• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The red children
 Shingebiss
 The legends of the lightning
 A legend of the South Wind
 The star beautiful
 The legend of the morning star
 Will-o' the-wisp
 The aurora, the white arch, and...
 The rainbow
 The rain and the snow
 The pine trees
 The lily-star
 Legends of the winds
 How the spring comes
 How the summer came
 The sun a prisoner
 Mondamin, the red plume
 Mount Tutokanula
 The snail and the beaver
 Legend of the opeche
 The Land of the Hereafter
 The Hiawatha legend
 The pole star
 Thunderers
 Back Cover






Group Title: Legends of the red children : a supplementary reader
Title: Legends of the red children
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085613/00001
 Material Information
Title: Legends of the red children : a supplementary reader
Physical Description: 128 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pratt-Chadwick, Mara L. ( Mara Louise ) ( Author, Primary )
American Book Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: American Book Company
Place of Publication: New York
Cincinnati
Chicago
Publication Date: c1897
Copyright Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Indians of North America -- Folklore -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897   ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Children's stories
Folk tales   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mara L. Pratt.
General Note: Indexed in Eastman's Index to fairy tales.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085613
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236225
notis - ALH6694
oclc - 03804379

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    List of Illustrations
        Page 4
    The red children
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Shingebiss
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The legends of the lightning
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    A legend of the South Wind
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The star beautiful
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The legend of the morning star
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Will-o' the-wisp
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The aurora, the white arch, and the great bear
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The rainbow
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The rain and the snow
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The pine trees
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The lily-star
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Legends of the winds
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    How the spring comes
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    How the summer came
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The sun a prisoner
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Mondamin, the red plume
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Mount Tutokanula
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    The snail and the beaver
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Legend of the opeche
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    The Land of the Hereafter
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The Hiawatha legend
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    The pole star
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Thunderers
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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LEGENDS OF THE


RED CHILDREN



A SUPPLEMENTARY READER







MARA L. PRATT









AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY
NEW YORK *:- CINCINNATI *:* CHICAGO







































Copyright, 1897, by WERNER SCHOOL BOOK COMPANY

Red Cildren
E-z 6














CONTENTS.
PAGB.
TH RD CHIIrDRN ............... ............ ................................. 5-9
SHINGEBISS ........... .................................................. 10-14
THE LEGEND OF THE LIGHTNING..................................................... 15-20
A LEGEND 01 THE SOUTH WIND................................................. 21-24'
THE STAR BEAUTIPUL .................................................................... 25-28
THE LEGEND OF THE MORNING STAR ............................................ 29-32
W II-IrO' THE-W ISP............... ... .... .......................................... 33-37
THE AURORA, THE WHITE ARCH. AND THB GREAT BEAR................. 38-44
THE RAINBow.. ......................... ............................................... 45-49
THE RAIN AND THE SNOW....................................... 50-62
THE PINE T EES.............................................................................. 53-65
THE LILY -STAR............................................................ ............... 66-59
LEGENDS OF THE WINDS................................................................. 60-65
How THE SPRING COMBS................................................................ 66-69
How THE SUMMER CAME...................................................... 70-75
THE SUN A PRISONER ....................................................... 76-81
MONDAMIN, THE RED PLUME..... ....... ...... .................. 82-86
MOUNT TUTOKANULA.................................................................... 87-90
THE SNAIL AND THE BEAVER ......................................................... 91-96
LEGEND OF THE OPECHE ..........................................97-102
THE LAND OF THE HEREAiTER............................................ ......103-109
THE HIAWATHA LEGEND...............................................................110-117
THE POLE STAR.......... ......................... ........................118-121
TEm .THUNDERERS......................................................................122-128
1 *.3










ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE.
WONDERFULI TO TH RED CHILDREN WERE THE WINDS."............... 6
"HA, LITTLE SHINGEBISS, HOW NOW CAN YOU GET YOUR FOOD? "...... 10
YOU HAVE WASTED ALL YOUR ARROWS."......................................... 19
"THE LAZY, SOFT-EYED SOUTH WIND LAY UPON HIS DOWNY COUCH
OF CLOUD IST."......... ............................................................ 22
THE YOUNG HUNTER........................................................................ 27
THERE YOU WIL, SEE YOUR SISTER SHINING OUT FROM THE GRAY." 31
"THEN A GREAT GUST OF WIND CAUGHT UP THE SINKING MAIDEN AND
CARRIED HER AWAY."............................................................. 35
"FOR TO THE DRAGONS THE MOON IS SWEET.".................................. 40
"A GREAT WHITE BEAR SPRANG OUT FROM THE FOREST."................. 42
"THERE, STRETCHING FROM NORTH TO SOUTH, SWEPT A GREAT ARCH." 47
"LET US TRY," SAID THE WILD SEA-GULLS. ......... ........................ 51
THE TALLEST CHIEF IN ALL THE EARTH............................................ 53
AN THE CHILDREN CAME IN THEIR TINY CANOS."................... 57
S. WEZEATTAH BRINGS WAR AGAINST ETOKAH....................................... 63
S.: .. THEN OLD WINTER'S VOICE WAS STILL................ ... ......................... 68
"BUT WE MUST HAVE FOOD," SAID THE RED MEN.......................... 71
"I WILL TRY," SAID THE MOLE..................................................... 79
THEN THE BRAVE WARRIOR AND THE TINY RED PLUME WRESTLED... 83
THERE THE LITTLE CHILDREN STOOD........................................... 89
", 'So THE MAN TOOK THE ARROW AND THE BOW.................................... 92
"SORROW NOT FOR ME, MY FATHER."............................................... 101
AND WHEN THE YOUNG BRAVE APPROACHED, THE ANIMALS RAN OUT
To MEET HIM................ .................. ................ ........ ..... 107
AND AS HE, SAT IN HIS CANOE, LO HE AIR WAS FILLED WITH SwaET
M SIC........................................ ................................... 11








THE RED CHILDREN.


Many years ago, when this country of ours was
one great forest stretching from ocean to ocean,
- there dwelt here and there, upon the plains and
along the river banks, a race of happy little children.
The Red Children we call them; but they called
themselves the Children of the Sun. Very free and
happy they were; for all day long tney played be-
neath the trees and among the grasses.
The winds and the- stars they called their little
brothers; and when the thunders rolled and the
beautiful lightning flashed, when the north wind
roared and the trees in the great forests bowed
before the storm, the Red Children rejoiced and their
brave little hearts throbbed with delight. For some
day they would be tall, strong warriors; strong like
the north wind; fleet like the lightning; terrible
like the heavy thunder.
They loved the sun and the clear sweet air;Kand'
when at sunset they looked away towards the west,
they thought of the wonderful tent where Wahkee-




LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"WONDERFUL TO THE RED CHILDREN WERE THE WINDS"


Yi





THE RED CHILDREN.


yan, the air god, dwelt. This tent, which had four
great doors, one looking east, one west, one south, one
North, was guarded by four sentinels robed in scarlet.
At the east gate there was a butterfly, of colors
like the sunrise; at the west was a bear; at the south
a fawn; and at the north a fleet reindeer.
Wonderful to the Red Children were the winds as
they swept across the plains, moving the trees and
the flowers to and fro, but never, no matter how
closely the children watched, forgetting to keep
themselves a mystery.
There was Wa-bund, the East Wind, always young
and beautiful. He it was that brought the morning,
and with his silver arrows chased the darkness down
the valley. He it was that painted the clouds, and
called the deer and the hunter from their sleep.
'There was the West Wind, Ka-be-yun, the strong,
soft wind that ever and forever, over all the winds
of heaven, held supremest power. It was he that could
drive away fhe clouds-the heavy water-laden clouds
of the. south, or the cold, cruel clouds of the north;
and at his call the sun shone forth, the moon and the
stars, and the blue sky smiled down upon the earth.





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


There was the South.Wind, dreamy and drowsy,
who had his dwelling far to southward, where sum-
mer never ended, and where the robins, the bluebirds,
and the swallows dwelt. When, amid his fields of
fruit and melons, and his vines heavy with the purple
clusters, he sat at sunset and smoked his pipe of
peace, then the smoke rolled northward; it filled the
air with haze and vapor; it touched the rugged moun-
tains with smoothness, and brought the. golden Indian
summer.
And there was the North Wind, Ka-bib-nok-ka,
who came forth from his lodge of snowdrifts, from his
home among the icebergs. His hair, sprinkled with
snow, floated behind him like a river. The little
brooks were still, and the fishes fled for shelter when '
the breath of Kabibnokka fell upon them. He loved
to send the snowflakes flying, sifting, hissing through
Sthe forest; to freeze the ponds, the lakes, the rivers;
to drive the loon and the seagull southward; and
to chase the cormorant and the curlew to their nests
among the rushes-this cruel, fitful Kabibnokka.
Thus the four winds were divided. And happy
were the little Red Children, when, curled up snugly





THE RED CHILDREN.


in their blankets, close beside the wigwam fire, they
listened to the chiefs as they told the stories of
them and of their dwelling-places in the corners of
the heavens.
But these were not the only stories; for the little
-Red Children were story-lovers, as were also their
_fathers and mothers.
Every tribe had its story-teller who went from
wigwam to wigwam; and when the days were short
and the nights long he would sit before the fire and
tell most wonderful stories of the moon, the stars,
the trees, the flowers, and even of the white rabbits,
the foxes, the waterfowl, and the tiny, timid birds.
All these, the little Red Children listened to and.'
learned. They told them to one another, the larger
children to the smaller; and by-and-by, when they"
were tall, strong warriors, they told them to their
own little children. These in turn told them to their
children; and those again in turn to theirs, till by-
and-by some wise men who loved the Red Children
and saw the sweetness of their simple stories, gathered
them together and told them in a book, so that you
and I might read these legends of the Red Children.









SHINGEBISS.










!
AR away to
the North,


snow and ice are
ever present,
where the lakes
"HA, LITTLE SHINGEBISS, HOW NOW CAN YOU GET wh the
SYOU FOOD?" are ever frozen
over, and where the mountains glisten white in the
sunlight, .dwelt the North Wind.
Beside a solitary lake, though the winter was bitter
and cold, and the ice was thick upon the water,
dwelt Shing-e-biss, the Wild Duck.
It was a poor, little hut, the house in which
10





SHINGEBISS.


Shingebiss lived and little wood had he to warm it
with. There were only four logs; yet, these were
large and each would burn a month.
"Why should I want another log," the cheery
Shingebiss would say, since there are but four cold
months in the year ?"
Now Shingebiss was brave and fearless. No day
was to him too cold; and let the North Wind rage as
he would, he was never afraid to fly down to the lake
for food.
Sometimes the North Wind would freeze the water
over and shriek, "Ha, ha, little Shingebiss, how now
can you get your food ?"
Shingebiss would laugh and say, "I still can live."
Then he would walk out upon the ice, and with his
strong bill pull out the rushes that grew up through
the water, so as to make holes in the ice, through
which he could catch the tiny fishes swimming be-
neath.- Often, even in the iciest weather, Shingebiss
was seen hurrying -homeward with strings of fish,
even though the North Wind had tried his best to
thwart him.
"This is a very strange duck," said the North





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Wind; "he cares not for snow or ice; for frost or
biting blast. I will go to his home, and send my
cold breath in upon him there."
But Shingebiss had cooked his fish and eaten a
-nice warm supper. The log was burning brightly,
and he lay stretched out before it.
Carefully the North Wind crept up to the door, and
breathed in upon the little hut.
"I know who is there," thought Shingebiss; for he
felt the cold upon his back. So he began to sing
loudly and with cheer:
"Ka neej, ka neej!
Bee in, bee in;
Bon in, bon in;
Oc ee, oc ee;
Ka weya! Ka weya!"
This was his way of saying:
"Windy god, I know your plan !
You are but my fellow man;
Blow you may your fiercest breeze,
Shingebiss you 'cannot freeze.
Sweep the strongest wind you can,
Shingebiss is still your man.
Heigh for life! and ho for bliss!
Who so free as Shingebiss!"





SHINGEBISS.


""Well, well," said the North Wind; "how dares
this Shingebiss sing of me like this! Does he not
know I can freeze him and nip him ? I will not be
defied like this ;" and so, creeping under the door,
the North Wind pushed his way into the house of
Shingebiss, and sat down before the fire.
Shingebiss knew that he had entered, but he paid
no heed.
"Ka neej! Ka neej!"
he kept.on singing, loud and clear.
"I wonder whether he knows I am here," the North
Wind thought to himself. "Does he not feel me ?"
But the little duck went on singing, louder and
louder, and at the same time stirring the great log
until it cracked and snapped, and the roaring flames
leaped up the chimney.-
"Ka neej! ka neej!
Bee in! bee in!"
"Well, well," said the North Wind again; "Well,
well!"
"Ka neej, ka neej!"
"I can never put down this fire! I am, melting;
but the Shingebiss is not freezing! I cannot breathe!
Never before did I feel such heat."





14 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.
And indeed the North Wind was melting. His
frosty hair was wet. The water dripped from his
long white beard; the tears ran down his cheeks.
Soon, with one faint shriek he fled out into the cold
air again.
"A strange little creature, that Shingebiss," said
he, as he flew towards his home in the north.- "A
strange little creature. I cannot freeze him, I can-
not starve him. I do not understand."
And never again did the North Wind try; and
that is why all winter long the Shingebiss is warm
in his soft coat of long, thick feathers, and why, even
when the ice is thick, he can always-find his food in
those places where the rushes grow.










THE LEGENDS OF THE LIGHTNING.

There was once a poor little Indian lad. whose'
father, a great chief, had fallen in battle, and whose
mother had been carried away by the enemy.
'We will not take that little lad with us," said
the enemy, "for it might be that he would grow up
and avenge the death of his father."
So when the village was burned' and the corn-
fields trampled down, the little lad was left alone with
neither food nor shelter; and the enemy went away,
down the valley, carrying with them the little lad's
mother and -all his sisters to serve as slaves in the
homes of their captors.
All day long the little lad wandered up and down-
-among the burned wigwams, finding here and there
a kernel of corn to keep him from starving; but
when night came he was very tired and hungry and
crept into the woods for shelter.
Already the wolves had learned that the village
had been burned, and that the people had gone away;
15





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


so down they came into the forest in search of food.
They said, "there will be no one now to watch for
.us and try to shoot us with their rapid arrows."
Hardly had the boy laid himself down to sleep
when, close beside his head, he heard the roars of
bears and the hungry howls of wolves.
He sprang to his feet, and tried to run; but the
wolves were everywhere about him, and already he
could see their flaming eyes.
Now this little lad was brave and nimble; he could
run like a deer and he could climb like a cat. So
with a bound he sprang toward a tall, straight pine,
seized it in his arms, and, before even the. swiftest
wolf could overtake him, was' far up among the tree's
..-.protecting branches.
Then the pine branches whispered, softly to him,
and bade him curl himself up among them and go
to sleep. The trunk, so erect and strong, made a
back for him to rest against, and the little pine tufts
spread themselves over him to keep him warm, and
the slender boughs held him securely in their arms.
But in the night, a voice from out the sky spoke
to him. It was the voice of a good manito, and it

',* '. .





LEGENDS OF THE LIGHTNING.


said to. the child: "I am sorry for you, little lad;
and I am come to bear you away with me into the
upper air. There you will never be hungry or cold,
and no cruel wild beasts will seek to devour you
when the night comes on."
Then the child felt himself lifted high above the
forest trees. Away out over the country they sped,
higher and higher, and towards the shining stars.
Then there were put into the child's hands, twelve
silver arrows, and the good manito said, "Go, now,
to the northern sky, where the cruel manitos dwell.
With these arrows shoot down the chiefest among
them. Fling them over the edge of the earth into
the great sea that surrounds us; then will the Red
Children bless you. The good manitos, too, will.be
glad; for those in the northern sky often work evil
to us as well."
So the child took the arrows and set out into the
northern sky where the manitos dwelt; and there
he found them in great numbers, hurrying back and
forth across the sky.
Skillfully he bent the bow while he took most
careful aim.





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


One, two, three arrows he shot across the great
snow fields. Four, five, six; still no manito had
been brought low. Seven, eight, nine; it was very
strange. Ten, eleven-only one arrow now was left;
for like a flash of lightning, the manitos, sharp of
eye and quick, when they saw the arrows coming,
sprang high in the air ,above them, or sank beneath
the mysterious sky line which man, though he should
travel day and night, could never reach.
Now one more, the last arrow, the child raised in
air. With care he poised it, and with skill he drew
the cord. Straight at the heart of the chiefest of the
manitos he sent it; but alas, hardly had it sped half
its way across the snow fields, when the manito,
transforming himself into a.mighty mountain, stood
black and grim against the northern sky.
Against the rocky mountain side the arrow struck,
Sand fell shattered into the seething waters.
And now," roared a voice from out the mountain,
"you have wasted all your arrows. Twelve of them
have you shot out across the sky at the mighty man-
itos. Bear now your punishment; for the anger of
the manitos is upon you.. In all the time to come,







LEGENDS OF THE LIGHTNING.


.... '


'. ... ...



" YOU HAVE WASTED ALL YOUR ARBOWB."
4k,





20 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.

you shall ever like your arrows, flash and gleam, and
.shoot across the skies. The people of the earth
shall fear you, and you shall carry destruction wher-
ever you go."
Then came a crash of thunder. The child was lifted
high among the clouds. The north wind howled, and
hurled him across the sky, leaving along his track
a trail of blazing fire.
"It is the lone lightning," the Red Children say
when they see the fire among the clouds; "the blue
lightning, into which once a little lad was changed
by the cruel manitos of the northern sky."









A LEGEND OF THE SOUTH WIND.


The lazy, soft-eyed South Wind lay upon his
downy couch of cloud mist, and looked away to the
distant north.
He sang softly to himself as he swung to and fro,
and wondered what there might be of joy and beauty
away off toward the northern sky.
And as he looked,, he saw a great field; and among
its waving grasses were bright yellow flowers, shin-
ing like bits of gold.
S"They are like my own soft yellow light," thought
the South Wind; "the soft yellow light with which
I mellow fields, and hills, and valleys, and dales, when
the Indian summer broods over the earth. But I
wonder, wonder what the little yellow flower is,
whence it came and whither it will go." -
But the South Wind was indolent;. he wondered
and he dreamed, but never once did he rise from his
soft cloud-mist couch.
One morning he looked again toward the north, and







A LEGEND OF THE SOUTH WIND.


d'h


*L


"'THE LAZY, SOFT-EYED SOUTH WIND LAY UPON HI8 DOWNY COUCH OF
CLOUD MIST."


22





A LEGEND OF THE SOUTH WIND.


lo, a great change had come upon the field of golden
flowers.
The rich yellow had disappeared; and in place of
the golden crowns each flower shone fleecy white,
among the waving grasses.
"Alas, alas," the South Wind sighed; "my
brother, the North Wind, has wrought this change.
He has touched the heads of these golden flowers
with his icy breath."
"Why need he blight the summer fields; why
need he rob them of their beauty ? "
And as the South Wind sighed, there was a flutter
among the flowers and grasses in all the sunny fields;
their heads waved to and fro, and the grasses
whispered softly to one another.
Then, even while the South Wind looked, be-
hold the little shining white crowns disappeared. It
was a strange change. The South Wind could not
understand, but the air for miles and miles around
was filled with tiny, white-winged filaments; and
they flew hither and thither, rising and falling with
the wind, and frolicking only the faster when the sad
South Wind sighed.





24 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.

"The dandelion seeds are looking for a plac6 to
sleep through" the winter, said the little Red Chil-
dren. "See how the South Wind helps them."
But the South Wind said, "What do the children
mean? It is very strange."









THE STAR BEAUTIFUL.


There was once a little Red Child who loved the
stars more even than he loved his little brothers and
sisters.
Every night when the sun began to sink .in the
west, the boy would creep away by himself up the
hillside to watch for the coming of the stars.
And one there was that seemed to him brighter
and more beautiful than all the others.
"It is my own Star Beautiful!" he would say; and
when it shot out its first ray of light to him -each
night, he would raise his hands toward it and cry,
"Welcome, welcome, my Star Beautiful!"
And when, sometimes, the star.could not shine out
because of the heavy clouds that lay between it
and the Red Child, the boy would look toward the
place where he had seen it last and say: "Star Beau-
tiful, you are there, I know, although I cannot see
you. I will go and call to the West Wind to drive
the clouds away, that I may see you again." And
25





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


the West Wind, loving the little Red Child, always
answered the prayer; for sometimes the clouds would
break, even that very evening, and the star would
shine down through the mist to its little friend.
By and by the boy grew to be a brave, strong war-
rior; no one in all his tribe was more daring than
he. Still better than war did the young man love
hunting and fishing.
Nothing was so dear to him as the fields with their
star-like flowers, and the forests through which his
Star Beautiful danced and twinkled among the
branches.
No hunter in any village was so skillful with his
bow as this young hunter; for steady was his aim
and clear his eye. Then, too, when he drew his
bow, he never forgot to say, "Star Beautiful, it is
you who gives me skill. My good Star Beautiful."
For many and many a time, now that the little Red
Child had become a man, did the star come to him,
and whisper words of wisdom into his heart.
It was the star who directed him to the forests
where game was plentiful, and to the streams where
fish were abundant; and never did he return to his





THE STAR BEAUTIFUL.


village without being laden with both shining fish
and tender venison.
"The mighty hunter," his people called him;
"who never fails, and whom the fish and deer seek
rather than flee away from in the chase."


T YE YOUNG HUNTER.


"It is my Star Beautiful that gives me help and
makes me skillful," the young man would say.
Years rolled on and on. The hunter became an old
man. All his people loved him; and when he could
no longer fight nor hunt, they often came to him,





28 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.

as he sat alone in his wigwam, to ask him what was
wisest and best to do; and never did his advice prove
false ; for he still said, "It is my Star Beautiful that
guides me."
And when after A long time the old man came to
die, he said, "I go now to my star-the Star Beauti-
ful; for the star has waited all my life for me to
come; even since I was a little child and climbed
up the hillside to catch its first ray of light."










THE LEGEND OF THE MORNING STAR.

Far away to the North where the great river had
its source, dwelt the little brother and sister manitos.
All their lives they had run and played to-
gether, up and down the river banks, gathering
the bright flowers and chasing the happy insects.
But now the time had come when the children's good
manito came to them and. said:
"Go, little sister, to the place of the. Breaking
Light; for there amid the morning clouds shall be
your home. There a beautiful palace awaits you,
and it is made of sparkling rays of light. The
clouds hang over it, soft and shining;, the warm sun
lights it, and everywhere is song and beauty.
"And you, little brother, go to the forests, the
mountains, and the plains. There, in the mountain
already cut for you from out the strong gray rock, is
a fortress brave. There you shall dwell; and at
your call the trees shall speak, the vines shall bear
their fruit, and beauty shall reign everywhere."
29





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Then the little children looked into each other's
eyes and said, "Our river is very beautiful; it, too,
sparkles and shines, and there is joy and beauty
everywhere. But it is the great manito's wish that
we go away-one to the place of the Breaking Light,
the other to the mountain where the echo dwells."
"But, my brother," said the sister, "when the pale
gray light begins to spread itself over the sky, look
put from your rocky home in the mountain, and turn
your eyes toivard the far-off east. There you will
see me, your sister, shining out from the gray, and
looking across the plains to where you, my brother,
dwell. And when the clouds begin to change and
their colors deepen into red and orange and purple,
know that it is my hand that makes the beauty; for
it is with these cloud mists, and the rays of soft
light that I will adorn my palace in the place of the
Breaking Light."
Then the brother said: "Dear sister, on the top-
most cliffs will I dwell that I may catch the first ray
of light that comes from your bright home among
the morning clouds; and at every break of day will I
lift my eyes to greet the coming of the red and pur-







THE LEGEND OF THE MORNING STAR. 3z













A'


l ..'


'i: +;.


V ~


1/ -:>


r-a


STERE YOU WILL SEE YOUR SISTER SHNIING OUT FROM THE GREY."


i i
` :
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LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


pie. And-when each morning I see the glory in the
east, I will say, 'It is my sister, and it is she who
spreads this beauty across the sky.' I will watch
till the sun comes and your light fades away; and
then I will know that you have gone into your beau-
tiful palace, and that when the sun is gone you will
come forth again and will greet your brother."
Then there came a great burst of sound; the four
winds were abroad and they swept down the river
banks and carried away the brother and sister. They
wafted the sister to the place of the Breaking Light,
and she became the Morning Star; and they carried
the brother to the mountain top, where he should
dwell forever. Often his voice was heard through
the forest and among the tall grasses; but never did
he leave his high cliffs where, when the morning
came, he could watch the red clouds with which his
sister made beautiful the eastern sky and her own
cloud palace among the stars.








WILL-O' THE-WISP.


There was strange commotion among the stars, and
one, losing its way in the mist and maze of clouds,
wandered down towards the home of the Red Chil-
dren.
Down, down, through *the air it hurried, shooting
like lightning across the sky.
"It is an evil spirit;" said the people. "It is a
wicked manito!" /And they fled from it and hid
themselves in great caves.
Up and down the earth for many years it wan-
dered, seeking rest. Often it looked up toward th'
place from which it had fallen, and saw its sister
stars shining in the deep blue above.
But never again could it return to its sister stars
or climb back to its old home in the sky.
Lonely and saat heart, the star wandered from
tribe to trib amon the people..
"I am lonely he~," the star would say. But the
people did not understand, and fled from it to hide
beneath the shelter of their wigwams.
*' 88





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Sometimes the star would wander up and down
the valleys; sometimes it would hang above the tiny
lakes of water; sometimes it would stand outside
the camp fires where the people lay asleep.
But no man would speak one word of cheer, one
word of welcome; and the beautiful star was deso-
late.
At last there came to dwell among the people a
little maiden with large brown eyes that looked far
away into the distance; and in them was a light that
no man understood. Wonderful dreams came to the
maiden, and visions more wonderful than she could
tell.
And when this little maiden saw the star she
reached her hands out towards it, and said "My
beautiful shining star !"
Then the star danced for joy, glad that at last a
soul was born that knew that it was lonely. And it
came toward the child, growing brighter and brighter,
and dancing higher and higher.
"It is strange," the people said; and they named
the child Wandering Star. Now the star and the
child loved each other, and never again was there







WILL-O' THE-WISP.


THEN A GREAT GUST OF WIND CAUGHT UP THE SINKING MAIDEN AND CAB-
BIED HER AWAY."





36 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.
loneliness in the heart of either. Every night when
the child looked out from her wigwam, she saw the
star and whispered' loving words to it; and the- star
watched over the maiden while she slept.
But one day the child wandered out into the world;
across the fields, up the valley, down into the treach-
erous morasses she wandered. Then darkness fell;
the clouds shut out the light of the moon, and the
frightened child sank in the green slime.
Then a great wind arose. The clouds hurried and
scurried across the sky; the lightning flashed ; the
thunder rolled; a great gust of wind swept down
the valley, caught up the sinking maiden and carried
her away, no man knew where.
All summer long the people searched for the child;
but no one could guide them to her. The trees
sobbed and the bulrushes sighed as the winds swept
-by; but they could not help the people who searched
the hills and dales.
Then the Wandering Star descended into the
marshy place where the maiden had last been seen.
Close down among the sedges it made its home, and
there it brooded sadly over the little child.





WILL-O' THE-WISP. 37

Never again was it seen on the hilltops, or among
the camp fires; and no longer did it wander up and
down the valleys. But every summer, when the
hunters went 'forth to. hunt, they found the faith-
ful star, still shining, still brooding over the place
where last the child had stood-the child who
had loved the star, and had stretched its hands out
toward it, and had called it "My beautiful shining
star."








THE AURORA, THE WHITE ARCH, AND
THE GREAT BEAR.

When the days are short and -the nights are long;
when the sun creeps southward and for six long
moons hovers over the land where the South Wind
dwells; when the air is cold and the sun lies glisten-
ing on the ground, then the little Red Children look
up into the sky and see the great arch of white
stretching across the blue heavens.
And in the North the red flames leap flashing like
fires across the sky.
"These red flames," the old chiefs say, "are the
spirits of brave warriors who have long since gone
to the happy hunting grounds.
Their arrows and their bows they carry with
them. The souls, too, of their dogs have joined
their masters in this land beyond the setting sun.
"There game is plenty; and all day long the war-
rior hunts and carries war into the homes of the foe.
Ever,successful in war is he; and on winter nights
he dances the war dance; he chants and shouts; he
38




THE AURORA, THE WHITE ARCH, AND THE GREAT BEAR. 39

waves his war club. It is his plumes of red and
white that we see, waving and flashing in the north-
ern sky.
"And the white arch? That is the pathway of the
spirits. Up and down this pathway, from earth to
heaven, they pass. There are more of them than
man can count; and their shadows make the line
of white which every night we see stretching like a
mist across the sky."
Then there is the moon swinging high in the
heavens. A strange moon it is to the Red Children;
for never is it the same. Some times they see it
a great beautiful ball of white; then again, as it
lifts its face above the eastern hills, it is rich and
golden, like the warm color of the autumn flowers.
But strangest of all, it changes its shape from
disk to crescent and from crescent to disk. Each
night as it rises, the Red Children see that the disk
grows smaller, till by and by they see no disk at all.
Then again it comes, a tiny crescent in the west, but
growing each night larger and larger.
"It is very strange," the Red Children used to say,
and they wondered and wondered.






LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


SFOR TO THE DRAGONS THE MOON IS SWEET."




THE AURORA, THE WHITE ARCH, AND THE GREAT BEAR. 41

But one night a wise chief had a dream; and in
the dream a voice said, Wonder no more why the
moon thus changes shape; for know now, and tell the
people, that they too may know, that it is because
of the great dragons that dwell in the four corners
of the earth. Out from their homes they come; and
it is upon the moon they feed, even as worms feed
upon the leaves of the trees.
:"For to the dragons, the moon is sweet; it gives
them strength and long life; it makes their scales to
shine and glitter even as the moonlight glitters upon
the Big Sea Water.
"But the moon still grows, on and on. Though
there were dragons dwelling in the sun and upon
every star; and though they should come one and
all to feed upon the great disk of silver light, still
would it never fail.
"For the moon is in the keeping of the Great
Spirit, and it is set in the heavens to light the Red
Children on their way through the forests at night.
It is to give them time as well; for the Red children
may watch its coming and its going; then when they
count their days, they shall say, 'ten moons ago,' or




LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


'ten moons to come;' for in this way each Red Man
shall know the time that another has in mind."
The stars, too, of the heavens are wonderful to the
Red Children; for among them they see birds and
animals and trees.
In the North is one group of stars which to them
looks like a great bear.
And that it is a great bear, they are quite sure;
for long long ago a great chief who knew all things
told them this story:

Wlt/Vt L'ifIri.







"A GREAT WHITE BEAR SPRANG OUT FROM THE FOREST."
"Once when the Red Men were out upon a chase,
a great white bear sprang out from the forests; and
had they not driven their arrows at him, he would
have slain them all, so large was he and fierce.





THE AURORA, THE WHITE ARCH, AND THE GREAT BEAR. 43

"But when he saw the arrows, he turned and fled.
The Red Men followed. For two whole moons they
followed, resting neither day nor night. But how-
ever fast they sped, the great white bear sped still
faster.
"On, on they flew towards the icy north where the
white bear lived. But a great giant came now upon
them, and a terrible battle followed. The Red Men
fought like warriors brave; till all but three fell
beneath the giant's strength.
"Then these three cried to the manitos to save
them. The manitos heard their cry; and they
gathered them up in their strong arms-the three
warriors and the bear with them-and placed them
in the, northern sky.
"There they dwell even to this day; and you may
see them every night the whole year long, the three
brave warriors still following close upoli the path of
the great white bear."
And these simple-hearted Red Children love the
skies; they love the rain and the snows, the thunder
and the lightning, the warm sun and the soft light
of the moon. For all these bring comfort to the





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


earth and to the people. And they pray to the man-
itos of all these good powers, and they sing songs to
them, beautiful and wild and free.
O white floating Clouds! clouds like the plains
come and water the earth! O Sun, smile down upon
the earth and bring forth the corn, the grasses and
the flowers!
O Moon, 0 Lion of the north, Bear of the west,
-Badger of the south, and Wolf of the east! Elder
war-hero, younger war-hero, warriors of the six
mountains of the world, intercede with the .cloud
people for us that they may water the earth. Medi-
cine-bowl, cloud-bowl, and water-vase, give us your
hearts that the earth may be watered. White Shell
Bead Woman who dwells where the sun goes down;
Mother Whirlwind, Father Sus-sis-tin-naks, Mother
Ya-ya, creator of good thoughts, Yellow Woman of
the North, Blue Woman of the West, Red Woman
of the South, White Woman of the East, hear us,
hear us, and intercede for us with the cloud people !









THE RAINBOW.


When the good Great Spirit had made the world
and had put into it everything that man could need;
had made the animals to serve him and had bidden
the trees and vines to bear fruits for food, then he
said: "Now will I make flowers for all these grow-
ing plants; aind the flowers shall be rich and beau-
tiful in color.
"The Red Children shall love these bright-colored
flowers, for they shall give a glory unto the fields
and the hill-sides."
So the Great Spirit covered the fields with purple
asters and goldenrod.; with dandelions and daisies.
By the river-side and in the cool forests were the
sweet violets, the anemones, and the columbines; and
even the bare rocks he covered with the fluffy saxi-
!frage and the white blossoms of the raspberry and
the blackberry vine.
All the long, beautiful summer these flowers made
the air sweet with their perfume, and the Red Child-
45





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


ren were content. When Autumn came, new flowers
came; great, gorgeous flowers of red and orange, so
that the fields were a great blaze of glory.
Nor was this all; the very trees themselves changed
their sober green to colors that were more gorgeous
even than the flowers of the field.
The Red Children gazed in awe and wonder at
the beauty spread out before them. They Ithanked
the good Great Spirit, and when the harvest moon
had come, they held a feast to show their gratitude.
But one morning a change came over this beauty.
The North Wind breathed upoh the flowers and the
trees, and they drooped and faded.
"O Great Spirit," the Red Children cried, "behold
what the North Wind's breath has done to the fields
and the forest."
Then the South Wind came again; the air was
filled with a hazy, yellow light; the flowers still hung
their heads; but there was a tender warmth in the
air, and the Great Spirit said, "This is the Red Child-
ren's summer."
Then a heavy shower of rain fell upon the earth;
the clouds and the sun struggled together the strong









THE RAINBOW.


i


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`:::-



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C.


r


Z, '



gp:~

Zu


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r:

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LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


South Wind blew, and the leaves fell from the trees;
then the wind and the rain gave way; the sun shone
out; and, to the leaves and the flowers, what a won-
derful change had come! For when the Great Spirit
saw them fading and falling he said, "They are too
beautiful to be lost."
And when the Red Children grieved to see them
fade, he said, "You shall not lose them; for I will
gather them together; the bright green of the grasses,
the red and orange of the leaves, the purple, the
pink, the blue and the yellow of all the flowers, and
I will set them in the sky."
Then the Red Children looked towards the east;
and there, stretching from north to south, swept a
great arch; and in it were the bright green of the
grasses, the red and the orange of the leaves, and
the purple, the pink, the blue, and the yellow of 11
the flowers, even as the Great Spirit had said!
And now when the Red Children look up and see
the bow of many colors stretching its beautiful
length across the sky, the old chief tells them this
story of so long ago. He bids them love the beauty
of the arch; and he bids them thank the Great Spirit





THE RAINBOW.


who gathered the colors together that they might not
be lost. "For," he says,
"'Tis the heaven of flowers you see there;
All the wild flowers of the forest,
All the lilies of the prairie,
When on earth they fade and perish,
Blossom in that heaven above us,
Make the heaven of flowers you see there"
















,y









THE RAIN AND THE SNOW.


"0 Mu-in-wa, Muninwa!" the flowers and the
grasses cried, "give us water, lest we die!"
And good Muinwa looking down upon the earth,
saw the flowers drooping their heads; the grasses
were turning brown, and even the leaves of the trees
hung lifeless.
"Big Sea Water," cried Muinwa, "send up your
waters upon the dry earth, and save the flowers and
the trees and the grasses."
And the Big Sea Water tried; but it could only
send its waters a little way up, when back it poured,
and the trees and the flowers had no help.
Then Muinwa cried to the rivers, "Send up your
waters upon the dry earth, and save the flowers and
the trees and the grasses."
And the rivers tried; they seethed and foamed and
overflowed their banks; but soon the waters sank
again, and only the grasses near the banks had lifted
their heads.





THE RAIN AND THE SNOW.


" 51


Then Muinwa cried to the lakes, "0 Lakes, send.
up your waters 'upon the dry earth, and save the
flowers, the trees, and the grasses."
And the lakes tried; they too seethed and foamed.
The waters splashed and broke upon the- shores like









LET US TRY,' SAID THE WILD SEA-GULLS.'
waves of the Big Sea Water; the winds rose, and
the mist was blown out across the fields, but it was
only for a little way; then the waters sank back, and
the trees, the flowers, and the grasses were left
parched and dry again.
"Let us try," said the wild sea-gulls. So they
dipped their wings in the Big Sea Water, and
flew out over the fields, scattering the waterdrdps
upon the flowers and the cornfields; but it was very
little they could do over the great, wide earth.





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


But Muinwa said, "Ybu have taught me a way to
save the flowers and the trees and the grasses, 0
good sea-gulls! I will gather feathers from all the
birds of the land; and I will make a great wing that
shall stretch from sea to sea and from sky to sky.
"This will I dip in. the waters of the lakes, and.
shake them down upon the earth as you have shaken
your wings across the cornfields."
So Muinwa called together all the birds from all
the forests. "Give me of your feathers, 0 birds both
great and small," he said, "that I may make a great
wing with which to sprinkle the earth and save the
flowers and trees and grasses. So may they live on
forever, and send forth each year new beauty on the
earth."
Then all the birds sang, and the skies rang with
their glad songs; for the birds loved the summer that
brings the flowers and the trees and the grasses, and
were glad to help the good Muinwa.
So it was, Muinwa made the great wing that holds
the waters; and when the flowers droop, he waves it
across the land, and the raindrops fall upon the
thirsty flowers and trees and grasses.









THE PINE TREES.


On the shores of a beautiful lake stand three tall
pine trees.
All the day long and all the night
long their branches wave and whis-
per and sigh, each to the other. And
sometimes in the stillness of the deep
Night, the Red Children say, these
trees have been known to sob; and
when the winds are strong, moans,
are heard, mingled with the rushing
of the winds.
For there are spirits in these trees
--the spirits of three chiefs, who, long,
long ago, ruled over their tribes and
carried on war with one another
Now these three chiefs,.though each
THE TALLEST F in his own way was strong and power-
IN ALL THE EATH. ful, longed for greater strength and
greater power. Each longed to surpass the others.
63




LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


So together the three went to the home of Gloos-
kap the manito.
"0 Gloo-skap," said the first of the three chiefs,
"make me tall. Make me the tallest chief in all the
earth.. Then I shall have power over all Red Men,
and they shall admire and fear me."
Glooskap looked down at the chief and smiled a
scornful smile. Already the chief had made thick
soles for his moccasins and had filled them with fur
and the bark of the trees.
Besides this, he had pulled his long hair high
above his head, and had built it up with sticks and
feathers to make himself seem tall.
"You shall have your wish," said Glooskap.
Then the second chief spoke. "Let me," said he,
"live, forever upon this earth."
"It shall be as you wish," Glooskap answered.
Then the third chief said, "Not forever would I
live but let me live to an exceeding old age; and
give me perfect health with which to enjoy my long
life."
"Foolish ones," said Glooskap, "know you not
that a brave death and a return to the happy hunt-


1 54





THE PINE TREES.


ing grounds is better than long life upon this earth ?
Still, you shall have your wishes-all of you."
Then Glooskap raised his hand; and, behold, the
three chiefs were changed in a twinkling.
One, to a tall pine tree-the tallest on the lake
shore-with a tassel waving proudly over him.
The other two were changed to pine trees also; for
thus the one could live on forever, and the other could
have his perfect health with which to enjoy his long life.
And so the three trees still stand upon the lake,
and the long years roll by; the one taller than all
the rest-the other two sturdy and strong, looking
down for centuries upon the tribes that come and go.
And are they happy ? Are they content ? No one
can tell; for they speak not, though they sigh all day
long, and even groan when the storms beat upon them.
It would seem almost as if their hearts were sad,
and that they had learned that their own simple,
natural life would have been best. Still, the Red
Children cannot tell.
It may be that what we call sighs and groans are
but the language of the trees-the way in which
they talk together. We do not know.







THE LILY-STAR.


Once the world was filled with happy people.
Game was plenty in the forests, and nowhere was
there drought or famine. People were well and
strong and happy. All the tribes were at peace.
The beasts of the field had no fear of man, nor had
man any fear of them.
The trees yielded richest fruit, and the bushes
bent low beneath their loads of berries. And there
was no cold, for the spring was everywhere; and all
the long year the flowers carpeted the earth, the
birds, beautiful of plumage, flew from tree to tree,
singing their wild, happy songs, and turning their
bright plumage in the sunlight.
And- the simple-hearted people dwelt in the for-
ests.and on the sunny hillsides. They loved the
:great, warm sun, and at night they watched the
bright stars shining down upon them; for to these
stars some time they would be carried by the good
manitos who watch over the wigwams of the dying.
But one night they saw a bright star fall. Down,
56







THE LILY-STAR.


"AND THE CHILDREN CAME IN THEIR TINY CANOES."

+-I




LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


down, down, through the heavens it fell, till it came
and stood at the foot of a great mountain.
Then the people went forth to meet the star,
and the star said: "I have come, 0 good people,
down to dwell with you; for you are good and
happy and your world is beautiful. Tell me, then,
where I may make my dwelling place, that I may
watch your wise men and your children at their
play; for I love you well, and I long to dwell among
you."
Then one chief said, "Dwell here in this mountain,
high up among the crags; for there you can overlook
the plain; the clouds will stoop to kiss the mountain
top, and each morning you may greet'the rising sun."
"DWell upon the sunny hillside," said another;
"for there the sun loves to linger, and.the flowers
are everywhere."
"Dwell in the forests," said another;." for there
the cool shadows lie, and the air is heavy with per-
fumebf the pine and spruce."
But the mountain tops are so far away! The star
could not see the little,children at their play; and it
loved the children best of all. The hillside, too, was





THE LILY-STAR. 59
distant; and the star felt lonely when the sun was
gone. And the forest, to the star that loved the heat
and warmth and light, seemed only dark and cold.
But one day the star came and hung above the
lake. The water was soft and warm; it rippled and
danced and sang. All day the sunlight sparkled on
its surface, and at night the stars shone down upon
it. Upon the banks of the lake the Red Children
played, and the men pushed their canoes across it.
"Here," said the star, "will I dwell, for I love the
Red Children, and the canoes are like the stars that
shoot across the sky."
And so it was that when the sun had set, the star
came down and alighted on the lake; and away down
beneath the waters it sent its rays. The Red Child-
ren say the rays took root, for when the morning
came, there lay a beautiful water-lily upon the lake.
Its petals were pure and white, its heart was golden
,like the star, and with its fragrance it called to the
children.
And the children came in their tiny canoes, for
they loved the sweet lily better than all the flowers
of the fields.









LEGENDS OF THE WINDS.


"Tell us," the Red Children ask, "whence comes
the Wind? See how it fans the fire and makes the
trees to bend How it sways the grasses and the
grains! Even the clouds and the waters of. the.
great ocean obey its will.
"Still, no man has ever seen it; nor can he ever,
though he watch from the mountain tops till twelve
moons go by; and though he watch upon the great
plains where he may see the heavens on every side."
Then the wise chief says, "Listen, little Red
Children, and I will tell you the mystery of the
Wind as it is known to us, and as it was told to our
tribes many moons ago. For in those days, when
the Great Spirit spoke with the Red Men here upon
the earth, he bade us listen while he revealed to us
the wonders of the heavens.
"And of the Wind, the Great Spirit said: 'Away
in the North, where no man yet has ventured, nor
will ever venture in all the moons to come, lest he
60





LEGENDS OF THE WINDS.


perish; away in the North, where the sky is cold and
the clouds are black; where the fields, are covered
with snow and ice that never melt; where no corn
grows, and the birds sing not; there in that unknown
land dwells the great Wind giant Kra-es-vel-gur.
Upon a mountain peak he sits, clad in a robe of
eagle feathers.
"'And so broad is his robe and so strong are the
feathers that when he raises them the whole earth
is put in motion. The whole earth and all that
grows or dwells upon it; for it is beneath these great
wings that the wind sleeps; and the great giant, sit-
ting upon the edge of the heavens, looks down upon
the waters and the fields and says which wind shall
blow and when.'"
"But the rain and the snow, 0 chief! Tell us, do
they, too, dwell in the North ?"
"It is E-tok-ah-Etokah and We-ze-at-tah my
children-who make the rain and the snow, the
warmth and the cold.'
"For Etokah is the spirit of the South. He it is
who holds in his great hand the warmth that brings
the summer and makes the grains to grow.





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"He comes with a great rush of wind and rain.
In his hand he bears a war club, and when he strikes
the heavens, lo! the lightning flash and terrible
thunders roll.
"With him come the crow and the plover; for
each rests upon a shoulder'of the giant when he
stalks forth upon the land.
"More terrible is Wezeattah, the spirit of the cold.
He drives before him the chill blast of the North,
and scatters the snowflakes over sea and land.
With him comes the howling wolf, whose teeth shine
and whose eyes glitter like the sun. Armed, too, is
Wezeattah, for he brings war against Etokah and
strives to drive him from the earth.
"These spirits-the strong Etokah and the fierce
Wezeattah-come forth from the corners of the
heavens; and when they meet, then the clouds fly
like weak warriors before a mighty foe. The great
drops of rain pour their floods down the mountain
side; or the flying sno0v fills the air and covers the
plains and rivers. The thunders roll, the lightning
flash across the sky, smiting the great trees and
blackening the growing roots. Or, the north wind




LEGENDS OF THE WINDS.


/


I-


WEZEATTAE BRINGS WAR AGAINST ETOKAH.





LEGENDS O P THE RED CHILDlREN.


shrieks and howls, and, rushing like an evil manito
across the plains, enters the forest and snaps the tall
tree-trunks and throws them across the trail.
".So these two battle against each other; and
when they cease, then the skies grow blue again and
the sun shines down upon the earth.
"Then Aminiki the storm god calls them to him.
His wings are black, and when he spreads them over
the skies, the sun itself is hidden and the stars shine
not. And to Etokah and Wezeattah he gives judg-
ment, saying, 'Go now, Etokah,' or' Go now, Wezeat-
tah, back to your home in the corner of the sky.
Bravely you made battle; but it is not for you to
always win. For six moons now shall you keep
within the great walls of your lodge. Come forth,
then, again; and again shall you battle, and to him
that shall win shall be given the rivers and the lakes,
the fields and the hillsides.
"'And if, Etokah, it is you that win, then shall you
scatter your flowersrup and down the land, and lift
the ice that imprisons lake and river.
"'Likewise t&'you, Wezeattah, if you win, shall be
given the land and the waters. You shall scatter





LEGENDS OF THE WINDS. 05

the sparkling snow till no flowers nor grains nor
grasses, shall be seen from sky to sky. And the
people shall build great fires and hide themselves
within their wigwams, saying: It is Wezeattah that
has come! Wezeattah, the ruler of the cold!
Wezeattah, the strong, white god of the North !'"




If .. #


HOW THE SPRING COMES..

Old Winter sat alone in his little hut beside a
frozen river. All across the plain, and up the
mountain side, the snow lay cold and still. The
winds howled and shrieked, the flowers and grasses
hid themselves in the soft earth, and even the great,
warm sun crept away toward the southern sky.
But one morning a gentle step was heard upon the
snow; there was a soft perfume in the air. The
Winter opened the door of his dismal hut, and said:
"Ah, it is you, sweet Springtime. Welcome will
your voice be in the ears of the Red Children. But
come in, and let us talk together, for soon shall I go
to my home in the northward; to my home where all
is still and cold and white; to my home where the
waters never sparkle, where the birds never- sing, and
where no flowers peep through the glittering ice."
"And from my hcme far away to the southward I
have come just now," said the sweet-voiced Spring.
"No ice and snows are there, but in their place lie
great fields of soft, green-grass. The skies and the
66 X





HOW THE SPRING COMES. 67

waters are blue; and when the soft winds blow, the
grasses and the flowers bend their heads to listen."
"Ah, but I have power," said old Winter. "I
have power like that of the manitos themselves!
For when I blow my breath, the streams stand still,
the waters stiffen and grow hard, like stone."
"I, too, have power," answered the Spring.
"Though I call not in a loud voice, though great
trees bend not before me, yet when I breathe, the
flowers and tender grasses spring up on plain and
hillside."
"I shake my long, white locks, and the cold snow
covers the land, the leaves drop from the strongest
trees, the birds fly far away to the homes of distant
tribes, the animals wrap themselves in their warm
covers and hide in deep caves; even the earth itself
grows hard, like rock, and hides from sight."
"I shake my golden ringlets, and sweet-smelling
showers fall upon the earth; the raindrops glisten
on the grasses, and the hearts of the Red Children
are glad; the singing birds come back and fill the
forests with their songs, the little brooks begin to
dance, and the whole earth sings for joy."





68 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.
1. '
But now the sun-far down in the southern sky
-had heard the soft voice of Spring and had crept
near to listen. Its warm rays fell straight upon old




















THEN OLD WINTER'S VOICE WAS STILL.

'Winter'- hut. A robin and a bluebird perched upon
the roof. The river began to sparkle back its wel-
come to the sun, and the whole hut was filled with
the odor of pleasant herbs and flowers.
the odor of pleasant herbs and flowers.





HOW THE SPRING COMES. 69

Then old Winter's voice grew still. Water dripped
from his long, white hair; a strange, gray color
spread over his cold, white face; smaller and smaller,
shorter and shorter grew his form, and weaker and
weaker the power of the old man's arm, till, when
the sun had sunk behind the purple clouds of
the west, no sign of him was left; but upon the
ground where he had sat had sprung the beautiful
pink claytonia-that sweetest, tenderest child of
Spring.










HOW THE SUMMER CAME.


Once, long, long ago, there was no summer in the
land of the Red Children, and they had no food but
the flesh of the animals which they could slay.
Then all the animals-the Otter, the Lynx, the
Beaver, the Badger, and the Wolf-held a council.
"We are never safe," said they, "from the arrows of
the Red Men. Let us go to them and bid them pre-
pare for war with us, unless indeed they will promise
to harm us no more."
"But we must have food," said the Red Men,
when the animals had come to them declaring war.
"Is there no other food that man can eat ?" asked
the sharp-eyed Lynx.
"There are fruits and maize," said the Red Men;
"but these grow not in a country where summer
never comes. Bring down warmth for us from the
heavens, and we will promise then to harm you no
more."






HOW THE SUMMER CAME.


"BUT WE MUST HAVE FOOD," SAID THE RED MEN.





72 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.
"We will try," said the Otter, and, stretching his
mouth back to his ears so that all his teeth showed
fiercely, he made a great -leap up toward the blue
sky. Up, up he flew, like a great bird; but his
flight was short, for down he came, head first, and
struck upon a mountain peak.
Then the Lynx, crouching low, made a leap such
as even Lynx had never made before; for he brushed
the arch of the sky with the tips of his ears.
Then the Badger tried and the Beaver, and to-
gether they cracked the sky, so that when the Wolf's
leap came, his head burst through, and he caught a
glimpse of the beautiful world beyond.
"Now," said, a brave chief of the Red Men, "I
will climb up the walls of the skies and steal the
warmth that we so need."
For three whole days and three whole nights the
brave chief climbed, for he loved his tribe and
longed to bring them warmth, and food, and. comfort.
And when he had entered the doorway which the
wolf had made, lo! there lay spread out before him
a land of such beauty as he had never dreamed.
The air was soft and sweet. Green grass stretched




HOW THE SUMMER CAME.


as far as his eye could reach. There were flowers
of colors brighter than the war-paint of greatest
chiefs.
And there were beautiful mocuks, in which were
birds whose songs were sweetest music. One bird
was there in each mocuk; for these birds were
Spring, and Summer, and Autumn. And when the
chief saw these, he opened wide their doors and
cried: "Fly, fly, goqd birds! and carry the seasons
down to the Red Children" below; for they live their
whole lives-they and their children after them-
and never know of change on tree, or sky, or earth."
Then all the birds flew out. Straight toward the
door they flew, but with such noise and confusion
thatthe people in the sunny world awoke and ran to
see what strange thing had happened to the birds.
Already the gorgeous-feathered Autumn had flown
down through. Spring, too, escaped, but left one
feather in the grasp of the foremost of the breathless
pursuers.
"Summer! Summer!" they cried. "Let not
Summer go from us!" But Summer was speeding
on close behind the trail of Spring. With one great





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


leap, four of the dwellers in the land beyond the sky
sprang forward and seized her by the wing.
"Hold hold !" they cried; but Summer struggled
with her great, strong beak and claws. Half way
through the door was she, nor would she yield.
With all their might the four held the bird, till at
last the body parted. One-half only escaped to the
earth below, for the other half was firm in the grasp
of the angry men of the Land Beyond the Sky.
"Now, who did this ?" they thundered, when they
had placed the poor half bird within the cage again.
Then they spied the chief of the Red Men, and with
a cry like the North Wind, and with bolts of thunder
and flashes of fire, they rushed upon him. Down
through the doorway, on, on across the sky they
flew.
"How it lightens!" the Red Men down upon the
earth cried ; and the animals crept, afraid, into the
dark caves of the forests.
Though the Red Man sped like a hare across the
sky, the angry people of the upper world followed
with a speed like the wind. All about him, above
him, and below, the fiery arrows darted, till at last




HOW THE SUMMER CAME. 75

one transfixed him. And to this day, there he lies,
pinned to the sky; and when the Red Children look
up and see him there among the stars, they say:
"See there is the brave chief who dared the people
of the Land Beyond the Sky and gave the warm
seasons to us !"
And when the beautiful Summer's stay is brief,
they say: It is because we have only half; the other
half is still in the heavens above."










THE SUN A PRISONER.

There was once a little lad whose -name was
Shooter-of-Birds. The little sister of Shooter-of-
Birds was very proud of her brother's name, for he
had earned it when he was a baby, swinging in his
hammock among the boughs of the trees.
Now, from the first bird little Shooter'-of-Birds had-
brought down with his arrow, he had maAe for
himself a wonderful coat; and most proud was he of
its bright red breast and its soft, brown back.
But one day little Shooter-of-Birds lay down upon
a mountain top to rest. He was very tired, and he
slept for hours and hours. When he awoke, there
stood the great Sun, shining straight down upon him,
hot and burning. Breathless, little Shooter-of-Birds
sprang to his feet. The air was full of the odor of
burning feathers; and already his beautiful coat
was dropping from his shoulders, singed and
scorched.





THE SUN A PRISONER. 77

"It is you that have done this, 0 Sun!" the boy
shouted. But the Sun took no heed, and rolled on
across the/ sky.
"You shall never rise again!" cried little Shooter-
of-Birds; and he ran across the mountain side to his
cave.irithe great rock.
"What tan you do ?" hooted the Owl all night.
" You you !, you "
"Wait wait! wait-!" peeped the birds at sunset.
But aigry little Shooter-of-Birds would not wait.
All night long he worked, for he was twisting a
mighty cord with which to ensnare the Sun. Then,
climbing high upoh the eastern ridge of mountains,
he spread his soil and watched the coming of the
Sun.
Slowly it crept up above the waters, but, blinded
by its own glare, it saw not the Shooter-of-Birds,
whose coil was spread across the skies.
"A daring boy is this Shooter-of-Birds," aaid the
mischievous manitos; and they laughed to think.
what havoc it would make up, and down the earth if
the Sun should never rise again. "We will help the
boy," they said. So they held the coil, and lo the





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Sun entered the great circle and was indeed en-
snared.
"Never again shall you scorch my coat of
feathers !" cried little Shooter-of-Birds; and he
fastened the cord to a mountain peak and ran down
into the valley.
Hours like many days passed by, and the Sun
came not. It is very strange," the people said.
"Oh, give us back the 'sunlight !" the trees and the
flowers and the grasses cried. But the sunlight did
not come, and the trees and the flowers and the
grasses withered and died.
By and by coldness fell on all the earth, and the
beasts of the fields and forests crept into dark caves,
crouching close together for warmth.
"This must not be," they said. "Let us go to
the Sun and beg that he shall come again."
So together they all set out; but no one of them,
save perhaps the Owl and the Wildcat, could see in
the darkness. Then, too, they were cold and starved,
so that by and by the persevering Mole found him-
self alone, and all his comrades gone back to their
caves.





THE SUN A PRISONER.


For as many hours as make a month, the Mole
traveled on toward the place where the Sun had
always risen. At last the Sun was found-the Sun
and the coil that bound him to the peak.
"Only cut away this cord of steel," said the Sun,
"and gladly will I come and bring again the light
and warmth."
"I will try," said the Mole, "for indeed we need
the light and warmth, and the world is sad without
them."


" I WILL TRY.' SAID THE MOLE.




LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


So the Mole crept nearer to the Sun, its heat
growing always more and more intense.
"Would that I could turn my head away, little
Mole," said the Sun; "but alas! I cannot, and I fear
you cannot come so near."
"I must try," said the brave Mole; but already its
hair was singed and its little back was scorched.
"The world needs the Sun! it must have it!" the
little Mole said over and over to himself, and so kept
his heart from losing courage.
At last the strong coil was reached, and the Mole
set to work upon it with its sharp, white teeth. For
ten long hours it gnawed and gnawed; and on the
eleventh the cord snapped, and the happy Sun sprang
up again into the heavens.
Then the animals crept forth again from their
caves, the trees grew green again, the grasses waved
their heads, the flowers smiled, and all the earth
was full of joy again. All but the little Mole!
for he, alas! blinded by the blazing Sun, could see
none of the beauty that the light and warmth had
brought
He could feel the soft breezes, and he could





THE SUN A PRISONER. 8I

smell the fragrant flowers; but eyes he had none;
and so it is that from that time on the moles
dwell forever in their darkness, paying the pen-
alty of the foolish anger of the little Shooter-of-
Birds.









MONDAMIN, THE RED PLUME.


Among the tribes of the Red Children, there lived
a warrior so brave and kind that all his people
loved him, even as they loved the good manitos
that watch over the wigwams and the cornfields, to
keep them from harm.
Now, this brave, kind warrior could cure the sick
and heal the wounded; he could take upon himself
the shape of birds and fishes, and fly through the air
and swim through the water.
But, most of all, even more than war, the warrior
loved to wander up and down among the people of
the tribe, bringing them health and happiness and
gifts of good.
SOne morning, as he walked through a dense
forest, into which the sun could scarcely shine, he
met a little Red Plumed man as brave as was he
himself.
"Good, morrow," said the little man. "You are
strong; but tell me, where does your strength lie ?"







,MONDAMIN, THE RED PLUME. 83


THEN THE BRAVE WARRIOR AN


I





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"My strength," answered the warrior, "is like the
strength of any brave man."
"Then let us wrestle!" said the strange little
man, "for I, too, am strong. And whoever is able
to throw the other, let him cry, Wa-ge-ne-wa! Wa-
ge-ne-wa! I have thrown you! I have thrown
you!"
Then the brave warrior and the tiny Red Plume
wrestled. For a whole day they wrestled, and nore
than once the warrior grew faint and weak; but, as
the sun went down, the wonderful strength of little
Red Plume failed, and at- last the warrior's cry,
"Wa-ge-ne-wa! Wa-ge-ne-wa!" rang through the
forest. But, as the big brave stooped to help Red
Plume to his feet again, lo! a wonderful change
had come upon him! Arms and legs were gone, and
his body had become like a full, ripe, red ear of corn.
Indeed, but for the red plume still waving, the
warrior would have believed the good manitos had
taken him away.
Then Red Plume spoke:. "Again, brave warrior,
you bring a great and goodly gift to your people.
For I am Mondamin, the friend of the Red Children;


:;




MONDAMIN, THE RED PLUME.


and, because you conquer me, then you shall take
me to your people.
"Strip froni me, first of all, these covers that hide
me from the wind and storm. Take then my rich,
red kernels and scatter them up and down beside
the river. Go then to your home, and, when one
moon is passed, come back; then shall be given you
the Gift of Corn."

And never do the brave warrior and his people
forget the place where the Corn first grew. Never
do they neglect the field where, through rain and
sunshine, Mon-da-min lies.
Each day they watch and wait beside it; they
drive the insects and the weeds and the hungry
birds from it; they spread the soft, green mold
above it. And, when at length the tiny blade of
green breaks through, they sing and dance about the
field; they chant and send up thankful prayers to
the Great Spirit for this rich gift, Mondamin.
Then, when the Summer passes, and the golden
Autumn comes; when the corn stands tall and rich,
and full of beauty, then, from out its shining robes





86 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.

and the long, soft, yellow tresses, comes the voice of
the Corn calling to the people. Then the people
gather in great numbers-all the tribes together-to
the feast of good Mondamin-the friend of man--
Mondamin.








MOUNT TUTOKANULA.


Away in the valley of the Yosemite is a great
mountain whose sides are steep, even 'like the walls
of a cafon. At the foot of this mountain was once
a lake, on whose banks two Red Children loved
to play the whole day long. One evening, so tired
were they, and home so far away, that they lay down
upon a great rock and went to sleep.
All night long they slept and all the next day;
then the next night and the next, till many moons
had come and gone. But all the time they'slept the
rock was rising, rising, till, when they woke, behold,
its summit reached far, up among the clouds. There
the two' Children stood, stretching their arms out
across the cliffs, and crying aloud for help.
The Sun and the Moon only heard their cry; and
when again they had lain down upon the high
mountain to sleep, the Moon whispered to the rain-
drops in the clouds, and bade them go down and
tell the people and the animals the story of the little
Red Children upon the mountain.
87





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


And, when the animals heard the story, they assem-
bled at the foot of the cliff to plan some way to
rescue the Children.
They saved me from a fierce cat," said the.
Mouse. "Let me, then, try to rescue them." So the
Mouse tried to leap up the mountain side. But alas!
it leaped only a hand-breadth, and then fell back..
"They freed me from a snare the Red Men had
set among the corn," said a Rat. And he, too, tried
to rescue the Children, but could leap only twc
hand-breadths.
"They helped me once to climb a tree when the
hunter's dogs were close upon me," said a Raccoon.
But he could leap only a little higher than the Rat.
Then the Bear tried, the Lion, and the Buffalo;
but all failed, even as the tiny Mouse had failed.
"They saved, once, my life, too," said a little
Worm. "I lay across their trail, for I had wandered
from my home in the tree, and had lost my way, I
was very thirsty, and the earth seemed parched and
dry. And these children-they trod not 'upon me
with their moccasins, but raised me up and laid me on
the rich, soft leaves. Therefore, will I rescue them."






MOUNT TUTOKANULA-


7-.



(Sic


THERE THE LITTLE CHILDREN STOOD.





90 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.

So the little Worm crept up the mountain side.
Close, close it clung; and, when one moon had
passed, it had reached the top of the great cliff, and
had guided the Children down safe paths into the
valley below.
And so the Children named the mountain Tutoka-
nula; and it bears thus the name of the little Worm,
even from that day to this.








THE SNAIL AND THE BEAVER.

Once there were no men, no women, and no little
children upon the earth; but everywhere there were
birds and fishes, and in the forest there were animals
of many kinds.
On the banks of the Great River lived a'little
Snail, whose brief life had been spent crawling up
and down the banks and burrowing in the mud. But
one day the Great Spirit looked down upon the Snail
and said: "From that little creature I will make a
tall, strong animal. He shall walk upon two feet,
holding his head high. He shall speak a language
never yet spoken, and I will call him Man."
Then the Great Spirit sent a mighty flood of water
down the valley. The river overflowed its banks,
and carried the little Snail to the high land, where
it left it far away from its water home.
Then the little Snail grew sleepy, and curled itself
down among the strange grasses. No one can say
how long it slept, for the little Snail itself could
never tell; but, by and by, when it woke, all the
91







LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


cCC.


8O THE MAN TOOK, THE ARROW AND THE BOW.


,3 ''^ a





THE SNAIL AND THE BEAVER.


world seemed changed. Never before had the sky
seemed so blue, nor had the sun seemed so near.
Strange thoughts crept into the Snail's little head.
It grew afraid, and, turning itself earthward, it
tried to hide itself within its shell. And lo! it
had no shell, but legs and arms, long and straight
and strong!
Now the Snail quaked indeed with fear. .It rose
high upon its feet and looked around. In a lake near
by, it saw itself and wondered what strange thing
had happened. Then a kind voice-the voice of the
Great Spirit-spoke from the air and said:
"Fear not, little Snail that you once were. You
are now a Man, and you shall be able to rule over all
things that live--the fishes, the birds, and all animals
in field or forest.. But first you must have food such
/ as Man should eat. Take, then, these, arrows and
this bow. Place the arrow thus, aiming at yonder
deer; and, when he is slain, take from him his skin;
for, by and by, when the North Wind blows, you will
need it for a covering.
So the Man took the arrow and the bow, and did
as the Great Spirit bade him. And, when this was





LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.


done, theh the Great Spirit taught him to strike fire
from rock, and so to cook his food.
After that the Great Spirit went away, and the Man
wandered up and down the river banks alone. Out
from a deep hole a Beaver crept, and to the strange,
new creature sitting there he said, Who are you ? "
And the strange, new creature said, "I am a Man,
though not long since I was a Snail. But tell me,
who are you ?"
"I am a Beaver. My home is beneath the banks,
and my kingdom is the river. But we are brothers.
Come, then, to my home, for you must need sleep and
food."
Gladly the Man crept into the hole from whence
the Beaver had come, and soon he found himself in
a beautiful beaver village. There were houses made
in the shape of cones, with a door through which to
enter.. And there were streets in this village, and
every Beaver knew the home of every other.
Then the Beaver called his wife and daughter,
and they laid before their guest a feast of poplar
leaves, willow, sassafras root, and elder bark. Little
of this could the strange man eat, but there came





THE SNAIL AND THE BEAVER.


into his heart a great loneliness. The Beaver had
his home, and both wife and daughter to wait upon
him, but the Man was all alone.
"Truly, you could spare this daughter," the Man
said, "and let her come and dwell with me. You
shall teach me to build a home like this, and she
shall daily lay the feast before me."
Now, the Beaver's daughter was kind, and she
pitied the lonely Man; so she said: "If my father
wills it so, gladly will I .go and make a home for
you."
"You shall go," said the Beaver. And the Man
led her out from her home and wandered with her
up the river bank, that they might have a place
there to build for themselves another home.
Night came, and they lay down beside the river to
sleep. But, behold when the sun rose, the Beaver
had disappeared, and in her place lay a beautiful
Maiden. And when the Man awoke and saw her,
then the Great Spirit whispered to them and said:
"Make, now, a wigwam for yourselves. Be brave,
Man; and hunt and fish. And you, most beautiful
Maiden, you shall cook the food, and, by and by,





96 LEGENDS OF THE RED CHILDREN.
you shall learn to weave, and grind the corn which
the Man shall plant; for you are like no other
creatures on this earth, but are high above them all."
So sprang the people from the Snail and the
Beaver, for such is the legend of the Red Children;
and, because of their origin, they are wise and
industrious, never idle, but busy always in the mak-
ing of their homes and in the building of their
villages.








LEGEND OF THE OPECHE.


When the son of the Red Man has grown tall and
strong and brave, then the father warrior calls him
to him and says:
"My son, my brave son, the time has come when
you must go forth into the wilderness and fast.
Behold the mat which your mother has woven for you
to rest upon. Take it, therefore, and prove to your
tribe that you are to be a brave, strong warrior, able
to endure."
Then the youth goes forth into the dense forest,
and stretches himself, face downward, upon the mat,
moving not and tasting neither food nor drink.
If he endures to the end of the time appointed for
the fast, then he is brought into the presence of the
chief. A great feast is laid, honors are poured upon
the youth, and he becomes now a warrior of his tribe.
So it was with the gentle-hearted Nir-ig-wis, who
loved the birds too well to shoot them; for to his
ears the music of their songs was sweeter than the
warrior's shout.




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