• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Daisy in trouble
 Good-bye
 Uncle Jack
 Daisy's new home
 Mrs. Smith
 Daisy's new friends
 At the seaside
 Good news
 The travellers' return
 "Peace on Earth, goodwill towards...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Daisy's visit to Uncle Jack and what came of it
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085605/00001
 Material Information
Title: Daisy's visit to Uncle Jack and what came of it
Physical Description: 63, 8 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Mara, Grace
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Blackie & Son, limited
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1897?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Loneliness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Grace Mara.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085605
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002233745
notis - ALH4154
oclc - 237050527

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Daisy in trouble
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Good-bye
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Uncle Jack
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Daisy's new home
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Mrs. Smith
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Daisy's new friends
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    At the seaside
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Good news
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The travellers' return
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    "Peace on Earth, goodwill towards men"
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Advertising
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text










w..


A'









. T
II













WE


The Badwm Library
UnA crual
oi
RmBFIldn


j.
-~~






























































"AND WHAT ABOUT THIS LITTLE WOMAN?"









DAISY'S

VISIT TO UNCLE JACK

AND WHAT CAME OF IT



BY

GR A.qE MARA


--- ----- --







LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, LIMITED, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN














CONTENTS.



Chap. Page
I. DAISY IN TROUBLE, . .. 5

II. GOOD-BYE, . . .12

III. UNCLE JACK, .. . 18

IV. DA.IY's NEW HIE .. . 23

V. MRS. S IITH, . . 28

VI. DAISY'S NEW FRIENDS, . 34

VII. AT THE SEASIDE, . .40

VIII. GooD NEWS, . . 46

IX. THE TRAVELLERS' RETURN. . 52

X. PEACE ON EARTH, GOODWILL TOWARDS MENx," 59















DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK,
AND WHAT CAME OF IT.



CHAPTER I.
DAISY IN TROUBLE.

N one of those narrow streets, so common
Sin Bloomsbury, on a cold, foggy fore-
noon in early spring, a doctor's carriage
stood waiting outside what was evi-
dently a lodging-house. The gloom outside
had penetrated within doors, and added to the
dismal look of the faded and footworn stair-
carpet and dingy walls and ceiling. A little
girl was seated on the stairs, her gaze fixed
upon the door through which the doctor had
passed into the sick-room.
Not a pretty child you would say at first
glance, for the little face is pale and the eyes







6 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.
are dull and heavy: for Daisy is weary wait-
ing, and it seems to her as if hours had passed
since she was left alone. In reality it is not
ten minutes, but it was just this morning
that her mother had told her that father will
have to go away for a long time, and that
she will require to go with him to take care
of him, for father has been very ill. But
they cannot take Daisy with them. She can
hardly believe it is true. Leave her all alone!
Why, she has never been parted from them
for a single day in all her life! And now
they are going to leave her for a whole year!
To five-year-old Daisy it seems equal to leav-
ing her for ever, and the tears rise to her eyes
at the thought.
Presently the door she has watched so long
opens, and her mother and the doctor come
out. Daisy rises quietly and slips her hand
into her mother's. In the last few weeks she
has learnt to be very quiet in all her move-
ments-a sad lesson for so young a child.
"And what about this little woman?" asks
the doctor, looking down upon Daisy kindly.
"I hardly know, Doctor," answers her mother
in trembling tones. Mr. Graham's kind offer
of a home for her during our absence has
lifted a load off our minds, but it will be hard
to part with her. Still, to know that she will
be cared for while we are away is a great






DAISY IN TROUBLE.


relief. The difficulty is to find some one to
take care of her on the journey; it is im-
possible for me to take her, and equally so
to send so young a child alone."
And at the bare thought the mother's sorely-
tried feeling gives way, and her voice breaks
into a scarcely-concealed sob.
"Come, come! we must not have you
breaking down," says the doctor cheerily.
"Why, I shouldn't wonder but what I will
be able to help you. I must go north next
week, and would be delighted to take charge
of my young friend here. Eh! Daisy, what
do you say to that?"
"I would rather go with Father and
Mother," replied Daisy very seriously.
"But, as they can't take you, will I not do
as the next best?" asked the doctor in a
playful manner.
But it was much too serious a matter for
Daisy to be amused, and her face lost none of
its gravity as she replied slowly:
"Yes, I think you will."
Well, that's settled, Mrs. Seaton," said the
doctor. "Nay, no thanks; it will be a plea-
sure," and he hurriedly took his leave, cutting
short the expressions of gratitude he well
understood how difficult it was for her to
make.
But when he had entered his carriage and






8 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


was being driven rapidly through the streets,
his thoughts were still busy with the house-
hold he had quitted, for he was an old friend
of the family, as well as the doctor, and had
planned this visit to Edinburgh that he might
help to lighten the burden that pressed so
heavily upon them.
Their story was no uncommon one, but to
let you understand it I must go back some
six or seven years. George Seaton, Daisy's
father, was then a young man of four- or five-
and-twenty. He lived with an uncle, an
Edinburgh merchant, who, having brought
him up, was greatly attached to him, and
never having married himself, began to form
plans for his nephew's marriage with a cer-
tain young lady at whose father's house both
George and he were frequent visitors. But
his castle in the air received a rude shock,
when one morning George announced that
he had proposed to and been accepted by
Miss Davidson, the governess of the same
family.
Penniless Margaret Davidson instead of
Rose Soutar! To Mr. Graham's eyes Rose was
everything to be desired, besides having a
very comfortable little fortune. So no wonder
he replied rather testily:
"Oh, no fear but what she would accept
you."







DAISY IN TROUBLE.


George, unaware of his uncle's disappoint-
ment, was both surprised and hurt by the
manner in which his uncle received his news
and at once answered:
"You are much mistaken if you imagine that
any mercenary motives influenced her. I can
assure you I consider myself most fortunate
in gaining the love of such a woman."
"And she won't have gained anything,"
said his uncle tauntingly.
This was too much for George, and he re-
plied hotly:
"Uncle, if you have no congratulations to
offer me, you cannot expect me to sit still and
hear the woman of my choice spoken slight-
ingly of," and, rising hastily, he left the room.
Although the subject was not mentioned
again, a coolness arose between them, and
George resolved-rather than bring his bride
to a home where she would be slighted and
looked down upon-to throw up the post he
held in his uncle's business and try his fortune
in London, this idea being the more feasible, as
he had already slight literary connection there.
He had never regretted his choice, for
"Fair as a summer dream was Margaret.

Her hair was not more sunny than her heart,
Though like a natural golden coronet,
It circled her dear head with careless art."







10 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

Time only served to show the treasure his
"Pearl ", as he loved to call her, was, and made
his longing to provide her with a fitting home
the greater. Yet a young man, even of un-
doubted talent, will ever find it uphill work
to make his way as a man of letters. And
after six years of struggle his health, never
robust, had completely broken down. The
doctor had ordered rest and a long sea voyage
as the only means of recovery. But how to
provide the requisite funds was a question
easier asked than answered; and it would
have remained unsolved had not his uncle, who
still retained a warm feeling for his nephew,
hearing of his illness, offered to advance the
required amount as a loan. In no other form,
indeed, would George have accepted it, as he
had a good deal of Scotch independence in his
character. And what was from Mr. Graham
a greater piece of generosity, a home was
offered to little Daisy during her parents'
absence. Not willingly, it is true, for he
was unused to children, and so was his house-
keeper, and he rather dreaded what Mrs. Smith
would say when she heard of it. But they
were his ain kin ", and there is an old Scotch
saying that "bluid is aye thicker than water ",
which, I take it, simply means that relations
must always be more attached to each other
than strangers.







DAISY IN TROUBLE. 11

But while I digress, the doctor has reached
his next patient's residence, and there we will
leavehim and return to Daisy and her mother.















CHAPTER II.

GOOD-BYE.

M UST I really go, Mother? I don't want
to! Can't you take me with you in-
stead?" and the little face looked up plead-
ingly.
"My darling!" and her mother clasped her
tightly in her arms and held her to her heart,
"we would take you with us if we could, but
we cannot; so our little girl must try to be
brave and good while she is with Uncle Jack,
who is so kind as to offer to take care of her,
and when we arrive home we will come for our
darling.
"Is a year a very long time, Mother?" asked
Daisy, bravely keeping back the tears, although
her little face flushed and her eyes filled.
"Not very long, darling, it will soon pass,
but I must go to Father now; when I come
back I will show you a pretty dress I am going
to make for you. But now you must amuse







GOOD-BYE.


yourself with your toys. Don't come out on
to the stairs again; it is cold there. I will
come back as soon as I can," and, kissing her
fondly, her mother put her down and left her.
Left to herself, Daisy did not turn to her
toys, she was too miserable for that, and the
long-kept-back tears followed each other slowly
down her cheeks. She would have liked to
go and sit on the stairs again, she felt nearer
her mother there. But her mother had said
not to do so, and it never entered Daisy's
thought to do anything her mother had for-
bidden.
True, she had told her to play, and it would
have made her mother's heart sad could she
have seen her child standing so forlorn by the
table where she had left her. Daisy herself
would have been happier if she had arranged
her cups and saucers and given her dolls a
tea-party, even although she cared very little
about it at first. But she was only a little
girl, and had not learned to be quite obedient;
that is, she did not try to do the thing that
was nearest, and older people than she often
fall into the same mistake. But wishing won't
mend matters, and poor little Daisy soon grew
tired, and, slipping down on the carpet, was
soon fast asleep, her arms locked round the
chair her mother had been sitting on, her head
resting on the seat.







14 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.
And there her mother found her when she
came back. She lifted her up-oh, so tenderly!
-for the sight of her pale little face-went to
her heart, and laying her gently on the sofa,
she left her to finish her sleep more comfortably,
while she busied herself putting the finishing
touches to the dinner-table.
Dinner over, and the invalid established in
the most comfortable easy-chair the room
possessed, her mother produced the promised
dress, hoping thereby to divert Daisy's atten-
tion. Calling the child to her side she showed
her a lovely pale blue skirt, which she was
already busily engaged in taking to pieces.
"Won't that make a pretty frock for my
Daisy?" she asked, holding it at arm's length
from her.
"But, Mother,"-and Daisy's voice was
expressive of disappointment rather than
pleasure, "that is your dress, the one father
always likes to see you in."
"Hush, darling!" but her mother's caution
came too late. Her father dropped his paper
and turned to see what the talking was about,
and at a glance understood how matters stood.
Although he was sorry that his wife had to
rob her own already scantily-furnished ward-
robe to provide for their child's necessities,
he well understood the pleasure it gave her.
So when Daisy turned to him for help to







GOOD-BYE.


prevent the work of destruction, he spoke
brightly:
So my little pearl is going to have a setting
that will suit her and set her off at the same
time."
Daisy had been christened Margaret, and
her father sometimes called her his "little
pearl", a pet name which always pleased her
greatly. So, finding that no one objected to
the dress but herself, Daisy, who was quite
accustomed to having her mother's things
made down for her, offered no further demur,
and was soon deeply interested in the making
of it. And by and by when her mother tried
it on her, her delight knew no bounds, and
she went skipping across in great glee to let
her father see it.
The dress was simply but prettily made;
the skirt gathered fully into a yoke round the
neck, and falling in graceful folds down almost
to her feet, with full puffed sleeves. Very
quaint and pretty she looked, as the colour of
the dress just suited her delicate complexion
and fair golden curls, while her eyes sparkled
with pleasure. So pretty was she that her
father could not forbear to tease.
"Ah, Miss Daisy! you will change your
mind about going away. You will not think
it a misfortune, seeing that you have got such
a nice dress."







16 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


"Don't speak about it! I don't want to
speak about it till the time comes," said Daisy,
for she had thought the matter over and very
wisely come to the conclusion that if she had
to go she need not think of it beforehand, and
she looked up so imploringly into her father's
face that he desisted, and praised the frock
instead.
It was only the first of several that her
mother's skilful fingers found time to make
during the busy week that followed. For she
took a pleasure, not unmixed with pain it is
true, in providing her darling with pretty
things, although she would not see her wear
them.
One morning, a week later, found the little
party on their way to the station, accompanied
by Doctor Heron, who, with his usual fore-
thought, had planned that they should all
leave on the same day, thus lightening the
pain of parting as much as possible.
So it was amid all the din and bustle at
"St. Pancras" that Daisy bade her parents
good-bye, not without tears on either side.
The last thing her mother's eyes saw, as the
train steamed away, was little Daisy waving.
her handkerchief. Then the doctor lifted her
up in his arms and hurried away to catch the
train for the north, for which they were just
in time. And there was so much novelty in
(952)






GOOD-BYE.


everything, and the doctor had such a pretty
picture-book to show her, and so many funny
stories to tell about the pictures, that Daisy's
attention was fully occupied. Then he had
such a nice lunch packed away in a little
basket, which he produced very soon (rightly
guessing that her breakfast had not been a
large one that morning), and they ate it very
merrily together. After it, worn out by
fatigue and excitement, Daisy fell fast asleep;
nor did she awake until they arrived in
Edinburgh.





(T^ -^l^














CHAPTER III.
UNCLE JACK.

ON the platform at the Waverley Station
an elderly gentleman paced up and down,
awaiting the arrival of the London train. He
was a fine-looking man, tall and erect, and
carrying his sixty odd years well. His face
betokened determination and strength of pur-
pose, and his whole manner and bearing
showed him to be a man of strong character.
John Graham, or Uncle Jack as he was called
by the Seatons, was one who had fought his
way in the world unaided, and by his own
exertions acquired for himself a position of
considerable affluence. But his hearth had
been a solitary one since his nephew left him,
and he had missed him more than he would
have cared to acknowledge even to himself.
Yet he did not view with any great satis-
faction the thought of Daisy's arrival. A
child of five is not exactly the kind of com-






UNCLE JACK.


panion a confirmed bachelor would choose.
But the choice had not been granted him, and
as he awaited the train the feeling uppermost
in his mind was anxiety as to how Mrs.
Smith, his housekeeper, would get on with
this addition to the family, if such I can call
it. The housekeeper was an institution, hav-
ing been with him for over twenty years; but
the servant girl might remain a month, or a
year, or longer as Mrs. Smith decreed, and
she ruled with a rod of iron. He never
troubled himself about the matter.
He was awakened from his reverie by the
train drawing up at the side of the platform,
and had no difficulty in recognizing Dr.
Heron, who, stepping from a carriage, came
forward and shook hands. Uncle Jack asked
after his nephew with great interest, and
then just glancing at Daisy said:
"So this is the child. Not much to look
at," and with that dismissed the subject by
asking Dr. Heron if time permitted of his
dining with him. But Dr. Heron was already
engaged to dine at a brother physician's and
there meet some other members of the profes-
sion. So, stooping down and kissing Daisy,
and with a hasty good-bye to Mr. Graham, he
took his leave, inwardly indignant at the cool
reception his little favourite had received.
Daisy, left all alone with her uncle, looked






20 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

very forlorn. Uncle Jack had neither kissed
her nor told her she was welcome. This was
a new experience to Daisy, who had all her
life been accustomed to be made much of.
Yet it was not altogether Uncle Jack's fault;
he simply did not know what to say to her.
When they were in the cab, however, he was
struck by her disconsolate look, and plunged
desperately into the subject by asking if she
had had a pleasant journey. At the question
Daisy's whole face brightened, for she was by
no means a shy child, and she replied quickly:
"Oh, such a nice journey! Dr. Heron is
such a nice man. I do love him."
Daisy always spoke of everybody she liked,
as loving them; brought up in an atmosphere
of love, it came naturally to her. "He gave
me this book, and told me such funny stories.
There is one in it about a man and a monkey.
Such a funny story!" and in her excitement
Daisy slipped down off her seat and went and
laid the book on Uncle Jack's knee, eagerly
turning over the leaves to find the picture.
Uncle Jack, watching her meanwhile, could
not help thinking that she looked an interest-
ing child after all, as her face glowed with
excitement and her little fingers twitched
with eagerness, while her childish voice fell
pleasantly on his ear.
So it was with rather more interest that he







UNCLE JACK.


lifted her out of the cab, when they reached
home, and carried her into the hall, where
Mary, the servant-maid, was waiting to take
charge of her.
Mrs. Smith disdained to have anything to
do with her, and viewed her advent with
little pleasure. Privately she had expressed
the opinion to Mary that "folk should look
after their bairns themselves, and not bother
those who had none or didn't want them".
But Mary was young and thought differently;
so Daisy had no need to complain of her wel-
come this time. The servant-girl picked
Daisy up in her arms and carried her upstairs
to her own bedroom, which it had been
arranged she was to share with her, a little
cot having been placed near her bed for Daisy
to sleep in. And while Mary, with gentle
hands, undid her wraps, Daisy prattled to
her about her journey, knowing with a child's
instinct that she had found a friend, and
finally looking up in her face, she asked in
most winning accents:
"Will you take care of me until my father
and mother come back?"
"That I will, you little pet!" said Mary,
while Daisy threw her arms round her neck
and kissed her heartily. So from that hour
Mary was her devoted slave.
Although she had slept during the journey,






22 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.
Daisy had gone through a good deal that day,
and looked so pale and tired that Mary lost
no time in putting her to bed, rightly consid-
ering it the best place for her. After giving
her a nice basin of bread-and-milk, she tucked
her in and told her to go to sleep.
But Daisy looked up and said:
I haven't said my prayers yet," and kneel-
ing in bed, she began her childish petitions.
But the thought of who had always sat by
her before, and was now so far away, was too
much for the child, and she began to sob as if
her little heart would break. Mary clasped
her in her arms and held her fast, while she
tried to soothe her, but all in vain. In time,
however, worn out by grief and sleep, the sobs
grew quieter, and the little eyes closed.















CHAPTER IV.

DAISY'S NEW HOME.

NEXT morning, when Mary brought Daisy
.A into the parlour, she ran forward to
Uncle Jack and held up her face for a kiss,
with all the freedom of an old acquaintance.
Nor was she disappointed. Uncle Jack could
not resist the winsome face, and, putting aside
his paper, stooped down and kissed the little.
rosebud of a mouth, then lifting her on his
knee, said:
"Well, little lady, and how did you sleep ?"
Oh, nicely! Mary is so kind," then with
a burst of confidence she added, "she is going
to take care of me until father and mother
come back."
Poor little child! thought Uncle Jack, has
she already felt that I did not welcome her?
But he only replied:
"Ah! so Mary and you are friends; that's
right."






24 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

"Yes, we are friends," said Daisy, in her
serious, yet childish way. Then she prattled
on about how Mary had brushed her curls
and various other matters, until breakfast was
brought in.
Uncle Jack was rather puzzled as to what
she ought to have for breakfast, but Daisy
had already settled the question with Mary,
assuring her that she always had porridge.
"So, little lady, you like porridge?" said
Uncle Jack, as a little plateful was brought
in for her, along with his own.
"Yes," said Daisy. Mother says it is the
proper breakfast for a child."
Uncle Jack laughed and said:
"Mother is a wise woman."
Nor did Daisy's behaviour give him any
reason to change his opinion, for her every
action showed how carefully she had been
brought up. So different was this morning
from his usual solitary breakfast, that he
found, on pulling out his watch, he would
just have time to catch the car he usually
took into town, for he had lately removed
to a house in the suburbs. So, rising hastily,
he said:
"Well, I must be off. You have almost
made me late with your chatter, little lady."
But Daisy was in the hall as soon as he,
and while he buttoned his greatcoat, she ran






DAISY'S NEW HOME.


and brought his gloves and cane. Her quick
eyes singled out those she had seen him use
the night before.
"Why, you little fairy, how did you know
to bring these?" asked Uncle Jack in sur-
prise.
Oh! I always got Father's," said Daisy,
capering about on her tiptoes until he was
ready.
"Well, good-bye, little lady," said Uncle
Jack taking them from her and hurrying
away. It was something new for Uncle Jack
to be looked after; and the memory of the
sweet little face lingered pleasantly with him,
as he sat in a corner of the car, to outward
appearance deep in his newspaper.
Left to herself Daisy returned to the par-
lour, where Mary was busily engaged clearing
away the breakfast things.
"May I help you? I used to help Mother,"
said Daisy, and Mary was too kind-hearted to
refuse her, although she was rather more of
a hindrance than a help. And all through
the forenoon she followed Mary about like
some faithful little dog.
After early dinner, to Daisy's great delight
Mary proposed taking her for a walk. To
the London-bred child, accustomed as she was
to dull streets and pavement, a country walk
was a rare pleasure, the trees and hedges






26 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

already showed signs that spring had come,
and Daisy tripped along merrily by Mary's
side, pausing often as something new and
wonderful caught her attention, and exclaim-
ing: Oh! how I wish Mother could see it."
Until now her mother had shared her every
pleasure, and nothing seemed quite complete
without her. Mary was touched to see how
much she continued to miss her mother, and
to comfort her proposed that she should write
and tell her all about it.
"But I can't write," said Daisy sorrow-
fully.
"Well, I will write, and you will tell me
what to say," said Mary good-naturedly.
Oh, you dear, dear Mary, how good you
are!" and Daisy threw her arms round her
neck and kissed her; "and I will tell Mother
how kind you are to me; she will like to
know that."
Mary laughed, and thinking they had gone
far enough, turned homeward, rather to
Daisy's regret, but she assured her she would
take her out again another day.
"Every day-do say every day," pleaded
Daisy, and Mary promised that she would go
out every day when it was fine weather. This
gave Daisy great pleasure.
After tea Daisy set herself down at the
dining-room window to watch for Uncle






DAISY'S NEW HOME.


Jack. When she saw him she bounded out
into the hall to greet him with a :shout of
delight, and eager to tell him of all she had
seen.
Somehow Uncle Jack did not dislike being
taken possession of in this unusual fashion,
and her prattle seemed a pleasant accompani-
ment to his hitherto quiet dinner. True, after
dinner Daisy clambered on his knee, thereby
doing away with his accustomed nap, yet he
bore it very philosophically and was rather
disappointed when at seven o'clock Mary
came and announced:
Miss Daisy's bed-time."
"Carry me upstairs; Father used to," said
Daisy, and Uncle Jack complied with very
good grace. When he set her down in the
landing, she hugged and kissed him so lovingly
that Uncle Jack's subjection was complete.















CHAPTER V.

MRS. SMITH.

I CAN'T understand what has happened to
the governor," remarked one of the clerks
in Mr. Graham's office one morning a few weeks
afterwards, "he seems quite a different man of
late. And these parcels he brings into the
office of a forenoon, I am certain they contain
neither more nor less than toys. For the
other day when I went into his room one of
them was lying open on his desk, and there
was a jack-in-the-box staring me in the face."
A general laugh greeted this announcement,
and another clerk suggested:
Bees in his bonnet!"
Not he! and I advise you to get these
books up to date, or he may show you what
it is to work like a bee in a way you won't
forget."
"Don't know, he seems very good-natured
of late, better than I remember his having






MRS. SMITH.


been since his nephew left," said Tom Purves,
who had been in the office for the last dozen
years. "Hillo, here he comes! and I declare
if he hasn't got another of these parcels under
his arm. Looks bad," said Tom, sotto voce, as
he settled himself to his books.
And, sure enough, Uncle Jack entered carry-
ing a brown paper parcel, for, struck by the
pleasure Daisy took in the picture-book Dr.
Heron had given her, he bethought him that
this would be an easy way of pleasing her.
And he was right. Her delight had been so
unbounded that rarely a day now passed with-
out his bringing her some plaything or other.
Wasting good money," declared Mrs. Smith,
indignantly, "enough to sicken anybody. How-
ever, I am not going to be turned like Mary
and the master; there is no doing with either
the one or the other, they are so taken up
with that child."
But nobody paid any heed to her grumbling,
until one afternoon Uncle Jack having brought
Daisy home a lovely doll, she rushed into the
kitchen to show it to Mary.
Mrs. Smith, who happened to be in a bad
humour, ordered her off, telling her not to
come back there again. Daisy shrank back
abashed, when to Mrs. Smith's surprise, Uncle
Jack, who, being in the hall, had heard every
word, walked into the kitchen, a thing he had







30 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


never been known to do before, and turning
sternly round on Mrs. Smith, said:
Miss Daisy has my permission to go into
any part of my house she pleases, and remem-
ber in future I will not have her spoken to in
that manner."
Oh! very well, sir," said Mrs. Smith in high
dudgeon, "perhaps you'll get another house-
keeper, for I'll not put up with such ongoing
any longer."
Certainly, Mrs. Smith, I have no wish for
anyone to remain in my service against their
inclination. Come, Daisy," he said, turning
to the child, who had stood looking on in open-
eyed astonishment, and with her hand in his
he left the kitchen.
Daisy felt that something was wrong, but
did not know exactly what until after dinner.
Uncle Jack, having taking her on his knee,
said:
"Well, Miss Daisy, and who's to cook my
dinner when Mrs. Smith goes away?"
"Why is Mrs. Smith going away?" asked
Daisy, and then an idea dawning upon her
mind, "is it because I went into the kitchen?"
Because you went into the kitchen," replied
Uncle Jack, mimicking her grave tones, and
amused at the serious look on her face. Before
he had time to say another word Mary
announced a visitor. Daisy slipped off his






MRS. SMITH.


knee, ran out of the room, and just escaped
tripping the gentleman who entered. But
Daisy was too much occupied by what she was
about to pay heed to anyone; for she had just
remembered that her mother had never al-
lowed her to go into the landlady's apartments
unless she was asked. To-day she had rushed
into the kitchen without even knocking, and
now Mrs. Smith was going away because of it.
Then Uncle Jack would have no one to cook
his dinner-for Daisy took it all literally. So,
putting on a brave face, though trembling all
over, for she stood very much in awe of Mrs.
Smith, she knocked at the kitchen door.
Mrs. Smith's temper was by no means im-
proved by the turn affairs had taken, and
when Daisy opened the kitchen door, after
she had called Come in ", she said, in no very
pleasant voice:
"Oh, it's you! What do you want now.?"
"Please, Mrs. Smith, I am very sorry I came
in before; I won't do it again, if you will stay
and cook Uncle Jack's dinners?"
"Bless the child! what does she mean?"
exclaimed 1 t-. Smith in astonishment.
So Daisy explained that Uncle Jack had
said that she was going away because of
her.
"Does Mr. Graham wish me to stay? Did
he send you?" asked Mrs. Smith, who by no






32 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

means relished leaving the house in which
she had reigned supreme for so many years.
No, Uncle Jack did not send me," answered
Daisy truthfully, but I think he wants you,
because he would have no one to cook his
dinner if you went away;" this fact had im-
pressed Daisy so much that she could not get
over it, and then she added pleadingly: "Do
stay, and I will be good."
Mrs. Smith was fairly conquered, and noth-
ing loth to stay, so she replied:
"Well! I think I must be the crossest old
woman in the world to find fault with such
a dear as you are. I won't do it again, that's
one thing; so you can run away and tell your
uncle that."
Daisy needed no second bidding, but ran off
in high spirits; and fortunately her uncle's
visitor had departed, or he would have been
rather surprised at the way she burst into the
room exclaiming:
"Mrs. Smith is going to stay, Uncle Jack!"
"So! ho! Fairy! that's where you've been.
Making it up with Mrs. Smith, have you?
Very well, see that you two agree in future
and don't bother me," said Uncle Jack.
And, strange to say, from that day Mrs
Smith and Daisy became fast friends, and the
kitchen was no longer forbidden ground to
Daisy.






MRS. SMITH.


And so the weeks lengthened into months,
and Daisy grew accustomed to her new home.
Her parents wrote long letters to her telling
her of the different places the vessel touched
at, and the strange sights they saw, and how
father was getting quite strong again.
Daisy would fain have told them everything
she did and saw in return; and very quaint
were the letters Mary wrote at her dictation,
at the close of every one of which Mary guided
her hand so that she might write from your
loving little daughter, Daisy". Then followed
a great number of crosses to stand for the
kisses she wished to send.
One thing alone troubled Uncle Jack; he
felt sure that Daisy was too much alone with
grown-up people, and regretted that she had
no companions of her own age, but did not
know how to mend matters. However, Daisy
settled the question herself one day, but that
will require a new chapter.




.^'!*. a*w^T *















CHAPTER VI.
DAISY'S NEW FRIENDS.

TTNCLE JACK, may I go with Mary this
afternoon to see her brothers and sister?"
asked Daisy one morning as they were finish-
ing breakfast.
"Eh! little lady, what's that? Want to go
a-visiting?" said Mr. Graham, who was engaged
scanning the newspaper.
Yes; Mary has promised to take me if you
will let me go," said Daisy.
Well, we'll see;" and Mrs. Smith coming in
just then for the orders for dinner, he asked
her if it was a place that Daisy might go to.
Well, sir, I don't see that any harm could
come of her going," said Mrs. Smith. Mary's
parents are very respectable people, and from
anything I have seen of the children, when
they have come to see their sister, they seem
quiet and well-behaved."
So Uncle Jack gave his permission, and






DAISY'S NEW FRIENDS.


Daisy was in a state of eagerness all forenoon.
Mary had talked a great deal about her
brothers and sister to Daisy. How Bob, who
was sixteen, was so clever, and had won such
a lot of prizes at school, and was now trying
to pass the Civil Service examination; and
then there was David, who was always getting
into scrapes, and Jim, who meant to be a sailor
by and by, and last and least, little Jeanie, the
pet of the whole household.
So it was with high spirits that Daisy set
off to make acquaintance with the family,
every one of whom she knew something about
beforehand.
Mary's parents lived in the outskirts of the
town in a little cottage, attached to which
there was a garden plot in front and a green
at the back, which, if small, had at least the
advantage of being private. And while Mary
sat talking with her mother the children took
Daisy (who was not the least shy after she
had been a few minutes there) out to the
back-green to play. And either because Mary
had talked so much about him, or because
something in his manner made her feel more
at home with him, Bob was her favourite from
the very first, although they all made a great
deal of their little visitor, who seemed to them
quite like a little fairy, as she flitted about in
her pretty white frock.







36 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


And greatly did Daisy enjoy her visit. She
had such a delightful time on the old swing,
and Bob was so careful not to let it go too
high; and afterwards he made his dog "Princie"
go through a number of wonderful tricks. He
was showing her how to set her hands that
"Princie" might jump over them, when Mary
came to tell her that it was time to go.
Daisy was rather loth to leave them all, and
nothing but the thought that Uncle Jack
would be home before her, if she did not go at
once, would have induced her to leave.
"May I come again?" she asked in her win-
ning way, as she bade Mrs. Sinclair good-bye.
"Yes, indeed, as often as you like, my dear,"
said Mrs. Sinclair, who was greatly taken with
her, and loud in praise of her to her husband
when he came home.
Daisy had a great deal to tell Uncle Jack
that evening about her new friends, and spoke
with such delight about the swing that Uncle
Jack, who never denied her anything that he
thought would give her pleasure, called on a
carpenter next morning and gave orders for a
swing to be erected in his back-green.
I leave Daisy's delight to be imagined.
Nor were there any neighbours to pass re-
marks on the eccentric old gentleman swing-
ing the little girl of an evening. For when Mr.
Graham bought the house, which was a semi-







DAISY'S NEW FRIENDS.


detached villa, he had purchased the adjoining
one, which was then being built, partly because
it was a safe investment, and partly that he
might please himself as to neighbours; and
not having yet found a suitable tenant it still
stood unoccupied.
After that Daisy often paid a visit to the
Sinclairs, and was very good friends with
them all, although Bob remained first favourite,
for, as they became used to her, David's pranks
were sometimes just a little rough, and Jim
frightened her by running along the wall.
This was no great feat for a boy of ten, but
to Daisy it seemed highly dangerous, although
he assured her that when he became a sailor
he would have to climb far worse places. And
Jeanie was inclined to be jealous of the little
lady who claimed so much of her brothers'
attention, but Bob, dear old Bob, as Mary
called him, made up for them all; and it was
wonderful the friendship that grew up be-
tween the big, clever lad and the little child.
One day Bob was out when she arrived, but
coming home just before she left, the news he
brought seemed to disappoint his mother and
sister.
Daisy looked on in silent sympathy, and
slipping her hand in Bob's, asked what was
the matter, in her grave, old-fashioned way.
Well, I don't think you'll understand, Miss







38 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


Daisy; but I was engaged to go to a situation
as office-boy, and now the gentleman won't
have me because I told him I was trying for
the'Civil Service'. Rather hard on a fellow,"
he added, turning to his mother, who, knowing
how much he wanted to earn something, and
thereby be a help to his father and herself,
sympathized greatly with him. But just now
she only replied:
"Never mind, my boy, something else will
turn up."
All the way home Daisy was rather silent,
but at dinner (the only part of which she
shared was the dessert and the talk) she sur-
prised Uncle Jack by asking him if to try for
the Civil Service was wicked.
"No," said Uncle Jack, highly amused; "do
you mean to try?"
"Don't tease, Uncle Jack," said Daisy, who
was very much in earnest. "That must have
been a bad man not to take Bob after he pro-
mised."
"Why, little lady, what do you mean?"asked
Uncle Jack.
So Daisy told him the whole story, finishing
by asking:
Could you not take him into your office,
Uncle Jack?"
Now, it happened that Mr. Graham required
a boy, but he liked one whom he could train,





DAISY'S NEW FRIENDS. 39
and disliked the prospect of losing-him after
a year or so. But Daisy was so loud in praise
of her favourite, and so eager about it, that
she carried her point, in so far that Uncle
Jack wrote a letter to Bob, asking him to call
at his office next day. And the result of the
interview was that he engaged him as office-
boy.




tuxtr















CHAPTER VII.

AT THE SEASIDE.

SEPTEMBER brought a pleasant change to
Daisy. Uncle Jack took a house at Joppa
for the month, and thither they all went.
Further from Edinburgh he could not bear to
go, but he felt that some change was desirable
on Daisy's account, and as he would reach town
about as quickly from there as from his own
house in the suburbs, it did not interfere
much with his ordinary habits; for, without a
daily run into business, Mr. Graham would
have felt himself lost. But as the month passed
by his stay in town became shorter in dura-
tion each day, for a certain little maiden
pleaded eagerly every morning:
"Come back soon, Uncle Jack."
And the other seaside visitors grew familiar
with the sight of the tall, gray-haired gentle-
man and the lovely little girl, who was always
dressed so prettily. At first in a white frock,






AT THE SEASIDE.


confined by neither sash nor waistband, but
hanging gracefully from the yoke at the neck,
and latterly-as Mary found how difficult it
was to keep white dresses in spotless condition
-in pretty brown holland blouses.
The delights of that long, long month need
I describe them? What child, whose annual
holiday is spent by the seaside, does not know
them already? The sandy holes just waiting
to be dug,-Mary proved a capital assistant
at that while Uncle Jack was in town. Then
the walks along the promenade with Uncle
Jack; going on to the pier to listen to the
band; and last but not least, the donkey-
rides, that pleasure which only a child can
enjoy. Daisy had a sixpenny ride every day,
and before the month was over she was the
best of friends with the donkey, which was
called Charlie, and his master, an old, bent
man, who learnt to look out for little Missie,
nor would he take anyone else if he saw her
coming. And Daisy, on her part, would wait
quite patiently should Charlie and his master
be out of stance when she arrived, refusing all
other offers quite politely but in a very
decided manner, until it became a matter of
course. Yet she was a great favourite with
the donkey people, her quaint little questions,
and the perfect freedom with which she went
about amongst them, won all hearts. Uncle






42 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

Jack who sometimes accompanied her, declared
that she bewitched everybody.
Nor were the donkey people the only
friends she made. Sometimes when Mary was
with her the children playing on the beach
would come and ask her to join in their
games, and if Mary gave her sanction, she
always went with great delight, and castle-
building and fort-digging went on apace.
Then there were the evenings when Uncle
Jack and she would wander about among the
rocks gathering shells, Daisy singing the
while snatches of a song Mary had taught her
about,-" the shells of the ocean, beautiful
shells". It took Uncle Jack back to the time
of his boyhood when his sister and he had
gathered shells together, and she had sung
that very song, and now her grandchild, who
had grown so very dear to him, ran about
among the rocks and sang the words that had
fallen so sweetly from her lips, long silent now.
And Uncle Jack's eyes became moist and
dim as he thought, for his heart, which had
become rather hard with long buffeting with
the world, was growing tender again. And
at night, when Daisy had gone to bed, and he
paced up and down the path before the house,
looking up to the quiet sky, words of a poem,
also familiar to him long ago, would come
into his thoughts:






AT THE SEASIDE.


"I remember, I remember
The fir-trees dark and high;
I used to think their slender tops
Were close against the sky:
It was a childish ignorance,
But now 'tis little joy
To know I'm further off from heaven,
Than when I was a boy ".
And then he would fall to thinking of his
nephew, and plan how he would help him
when he came back. And if the healing of
discord is drawing nearer to heaven,-and
who shall say it is not?-Uncle Jack was
drawing nearer, and a little child was leading
him.
Then on one never-to-be-forgotten day
Daisy had all the Sinclairs down to the sea-
side, Bob getting a holiday from the office for
the purpose. It was a day of perfect pleasure,
the weather was of the finest, and everybody
in high spirits. Uncle Jack stood donkey-rides
all round, Mrs. Smith prepared the most excel-
lent of dinners. And in the afternoon, while
Mary and the children were digging on the
sands, Uncle Jack had a long talk with Bob,
by which he learnt to know him better than
he would from merely seeing him daily in his
office for a whole year. Bob on his part was
greatly taken with Mr. Graham, and told his
mother that he was quite different from
what he had thought him. Afterwards Mr.







44 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.
Graham sent the boys out for a row in a
little boat with a boatman in charge, while he
took the little girls on to the pier. When the
boys came back they all went together and
had tea in the open air at the "Portobello
Caf6" with an unstinted number of buns and
other good things, and everyone was sorry
when train time arrived.
Altogether it was a perfect day, and loud
were Mr. Graham's praises sounded that night
by one and all.
"It was downright jolly," said David.
"You've got a regular brick of a master. I
only wish I was in your shoes," he added
turning to Bob.
Oh, he is not like that in the office; you
would have to work there, I can tell you,"
replied Bob, pleased nevertheless, for what
higher praise can a boy accord than to call
a man a brick, and say he has had a jolly
time.
But all pleasant things come to an end;
so do unpleasant things for that matter, only
the pleasant ones have a way of seeming to go
faster. It was so with the month at the sea-
side, and Daisy took her last ride on Charlie
with such evident regret, that nothing but
the impossibility of accommodating him with a
stall prevented Uncle Jack from buying him
on the spot if his master would have sold him.







AT THE SEASIDE. 45

which I doubt. So Daisy was forced to bid
good-bye to the "dearest of donkeys ".
"Except your dear little self," said Uncle
Jack.
"Oh! don't, Uncle Jack, don't tease," said
Daisy, who hated parting with anyone she
loved, "be it beast or body," as Mrs. Smith
said, and I really believe she loved that
donkey. And not without reason, for many
a pleasant ride she had had on his back, while
his old master had even a larger place in her
heart.





-T -I.-
'^^^^ ""*<














CHAPTER VIII.


GOOD NEWS.

A FEW weeks after they came home the
morning post brought a letter to Daisy
inclosed in one to Uncle Jack, telling that her
father and mother were returning earlier than
they had at first expected. Her father was so
fully recovered that they would not need to
spend the winter abroad, as they had at first
intended. In fact they hoped to spend Christ-
mas with their darling.
All the rest of the news was lost upon Daisy,
she had room for no other thought.
"Coming back so soon. Oh! I am so glad,
so glad!"
And she got up and danced round the
breakfast table, unable to sit still-her excite-
ment was so great. Finally jumping on
Uncle Jack's knee, she hugged and kissed
him until he laughingly told her to keep a
few kisses for her father and mother, and not
give them all away before they came.







GOOD NEWS.


Oh! I've plenty more," said Daisy, kissing
him afresh.
And it pleased Uncle Jack to think that she
turned to him in her happiness, instead of the
good news making her forget him.
The letter his nephew sent said that if he
were agreeable, they would come straight to
Edinburgh on their arrival, as they longed to
see their child again, "and to thank you, my
dear uncle, for all your goodness to her and us".
"Agreeable! I should think I am," said
Uncle Jack to himself; "what can the lad be
thinking of?"-quite forgetful of the fact that
he had never, since his nephew's marriage,
even asked them to pay him a visit. But
everything was altered now, and he looked
forward with pleasure to the prospect of see-
ing his nephew again, and was prepared to at
least tolerate George's wife for his and the
child's sake.
So he sent off a hearty invitation, telling
them that they must at least spend a month
with him.
Cheered by the thought of a speedy reunion,
the days and weeks passed quickly by. Nor
did Daisy ever pause to consider that by her
parents coming home she would lose Uncle
Jack-children do not reason that way.
Christmas was coming, and Father and Mother
with it, and that was enough for Daisy.







48 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


Her first question to Mary every morning
was, How many days are there to Christmas
now?" until Mary hit upon a plan by which
she could reckon it up herself. She got a
large sheet of cardboard, and dividing it into
sections like a draughtboard, placed the dif-
ferent dates of the month upon it in large
figures. Each line contained six dates, and
Daisy, who could count up to a hundred, had
no difficulty in finding out the number, scoring
off one each morning with great satisfaction.
One morning she came to Mary with tears
in her eyes, exclaiming pitifully:
"There were only twenty-five days yester-
day, and to-day there are thirty!"
Nor could Mary convince her of her mis-
take until she had gone over it all with her,
and pointed out how she had counted one line
twice.
Now that the days were shorter Uncle Jack
did not care for Daisy's going to the Sinclairs',
so Jeanie came to see her instead, and Bob
called as he came from the office to take his
sister home at night. And as Jeanie and Bob
were her favourites Daisy was very well
pleased with the arrangement, as, the days
being cold, they could no longer play out of
doors.
When the winter came Uncle Jack had a
little room fitted up as a play-room for her,






GOOD NEWS.


and thither she and her little guest repaired,
and amused themselves with the beautiful
toys of which she had so large a number.
Daisy always planned the game they were to
play (and very original games they were), yet
she was always ready to defer to Jeanie in
everything. So there was no wrangling or
quarrelling, as there is sure to be when each
child insists on having his or her own way.
And Jeanie, who was rather spoilt, as the
youngest of a family is so often apt to be,
learned many a lesson of unselfishness by
Daisy's behaviour, for Daisy was a true little
gentlewoman, gentle in word and deed, and
her mother had always taught her to put
others before herself.
As Christmas drew near many were the
preparations made to welcome the return of
the wanderers. Mrs. Smith was busy for
days beforehand with cakes and shortbread,
and there was nothing Daisy liked better
than to watch her as she added the finishing
touches. Great was her delight one day when
she discovered her own name in little pink
dots on a frosted cake.
Is it really mine, my very own, to do what
I like with?" she asked.
"Yes," said Mrs. Smith; "what will you do
with it?"
"I would like to take it to the Sinclairs,"
(952) D






50 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

she replied, a good deal to Mrs. Smith's
astonishment.
But Daisy's thoughts had gone back to last
Christmas, when Mother had told her "the
old, old story", and how the best way to keep
the day was to share her good things with
others. They had then made up a parcel
from amongst her toys, and taken them to
some little children whose parents were too
poor to spare money to buy toys.
After dinner that evening she told Uncle
Jack all about this, and asked:
"Are there any poor children in Edinburgh
that I could give some to?"
Why, are you tired of them?" asked Uncle
Jack.
"No, I love every one," answered Daisy.
"'Then I will buy some other toys, and you
can send them to the 'Sick Children's Hospi-
tal'," said Uncle Jack.
"But they would not be mine; I want to
send my very own," objected Daisy. And as
usual she carried her point.
So next day, with Mary's help, she chose
several of her prettiest toys, and sent them
away. Nor were these her only gifts. Uncle
Jack gave her a half-sovereign, and with the
help of her usual confidante, Mary, she bought
gifts for every one: a tobacco-pouch for Uncle
Jack, a cigarette-case for her father, a satchet






GOOD NEWS. 51

for her mother, a white silk neckerchief for
Mrs. Smith, and, lastly, a pair of gloves for
Mary. As Daisy completed this last purchase
she said, "Turn away your head and shut
your eyes, Mary," greatly to the shopman's
amusement.
Nor would she allow Mary to handle her
purchases, but carried them home herself, and
laid them in a drawer to await the proper
time for giving them away.















CHAPTER IX.

THE TRAVELLERS' RETURN.

FOR the last few weeks it had been known
that Mr. and Mrs. Seaton would reach
England on the 23d, and, travelling overnight,
arrive in Edinburgh on the morning of the
24th.
So Uncle Jack had already set off to meet
them when Mary went to dress Daisy, who
was in a great state of excitement, so much so
that Mary threatened to put her to bed again
if she did not keep quiet.
"Oh! don't say that, and I will be good-I
will be good!" exclaimed Daisy.
So to divert her attention Mary asked
what frock she would like to put on.
My blue one," said Daisy, to Mary's sur-
prise.
"What! not the pretty velvet frock your
uncle gave you?" asked Mary.
"No. Not my welwet frock," said Daisy,







THE TRAVELLERS' RETURN.


who, although actually a very plain speaker,
had in her excitement lapsed back into baby
language. The blue frock Mama made before
she went away."
So Mary dressed her in it, and very sweet
and pretty she looked, her fair, golden curls
falling gracefully on her shoulders, her cheeks
flushed and her eyes sparkling with excite-
ment, as she looked up in Mary's face and
remarked in her old-fashioned way:
Mother will like to see me in it because
she made it herself before she went away.
"I am sure she will," said Mary, stooping
down and kissing her.
Then they went down to the dining-room,
and Daisy took up her stand at the window
to watch for the cab, while Mary put the
finishing touches to the breakfast-table.
Nor had she long to wait.
"That's it! That's it! Open the door,
Mary, please open the door!" and Daisy's
voice almost ended in a scream.
In another instant she was clasped in her
mother's arms, who held her tightly as if she
could not bear to let her go, showering kisses
upon her the while, until her husband's voice
roused her saying:
"Come, Pearl, that's not fair, let me have a
sight of the child too."
And then followed what Uncle Jack called







54 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


a regular bear's hug, and he expressed a fear
that there wouldn't be any of his little fairy
left for him at all.
But Daisy soon assured him in a very
practical manner that there was no fear of
that; while her father turned to shake hands
with Mrs. Smith,-who had come into the hall,
-and introduce his wife to her.
Then Daisy caught sight of Mary, who had
been carrying in the wraps, and drawing her
forward, said:
"Mother, this is Mary."
Margaret not only shook hands with her,
but, kissing her, warmly assured her that she
could never repay all her kindness to her
child; while Uncle Jack, looking on, thought
to himself that it was easily seen where Daisy
got her winning way from. Indeed, now that
his prejudice was done away with, he began
to be very much taken with Margaret Seaton.
It was a merry party that gathered round
the breakfast-table that morning, and not-
withstanding a great deal of talking every one
did ample justice to the good fare provided;
for happiness as well as hunger gives an
excellent appetite, and the travellers were
both hungry and happy.
When at length they rose from the table,
Mr. Graham proposed to his nephew that, if
he were not too tired, he should accompany







THE TRAVELLERS' RETURN.


him along to the office, and renew his acquain-
tance with the clerks.
George assented very willingly, as he wished
for an opportunity alone with his uncle that
he might thank him for all he had done for
them.
When they reached the office, Mr. Graham
led the way straight to his private room, and
there unfolded a plan that had been maturing
in his mind for months.
"The long and the short of it is, my boy, I
am not as young as I once was, and need the
help of a younger man to carry on the busi-
ness. Now, you have already had the requi-
site training, and would have the interests of
the business thoroughly at heart. Besides, I
am beginning to see that in offering you a
partnership, I am only doing now what I
ought to have done seven years ago. But
that child has opened my eyes to a great
many things."
George was deeply touched, and could
hardly find words to express his feelings, and
just managed to say:
"I came here, Uncle, meaning to thank you
for your great kindness to us already, and
instead of giving me an opportunity, you
overwhelm me with more favors. I know
not how to thank you."
Well, well," said Uncle Jack, say no more







56 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.


about it, but talk it over with your wife. Now
I can breathe more freely that there is a pros-
pect of my not losing the child altogether, as
I would have to do, if you went back to Lon-
don. Don't mistake me. I don't ask you to
give her to me, but I will not lose her entirely,
and you cannot think how precious she has
grown to me in these last few months." And
Uncle Jack, who had said a great deal more
about his feelings than was his habit, made
haste to change the subject by opening the
door into the public room.
George Seaton needed no introduction to
several of the clerks, for they had been in the
office before he left, and were glad to welcome
him amongst them again, for his genial man-
ner had made him a favourite, and as Tom
Purves had remarked, the "governor" had
never been so easy to get on with since he
left.
Here is a new face," he said, as he ap-
proached Bob's desk.
This is Bob Sinclair," said Uncle Jack.
"Then we ought to be friends," said George
shaking hands, "I seem to know you quite
well already from my little girl's letters."
"Are you Miss Daisy's father?" said Bob in
surprise. Somehow he had always thought
of Mr. Seaton as a much older man, and
found it difficult to reconcile this tall fine-







THE TRAVELLERS' RETURN.


looking young gentleman with his former
idea.
"Yes," said George laughing at the ques-
tion. "And I can assure you I have heard a
great deal about you of late."
Left to themselves, Daisy and her mother
paid a visit to the kitchen to see Mrs. Smith,
and then up to her play-room, for Daisy was
eager to show her mother her toys.
"Aye!" said Mrs. Smith to herself when
they were gone, "it's easy to see where the
bairn got her winning way from; she's just
her mother over again, and a sweeter or a
bonnier creature never breathed. I'm sure,
whatever the master saw against her, I can't
think. Eh! but it'll be a dull house when
they take their bairn away."
After Daisy had gone to bed that night
George told his wife of his uncle's proposal,
and in so doing removed the last part of the
burden of anxiety she had carried so long; for
she had looked forward with apprehension to
the time when her husband would have to
resume his work in London.
Yet, like a true wife, she would not allow
him to sacrifice his future prospects that she
might be free from care, so she asked:
Will you not regret giving up your liter-
ary work?"
"Nay, wifee" said George, "I will not give







58 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

it up, but will work all the better now that I
will not need to do it for my daily bread, and
you know Sir Walter Scott said that litera-
ture was better used 'as a staff than a
crutch'."
So it was with a face from which the
shadow of every care had been chased away,
that Margaret turned to thank Uncle Jack
when he came into the drawing-room to ask
the result.








''"'- ,'-- -.' c -: -- '-.
; ".' .. .






CHAPTER X.
' PEACE ON EARTH, GOODWILL TOWARDS MEN."

VERY different was that Christmas from
any Uncle Jack had spent for a number
of years. Instead of his solitary hearth there
were bright faces and loving greetings, while
many were the good wishes exchanged as the
little party gathered round the breakfast-
table.
"What does this mean?" asked George
Seaton as a large key dropped out of his
napkin when he lifted it off his plate, and he
looked to his uncle in surprise.
Oh, it is just my Christmas present," said
Uncle Jack. "You see, when I bought this
house the one next door was only being built,
and as I am rather fidgety about whom I get
for neighbours, I just bought it at the same
time, thinking I could please myself as to
tenants; and I don't think I could find any
one who would suit me better than yourself.







60 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.

So if you'll just take it off my hands alto-
gether I will be greatly obliged."
Well, Uncle Jack, you are showering gifts
upon us," and George looked across to his
wife, wishing her to help him to thank his
uncle.
Instead she held up a cheque for five hun-
dred pounds.
"What, more, Uncle Jack? How can we
ever thank you?" said George.
Margaret did not attempt, but rising from
her seat she kissed Uncle Jack almost as
impulsively, and quite as affectionately, as
Daisy would have done.
Uncle Jack submitted to the embrace with
very good grace, and passed the matter over
lightly by saying:
Surely you would not expect me to give
you a house without adding something to help
to furnish it." Then looking to Daisy he
asked her, "How she liked the gift Santa
Claus had sent her?"
"It's such a funny one," said Daisy, who
had sat quietly looking on whilst the elders
were engaged, and now held up a riding-whip.
"I don't know what to do with it," she added
with her bright little laugh.
"Don't you? Well, we'll see by and by.
Now let's have breakfast," and Uncle Jack set
the example by beginning.







" PEACE ON EARTH."


Nor had Mrs. Smith and Mary been for-
gotten. Uncle Jack was not one to do things
by halves. So he had consulted Margaret,
and the result was a dress-piece of handsome
black silk for Mrs. Smith, and a pretty little
silver watch for Mary.
Margaret on her part had remembered those
who had been good to her child while she was
away, and although she had not much money
to spend, her clever fingers had helped her
slender purse. She had found time to sew a
pair of slippers for Uncle Jack, knit a shawl
for Mrs. Smith, and for Mary she had bought
a pretty brooch.
But these, as well as Daisy's gift, had all
been bestowed ere this, and I need not say
had given great satisfaction. Just as they
were finishing breakfast Mary announced that
there was some one at the door waiting for
Miss Daisy.
"For me?" said Daisy, jumping up and
looking first to her mother and then to Uncle
Jack for permission to go.
Come along," said Uncle Jack. Rising and
taking her hand in his own, he hurried out of
the room in a manner which showed that he,
at least, knew what to expect.
And there, just outside the garden gate,
stood a groom, holding one of the prettiest of
little Shetland ponies.







62 DAISY'S VISIT TO UNCLE JACK.
"Now, little lady, do you see the use for
the riding-whip?"
"Is it for me? Oh, the little darling!" and
her scream of delight brought both her father
and mother into the hall.
But Uncle Jack didn't want any more
thanks, so he cut the matter short by telling
Mary to get the riding-habit he had sent in
for Miss Daisy. So, fully equipped in dainty
habit and little felt hat, Daisy set off to try
her pony.
"And I don't see, George," said Uncle Jack
as they stood watching her, "why you
shouldn't keep a horse and take to riding
again; it would be good for you, and when
the child is a little older she will be able to
accompany you on your rides."
George, who had been passionately attached
to riding, could find nothing to say against
the proposal. Indeed, Uncle Jack seemed to
have found a way of planning things to please
everybody.
Ere the month's visit was over their pretty
villa was furnished by his generous present,
and when they moved into it Mary went with
them, and Uncle Jack had to get a new table-
maid.
But he had his wish, and did not lose Daisy
altogether; indeed it was hard to say which of
the twin houses was most her home. Of one






" PEACE ON EARTH."


thing I am certain. She never missed seeing
Uncle Jack off in the morning, nor watching
for his home-coming every evening.






THE END.





A SELECTION OF
BLACKIE & SON'S

BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.
SUITABLE FOR GIFTS. FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIES.
FOR PRIZES.

BLACKIE'S HALF-CROWN SERIES.
Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.
Nicola: The Career of a Girl Musician. By M. CORBET-SEYMOUR.
A Little Handful. By HARRIET J. SCRIPPS.
A Golden Age: A Story of Four Merry Children. By ISMAY THORN.
A Cruise in Cloudland. By HENRY FRITH.
A Rough Road: Or, How the Boy made a Man of Himself. By
Mrs. G. LINNaES BANKS.
The Two Dorothys: A Tale for Girls. By Mrs. HERBERT MARTIN.
Penelope and the Others. By AmY WALTON.
Stimson's Reef: A Tale of Adventure. By C. J. HYNE.
Marian and Dorothy. By ANNIE E. ARMSTRONG.
Gladys Anstruther: Or, The Young Stepmother. By LOUISA
THOMPSON.
The Secret of the Old House. By EVELYN EVERETT-GREEN.
Hal Hungerford: Or, The Strange Adventures of a Boy Emigrant.
By J. R. HUTCHINSON, B.A.
The Golden Weathercock. By JULIA GODDARD.
The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. By DR. GORDON STABLES.
Miriam's Ambition. By EVELYN EVERETT-GREEN.
White Lilac: Or, The Queen of the May. By AMY WALTON.
Little Lady Clare. By EVELYN EVERETT-GREEN.
The Saucy May. By HENRY FRITH.
The Brig "Audacious". By ALAN COLE.
Jasper's Conquest. By ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.
Sturdy and Strong: Or, How George Andrews made his Way.
By G. A. HENTY.






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.


HALF-CROWN SERIES-Continued.


Gutta-Percha Willie: The Working Genius. By GEORGE MAO
DONALD.
The War of the Axe: Or, Adventures in South Africa. By
J. PEROY-GROVES.
The Eversley Secrets. By EVELYN EVERETT-GREEN.
The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. STEAD.
Ten Boys who lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now. By JANE
ANDREWS. With 20 Illustrations.
Winnie's Secret: A Story of Faith and Patience. By KATE WOOD.
A Waif of the Sea: Or the Lost Found. By KATE WOOD.
Miss Willowburn's Offer. By SARAH DOUDNEY.
A Garland for Girls. By LOUISA M. ALCOTT.
Hetty Gray: Or Nobody's Bairn. By RosA MULHOLLAND.
Brothers in Arms: A Story of the Crusades. By F. B. HARRISON.
The Ball of Fortune. By CHARLES PEARCE.
Miss Fenwiek's Failures. By EsMr STUART.
Gytha's Message: A Tale of Saxon England. By EMMA LESLIE.
My Mistress the Queen: A 17th Century Tale. By M. A. PAULL.
Jack o' Lanthorn: A Tale of Adventure. By HENRY FRITH.
The Family Failing. By DARLEY DALE.
The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff: The Deliverer of Sweden,
and the Favourite of Czar Peter.
Stories of the Sea in Former Days.
Tales of Captivity and Exile.
Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.
Stirring Events of History.
Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.


2






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 3


BLACKIE'S TWO SHILLING SERIES.
In crown 8vo, with Illustrations, cloth elegant, 2s.

Queen of the Daffodils: A Story of High School Life. By LESLIE
LAING.
Raff's Ranehe: Adventures among Cow-boys and Indians. By
F. Mi. HOLMES.
The Bushranger's Secret. By Mrs. HENRY CLARKE.
An Unexpected Hero. By ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.
The White Squall: A Story of the Sargasso Sea. By JOHN C.
HUTCHESON.
The Wreck of the Nancy Bell: Or, Cast away on Kerguelen
Land. By JOHN C. HUTCHESON.
The Joyous Story of Toto. By LAURA E. RICHARDS. With 30
Illustrations.
The Lonely Pyramid: A Tale of Adventures. By J. H. YOXALL.
Brave and True, and other two Stories. By GREGSON Gow.
Climbing the Hill, and other two Stories. By ANNIE S. SWAN.
The Light Princess, and other Stories. By GEORGE MAC DONALD.
Nutbrown Roger and I: A Romance of the Highway. By J. H.
YOXALL.
A Rash Promise: Or, Meg's Secret. By CECILIA SELBY LOWNDES.
Sam Silvan's Sacrifice. By JESSE COLMAN.
A Warrior King: Adventures in South Africa. By J. EVELYN.
Susan. By AMY WALTON.
Linda and the Boys. By CECILIA SELBY LOWNDES.
Swiss Stories for Children and those who Love Children.
From the German of MADAM SPYRI. By LuOY WHEELOCK.
Aboard the "Atalanta". By HENRY FRITH.
The Penang Pirate. By JOHN C. HUTCHESON.
Teddy: The Story of a "Little Piclde." By JOHN C. HUTCHESUN.






i BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

TWO SHILLING SERIES-Continued.

Warner's Chase: Or the Gentle Heart. By ANNIE S. SWAN.
New Light through Old Windows. A Series of Stories illus-
trating Fables of 2sop. By GREGSON Gow.
A Pair of Clogs, and other Stories. By AMY WALTON.
The Hawthorns. By AMY WALTON.
Dorothy's Dilemma: A Tale of the Time of Charles I. By CARo-
LINE AUSTIN.
Marie's Home: Or, A Glimpse of the Past. By CAROLINE AUSTIN.
The Squire's Grandson: A Devonshire Story. By J. M. CALL-
WELL.
Insect Ways on Summer Days in Garden, Forest, Field, and
Stream. By JENNETT HUMPHREYS. With 70 Illustrations.
Magna Charta Stories: Or, Struggles for Freedom in the Olden
Time. Edited by ARTHUR GILMAN, A.M.
The Wings of Courage; AND THE CLOUD-SPINNER. Translated
from the French of GEORGE SAND, by Mrs. CORKRAN.


FOR THE YOUNGER CHILDREN.
Bab: Or, The Triumph of Unselfishness. By IS~AY THORN.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be. By ALICE CORKRAN.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways. By Mrs. R. H. READ.
Fairy Fancy: What she Heard and Saw. By Mrs. R. H. READ.
Four Little Mischiefs. By RosA MULHOLLAND.
Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories. By THOMAS ARCHER.
Naughty Miss Bunny. By CLARA MULHOLLAND.
Chirp and Chatter: Or, LESSONS FROM FIELD AND TREE. By
ALICE BANKS. With 54 Illustrations by GORDON BROWNE.






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 5


BLACKIE'S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.

In Crown 8vo, cloth extra, each with Tinted or Coloured Illustrations.


A Soldier's Son. By ANNETTE LYS-
TER.
Town Mice in the Country. By
M. E. FRANCIS.
Mischief and Merry-making. By
ISABELLA PEARSON.
Phil and his Father. By ISMAY
THORN.
Prim's Story. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Littlebourne Lock. ByF. BAYFORD
HARRISON.
Wild Meg and Wee Dickie. By
MARY E. ROPES.
Grannie: A Story by ELIZABETH J.
LYSAGHT.
The Seed She Sowed. By EMMA
LESLIE.
Unlucky: A Fragment of a Girl's Life.
By CAROLINE AUSTIN.
Everybody's Business: or a Friend
in Need. By ISMAY THORN.
Tales of Daring and Danger. By
G. A. HENTY.
The Seven Golden Keys. By JAMES
E. ARNOLD.
The Story of a Queen. By MARY
C. ROWSELL.
Joan's Adventures at the North
Pole. By ALICE CORKRAN.
Filled with Gold. By J. PERRETT.
Edwy: Or, Was he a Coward? By
ANNETTE LYSTER.
The Battlefield Treasure. By F.
BAYFORD HARRISON.


Yarns on the Beach. By G. A.
HENTY.
A Terrible Coward. By G. M. FENN.
The Late Miss Hollingford. By
ROSA MULHOLLAND.
Our Frank, and other Stories. By
AMY WALTON.
The Pedlar and his Dog. By MARY
C. ROWSELL.
Into the Haven. By ANNIE S. SWAN.
Tom Finch's Monkey. By J. C.
HUTCHESON.
Our General: A Story for Girls. By
ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.

Aunt Hesba's Charge. By ELIZA-
BETH J. LYSAGHT.
By Order of Queen Maude. By
LOUISA CROW.
Miss Grantley's Girls, andtheStories
she told them. By THOS. ARCHER.
The Troubles of Little Tim. By
GREGSON Gow.
Down and Up Again. By GREGSON
Gow.
The Happy Lad. By B. BJSRNSON.
The Patriot Martyr, and other Nar-
ratives of Female Heroism.
Madge's Mistake. By ANNIE E.
ARMSTRONG.
Box of Stories. By H. HAPPYMAN.

When I was a Boy in China. By
YAN PHOU LEE.






6 HLACCKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.


BLACKIE'S SHILLING SERIES.

Square 16mo, 128 pp., elegantly bound in cloth, with Frontispiece.


Brave Dorette. By JULIA GODDARD.
Piecrust Promises. By W. L.
ROOPER.
Little Aunt Dorothy. By JENNIE
CHAPPELL.
Summer Fun and Frolic. By ISA-
BELLA PEARSON.
The Lost Dog. By ASCoTT R. HOPE.
A Council of Courtiers. By CORA
LANGTON.
The Rambles of Three Children.
By GERALDINE MOCKLER.
A Parliament of Pickles. By CORA
LANGTON.
Sharp Tommy. By E. J. LYSAGHT.
The Strange Adventures of Nell,
Edie, and Toby. By G. MOOKLER.
Freda's Folly. By Mt. S. HAYOCRAT.
Philip Danford. By JULIA GODDARD.
The Youngest Princess. By JENNIE
(CHAPPELL.
Arthur's Temptation. By EMMA
LESLIE.
A Change for the Worse. By M.
HARRIET AM. CAPES.
Our Two Starlings. By CHRISTIAN
REDFORD.
Mr. Lipseombe's Apples. By JULIA
GODDARD.
A Gypsy against Her Will. By
EMMA LESLIE.
An Emigrant Boy's Story. By
AscOTT R. HOPE.
The Castle on the Shore. By ISA-
BEL HORNIBROOK.
John a' Dale. By MARY C. ROWSELL.
Jock and his Friend. By CORA
LANGTON.
Gladys. ByE. O'BYRNE.
In the Summer Holidays. By JEN-
NETT HUMPHREYS.
How the Strike Began. By EMMA
LESLIE.


Tales from the Russian of Madame
Kubalensky. By G. JENNER.
Cinderella's Cousin. By PENELOPE.
Their New Home. By A. S. FENN.
Janie's Holiday. By C. REDFORD.
The Children of Haycombe. By
ANNIE S. FENN.
The Cruise of the "Petrel".
The Wise Princess. By M. HARRIET
M. CAPES.
A Boy Musician.
Hatto's Tower. By M. C. ROWSELL.
Fairy Lovebairn's Favourites.
Alf Jetsam. By Mrs. GEO. CUPPLES.
The Redfords. By Mrs. G. CUPPLES.
Missy. By F. BAYFORD HARRISON.
Hidden Seed. By EMMA LESLIE.
Jack's Two Sovereigns.
Ursula's Aunt. By ANNIE S. FENN.
A Little Adventurer.
Olive Mount. By ANNIE S. FENN.
Three Little Ones. By C. LANGTON.
Tom Watkin's Mistake.
Two Little Brothers.
The New Boy at Merriton.
The Blind Boy of Dresden.
Jon of Iceland: A True Story
Stories from Shakespeare.
Every Man in his Place.
Fireside Fairies.
To the Sea in Ships.
Little Daniel: A Story of the Rhine.
Jack's Victory: Stories about Dogs.
Story of a King.
Prince Alexis: or, Old Russia.
Sasha the Serf: Stories of Russia.
True Stories of Foreign History.






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.


THE NINEPENNY SERIES OF BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each 96 pp., with Illustration.
A Little English Gentleman. By A Day of Adventures. By CHAI-
JANE DEAKIN. LOTTE WYATT.
The Doctor's Lass. By L. E. Trn- The Golden Plums: and other Stories.
DEMAND. By FRANCIS CLARE.
Spark and I. By ANNIE ARMSTRONG. The Queen of Squats. By ISABEL
What Hilda Saw. By PENELOPE hORNIIROO
LESLIE. Shucks. By EMMA LESLIE.-
Little Miss Masterful. By L. E. Sylvia Brooke. By M. HARRIET M.
TIDDEMAN. CAPES.
An Australian Childhood. ByELLEN The Little Cousin. By A. S. FENN.
CAMPBELL. In Cloudland. By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.
A Sprig of Honeysuckle. By Jack and the Gypsies. By KATE
GEORGINA M. SQUIRE. WOOD.
Kitty Carroll. By L. E. TIDDEMAN. Hans the Painter. By MARY C.
A Joke for a Picnic. By W. L. ROWSELL.
ROOPER. Little Troublesome. By ISABEL
Cross Purposes, and The Shadows. HORNIBROOK.
By GEORGE MAC DONALD. My Lady May. By HARRIET BoUrLT-
Patty's Ideas. By L. E. TIDDEMAN. WOOD.
Daphne: A Story of Self-conquest. A Little Hero. By Mrs. MUSRAVE.
By E. O'BYRNE. Prince Jon's Pilgrimage. By
Lily and Rose in One. By CECILIA JESSIE FLEMING.
S. LOWNDES. Harold's Ambition. By JENNIE
Crowded Out. By M. B. MANWELL. PERRETT.
Sepperl the Drummer Boy. By
Tom in a Tangle. By T. SPARROW. MRY C. r Boy ByS .
Things will Take a Turn. By Aboard the Mersey. By Mrs.
BEATRICE HARRADEN. GEORGE CUPPLES.
Max or Baby. By ISMAY THORN. A Blind Pupil. By ANNIE S. FENN.
The Lost Thimble: and other Stories. Lost and Found. By Mrs. CAILL
By Mrs. MUSGRAVE. BROTHER.
Jack-a-Dandy; or the Heir of Castle Fisherman Grim. By MARY C.
Fergus. By E. J. LYSAGHT. ROWSELL.

SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONES.
Illustrated. Cloth. 6d. each. Illustrated. Cloth. 2d. each.

Tales Easy and Small for the Young- Fred's Run.
eat of All. By J. HUMPHREYS. Nora's Dark Look.
Old Dick Grey. Honest Dolly.
Maud's Doll and Her Walk. Ella's Fall.
In Holiday Time. Patty's Walk.
Whisk and Buzz. Little Queen Pet.






8 BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

THE SIXPENNY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each contains 64 pages and a Coloured Cut.


Mrs. Holland's Peaches. By PEN-
ELOPE LESLIE.
Marjory's White Rat. By do.
Grandmother's Forget-me-nots.
From over the Sea. By L. E. TIDDE-
MAN.
The Kitchen Cat. ByAmY WALTON.
The Royal Eagle. ByL. THOMPSON.
Two Little Mice. By Mrs. GARLICK.
A Little Man of War.
Lady Daisy. By CAROLINE STEWART.
Dew. By H. MARY WILSON.
Chris's Old Violin. By J. LOKHART.
Mischievous Jack. By A. CORKRAN.
The Twins. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Pet's Project. By CORA LANGTON.
The Chosen Treat. By C. WYATT.
Little Neighbours. By A. S. FENN.
Jim. By CHRISTIAN BURKE.
Little Curiosity; or a German Christ-
mas. By J. M. CALLWELL.
Sara the Wool-gatherer.
Fairy Stories: told by PENELOPE.


A New Year's Tale. ByM. A. CURRIE.
Little Mop. By Mrs. CHARLES BRAY.
The Tree Cake. By W. L. ROOPER.
Nurse Peggy, and Little Dog Trip.
Fanny's King. By DARLEY DALE.
Wild Marsh Marigolds. By do.
Kitty's Cousin.
Cleared at Last.
Little Dolly Forbes.
A Year with Nellie. By A. S. FENN.
The Little Brown Bird.
The Maid of Domremy.
Little Eric: a Story of Honesty.
Uncle Ben the Whaler.
The Palace of Luxury.
The Charcoal Burner.
Willy Black: A Story of Doing Right.
The Horse and his Ways.
The Shoemaker's Present.
Lights to Walk by.
The Little Merchant.
Nicholina: A Story about an Iceberg.


A SERIES OF FOURPENNY REWARD BOOKS.
Each 64 pages, 18mo, Illustrated, in Picture Boards.


A Start in Life. By J. LOCKHART.
Happy Childhood.
Dorothy's Clock.
Toddy. By L. E. TIDDEnMAN.
Stories about my Dolls.
Stories about my Cat Timothy.
Delia's Boots. By W. L. ROOPER.
Lost on the Rocks. ByR. SCOTTER.
A Kitten's Adventures.
A Year at Coverley. By A. S. SWAN.
Climbing the Hill. By Do.


Phil Foster. By J. LOCKHART.
Papa's Birthday. ByW. L. ROOPER.
The Charm Fairy. By PENELOPE.
Little Tales for Little Children.
Brave and True. By GREGsoN Gow.
The Children and the Water-Lily.
Poor Tom Olliver.
Maudie and Bertie. GREGSON GOW.
Johnnie Tupper's Temptation. Do.
Fritz's Experiment.
Lucy's Christmas-Box.


*,* A Complete List of Books for the Young, prices from 4d. to 7s. 6d.,
with Synopsis of their Contents, will be supplied on Application.

BLACKIE & SON, LIMITED: LONDON, GLASGOW, AND EDTNBURGH.





I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs