• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The Red Cross knight
 "The good Sir Guyon"
 The legend of Britomart
 The squire of low degree
 The adventures of Sir Artegall
 Sir Calidore, knight of courte...
 Advertising
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Stories from the Faerie queene
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085604/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories from the Faerie queene
Physical Description: xxvii, 394, 8 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Macleod, Mary, d. 1914
Spenser, Edmund, 1552?-1599
Hales, John W ( John Wesley ), 1836-1914 ( Author of introduction )
Walker, Arthur G ( Illustrator )
Wells Gardner, Darton & Co ( Publisher )
Ballantyne, Hanson and Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Gardner, Darton & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Ballantyne, Hanson & Co.
Publication Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Queens -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Knights and knighthood -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Chivalry -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Temperance -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Chastity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Justice -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Allegories -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Allegories   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication on t.p. verso.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Macleod ; with introduction by John W. Hales ; drawings by A.G. Walker.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085604
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237750
notis - ALH8243
oclc - 237051086

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
    Half Title
        Page iii
    Frontispiece
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
        Page xix
        Page xx
    Table of Contents
        Page xxi
        Page xxii
        Page xxiii
        Page xxiv
    List of Illustrations
        Page xxv
        Page xxvi
        Page xxvii
        Page xxviii
    The Red Cross knight
        Page 1
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    "The good Sir Guyon"
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    The legend of Britomart
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    The squire of low degree
        Page 260
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    The adventures of Sir Artegall
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    Sir Calidore, knight of courtesy
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    Advertising
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    Back Matter
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



















































The Baldwin Library
Univer ity
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Stories from the

Faerie Queene



















































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Ubeu Oo zbe prapob, anb tbankt ber faitbfull 1ftntgbt
Ubat bab atcbtevZe so great a conquest bl ? 6 migbt."
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1897




























Introduction


T HE object of this volume is to excite interest
in one of the greatest poems of English litera-
ture, which for all its greatness is but little read and
known-to excite this interest not only in young per-
sons who are not yet able to read The Faerie Queene,"
with its archaisms of language, its distant ways and
habits of life and thought, its exquisite melodies that
only a cultivated ear can catch and appreciate, but
also in adults, who, not from the lack of ability, but
because they shrink from a little effort, suffer the
loss of such high and refined literary pleasure as the
perusal of Spenser's masterpiece can certainly give.
Vii







Introduction


Assuredly, when all that cavillers can say or do is
said and done, "The Faerie Queene" is deservedly
called one of the greatest poems of English literature.
From the high place it took, and took with acclama-
tion, when it first appeared, it has, in fact, never been
deposed. It has many defects and imperfections, such
as the crudest and most commonplace critic can dis-
cover, and has discovered with much self-complacency;
but it has beauties and perfections that such critics
very often fail to see; and, so far as the status of
"The Faerie Queene" is concerned, it is enough for
the ordinary reader to grasp the significant fact that
Spenser has won specially for himself the famous
title of "the poets' poet." Ever since his star ap-
peared above the horizon, wise men from all parts
have come to worship it; and amongst these devotees
fellow-poets have thronged with a wonderful enthu-
siasm. In one point all the poetic schools of England
have agreed together, viz., in admiration for Spenser.
From Milton and Wordsworth on the one hand to
Dryden and Pope-from the one extreme of English
poetry to the other-has prevailed a perpetual reverence
for Spenser. The lights in his temple, so to speak,
have never been extinguished-never have there been
wanting offerers of incense and of praise; and, to
repeat in other words what has already been said, as
it is what we wish to specially emphasise, amidst this
faithful congregation have been many who already
had or were some day to have temples of their own.
We recognize amongst its members not only the great
poets already mentioned, but many others of the
viii








Introduction


divine brotherhood, some at least of whom rank with
the greatest, such as Keats, Shelley, Sidney, Gray,
Byron, the Fletchers, Henry More, Raleigh, Thomson,
not to name Beattie, Shenstone, Warton, Barnefield,
Peele, Campbell, Drayton, Cowley, Prior, Akenside,
Roden Noel. To this long but by no means exhaus-
tive list might be added many of high eminence in
other departments of literature and of life, as Gibbon,
Mackintosh, Hazlitt, Craik, Lowell, Ruskin, R. W.
Church, and a hundred more.
Now, of course, the acceptance of a poet is and
must be finally due to his own intrinsic merits. No
amount of testimonials from ever so highly distin-
guished persons will make a writer permanently popu-
lar if he cannot make himself so-if his own works
do not make him so. Of testimonials there is very
naturally considerable distrust--very naturally, when
we notice what second-rate penmen have been and are
cried up to the skies. But in the present case the
character of the testifiers is to be carefully considered;
and, secondly, not only their words but their actions
are to be taken into account. Many of our greatest
poets have praised Spenser not only in formal phrases,
but practically and decisively, by surrendering them-
selves to his influence, by sitting at his feet, by taking
hints and suggestions from him. He has been their
master not merely nominally but actually, and with
obvious results. If all traces of Spenser's fascination
and power could be removed from subsequent English
literature, that literature would be a very different
thing from what it is: there would be strange breaks
ix







Introduction


and blanks in many a volume, hiatuses in many a
line, an altered turning of many a sentence, a modifi-
cation of many a conception and fancy. And we are
convinced that the more Spenser is studied the more
remarkable will his dominance and his dominion be
found to be. To quote lines that have been quoted
before in this connection-
Hither, as to their fountain, other stars
Repairing, in their urns draw golden light."
"The Faerie Queene" is one of the great well-
heads of English poetry; or, in other words, Spenser's
Faerie Land has been and is a favourite haunt of all
our highest poetic spirits.
And yet it is incontrovertible that this poem is
very little known as a whole to most people. Every-
body is familiar with the story of Una and the
Lion, and with two or three stanzas of singular
beauty in other parts of "The Faerie Queen," because
these occur in most or all books of selections: in
every anthology occur those fairest flowers. But the
world at large is content to know no more. The size
of the poem appals it. "A big book is a big evil," it
thinks, and it shudders at the idea of perusing the
six twelve-cantoed books in which Spenser's genius
expressed itself-expressed itself only in an incom-
plete and fragmentary fashion, for many more books
formed part of his enormous design. "Of the persons
who read the first canto," says Macaulay in a famous
Essay, "not one in ten reaches the end of the First
Book, and not one in a hundred perseveres to the end
of the poem. Very few and very weary are those who







Introduction


are in at the death of the Blatant Beast. If the last
six books, which are said [without any authority] to
have been destroyed in Ireland, had been preserved,
we doubt whether any heart less stout than that of a
commentator would have held out to the end." And
Macaulay speaks truly as well as wittily. He is as
accurate as Poins when Prince Hal asks him what he
would think if the Prince wept because the King his
father was sick. "I would think thee a most princely
hypocrite," replies Poins. "It would be every man's
thought," says the Prince: "and thou art a blessed
fellow to think as every man thinks. Never a man's
thought in the world keeps the roadway better than
thine." Even so is Macaulay "a blessed fellow to
think as every man thinks," and no doubt his blessed-
ness in this respect is one of the characteristics-by
no means the only one-that account for his wide-
spread popularity. He not only states that people
do not read "The Faerie Queen," but he shows that
he himself, voracious reader--elluo librorum- as he
was, had not done so, or had done so very carelessly;
for, alas! the Blatant Beast, as at all events every
student of the present volume will know, does not
die; Sir Calidore only suppresses him for a time; he
but temporarily ties and binds him in an iron chain,
"and makes him follow him like a fearful dog;" and
one day long afterwards the beast got loose again-

Ne ever could by any, more be brought
Into like bands, ne maystred any more,
Albe that, long time after Calidore,
The good Sir Pelleas him tooke in hand,







Introduction


And after him Sir Lamoracke of yore,
And all his brethren borne in Britaine land;
Yet none of them could ever bring him into band.

"So now he raungeth through the world again,
And rageth sore in each degree and state;
Ne any is that may him now restraine,
He growen is so great and strong of late,
Barking and biting all that him doe bate,
Albe they worthy blame, or clear of crime;
Ne spareth he most learned wits to rate,
Ne spareth he the gentle Poets rime;
But rends without regard of person or of time."

And Spenser goes on to declare that even his "homely
verse of many meanest" cannot hope to escape "his
venemous despite;" for, in his own day, as often
since, Spenser by no means found favour with every-
body. Clearly even Macaulay's memory of the close of
" The Faerie Queene" was sufficiently hazy. But even
Milton, to whom Spenser was so congenial a spirit,
and whom he acknowledged as his "poetical father,"
on one occasion at least forgets the details of the
Spenserian story. When insisting in the Areopagitica
that true virtue is not a fugitive and cloistered
virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies
out and sees her adversary," but a virtue that has
been tried and tested, he remarks that this "was the
reason why our sage and serious poet Spenser, whom
I dare be known to think a better teacher than Scotus
or Aquinas, describing true temperance under the
person of Guion, brings him in with his Palmer
through the cave of Mammon and the bower of
xii








Introduction


earthly bliss, that he may see, and know, and yet
abstain." But the Palmer was not with Sir Guyon in
the Cave of Mammon, Phedria having declined to
ferry him over to her floating island. See "The
Faerie Queene," ii. 6, 19: -

Himself [Sir Guyon] she tooke aboard,
But the Black Palmer suffered still to stond,
Ne would for price or prayers once afford
To ferry that old man over the perlous foord.

"Guyon was loath to leave his guide behind,
Yet being entered might not back retyre;
For the flitt barke, obeying to her mind,
Forth launched quickly as she did desire,
Ne gave him leave to bid that aged sire
Adieu."

So Macaulay's lapse must not be regarded too
severely, though, as may be seen, much more promi-
nence is given by Spenser to the fact that the Blatant
Beast was not killed, than to the absence of the
Palmer from Guyon's side in Mammon's House. It
seems probable, indeed, that Macaulay mixed up the
fate of the Dragon in the eleventh canto of the First
Book with that of the Blatant Beast in the twelfth of
the Sixth. But we mention these things only to pre-
vent any surprise at the general ignorance of Spenser,
when such a confirmed book-lover as Macaulay, and
such a devoted Spenserian as Milton, are found tripping
in their allusions to his greatest work.
Now this ignorance, however explicable, is, we
think, to be regretted. A poet of such splendid attri-
xiii








Introduction


butes, and with such a choice company of followers,
surely deserves to be better known than he is by "the
general reader" ; and we trust that this volume may
be of service in making the stories of The Faerie
Queene more familiar, and so in tempting the general
reader to turn to Spenser's own version of them, and
to appreciate his amazing affluence of language, of
melody, and of fancy.
Clearly, Spenser does not appeal to'everybody at
first; we mean that to enjoy him fully needs some
little effort to begin with-some distinct effort to put
ourselves in communication with him, so to speak;
for he is far away from us in many respects. His
costume and his accent are very different from ours.
He does not seem to be of us or of our world. His
soul is "like a star" : it dwells "apart." We have,
it would appear at first sight, nothing in common with
him : he moves all alone in a separate sphere-he is
not of our flesh and blood. What strikes us at first
sight is a certain artificiality and elaborateness, as we
think. We cannot put ourselves on confidential terms
with him; he is too stately and point devise. His
art rather asserts than conceals itself to persons who
merely glance at him. But these impressions will be
largely or altogether .removed, if the reader will
really read The Faerie Queene." He will no.longer
think of its author as a mere phrase-monger, or only
a dainty melodist, or the master of a superfine'style.
He will find himself in communion with a man of
high intellect, of a noble nature-of great attraction,
not only for his humanism, but for his humanity. To








Introduction


Spenser, Wordsworth's lines in "A Poet's Epitaph"
may be applied with particular and profound truth :
"He is retired as noontide dew,
Or fountain in a noonday grove;
And you must love him ere to you
He will seem worthy of your love."

The very opulence of Spenser's genius stands in
the way of his due appraisement. There can scarcely
be a doubt that if he could have restrained the re-
dundant stream of his poetry, he might have been
more worthily recognized. Had he written less, he
would have been praised more; as it is, with many
readers, mole ruit sua: they are overpowered and
bewildered by the immense flood. The waters of
Helicon seem a torrent deluge. We say his popu-
larity would have been greater, if he could have
restrained and controlled this amazing outflow; but,
after all, we must take our great poets as we find
them. In this very abundance, as in other ways,
Spenser was a child of his age, and we must accept
him with all his faults as well as with all his excellences.
Both faults and excellences are closely inter-connected.
II a les ddfauts de ses qualities.
He said that Chaucer was his poetical master, and
more than once he mentions Chaucer with the most
generous admiration :-

"Dan Chaucer, well of English undefyled,
On Fames eternal beadroll worthy to be fyled."
That old Dan Geffrey, in whose gentle spright
The pure well head of Poesie did dwell,"
xV







Introduction


And Chaucer too may be said to suffer from a very
plethora of wealth. Chaucer is apt to be super-
abundant; but yet he was a model of self-restraint
as compared with Spenser. One cannot say in this
case, "Like master, like man," or, "Like father, like
son." Their geniuses are entirely different a fact
which makes Spenser's devotion to Chaucer all the
more noticeable and interesting; and the art of the
one is in sharp contrast with the art of the other.
Chaucer is a masterly tale-teller : no one in all English
poetry equals him in this faculty; he is as supreme
in it as Shakespeare in the department of the drama.
In his tales Chaucer is, without o'erflowing, full."
The conditions under which they were told bene-
ficially bounded and limited them. Each is multum
in parvo. They are very wonders of compression,
and yet produce no sense of confinement or excision.
Spenser could not possibly have set before himself a
better exemplar; but yet he so set him in vain. The
contrast between the two poets, considered merely as
narrators or story-tellers, is vividly exhibited in the
third canto of the Fourth Book of "The Faerie
Queene," where, after a reverent obeisance to his great
predecessor, he attempts to tell the other half of the
half-told story.

Of Cambuscan bold,
Of Camball and of Algarsife,
And who had Canace to wife,
That owned the virtuous ring and glass,
And of the wondrous horse of brass,
On which the Tartar king did ride."
xvi









Introduction


It is not without some misgiving that he adventures
on such a daring task:-

Then pardon, O most sacred happie Spirit!
That I thy labours lost may thus revive,
And steale from thee the meede of thy due merit,
That none durst ever whilest thou wast alive,
And being dead in vain yet many strive.
Ne dare I like; but through infusion swete
Of thine own Spirit which doth in me survive,
I follow here the footing of thy feete,
But with thy meaning so I may the rather meete."

But it can scarcely be allowed either that he follows
the footing of his master's feet, or that he caught the
breath of his master's spirit. There are diversities of
operations "; and Spenser's method and manner were
not those of Chaucer, however sincere the allegiance he
professed, and however sincere his intentions to tread
in his footsteps and march along the same road. He
wanted some gifts and some habits that are necessary
for the perfect story-teller-gifts and habits which
Chaucer, by nature or by discipline, possessed in a
high degree, such as humour, concentration, realism.
The very structure of "The Faerie Queene" is de-
fective. It begins in the middle-at its opening it
takes us in medias res, seemingly in accordance with

I Spenser thought that the latter Part or Parts of the Squire's Tale had
actually been written but been lost-been "quite devoured" by "cursed eld,"
and "'brought to nought by little bits," as he quaintly expresses it. But it
may be taken as certain Chaucei left the tale as we have it, that is, half told."
The closing lines of what we have are clearly unrevised. For some reason or
another-trouble or sickness, or his growing infirmity-what would have
been one of the most brilliant works of the Middle Ages was never completed,
and, like Christabel" and "Hyperion," remains only a glorious fragment.
xvii b








Introduction


the precedent of the Iliad or of the AEneid, but
only seemingly, for both Homer and Virgil very
soon finish the explanation of their opening initial
scenes, and their readers know where they are. But
the first six books of "The Faerie Queene" are very
slightly connected together; and what the connection
is meant to be we learn only from the letter of the
poet to Sir Walter Raleigh, which it was thought
well to print with the first three books, no doubt in
consequence of some complaints of obscurity and dis-
attachment. This letter is significantly described as
"expounding his" (the author's) "whole intention in
the course of this work," and as hereunto annexed, for
that it giveth great light to the reader for the better
understanding." Certainly a story ought not to re-
quire a prose appendix to set forth its arrangement
and its purpose, even if only a fourth of it is completed.
The exact correlation of eleven books was to remain
unrevealed till the Twelfth Book appeared. In fact,
had the poem ever been completed, we should have
had to begin its perusal at the end! Thus "The Faerie
Queene," as has often been remarked, lacks unity and
cohesion. It is not so much one large and glorious
mansion as a group of mansions. To use the metaphor
of Professor Craik, to whom many subsequent writers
on Spenser have been so considerably indebted, and
often without any at all adequate acknowledgment, it
is a street of fine houses, or, to use another meta-
phor of Professor Craik's, which also has been freely
adopted by other critics, it is in parts a kind of wilder-
ness-a wilderness of wonderful beauty and wealth,
xviii








Introduction


in which it is a delight to wander, but yet a wilderness
with paths and tracks dimly and faintly marked, often
scarcely to be discerned.
Such was the abundance of Spenser's fancy, and so
various and extensive was his learning, that he wrote,
it would seem, with an amazing facility, never checked
by any paucities of either knowledge or ideas. His
pen could scarcely keep pace with his imagination.
His material he drew from all accessible sources-
from the Greek and Latin classics (his sympathetic ac-
quaintance with Plato is one of his distinctions), from
the Italian poets (not only from Ariosto and Tasso,
but Berni, Boiardo, Pulci, and others), from the old
Romances of Chivalry (especially the Arthurian in
Malory's famous rendering, Bevis of Southampton,
Amadis de Gaul), from what there was of modern
English literature (above all, Chaucer's works, but
also Hawes and other minor writers) and of modern
French literature (especially Marot), from contempo-
rary history (all the great personages of his time are
brought before us in his pages): but all these diverse
elements he combines and assimilates in his own
fashion, and forms into a compound quite unique, and
highly characteristic both of the hour and of the man.
No wonder if the modern reader is at first somewhat
perplexed and confused; no wonder if he often loses
the thread of the story, and fails to comprehend
such an astonishing prodigality of incident and of per-
sonification. Figure after figure flits before his eyes-
the cry is still "They come"; one seems to be in the
very birthplace and home of dreams, knights, ladies,
xix







Introduction


monsters, wizards, and witches; all forms of good and
evil throng by in quick succession, and we are apt to
forget who is who and what is what. Probably some
candid good-natured friend complained to Spenser of
this complicatedness, which is certainly at its worst in
the Third and Fourth Books; and in a certain passage
in the Sixth he makes some sort of defence of himself
for what might seem divisions or aberrations in the
story of Sir Calidore. He compares himself to a ship
that, by reason of counter-winds and tides, fails to go
straight to its destination, but yet makes for it, and
does not lose its compass; see VI. xii. I and 2.
We are sure that for all young readers such a
version of Spenser's stories as is given in this volume
may be truly serviceable in preparing them for the
study of the poem itself. And with some older
readers too and it is to them this Introduction is
mainly addressed-we would fain hope this volume
may find a hearty welcome, as providing them with
a clue to what seems an intricate maze. What we
should like to picture to ourselves is young and old
reading these stories together, and the elder students
selecting for their own benefit, and for the benefit of
the younger, a few stanzas here and there from "The
Faerie Queene" by way of illustration. Of course we
do not make this humble suggestion to the initiated,
but to those--and their name is Legion--who at
present know nothing or next to nothing of what is
certainly one of the masterpieces of English literature.

JOHN W. HALES.









































THE RED CROSS KNIGHT-
THE COURT OF THE QUEEN
THE WOOD OF ERROR
THE KNIGHT DECEIVED BY THE MAGICIAN


THE KNIGHT FORSAKES UNA
HOLINESS FIGHTS FAITHLESS, AND
WITH FALSE RELIGION
UNA AND THE LION .
IN THE HANDS OF THE ENEMY
THE HOUSE OF PRIDE
THE BATTLE FOR THE SHIELD.
UNA AND THE WOODLAND KNIGHT.
THE FALSE PILGRIM .
GIANT PRIDE .
PRINCE ARTHUR. .


MAKES FRIENDS
S15
S 17
S 23
26
S 36
41
S 43


THE WONDROUS BUGLE AND THE MIGHTY SHIELD
THE KNIGHT WITH THE HEMPEN ROPE .
xxi










Contents

PAGE
IN THE CAVE OF DESPAIR 68
HOW THE RED CROSS KNIGHT CAME TO THE HOUSE
OF HOLINESS 73
THE CITY OF THE GREAT KING 79
THE LAST FIGHT 84
EASE AFTER WAR" 86



THE GOOD SIR GUYON-
SIR GUYON MEETS THE MAGICIAN 92
FRIEND OR FOE? 96
THE STORY OF THE KNIGHT AND THE LADY. 100
THE THREE SISTERS 104
BRAGGADOCHIO 108
FURY'S CAPTIVE 112
THE ANGER OF FIRE. I16
THE IDLE LAKE 121
THE REALM OF PLUTO 127
THE CAVE OF MAMMON 132
THE CHAMPION OF CHIVALRY 139
THE HOUSE OF TEMPERANCE 144
THE ROCK OF REPROACH AND THE WANDERING
ISLANDS 150
SEA-MONSTERS AND LAND-MONSTERS 156
THE BOWER OF BLISS 158



THE LEGEND OF BRITOMART-
How SIR GUYON MET A CHAMPION MIGHTIER THAN
HIMSELF 167
How BRITOMART FOUGHT WITH SIX KNIGHTS 172
HOW IT FARED WITH BRITOMART IN CASTLE JOYOUS 177
HOW BRITOMART LOOKED INTO THE MAGIC MIRROR 181
HOW BRITOMART WENT TO THE CAVE OF THE
MAGICIAN MERLIN 186
HOW BRITOMART SET FORTH ON HER QUEST 192
xuii









Contents
PAGE
How BRITOMART CAME TO THE CASTLE OF THE
CHURL MALBECCO 196
How BRITOMART WALKED THROUGH FIRE 200
WHAT BRITOMART SAW IN THE ENCHANTED CHAMBER 206
HOW BRITOMART RESCUED A FAIR LADY FROM A
WICKED ENCHANTER 212
WHAT STRANGE MEETINGS BEFELL ON THE WAY. 217
How SIR SATYRANE PROCLAIMED A GREAT TOURNA-
MENT 223
WHAT BEFELL ON THE FIRST AND SECOND DAYS OF
THE TOURNAMENT 229
HOW BRITOMART DID BATTLE FOR THE GOLDEN
GIRDLE 234
HoW THE GOLDEN GIRDLE WAS AWARDED TO 1HE
FALSE FLORIMELL 239
How SIR SCUDAMOUR CAME TO THE HOUSE OF CARE 244
HOW THE "SAVAGE KNIGHT" MET THE "KNIGHT
WITH THE EBONY SPEAR" 250
How BRITOMART ENDED HER QUEST 255



THE SQUIRE OF LOW DEGREE-
THE GIANT WITH FLAMING EYES 260
"FOR HIS FRIEND'S SAKE" . 268
THE GIANT'S DAUGHTER 274



THE ADVENTURES OF SIR ARTEGALL-
THE SWORD OF JUSTICE AND THE IRON MAN 280
THE ADVENTURE OF THE SARACEN'S BRIDGE 286
THE GIANT WITH THE SCALES. 290
BORROWED PLUMES, AND THE FATE OF THE SNOWY
LADY 294
HOW THE GOOD HORSE BRIGADORE KNEW HIS OWN
MASTER. 301









Contents

PAGE
THE ADVENTURE OF THE TWO BROTHERS AND THE
COFFER 305
RADIGUND, QUEEN OF THE AMAZONS 311
How SIR ARTEGALL THREW AWAY HIS SWORD 318
THE HOUSE OF GUILE 323
THE BATTLE OF QUEEN RADIGUND AND BRITOMART 331
THE ADVENTURE OF THE DAMSEL, THE TWO
KNIGHTS, AND THE SULTAN'S HORSES 336
THE ADVENTURE AT THE DEN OF DECEIT 345
THE ADVENTURE OF THE TYRANT GRANTORTO 352


SIR CALIDORE, KNIGHT OF COURTESY-
THE QUEST OF THE BLATANT BEAST 360
THE PROUD DISCOURTEOUS KNIGHT 369
CORIDON AND PASTORELLA 374
IN THE BRIGANDS' DEN 381
THE BEAST WITH A THOUSAND TONGUES 389
































FRONTISPIECE On the morning of the third day he slew the
Dragon.
TITLE-PAGE.
PAGE
Heading to Introduction .vii
S Contents .xxi
S List of Illustrations .. xxv
Arming the Knight I
There rode into the city a fair lady 3
Rushing at his foe 6
At last they chanced to meet an old man 9
"The Lady Una has left you !" 13
Sleeping quietly in her bower 14
The two knights levelled their spears and rushed at each other 16
When she slept, he kept watch .19
He was afraid to go too near .23
Tearing off his helmet 24
With his sword he struck the lion 25
They saw in front of them a grand and beautiful building .26
Xxv










List of Illustrations
PAGE
High above all sat the Queen 29
The coach was drawn by an ugly and ill-matched team 33
Duessa stole secretly to the lodging of the pagan knight 37
A poor, simple pilgrim 45
The Knight tried to seize his weapons 48
The Prince carried him out of the castle 59
They saw a knight galloping towards them 65
They came to the place where Despair had his dwelling 69
The third daughter, whose name was Love 77
It was called "The City of the Great King" 81
The Red Cross Knight and Una were betrothed 87
Sir Guyon and the Black Palmer 92
He saw marching to meet him a noble Knight 93
A beautiful lady sat alone, weeping bitterly 97
An end to all her sorrow 103
They came to a Castle on a rock near the sea .105
" Yield thyself my captive 110
A savage man beating a handsome youth 13
" There is now coming a knight of wondrous power". 119
" Lady, you have not done right to mislead me like this" .123
He began with trembling hands to pour them through a hole
into the earth 129
"Behold what living eye has never seen before" 135
Watched over by a beautiful angel 140
The Knights soon drove them into confusion 147
The ferryman had to put forth all his strength and skill 153
A pack of wild beasts rushed forward 159
Acrasia tried to set herself free 164
Disguising themselves in poor clothes. 167
Hurled from his horse 169
Britomart saw six knights 173
One of them shot a keen arrow at her 179
xxvi









List of Illustrations


PAGE
Britomart looked well at the figure of this Knight 84
Deep in some work of wonder 89
Glauc6, taking down the armour, dressed her in it 193
The valiant stranger was a beautiful maiden 198
The flames parted on either side 203
He rode on a ravenous lion. 209
Fastened to a brazen pillar 214
They presently saw two knights in armour 219
Feeding on the dead body of a milk-white palfrey 225
Both champions were felled to the ground 231
Smote him sorely on the visor .. 237
Britomart showed her lovely Amoret 241
They heard the sound of many iron hammers 247
Threatening to strike 254
At last she was obliged to leave him 258
The rescue of Amoret 260
A mighty man, riding on a dromedary 265
The Giant's daughter came one day in glee to the prison 271
He found Poeana playing on a rote .. 275
The Saracen's Bridge 280
Wild beasts wrongfully oppressing others of their own kind 283
Sir Artegall gripped him fast by his iron collar 288
They beheld a giant on a rock, holding a pair of scales 291
Straightway the enchanted damsel vanished into nothing 299
He scourged him out of the court 303
"I helped to save her from the jaws of death" 308
In the midst of them he saw a Knight pinioned 312
He was dazzled with astonishment 320
She came to a window opening to the west 326
In the temple of Isis 333
The Sultan's horses, like hungry hounds, cruelly chased him 342
The noise of her weeping speedily brought forth the villain 347
xxvii









List of Illustrations

PAGE
Artegall, with his sword Crysaor, swiftly cut off his head 359
Sir Calidore and the shepherds 360
A comely Squire, bound hand and foot to a tree. 363
The Knight invited him to sit down beside them 373
He saw seated on a little hillock a beautiful maiden 375
The brigands made search to see who was slain 383
He threw his shield on him, and pinned him to the ground 391















The Red Cross Knight

"Right faithful true he was in deed and word"


The Court of the Queen

NCE upon a time, in the days
S .. when there were still such
things as giants and dragons, there
lived a great Queen. She reigned
S over a rich and beautiful country,
and because she was good and noble
every one loved her, and tried also
to be good. Her court was the
most splendid one in the world, for all her knights
were brave and gallant, and each one thought only
of what heroic things he could do, and how best he
could serve his royal lady.
The name of the Queen was Gloriana, and each of
her twelve chief knights was known as the Champion
of some virtue. Thus Sir Guyon was the representa-
tive of Temperance, Sir Artegall of Justice, Sir Cali-
dore of Courtesy, and others took up the cause of
Friendship, Constancy, and so on.
Every year the Queen held a great feast, which
S I A







The Red Cross Knight

lasted twelve days. Once, on the first day of the
feast, a stranger in poor clothes came to the court, and,
falling before the Queen, begged a favour of her. It was
always the custom at these feasts that the Queen
should refuse nothing that was asked, so she bade the
stranger say what it was he wished. Then he besought
that, if any cause arose which called for knightly aid,
the adventure might be entrusted to him.
When the Queen had given her promise he stood
quietly on one side, and did not try to mix with the
other guests who were feasting at the splendid tables.
Although he was so brave, he was very gentle and
modest, and he had never yet proved his valour in
fight, therefore he did not think himself worthy of
a place among the knights who had already won for
themselves honour and renown.
Soon after this there rode into the city a fair lady
on a white ass. Behind her came her servant, a dwarf,
leading a warlike horse that bore the armour of a
*knight. The face of the lady was lovely, but it was
very sorrowful.
Making her way to the palace, she fell before Queen
Gloriana, and implored her help. She said that her
name was Una; she was the daughter of a king and
queen who formerly ruled over a mighty country;
but, many years ago, a huge dragon came and wasted
all the land, and shut the king and queen up in a
brazen castle, from which they might never come out.
The Lady Una therefore besought Queen Gloriana to
grant her one of her knights to fight and kill this
terrible dragon.


___~ _








The Court of the Queen


she was unwilling to consent, for the Knight was
young, and, moreover, he had no armour of his
own to fight with.
Then said the Lady Una to him, Will you
wear the armour that I bring you, for unless you do
you will never succeed in the enterprise, nor kill the
horrible monster of Evil ? The armour is not new,
it is scratched and dinted with many a hard-fought
battle, but if you wear it rightly no armour that ever
was made will serve you so well."
Then the stranger bade them bring the armour and
put it on him, and Una said, Stand, therefore, having
your loins girt about with truth, and having on the
breastplate of righteousness, and your feet shod with
the preparation of the gospel of peace; above all
taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able
to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked, and take







The Red Cross Knight

the helmet of salvation and the sword of the SPIRIT,
which is the word of GOD."
And when the stranger had put off his own rough
clothes and was clad in this armour, straightway he
seemed the goodliest man in all that company, and
the Lady Una was well pleased with her champion;
and, because of the red cross which he wore on his
breastplate and on his silver shield, henceforth he
was known always as "the Red Cross Knight." But
his real name was Holiness, and the name of the lady
for whom he was to do battle was Trutk.
So these two rode forth into the world together,
while a little way behind followed their faithful atten-
dant, Prudence. And now you shall hear some of
the adventures that befell the Red Cross Knight and
his two companions.


The Wood of Error

The first adventure happened in this way. Scarcely
had the Red Cross Knight and the Lady Una started
on their journey when the sky suddenly became over-
cast, and a great storm of rain beat down upon the
earth. Looking about-for shelter, they saw, not far
away, a shady grove, which seemed just what they
wanted. The trees here had great spreading branches,
which grew so thickly overhead that no light could
pierce the covering of leaves. Through this wood
wide paths and alleys, well trodden, led in all direc-
tions. It seemed a truly pleasant place, and a safe
4







The Wood of Error


shelter against the tempest, so they entered in at
once.
At first, as they roamed along the winding paths
they found nothing but pleasure. Deeper and deeper
into the heart of the wood they went, hearing with joy
the sweet singing of the birds, and filled with wonder
to see so many different kinds of beautiful trees clus-
tered in one spot. But by-and-by, when the storm was
over and they wished to go forward on their journey,
they found, to their sorrow, that they had lost. their
way. It was impossible to remember by which path
they had come; every way now seemed strange and
unknown. Here and there they wandered, backwards
and forwards; there were so many turnings to be. seen,
so many paths, they knew not which to take to lead
them out of the wood.
In this perplexity, at last they determined to go
straight forward until they found some end, either in
or out of the wood. Choosing for this purpose one of
the broadest and most trodden paths, they came pre-
sently, in the thickest part of the wood, to a hollow
cave. Then the Red Cross Knight dismounted from
his steed, and gave his spear to the dwarf to hold.
"Take heed," said the Lady Una, "lest you too
rashly provoke mischief. This is a-wild and unknown
place, and peril is often without show. Hold back,
therefore, till you know further if there is any danger
hidden there."
"Ah, lady," said the Knight, "it were shame to
go backward for fear of a hidden danger. Virtue her-
self gives light to lead through any darkness."
5







The Red Cross Knight

"Yes," said Una; "but I know better than you
the peril of this place, though now it is too late to
bid you go back like a coward. Yet wisdom warns
you to stay your steps, before you are forced to re-
treat. This is the Wandering Wood, and that is the
den of Error, a horrible monster, hated of all. There-
fore, I advise you to be cautious."















But th1e ..,ungi Knight
was full of eagerness and
fiery courage, and nothing could stop him. Forth
to the darksome hole he went, and looked in. His
glittering armour made a little light, by which he
could plainly see the ugly monster. Such a great,
horrible thing it was, something like a snake, with a
long tail twisted in knots, with stings all over it.
And near this wicked big creature, whose other name
was Falsehood, there were a thousand little ones, all








The Wood of Error


varying in shape, but every one bad and ugly; for
you may be quite sure that wherever one of this
horrible race is found, there will always be many
others of the same family lurking near.
When the light shone into the cave all the little
creatures fled to hide themselves, and the big parent
Falsehood rushed out of her den in terror. But
when she saw the shining armour of the Knight she
tried to turn back, for she hated light as her deadliest
foe, and she was always accustomed to live in dark-
ness, where she could neither see plainly nor be seen.
When the Knight saw that she was trying to
escape, he sprang after her as fierce as a lion, and
then the great fight began. Though he strove
valiantly, yet he was in sore peril, for suddenly the
cunning creature flung her huge tail round and round
him, so that he could stir neither hand nor foot.
Then the Lady Una cried out, to encourage him,
" Now, now, Sir Knight, show what you are! Add
faith unto your force, and be not faint! Kill her,
or else she will surely kill you."
With that,, fresh strength and courage came to
the Knight. Gathering all his force, he got one
hand free, and gripped the creature by the throat
with so much pain that she was soon compelled
to loosen her wicked hold. Then, seeing that she
could not hope to conquer in this way, she suddenly
tried to stifle the Knight by flinging over him a flood
of poison. This made the Knight retreat a moment;
then she called to her aid all the horrid little creeping
and crawling monsters that he had seen before, and







The Red Cross Knight

many others of the same kind, or worse. These came
swarming and buzzing round the Knight like a cloud
of teasing gnats, and tormented and confused him
with their feeble stings. Enraged at this fresh attack,
he made up his mind to end the matter one way or
another, and, rushing at his foe, he killed her with
one stroke of his sword.
Then Lady Una, who, from a distance, had
watched all that passed, came near in haste to greet
his victory.
"Fair Knight," she said, "born under happy
star! You are well worthy of that armour in which
this day you have won great glory, and proved your
strength against a strong enemy. This is your first
battle. I pray that you will win many others in
like manner."


The Knight deceived by the Magician

After his victory over Falsehood, the Red Cross
Knight again mounted his steed, and he and the Lady
Una went on their way. Keeping carefully to one
path, and turning neither to the right hand nor the
left, at last they found themselves safely out of the
Wood of Error.
But now they were to fall into the power of a more
dangerous and treacherous foe than even the hateful
monster, Falsehood.
They had travelled a long way, and met with no
fresh adventure, when at last they chanced to meet in
8







Knight deceived by the Magician

the road an old man. He looked very wise and good.
He was dressed in a long black gown, like a hermit,
and had bare feet and a grey beard; he had a book
hanging from his belt, as was the
custom with scholars in those days.
He seemed very quiet and sad,
and kept his eyes fixed on the
ground, and all the time, as he
went along, he seemed to be say-
ing prayers, and lamenting over
his own wickedness.
When he saw the travellers he







..1 ,- .







made a very humble salute to them. The Red Cross
Knight returned the greeting with all courtesy, and
asked him if he knew of any strange adventures that
were then taking place.
"Ah, my dear son !" said the hermit, how should
9







The Red Cross Knight

a simple old man, who lives in a lonely cell, and does
nothing all day but sorrow for his own faults-how
should such a man know any tidings of war or worldly
trouble ? It is not fitting for me to meddle with such
matters. But, if indeed you desire to hear about
danger and evil near at hand, I can tell you about a
strange man who wastes all the surrounding country."
"That," said the Knight, "is what I chiefly ask
about, and I will reward you well if you will guide
me to the place where he dwells. For it is a disgrace
to knighthood that such a creature should be allowed
to live so long."
"His dwelling is far away from here, in the midst
of a barren wilderness," answered the old man. "No
living person may ever pass it without great danger
and difficulty."
"Now," said the Lady Una, night is drawing
near, and I know well that you are wearied with your
former fight. Therefore, take rest, and with the new
day begin new work."
"You have been well advised, Sir Knight," said
the old man. "Day is now spent; therefore take up
your abode with me for this night."
The travellers were well content to do this, so
they went with the apparently good old man to his
home.
It was a little lowly hermitage, down in a dale by
the side of a forest, far from the beaten track of
travellers. A small chapel was built near, and close
by a crystal stream gently welled forth from a never-
failing fountain.








Knight deceived by the Magician

Arrived at the house, they neither expected nor
found any entertainment; but rest was what they
chiefly needed, and they were well satisfied, for the
noblest mind is always the best contented. The old
man had a good store of pleasing words, and knew well
how to fit his talk to suit his visitors. The evening
passed pleasantly, and then the hermit conducted his
guests to the lodgingswhere theywere to spend the night.
But when they were safely asleep a horrid change
came over the old man, for in reality he was not good
at all, although he pretended to be so. His heartwas
full of hatred, malice, and deceit. He called himself
Archimago, which means a Great Magician," but his
real name was Hyfocrisy. He knew that as long as
Holiness and Truth kept together, no great harm
could come to either of them; so he determined to
do everything in his power to separate them. For
this purpose he got out all his books of magic, and set
to work to devise cunning schemes and spells. He
was so clever and wily that he could deceive people
much better and wiser than himself. He also had at
his bidding many bad little spirits, who ran about and
did his messages; these he used to help his friends
and frighten his enemies, and he had the power of
making them take any shape he wished.
Choosing out two of the worst of these, he sent
one on a message to King Morpheus, who rules over
the Land of Sleep. He bade him bring back with
him a bad, false dream, which Archimago then carried
to the sleeping Knight. So cunningly did he contrive
the matter, that when the Knight awoke the next
II







The Red Cross Knight

.morning he never knew that it had only been a dream,
but believed that all the things he had seen in his sleep
had really happened.
In the meanwhile, Archimago dressed up the other
bad spirit to look like Una, so that at a little distance
it was impossible to tell any difference in the two
figures. He knew that the only way to part Holiness
and Truth was to make Holiness believe by some
means that Truth was not as good as she appeared to
be. He knew also that the Red Cross Knight would
believe nothing against the Lady Una except what he
saw with his own eyes. Therefore he laid his plans
with the greatest care and guile.
Now we shall see how he succeeded in his wicked
endeavour.


The Knight forsakes Una
The next morning at daybreak the Knight awoke,
sad and unrested after the unpleasant dreams that had
come to him in the night. He did not know he had
been asleep; he thought the things that troubled him
had really happened.
It was scarcely dawn when Archimago rushed up
to him in a state of pretended sorrow and indignation.
"The Lady Una has left you," said this wicked
man. "She is not good as she pretends to be. She
cares nothing at all for you, nor for the noble work on
which you are bound, and she does not. mean to go
any farther with you on your toilsome journey."
The Red Cross Knight started up in anger. This
12







The Knight forsakes Una

was like his dream, and he knew not what was true
nor what was false.
Come," said Archimago, "see for yourself."
He pointed to a figure in the distance whom the
Knight took to be Una. Then, indeed, he was forced
to believe what the wicked magician told him. He
now took for granted that Una had been deceiving
him all along, and had seized this moment to escape.
















He forgot all her real sweetness and goodness and
beauty; he only thought how false and unkind she
was. He was filled with anger, and he never paused
a moment to reflect if there could be any possibility
of mistake. Calling his servant, he bade him bring
his horse at once, and then these two immediately set
forth again on their journey.
Here the Red Cross Knight was wrong, and we
13







The Red Cross Knight

shall see presently into what perils and misfortunes he
fell because of his hasty want of faith. If he had had
a little patience he would soon have discovered that
the figure he saw was only a
dressed-up imitation. The real
Lady Una all this time was
sleeping quietly in her own
S~~~bower.
-, When she awoke and found
Si that her two companions had
l.- fled in the night and left her
Siialone behind, she was filled with
grief and dismay. She could
not understand why they should
do such a thing. Mounting her white ass, she rode
after them with all the speed she could, but the Knight
had urged on his steed so fast it was almost useless to
try to follow. Yet she never stayed to rest her weary
limbs, but went on seeking them over hill and dale,
and through wood and plain, sorely grieved in her
tender heart that the one she loved best should leave
her with such ungentle discourtesy.
When the wicked Archimago saw that his cunning
schemes had succeeded so well he was greatly pleased,
and set to work to devise fresh mischief. It was Una
whom he chiefly hated, and he took great pleasure
in her many troubles, for hypocrisy always hates real
goodness. He had the power of turning himself into
any shape he chose-sometimes he would be a fowl,
sometimes a fish, now like a fox, now like a dragon.
On the present occasion, to suit his evil purpose, it
14







Holiness fights Faithless

seemed best to him to put on the appearance of the
good knight whom he had so cruelly beguiled.
Therefore, Hypocrisy dressed himself up in imita-
tion armour with a silver shield and everything exactly
like the Red Cross Knight. When he sat upon his
fiery charger he looked such a splendid warrior you
would have thought it was St. George himself.


Holiness fights Faithless, and makes Friends with
False Religion

The true St. George, meanwhile, had wandered far
away. Now that he had left the Lady Una, he had
nothing but his own will to guide him, and he no
longer followed any fixed purpose.
Presently he saw coming to meet him another
warrior, fully armed. He was a great, rough fellow,
who cared nothing for GOD or man; across his shield,
in gay letters, was written "Sans Foy," which means
Fazitless.
He had with him a companion, a handsome lady,
dressed all in scarlet, trimmed with gold and rich
pearls. She rode a beautiful palfrey, with gay trap-
pings, and little gold bells tinkled on her bridle. The
two came along laughing and talking, but when the
lady saw the Red Cross Knight, she left off her mirth
at once, and bade her companion attack him.
Then the two knights levelled their spears, and
rushed at each other. But when Faithless saw the
red cross graven on the breastplate of the other, he







The Red Cross Knight


I





5 '"




Jk knev. t hat he cou ld never prevail
again: t that safeguard. However,
he t,-,ught wich great fury, and the
', R, Rd Cri ': K,-ight had a hard battle
~ i, before he ':.ercame him. At la-t
hl managed to kill him, and he told
his servant to carry away the shield of Faithless in token
of victory.
When the lady saw her champion fall, she fled in
terror; but the Red Cross Knight hurried after her,
and bade her stay, telling her that she had nothing
now to fear. His brave and gentle heart was full of
pity to see her in so great distress, and he asked her
to tell him who she was, and who was the man that
had been with her.
Melting into tears, she then told him the following
sad story:-She said that she was the daughter of an
emperor, and had been engaged to marry a wise and
good prince. Before the wedding-day, however, the







Una and the Lion


prince fell into the hands of his foes, and was cruelly slain.
She went out to look for his dead body, and in the course
of her wandering met the Saracen knight, who took her
captive. "Sans Foy" was one of three bad brothers.
The names of the others were Sans Loy," which means
Lawless, and Sans Joy," which means Joyless. She
further said that her own name was Fidessa," or True
Religion, and she besought the Knight to have compas-
sion on her, because she was so friendless and unhappy.
"Fair lady," said the Knight, ."a heart of flint
would grieve to hear of your sorrows. But henceforth
rest safely assured that you have found a new friend
to help you, and lost an old foe to hurt you. A new
friend is better than an old foe."
Then the seemingly simple maiden pretended to
look comforted, and the two rode on happily together.
But what the lady had told about herself was quite
untrue. Her name was not "Fidessa" at all, but
"Duessa," which means False Religion. If Una had
still been with the Knight, he would never have been
led astray; but when he parted from her he had
nothing but his own feelings to guide him. He still
meant to do right, but he was deceived by his false
companion, who brought him into much trouble and
danger.

Una and the Lion

All this while the Lady Una, lonely and forsaken,
was roaming in search of her lost Knight. How sad
was her fate She, a King's daughter, so beautiful, so
17 B







The Red Cross Knight

faithful, so true, who had done no wrong either in word
or deed, was left sorrowful and deserted because of the
cunning wiles of a wicked enchanter. Fearing nothing,
she sought the Red Cross Knight through woods and
lonely wilderness, but no tidings of him ever came
to her.
One day, being weary, she alighted from her steed,
and lay down on the grass to rest. It was in the midst
of a thicket, far from the sight of any traveller. She
lifted her veil, and put aside the black cloak which
always covered her dress.

Her angel's face,
As the great eye of Heaven shined bright,
And made a sunshine in the shady place."

Suddenly, out of the wood there rushed a fierce
lion, who, seeing Una, sprang at her to devour her;
but, when he came nearer, he was amazed at the sight
of her loveliness, and all his rage turned to pity.
Instead of tearing her to pieces, he kissed her weary
feet and licked her lily hand as if he knew how inno-
cent and wronged she was.1
When Una -saw the gentleness of this kingly
creature, she could not help weeping.
Sad to see her sorrow, he stood gazing at her; all'
his angry mood changed to compassion, till at last Una
mounted her snowy palfrey and once more set out to
seek her lost companion.

1 The figure of the lion may be taken as the emblem of Honour,
which always pays respect to Truth.








Una and the Lion


The lion would not leave her desolate, but went
with her as a strong guard and as a faithful companion.
When she slept he kept watch, and when she waked he
waited diligently, ready
.., ..-- .' tl: help her in any way he
Str-'' : .-. c.-.uld. He always knew
St'r-n.. -. her looks what she
3 anted.
Long he travelled thus through
i: lnev places, where she thought
her v.andeiring Knight might pass,
.. et n-ec r found trace of living
man. At length she came to the
to.t tof a steep mountain, where
the tri-:Jdcn grass showed that
therc v.a-_ a path for people to go.
.... Thi path she followed till at
.last she saw, slowly walking
S ini, the front of her, a damsel
carrying ajar of water,









The Lady Una called to her to ask if there were
any dwelling-place near, but the rough-looking girl
made no answer, she seemed not able to speak, nor







The Red Cross Knight


hear, nor understand. But when she saw the lion
standing beside her, she threw down her pitcher with
sudden fear and fled away. Never before in that land
had she seen the face of a fair lady, and the sight of
the lion filled her with terror. Fast away she fled, and
never looked behind till she came at last to her home,
where her blind mother sat all day in darkness. Too
frightened to speak, she caught hold of her mother
with trembling hands, while the poor old woman, full
of fear, ran to shut the door of their house.
By this time the weary Lady Una had arrived, and
asked if she might come in; but, when no answer came
to her request, the lion, with his strong claws, tore
open the wicket-door and let her into the little hut.
There she found the mother and .daughter crouched up
in a dark corner, nearly dead with fear.
The name of the poor old blind woman was Szuer-
stition. She tried to be good in a very mistaken way.
She hid herself in her dark corner, and was quite con-
tent never to come out of it. When the beautiful Lady
Una, who was all light and truth, came to the hut, the
mother and daughter, instead of making her welcome,
hated her, and would gladly have thrust her out.
Trying to soothe their needless dread, Una spoke
gently to them, and begged that she might rest that
night in their small cottage. To this they unwillingly
agreed, and Una lay down with the faithful lion at her
feet to keep watch. All night, instead of sleeping, she
wept, still sorrowing for her lost Knight and longing
for the morning.
In the middle of the night, when all the inmates
20








Una and the Lion


of the little cottage were asleep, there came a furious
knocking at the door. This was a wicked thief,
called "Kirkrapine," or Church-robber, whose custom
it was to go about stealing ornaments from churches,
and clothes from clergymen, and robbing the alms-
boxes of the poor. He used to share his spoils with
the daughter of the blind woman, and to-night he
had come with a great sackful of stolen goods.
When he received-no answer to his knocking, he
got very angry indeed, and made a loud clamour at
the door; but the women in the hut were too much
afraid of the lion to rise and let him in. At last he
burst open the door in a great rage and tried to enter,
but the lion sprang upon him and tore him to pieces
before he could even call for help. His terrified
friends scarcely dared to weep or move in case they
should share his fate.
When daylight came, Una rose and started again
on her journey with the lion to seek the wandering
Knight. As soon as they had left, the two frightened
women came forth, and, finding Church-robber slain
outside the cottage, they began to wail and lament;
then they ran after Una, railing at her for being the
cause of all their ill; they called after her evil wishes
that mischief and misery might fall on her and follow
her all the way, and that she might ever wander in
endless error.
When they saw that their bad words were of no
avail, they turned back, and there in the road they
met a knight, clad in armour; but, though he looked
such a grand warrior, it was really only the wicked







The Red Cross Knight

enchanter, Hypocrisy, who was seeking Una, in
order to work her fresh trouble. When he saw
the old woman, Superstition, he asked if she could
give him any tidings of the lady. Therewith her
passion broke out anew; she told him what had
just happened, blaming Una as the cause of all
her distress. Archimago pretended to condole with
her, and then, finding out the direction in which Una
had gone, he followed as quickly as possible.
Before long he came up to where Una was slowly
travelling; but seeing the noble lion at her side, he
was afraid to go too near, and turned away to a hill
at a little distance. When Una saw him, she-thought,
from his shield and armour, that it was her own true
knight, and she rode up to him, and spoke meekly,
half-frightened.
Ah, my lord," she said, where have you been so
long out of my sight ? I feared that you hated me,
or that I had done something to displease you, and
that made everything seem dark and cheerless. But
welcome now, welcome "
"My dearest lady," said false Hypocrisy, "you
must not think I could so shame knighthood as to
desert you. But the truth is, the reason why I left
you so long was to seek adventure in a strange place,
where Archimago said there was a mighty robber, who
worked much mischief to many people. Now he will
trouble no one further. This is the good reason why
I left you. Pray believe it, and accept my faithful
service, for I have vowed to defend you by land and
sea. Let your grief be over."
22







In the Hands of the Enemy


When Una heard these
sweet words it seemed to her
that she was fully rewarded
for all the trials she had gone
through. One loving hour can
make up for many years of sorrow.
She forgot all that she had suf-
fered; she spoke no more of the
past. True love never looks back, but always forward.
Before her stood her Knight, for whom she had toiled
so sorely, and Una's heart was filled with joy.


In the Hands of the Enemy

Una and the Magician (who was disguised as the
Red Cross Knight) had not gone far when they saw
some one riding swiftly towards them. The new-comer
was on a fleet horse, and was fully armed; his look was
stern, cruel, and revengeful. On his shield in bold
23







The Red Cross Knight

letters was traced the name "Sans Loy," which means
Lawless. He was one of the brothers of Sans Foy,"
or Faithless, whom the real Red Cross Knight had slain,
and he had made up his mind to avenge his brother's
death.
When he saw the red cross graven on the shield
which Hypocrisy carried, he thought that he had found
the foe of whom he was in search, and, levelling his
spear, he prepared for battle. Hypocrisy, who was a
mean coward, and had never fought in his life, was
nearly fainting with fear; but the Lady Una spoke
such cheering words that he began to feel more hope-
ful. Lawless, however, rushed at him with such fury
that he drove his lance right through the other's shield,












and bore him to the ground. Leaping from his horse,
he ran towards him, meaning to kill him, and exclaim-
ing, Lo, this is the worthy reward of him that slew
Faithless!"
Una begged the cruel knight to have pity on his
fallen foe, but her words were of no avail. Tearing off







In the Hands of the Enemy

his helmet, Lawless would


A rch-. ';o.. 7 --7 = = ---
have slain him st -
once, but h a st:. pptd
in asto nishment
when. instead of the -
Red Cross Kniight,
he sa:. the face oft -
Archime e, Hu it o I- a
knew:x elI that crafty N --
Hy p c r i s y a --
skilled in all forins
of deceit, but that he took care to shun fighting and
brave deeds. Now, indeed, had Hypocrisy's guile met
with a just punishment.
"Why, luckless Archimago, what is this ?" cried
Lawless. What evil chance brought you here ? Is
it your fault, or my mistake, that I have wounded my
friend instead of my foe ?"
But the old Magician answered nothing; he lay
still as if he were .dying. So-Lawless spent no more
time over him, but went over to where Una waited,
lost in amazement and sorely perplexed.
Her companion, whom she had imagined was her
own true Knight, turned out to be nothing but an
impostor, and she herself had fallen into the hands of
a cruel enemy.







The Red Cross Knight

When the brave lion saw Lawless go up to Una
and try to drag her roughly from her palfrey, full
of kingly rage he rushed to protect her. He flew at
Lawless and almost tore his shield to pieces with his
sharp claws. But, alas he could not overcome the
warrior, for Lawless was one of the strongest men that
ever wielded spear, and was well skilled in feats of arms.
With his sharp sword he struck the lion, and the noble
creature fell dead at his feet.
Poor Una, what was to become of her now ? Her
faithful guardian was gone, and she found herself the
captive of a cruel foe. Lawless paid no heed to her
tears and entreaties. Placing her on his own horse, he
rode off with her; while her snow-white ass, not will-
ing to forsake her, followed meekly at a distance.










The House of Pride
Now the Red Cross Knight, because of his lack of
loyalty to Una, fell into much danger and difficulty.
His first fault was in believing evil of her so readily,
and leaving her forlorn; after that he was too easily
beguiled by the pretended goodness and beauty of
26







The House of Pride


Duessa. All who fight in a good cause must beware
of errors such as these. If matters do not go exactly
as we wish, we must not lose heart and get impatient;
even if we cannot understand what is happening,
we must trust that all will be well. We must keep
steadily to the one true aim set before us, or else,
like the Red Cross Knight, we may be led astray by
false things that are only pleasant in appearance, and
have no real goodness.
Duessa and the Knight travelled for a long way, till
at last they saw in front of them a grand and beautiful
building. It seemed as if it were the house of some
mighty Prince; a broad highway led up to it, all
trodden bare by the feet of those who flocked thither.
Great troops of people of all sorts and condition
journeyed here, both by day and night. But few re-
turned, unless they managed to escape, beggared and
disgraced, when, ever afterwards, they lived a life of
misery.
To this place Duessa guided the Red Cross Knight,
for she was tired with the toilsome journey, and the
day was nearly over.
It was a stately palace, built of smooth bricks,
cunningly laid together without mortar. The walls
were high, but neither strong nor thick, and they were
covered with dazzling gold-foil. There were many
lofty towers and picturesque galleries, with bright
windows and delightful bowers; and on the top there
was a dial to tell the time.
It was lovely to look at, and did much credit to
the workman that designed it; but it was a great pity
27







The Red Cross Knight

that so fair a building rested on so frail a foundation.
For it was mounted high up on a sandy hill that kept
shifting and falling away. Every breath of heaven
made it shake; and all the back parts, that no one
could see, were old and ruinous, though cunningly
painted over.
Arrived here, Duessa and the Red Cross Knight
passed in at once, for the gates stood wide open to all.
They were in charge of a porter, called Ill-come," who
never denied entrance to any one. The hall inside was
hung with costly tapestry and rich curtains. Numbers
of people, rich and poor, were waiting here, in order to
gain sight of the Lady of this wonderful place.
Duessa and the Knight passed through this crowd,
who all gazed at them, and entered the Presence
Chamber of the Queen.
What a dazzling sight met their eyes! Such a
scene of splendour had never been known in the court
of any living prince. A noble company of lords and
ladies stood on every side, and made the place more
beautiful with their presence.
High above all there was a cloth of state, and a
rich throne as bright as the sun. On the throne, clad
in royal robes, sat the Queen. Her garments were all
glittering with gold and precious jewels; but so great
was her beauty that it dimmed even the brightness of
her throne. She sat there in princely state, shining
like the sun. She hated and despised all lowly things
of earth. Under her scornful feet lay a dreadful
dragon, with a hideous tail. In her hand she held a
mirror in which she often looked at her face; she took
28









































"XLo! unoertteatb ber !cortftt1 feet Wa6 Ia~2ue
R ZreaZftuI Oragon witb an biWeoMe tra)211e;
Zint in her banO obe beIf a mirrbour briobt,
Ilalberefi ber face sOe often vieWeC fal"Ie,
2In0 in ber BelfIoVCOb semlblalac toof te igbt."







The House of Pride


great delight in her own appearance, for she was fairer
than any living woman.
She was the daughter of grisly Pluto, King of
Hades, and men called her proud Lucifera. She had
crowned herself a queen, but she had no rightful king-
dom at all, nor any possessions. The power which she
had obtained she had usurped by wrong and tyranny.
She ruled her realm not by laws, but by craft, and
according to the advice of six old wizards, who with
their bad counsels upheld her kingdom.
As soon as the Knight and Duessa came into the
presence-chamber, an usher, by name Vanity, made
room and prepared a passage for them, and brought
them to the lowest stair of the high throne. Here
they made a humble salute, and declared that they had
come to see the Queen's royal state, and to prove if
the wide report of her great splendour were true.
With scornful eyes, half unwilling to look so low,
she thanked them disdainfully, and did not show them
any courtesy worthy of a queen, scarcely even bidding
them arise. The lords and ladies of the court, how-
ever, were all eager to appear well in the eyes of the
strangers. They shook out their ruffles, and fluffed up
their curls, and arranged their gay attire more trimly;
and each one was jealous and spiteful of the others.
They did their best to entertain the Knight, and
would gladly have made him one of their company.
To Duessa, also, they were most polite and gracious,
for formerly she had been well known in that court.
But to the knightly eyes of the warrior all the glitter
of the crowd seemed vain and worthless, and he thought
31







The Red Cross Knight

that it was unbefitting so great a queen to treat a
strange knight with such scant courtesy.
Suddenly, Queen Lucifera rose from her throne, and
called for her coach. Then all was bustle and con-
fusion, every one rushing violently forth. Blazing with
brightness she paced down the hall, like the sun dawn-
ing in the east. All the people thronging the hall
thrust and pushed each other aside to gaze upon her.
Her glorious appearance amazed the eyes of all men.
Her coach was adorned with gold and gay garlands,
and was one of the most splendid carriages ever seen,
but it was drawn by an ugly and ill-matched team. On
every animal rode one of her evil Councillors, who was
much like in nature to the creature that carried him.
The first of these, who guided all the rest, was
Idleness, the nurse of Sin. He chose to ride a sloth-
ful ass; he looked always as if he were half asleep, and
as if he did not know whether it were night or day.
He shut himself away from all care, and shunned manly
exercise, but if there were any mischief to be done he
joined in it readily. The Queen was indeed badly
served who had Idleness for her leading Councillor.
Next to him came Gluttony, riding on a pig; then
Self-indulgence on a goat, Avarice on a camel, Envy
on a wolf, and Wrath on a lion. Each in his own
way was equally hideous and hateful.
As they went along, crowds of people came round,
shouting for joy; always before them a foggy mist
sprang up, covering all the land, and under their feet
lay the dead bones of men who had wandered from
the right path.





































~~-~__


. .bis was Orawne of oig unequall beasts
On wbicb ber six 6age CouiisellourO ORt rvec."


BL


''I
--,I


M, TIIA


O~







The House of Pride


So forth they went in this goodly array to enjoy the
fresh air, and to sport in the flowery meadows. Among
the rest, next to the chariot, rode the false Duessa, but
the good Knight kept far apart, not joining in the noisy
mirth which seemed unbefitting a true warrior.
Having enjoyed themselves awhile in the pleasant
fields, they returned to the stately palace. Here they
found that a wandering knight had just arrived. On his
shield, in red letters, was written the name Sans Joy,"
which means Joyless, and he was the brother of Fait/z-
less, whom the Red Cross Knight had slain, and of
Lawless, who had taken Una captive. He looked
sullen and revengeful, as if he had in his mind bitter
and angry thoughts.
When he saw the shield of his slain brother, Faith-
less, in' the hands of the Red Cross Knight's page, he
sprang at him and snatched it away. But the Knight
had no mind to lose the trophy which he had won in
battle, and, attacking him fiercely, he again got pos-
session of it.
Thereupon they hastily began to prepare for battle,
clashing their shields and shaking their swords in the
air. But the Queen, on pain of her severe displeasure,
commanded them to restrain their fury, saying that if
either had a right to the shield, they should fight it
out fairly the next day.
That night was passed in joy and gaiety, feasting
and making merry in bower and hall. The steward
of the court was Gluttony, who poured forth lavishly
of his abundance to all; and then the chamberlain,
Sloth, summoned them to rest.
35








The Red Cross Knight


The Battle for the Shield

That night, when every one slept, Duessa stole
secretly to the lodgings of the pagan knight Joyless.
She found him wide awake, restless, and troubled,
busily devising how he might annoy his foe. To
him she spoke many untrue words.
Dear Joyless," she said, "I am so glad that you
have come. I have passed many sad hours for the sake
of Faithless, whom this traitor slew. He has treated
me very cruelly, keeping me shut up in a dark cave;
but now I will take shelter with you from his disdain-
ful spite. To you belongs the inheritance of your
brother, Faithless. Let him not be unavenged."
"Fair lady, grieve no more for past sorrows," said
Joyless; neither be afraid of present peril, for need-
less fear never profited any one, nor is it any good to
lament over misfortunes that cannot be helped. Faith-
less is dead, his troubles are over; but I live, and I
will avenge him."
Oh, but I fear what may happen," she answered,
"and the advantage is on his side."
Why, lady, what advantage can there be when
both fight alike ?" asked Joyless.
"Yes, but he bears a charmed shield," said Duessa,
"and also enchanted armour that no one can pierce.
None can wound the man that wears them."
Charmed or enchanted, I care not at all," said Joy-
less fiercely, nor need you tell me anything more about
them. But, fair lady, go back whence you came and






The Battle for the Shield
rest awhile. To-morrow I shall subdue the Red Cross
Knight, and give you the heritage of dead Faithless."



,1!^jj L_ IIT 4


"Wherever I am, my secret aid shall follow you,"
she answered, and then she left him.
At the first gleam of dawn the Red Cross Knight
37







The Red Cross Knight


sprang up and dressed himself for battle in his sun-
bright armour. Forth he stepped into the hall, where
there were many waiting to gaze at him, curious to
know what fate was in store for the stranger knight.
Many minstrels were there, making melody to drive
away sadness; many singers that could tune their voices
skilfully to harp and, viol; many chroniclers that could
tell old stories of love and war.
Soon after, came the pagan knight, Joyless, warily
armed in woven mail. He looked sternly at the Red
Cross Knight, who cared not at all how any living
creature looked at him. Cups of wine were brought
to the warriors, with dainty Eastern spices, and they
both swore a solemn oath to observe faithfully the
laws of just and fair fighting.
At last, with royal pomp, came the Queen. She
was led to a railed-in space of the green field, and
placed under a stately canopy. On the other side, full
in all men's view, sat Duessa, and on a tree near was
hung the shield of Faithless. Both Duessa and the
shield were to be given to the victor.
A shrill trumpet bade them prepare for battle.
The pagan knight was stout and strong, and his blows
fell like great iron hammers. He fought for cruelty
and vengeance. The Red Cross Knight was fierce, and
full of youthful courage; he fought for praise and
honour. So furious was their onslaught that sparks of
fire flew from their shields, and deep marks were hewn
in their helmets.
Thus they fought, the one for wrong, the other for
right, and each tried to put his foe to shame. At last
38







The Battle for the Shield


Joyless chanced to look at his brother's shield which
was hanging near. The sight of this doubled his anger,
and he struck at his foe with such fury that the Knight
reeled twice, and seemed likely to fall. To those who
looked on, the end of the battle appeared doubtful, and
false Duessa began to call loudly to Joyless,-
Thine the shield, and I, and all "
Directly the Red Cross Knight heard her voice he
woke out of the faintness that had overcome him; his
faith, which had grown weak, suddenly became strong,
and he shook off the deadly cold that was creeping
over him.
This time he attacked Joyless with such vigour that
he brought him downupon his knees. Lifting his sword,
he would have slain him, when suddenly a dark cloud fell
between them. Joyless was seen no more; he had van-
ished The Knight called aloud to him, but received no
answer: his foe was completely hidden by the darkness.
Duessa rose hastily from her place, and ran to the
Red Cross Knight, saying,--
"O noblest Knight, be angry no longer! Some
evil power has covered your enemy with the cloud of
night, and borne him away to the regions of darkness.
The conquest is yours, I am yours, the shield and the
glory are yours."
Then the trumpets sounded, and running heralds
made humble homage, and the shield, the cause of all
the enmity, was brought to the Red Cross Knight.
He went to the Queen, and, kneeling before her, offered
her his service, which she accepted with thanks and
much satisfaction, greatly praising his chivalry.
39







The Red Cross Knight

So they marched home, the Knight next the Queen,
while all the people followed with great glee, shout-
ing and clapping their hands. When they got to the
palace the Knight was given gentle attendants and
skilled doctors, for he had been badly hurt in the fight.
His wounds were washed with wine, and oil, and heal-
ing herbs, and all the while lovely music was played
round his bed to beguile him from grief and pain.
While this was happening, Duessa secretly left the
palace, and stole away to the Kingdom of Darkness,
which is ruled over by the Queen of Night. This
queen was a friend of her own, and was always ready
to help in any bad deeds. Duessa told her of what
had befallen the pagan knight, Joyless, and persuaded
her to carry him away to her own dominions. Here he
was placed under the care of a wonderful doctor, who
was able to cure people by magic, and Duessa hastened
back to the House of Pride.
When she got there she was dismayed to find that
the Red Cross Knight had already left, although he
was not nearly healed from the wounds which he
had received in battle.
The reason why he left was this. One day his
servant, whose name you may remember was Prudence,
came and told him that he had discovered in the palace
a huge, deep dungeon, full of miserable prisoners.
Hundreds of men and women were there, wailing and
lamenting-grand lords and beautiful ladies, who, from
foolish behaviour or love of idle pomp, had wasted
their wealth and fallen into the power of the wicked
Queen of Pride.







Una and the Woodland Knight

When the good Red Cross Knight heard this, he
determined to stay no longer in such a place of peril.
Rising before dawn, he left by a small side door, for
he knew that if he were seen he would be at once put to
death. To him the place no more seemed beautiful;
it filled him with horror and disgust. Riding under
the castle wall, the way was strewn with hundreds of
dead bodies of those who had perished miserably.
Such was the dreadful sight of the House of Pride.


Una and the Woodland Knight

We left Una in a piteous plight, in the hands of a
cruel enemy, the pagan knight Lawless.
Paying no heed to her tears and entreaties, he
placed her on his horse, and rode off with her till he
came to a great forest.
Una was almost in despair, for there seemed no
hope of any rescue. But suddenly there came a
wonderful way of deliverance.
In the midst of the thick wood Lawless halted to
rest. This forest was inhabited by numbers of strange
wild creatures, quite untaught, almost savages. Hear-
ing Una's cries for help, they came flocking up to see
what was the matter. Their fierce, rough appearance
so frightened Lawless that he jumped on to his horse
and rode away as fast as he could.
When the wild wood-folk came up they found
Una sitting desolate and alone. They were amazed
at such a strange sight, and pitied her sad condition.
41







The Red Cross Knight

They all stood astonished at her loveliness, and could
not imagine how she had come there.
Una, for her part, was greatly terrified, not know-
ing whether some fresh danger awaited her. Half in
fear, half in hope, she sat still in amazement. Seeing
that she looked so sorrowful, the savages tried to show
that they meant to be friendly. They smiled, and came
forward gently, and kissed her feet. Then she guessed
that their hearts were kind, and she arose fearlessly
and went with them, no longer afraid of any evil.
Full of gladness, they led her along, shouting and
singing and dancing round her, and strewing all the
ground with green branches, as if she had been a queen.
Thus they brought her to their chief, old Sylvanus.
When Sylvanus saw her, like the rest he was
astonished at her -beauty, for he had never seen any-
thing so fair. Her fame spread through the forest,
and all the other dwellers in it came to look at her.
The Hamadryads, who live in the trees, and the
Naiades, who live in the flowing fountains, all came
flocking to see her lovely face. As for the wood-
landers, henceforth they thought no one on earth fair
but Una.
Glad at such good fortune, Una was quite con-
tented to please the simple folk. She stayed a long
while with them, to gather strength after her many
troubles. During this time she did her best to teach
them, but the poor things were so ignorant, it was
almost impossible to make them understand the differ-
ence between right and wrong.
It chanced one day that a noble knight came to
42







The False Pilgrim

the forest to seek his kindred who dwelt there. He
had won much glory in wars abroad, and distant lands
were filled with his fame. He was honest, faithful,
and true, though not very polished in manner; nor
accustomed to a courtly life. His name was Sir Saty-
rane. He had been born and brought up in the forest,
and his father had taught him nothing but to be utterly
fearless. When he grew up, and could master every-
thing in the forest, he went abroad to fight foreign foes,
and his fame was soon carried through all lands. It
was always his custom, after some time spent in labour
and adventure, to return for a while to his native
woods, and so it happened on this occasion that he
came across Una.
The first time he saw her she was surrounded by
the savages, whom she was trying to teach good and
holy things. Sir Satyrane wondered at the wisdom
which fell from her sweet lips, and when, later on, he
saw her gentle and kindly deeds, he began to admire
and love her. Although noble at heart, he had never
had any one to teach him, but now he began to learn
from Una faith and true religion.


The False Pilgrim

Una's thoughts were still fixed on the Red Cross
Knight, and she was sorry to think of his perilous
wandering. She was always sad at heart, and spent
her time planning how to escape. At last she told
her wish to Sir Satyrane, who, glad to please her in
43







The Red Cross Knight

any way, began to devise how he could help her to get
free from the savage folk. One day, when Una was
left alone, all the woodlanders having gone to pay
court to their chief, old Sylvanus, she and Sir Satyrane
rode away together. They went so fast and so care-
fully that no one could overtake them, and thus at
last they came to the end of the forest, and out into
the open plain.
Towards evening, after they had journeyed a long
distance, they met a traveller. He seemed as if he
were a poor, simple pilgrim; his clothes were dusty
and travel-worn; his face brown and scorched with
the sun; he leant upon a staff, and carried all his neces-
saries in a scrip, or little bag, hanging behind.
Sir Satyrane asked if there were any tidings of new
adventures, but the stranger had heard of none. Then
Una began to ask if he knew anything about a knight
who wore on his shield a red cross.
"Alas dear lady," he replied, "I may well grieve
to tell you the sad news I have seen that knight with
my own eyes, both alive and also dead."
When Una heard these cruel words she was filled
with sorrow and dismay, and begged the pilgrim to tell
her everything he knew.
Then he related how" on that very morning he had
seen two knights preparing for battle. One was a
pagan, the other was the Red Cross Knight. They
fought with great fury, and in the end the Red Cross
Knight was slain.
This story was altogether false. The pretended
pilgrim was no other than the wicked enchanter


--~---------~ I I----( 3-X--aiZ-~




























1
.widgl


"Cbe 1ftnftbt, approacbing utoib, of bim icuiutreb
Utbtup of warre, anD of atvc11tures ICW."








Giant Pride


Archimago, or Hypocrisy, in a fresh disguise. But Sir
Satyrane and Una believed everything he told them.
"Where is this pagan now?" asked Satyrane.
"Not far from here," replied the pilgrim; "I
left him resting beside a fountain."
Thereupon Sir Satyrane hastily marched off, and
soon came to the place where he guessed that the
other would be found. This pagan knight turned
out to be Lawless, from whom, you may remember,
Una had escaped in the forest, before she was found
by the woodlanders. Sir Satyrane challenged Law-
less to fight,-and they were soon engaged in a fierce
battle. Poor Una was so terrified at this new peril,
and in such dread of Lawless, that she did not wait
to see what the end would be, but fled far away as
fast as she could.
Archimago had been watching everything from a
secret hiding-place. Now, when he saw Una escaping,
he quickly followed, for he hoped to be able to work
her some further mischief.


Giant Pride

When Duessa found that the Red Cross Knight had
left the palace of Queen Lucifera, she immediately set
out in search of him. It was not long before she found
him where he sat wearily by the side of a fountain to
rest himself. He had taken off all his armour, and his
steed was cropping the grass close by. It was pleasant
in the cool shade, and the soft wind blew refreshingly
47








The Red Cross


Knight


upon his :forehead,
\i hilc, i the trees
iab:,ve, m Ilbers of
Ce fsingi i birds de-
S ighted him with
J.he their sweet muiadc.
DuLkssa at first
pretended to be
Stgrs iy with the
Kniitht fo:r leaving
her C,0 dukindl, b.t
theN were .- g-,d
friends again. They
stayed for some time
beside the fountain, where the green boughs sheltered
them from the scorching heat.
But although it looked so lovely and tempting,
the fountain near which they sat was an enchanted one.
Whoever tasted its waters grew faint and feeble.
The Knight, not knowing this, stooped down to
drink of the stream, which was as clear as crystal. Then
48







Giant Pride

all his strength turned to weakness, his courage melted
away, and a deadly chill crept over him.
At first he scarcely noticed the change, for he had
grown careless both of himself and of his fame. But
suddenly he heard a dreadful sound-a loud bellowing
which echoed through the wood. The earth seemed
to shake with terror, and all the trees trembled. The
Knight, astounded, started up, and tried to seize his
weapons. But before he could put on his armour, or get
his shield, his monstrous enemy came stalking into sight.
It was a hideous Giant, great and horrible. The
ground groaned under him.. He was taller than three
of the tallest men put together. His name was
Orgoglio, or Pride, and his father's name was Ignor-
ance. He was puffed up with arrogance and conceit,
and because he was so big and strong he despised every
one else. He leant upon a gnarled oak, which he had
torn up by its roots from the earth; it also served
him as a weapon to dismay his foemen.
When he saw the Knight he advanced to him with
dreadful fury. The latter, quite helpless, all in vain
tried to prepare for battle. Disarmed, disgraced, in-
wardly dismayed, and faint in every limb, he could
scarcely wield even his useless blade. The Giant aimed
such a merciless stroke at him, that if it had touched
him it would have crushed him to powder. But the
Knight leapt lightly to one side, and thus escaped the
blow. So great, however, was the wind that the club
made in whirling through the air that the Knight was
overthrown, and'lay on the ground stunned.
When Giant Pride saw his enemy lying helpless, he
49 D







The Red Cross Knight

lifted up his club to kill him, but Duessa called to
him to stay his hand.
0 great Orgoglio," she cried, "spare him for my
sake, and do not kill him. Now that he is vanquished
make him your bond-slave, and, if you like, I will be
your wife!"
Giant Pride was quite pleased with this arrangement,
and, taking up the Red Cross Knight before he could
awake from his swoon, he carried him hastily to his
castle, and flung him, without pity, into a deep dungeon.
As for Duessa, from that day forth she was treated
with the greatest honour. She was given gold and
purple to wear, and a triple crown was placed upon her
head, and every one had to obey her as if she were a
queen. To make her more dreaded, Orgoglio gave
her a hideous dragon to ride. This dragon had seven
heads, with gleaming eyes, and its body seemed made
of iron and brass. Everything good that came within
its reach it swept away with a great long tail, and then
trampled under foot.
All the people's hearts were filled with terror when
they saw Duessa riding on her dragon.


Prince Arthur

When the Red Cross Knight was made captive by
Giant Pride and carried away, Prudence, his servant,
who had seen his master's fall, sorrowfully collected his
forsaken possessions-his mighty armour, missing when
most needed, his silver shield, now idle and masterless,
50







Prince Arthur


his sharp spear that had done good service in many a
fray. With these he departed to tell his sad tale.
*He had not gone far when he met Una, flying
from the scene of battle, while Sir Satyrane hindered
Lawless from pursuing her. When she saw Prudence
carrying the armour of the Red Cross Knight, she
guessed something terrible had happened, and fell to
the ground as if she were dying of sorrow.
Unhappy Prudence would gladly have died himself,
but he did his best to restore Una to life. When she
had recovered she implored him to tell her what had
occurred.
Then the dwarf told her everything that had taken
place since they parted. How the crafty Archimago
had deceived the Red Cross Knight by his wiles, and
made him believe that Una had left him; how the
Knight had slain Faithless and had taken pity on Duessa
because of the false tales she told. Prudence also told
Una all about the House of Pride and its perils; he
described the fight which the Knight had with Joyless,
and lastly, he told about the luckless conflict with the
great Giant Pride, when the Knight was made captive,
whether living or dead he knew not.
Una listened patiently, and bravely tried to master
her sorrow, which almost broke her heart, for she dearly
loved the Red Cross Knight, for whose sake she had
borne so many troubles. At last she rose, quite resolved
to find him, alive or dead. The dwarf pointed out the
way by which Giant Pride had carried his prisoner, and
Una started on her quest. Long she wandered, through
woods and across valleys, high over hills, and low







The Red Cross Knight

among the dales, tossed by storms and beaten by the
wind, but still keeping steadfast to her purpose.
At last she chanced by good fortune to meet a
knight, marching with his squire. This knight was
the most glorious she had ever seen. His glittering
armour shone far off, like the glancing light of the
brightest ray of sunshine; it covered him from top to
toe, and left no place unguarded. Across his breast he
wore a splendid belt, covered with jewels that sparkled
like stars. Among the jewels was one of great value,
which shone with such brilliancy that it amazed all who
beheld it. Close to this jewel hung the knight's sword,
in an ivory sheath, carved with curious devices. The
hilt was of burnished gold, the handle of mother-of-
pearl, and it was buckled on with a golden clasp.
The helmet of this knight was also of gold, and for
crest it had a golden dragon with wings. On the top of
all was a waving plume, decked with sprinkled pearls,
which shook and danced in every little breath of wind.
The shield of the warrior was closely covered, and
might never be seen by mortal eye. It was not made
of steel nor of brass, but of one perfect and entire
diamond. This had been hewn out of the adamant
rock with mighty engines; no point of spear could ever
pierce it, nor dint of sword break it asunder.
This shield the knight never showed to mortals,
unless he wished to dismay some huge monster or to
frighten large armies that fought unfairly against him.
No magic arts nor enchanter's spell had any power
against it. Everything that was not exactly what it
seemed to be faded before it and fell to ruin.
52








Prince Arthur


The maker of the shield was supposed to be
Merlin, a mighty magician; he made it with the
sword and armour for this young prince when the
latter first took to arms.
The name of the knight was Prince Arthur, type
of all Virtue and Magnificence, and pattern of all true
Knighthood.
His squire bore after him his spear of ebony wood;
he was a gallant and noble youth, who managed his
fiery steed with much skill and courage.
When Prince Arthur came near Una, he greeted
her with much courtesy. By her unwilling answers he
guessed that some secret sorrow was troubling her, and
he hoped that his gentle and kindly words would
persuade her to tell him the cause of her grief.
What good will it do to speak of it ?" said Una.
"When I think of my sorrow it seems to me better
to keep it hidden than to make it worse by speaking of
it. Nothing in the world can lighten my misfortunes.
My last comfort is to be left alone to weep for them."
"Ah, dear lady," said the gentle Knight, "I know
well that your grief is great, for it makes me sad even
to hear you speak of it. But let me entreat you to
tell me what is troubling you. Misfortunes may be
overcome by good advice, and wise counsel will lessen
the worst injury. He who never tells of his hurts will
never find help."
His words were so kind and reasonable that-Una
was soon persuaded to tell him her whole story. She
began with the time when she had gone to the Court
of Queen Gloriana to seek a champion to release her








The Red Cross Knight


parents from the horrible dragon, and ended with the
account of how the Red Cross Knight had fallen a prey
to Giant Pride, who now held him captive in a dark
dungeon.
"Truly, lady, you have much cause to grieve," said
Prince Arthur when the story was finished. But be of
good cheer, and take comfort. Rest assured I will never
forsake you until I have set free your captive Knight."
His cheerful words revived Una's drooping heart,
and so they set forth on their journey, Prudence guiding
them in the right way.


The Wondrous Bugle and the Mighty Shield

Badly indeed would it now have fared with the Red
Cross Knight had it not been for the Lady Una. Even
good people daily fall into sin and temptation, but as
often as their own foolish pride or weakness leads them
astray, so often will Divine love and care rescue them,
if only they repent of their misdoings. Thus we see
how Holiness, in the guise of the Red Cross Knight,
was for a while cast down and defeated; yet in the end,
because he truly repented, help was given him to fight
again and conquer.
Prince Arthur and the Lady Una travelled till they
came to a castle which was built very strong and high.
"Lo," cried the dwarf, "yonder is the place where
my unhappy master is held captive by that cruel
tyrant!"
The Prince at once dismounted, and bade Una stay








The Wondrous Bugle

to see what would happen. He marched with his
squire to the castle walls, where he found the gates
shut fast. There was no warder to guard them, nor
to answer to the call of any who came.
Then the squire took a small bugle which hung at
his side with twisted gold and gay tassels. Wonderful
stories were told about that bugle; every one trembled
with dread at its shrill sound. It could easily be heard
three miles off, and whenever it was blown it echoed
three times. No false enchantment or deceitful snare
could stand before the terror of that blast. No gate
was so strong, no lock so firm and fast, but at that
piercing noise it flew open or burst.
This was the bugle which Prince Arthur's squire
blew before the gate of Giant Pride. Then the whole
castle quaked, and every door flew open. The Giant
himself, dismayed at the sound, came rushing forth in-
haste from an inner bower, to see what was the reason
of this sudden uproar, and to discover who had dared
to brave his power. After him came Duessa, riding on
her dragon with the seven heads; every head had a
crown on it, and a fiery tongue of flame.
When Prince Arthur saw Giant Pride, he took his
mighty shield and flew at him fiercely; the Giant lifted
up his club to smite him, but the Prince leaped to one
side, and the weapon, missing him, buried itself with such
force in the ground, that the Giant could not quickly
pull it out again. Then with his sharp sword Prince
Arthur struck at the Giant, and wounded him severely.
Duessa, seeing her companion's danger, urged for-
ward her dragon to help him, but the brave squire sprang








The Red Cross Knight

in between it and the Prince, and with his drawn sword
drove it back. Then the angry Duessa took a golden
cup, which she always carried, and which was full of a
secret poison. Those who drank of that cup either died,
or else felt despair seize them. She lightly sprinkled
the squire with the contents of this cup, and immedi-
ately his courage faded away, and he was filled with
sudden dread. He fell down before the cruel dragon,
who seized him with its claws, and nearly crushed the
life out ofhim. He had no power nor will to stir.
When Prince Arthur saw what had happened, he
left Giant Pride and turned against the dragon, for he
was deeply grieved to see his beloved squire in such peril.
He soon drove back the horrible creature, but now once
again the Giant rushed at him with his club. This time
the blow struck the Prince with such force, that it bore
him to the ground. In the fall, his shield, that had been
covered, lost by chance its veil, and flew open.
Then through the air flashed such a blazing bright-
ness, that no eye could bear to look upon it. Giant
Pride let fall the weapon with which he was just going
to slay the Prince, and the dragon was struck blind,
and tumbled on the ground.
Oh, help, Orgoglio, help, or we all perish !" cried
Duessa.
Gladly would Giant Pride have helped her, but all
was in vain; when that light shone he had no power
to hurt others, nor to defend himself; so Prince Arthur
soon killed him.
When he was dead, his great body, that had seemed
so big and strong, suddenly melted away, and nothing








The Wondrous Bugle

was left but what looked like the shrivelled skin of a
broken balloon; for, after all, there was no real sub-
stance in him, but he was simply puffed out with empti-
ness and conceit, and his grand appearance was nothing
but a sham.
So that was the end of Giant Pride.
When false Duessa saw the fall of Giant Pride she
flung down her golden cup, and threw aside her crown,
and fled away. But the squire followed, and soon took
her prisoner. Telling him to keep safe guard on her,
Prince Arthur boldly entered the Giant's Castle. Not
a living creature could he spy; he called loudly, but
no one answered; a solemn silence reigned everywhere,
not a voice was to be heard, not a person seen, in
bower or hall.
At last an old, old man, with beard as white as
snow, came creeping along; he guided his feeble steps
with a staff, for long ago his sight had failed. On his
arm he bore a bunch of keys, all covered with rust. They
were the keys of all the doors inside the castle; they
were never used, but he still kept possession of them.
It was curious to see the way in which this old man
walked, for always, as he went forward, he kept his
wrinkled face turned back, as if he were trying to
look behind. He was the keeper of the place, and
the father of the dead Giant Pride; his name was
Ignorance.
Prince Arthur, as was fitting, honoured his grey
hair and gravity, and gently asked him where all the
people were who used to live in that stately building.
The old man softly answered him that he could not
57








The Red Cross Knight

tell. Again the Prince asked where was the Knight
whom the Giant had taken captive ?
"I cannot tell," said the old man.
Then the Prince asked which was the way into the
castle, and again he got the same answer, "I cannot
tell."
At first he thought the man was mocking him, and
began to be much displeased. But presently, seeing
that the poor old thing could not help his foolishness,
he wisely calmed his anger. Going up to him he took
the keys from his arm, and made an entrance for him-
self. He opened each door without the least difficulty;
there was no one to challenge him, nor any bars to
hinder his passage.
Inside the castle he found the whole place fitted
up in the most splendid manner, decked with royal
tapestry, and shining with gold, fit for the presence of
the greatest prince. But all the floors were dirty, and
strewn with ashes, for it was here that the wicked
Giant Pride used to slay his unhappy victims.
Prince Arthur sought through every room, but
nowhere could he find the Red Cross Knight. At last
he came to an iron door, which was fast locked, but
- he found no key among the bunch to open it. In the
door, however, there was a little grating, and through
this the Prince called as loudly as he could, to know
if there were any living person shut up there whom he
could set free.
Then there came a hollow voice in answer. "Oh,
who is that who brings to me the happy choice of
death ? Here I lie, dying every hour, yet still compelled
58








































I- -


"MXftbome wbcit Ne 1Labp oaw, to bim ebe ran
'Xitb baetp2 lop: to oee bim mane ber gIab,
Bin eab to view bNe vtiagea pale anb wan."







The Wondrous Bugle

to live, bound in horrible darkness. Three months
have come and gone since I beheld the light of day.
Oh, welcome, you who bring true tidings of death."
When Prince Arthur heard these words his heart
was so filled with pity and horror at any noble knight
being thus shamefully treated, that, in his strength and
indignation, he rent open the iron door. But entering,
he found no floor; there was a deep descent, as dark
as a pit, from which came up a horrible deadly smell.
Neither darkness, however, nor dirt, nor poisonous
smell could turn the Prince from his purpose, and he
went forward courageously. With great trouble and
difficulty he found means to raise the captive, whose
own limbs were too feeble to bear him, and then he
carried him out of the castle.
What a mournful picture was now the Red Cross
Knight! His dull, sunken eyes could not bear the
unaccustomed. light of the sun; his cheeks were thin
and gaunt; his mighty arms, that had fought so often
and so bravely, were nothing now but bones; all his
strength was gone, and all his flesh shrunk up like a
withered flower.
When Una saw Prince Arthur carrying the Red
Cross Knight out of the castle she ran to them joy-
fully; it made her glad even to see the Knight, but
she was full of sorrow at the sight of his pale, wan
face, which had formerly been radiant with the glory
of youth.
"My dearest lord," she cried, "what evil star has
frowned on you and changed you thus? But welcome
now, in weal or woe, my dear lord whom I have lost







The Red Cross Knight

too long! Fate, who has been our foe so long, will
injure us no further, but shall pay penance with three-
fold good for all these wrongs."
The unhappy man, dazed with misery, had no
desire to speak of his troubles; his long-endured
famine needed more relief.
"Fair lady," then said the victorious Prince,
" things that were grievous to do or to bear it brings
no pleasure to recall. The only good that comes from
past danger is to make us wiser and more careful for
the future. This day's example has deeply written this
lesson on my heart-perfect happiness can never be
lasting while we still live on earth.
"Henceforth, Sir Knight," he continued, "take to
yourself your old strength, and master these mishaps
by patience. Look where your foe lies vanquished,
and the wicked woman, Duessa, the cause of all your
misery, stands in your power, to let her live or die."
"To kill her would be to act unworthily," said
Una, and it would be a shame to avenge one's self
on such a weak enemy. But take off her scarlet robe
and let her fly "
So they did as Una bade them. They took from
Duessa all her finery-her royal robe, and purple cloak,
and all the rich ornaments with which she was decked.
And when this disguise was taken from her, they saw
her as she really was-old, and ugly, and bad. She
would no longer be able to deceive people by her pre-
tended goodness, and youth, and beauty, for every one
who saw her shrunk away in horror.
Such,", said Una, is the face of Falsehood when







The Knight with Hempen Rope

its borrowed light is laid aside, and all its deceitfulness
is made known."
Thus, having taken from Duessa her power to work
evil, they set her free to go where she pleased. She
fled to a barren wilderness, where she lurked unseen in
rocks and caves, for she always hated the light.
But Prince Arthur, and the Red Cross Knight, and
fair Una stayed for awhile in the castle of Giant Pride, to
rest themselves and to recover their strength. And here
they found a goodly store of all that was dainty and rare.


The Knight with the Hempen Rope

When the two Knights and the Lady Una had
rested awhile in the castle of Giant Pride, they set out
again on their journey. Before they parted, Prince
Arthur and the Red Cross Knight gave each other
beautiful gifts-tokens of love and friendship. Prince
Arthur gave a box of adamant, embossed with gold,
and richly ornamented; in it were enclosed a few drops
of a precious liquid of wonderful power, which would
immediately'heal any wound. In return the Red Cross
Knight gave the Prince a Bible, all written with golden
letters, rich and beautiful.
Thus they parted, Prince Arthur to go about his
own work, and the Knight to fight the terrible Dragon
that was laying waste the kingdom that belonged to
Una's father and mother. But she, seeing how thin
and ill her champion looked, and knowing that he was
still weak and weary, would not hasten forward, nor







The Red Cross Knight

let him run the chance of any further fighting, until
he had recovered his former strength.
As they travelled, they presently saw an armed
knight galloping towards them. It seemed as though
he were flying from a dreaded foe, or some other grisly
thing. As he fled, his eyes kept looking backwards as
if the object of his terror were pursuing him, and his
horse flew as if it had wings to its feet.
When he came nearer they saw that his head was
bare, his hair almost standing on end with fright, and
his face very pale. Round his neck was a hempen
rope, suiting ill with his glittering armour.
The Red Cross Knight rode up to him, but could
scarcely prevail upon him to stop.
"Sir Knight," he said, "pray tell us who hath
arrayed you like this, and from whom you are flying,
for never saw I warrior in so unseemly a plight."
The stranger seemed dazed with fear, and at first
answered nothing; but after the gentle Knight had
spoken to him several times, at last he replied with
faltering tongue, and trembling in every limb: "I
beseech you, Sir Knight, do not stop me, for lo! he
comes-he comes fast after me! "
With that he again tried to run away, but the Red
Cross Knight prevented him, and .tried to persuade him
to say what was the matter.
"Am I really safe from him who would have
forced me to die?" said the stranger. "May I tell
my luckless story ?"
"Fear nothing," said the Knight; "no danger is
near now."













































",o as tbep traveifR, to! tbcvg lan esPI?
Ain armeb hniobt towarbs tbem gaIop fast,
Cbat seemeO from eomne feared foe to fip,
Or otber gricep tbing tbat bfm agbaet."

F







The Knight with Hempen Rope

Then the stranger told how he and another knight
had lately been companions. The name of his friend
was Sir Terwin. He was bold and brave, but because
everything did not go exactly as he wished, he was not
happy. One day when they were feeling very sad and
comfortless, they met a man whose name was Despair.
Greeting them in a friendly fashion, Despair soon con-
trived to find out from them what they were feeling,
and then he went on to make the worst of everything.
He told them there was no hope that things would get
any better, and tried to persuade them to put an end
to all further trouble by killing themselves. To Sir
Terwin he lent a rusty knife, and to the other knight
a rope. Sir Terwin, who was really very unhappy,
killed himself at once; but Sir Trevisan, dismayed at
the sight, fled fast away, with the rope still round his
neck, half dead with fear.
"May you never hear the tempting speeches of
Despair," he ended.
"How could idle talking persuade a man to put
an end to his life ? said the Red Cross Knight. He
was ready to despise the danger, and he trusted in his
own strength to withstand it.
"I know," said the stranger, "for trial has lately
taught me; nor would I go through the like again for
the world's wealth. His cunning, like sweetest honey,
drops into the heart, and all- else is forgotten. Before
one knows it, all power is secretly stolen, and only
weakness remains. Oh, sir, do not wish ever to meet
with Despair."
"Truly," said the Red Cross Knight, "I shall
67







The Red Cross Knight

never rest till I have heard what the traitor has to
say for himself. And, Sir Knight, I beg of you, as
a favour, to guide me to his cabin."
"To do you a favour, I will ride back with you
against my will," said Sir Trevisan ; "but not for gold,
nor for anything else will I remain with you when you
arrive at the place. I would rather die than see his
deadly face again."


In the Cave of Despair

Sir Trevisan and the Red Cross Knight soon came
to the place where Despair had his dwelling. It was
in a hollow cave, far underneath a craggy cliff, dark
and dreary. On the top always perched a melancholy
owl, shrieking his dismal note, which drove all cheerful
birds far away. All around were dead and withered
trees, on which no fruit nor leaf ever grew.
When they arrived, Sir Trevisan would have fled
in terror, not daring to go near, but the Red Cross
Knight forced him to stay, and soothed his fears.
They entered the gloomy cave, where they found a
miserable man sitting on the ground, musing sullenly.
He had greasy, unkempt locks, and dull and hollow
eyes, and his cheeks were thin and shrunken, as if he
never got enough to eat. His garment was nothing
but rags, all patched, and pinned together with thorns.
At his side lay the dead body of Sir Terwin, just as
Sir Trevisan had told.
When the Red Cross Knight saw this sad sight, all
68 -












































" rEe Iong tbep come were tbat same wicked wigbt
bis Dwelling bas, .low in a follow cave,
ffor unDerneatb a cragg cliff pfiabt,
)arft, DoIeful, brearg, [ihe a greebO grave,
Ubat still for carrion carcases botb crave."




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