the Solfatara,
which is thought to be the crater of the extinct volcano,
where there is a cave that hisses, and roars, and puffs out
scalding steam like a perpetual locomotive, and all the
ground around shakes and quivers as if it were only a
crust over some terrible abyss. The pools of water are all
white with sulphur; the ground is made of sulphur and
arsenic and all such sort of uncanny matters; and we
were in a fine fright lest Miss Florence, being in one of
her wildest and most indiscreet moods, should tumble into
some burning hole, or strangle herself with sulphur; and
in fact she rolled over and over in a sulphur puddle, and
then, scampering off, rolled in ashes by way of cleaning
herself. We could not, however, leave her at home during
any of our excursions, and so had to make the best of
these imprudences.
When at last the time came for us to leave Italy, we
were warned that Florence would not be allowed to travel
in the railroad cars in the French territories. All dogs, of
all sizes and kinds, whose owners wish to have travel with
them, are shut up in a sort of closet by themselves, called
the dog-car; and we thought our nervous, excitable little
pet would be frightened into fits, to be separated from all
her friends, and made to travel with all sorts of strange
dogs. So we determined to smuggle her along in a bas-
ket. At Turin we bought a little black basket, just big
enough to contain her, and into it we made her go, -
very sorely against her will, as we could not explain to
her the reason why. Very guilty indeed we felt, with this
traveling conveyance hung on one arm, sitting in the
waiting-room, and dreading every minute lest somebody
should see the great bright eyes peeping through the holes
of the basket, or hear the subdued little whines and howls
which every now and then came from its depths.
Florence had been a petted lady, used to having her own